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View Diary: How ACA can save lives: let’s visit my Emergency Room on Thanksgiving morning (158 comments)

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  •  I also liked (18+ / 0-)

    that you stopped the stories at the diagnosis of the serious condition and the costly ensuing treatment.  This avoids getting distracted by the human drama and personal financial implications.  The focus stays on the flaws in the system and how the ACA addresses them.

    I don't know if reasonable conservatives can be persuaded by efficiency arguments (e.g. the ER isn't the most effective way to deal with the uninsured), but we sure as hell know they're not motivated by non-judgmental compassion.

    First they came for the slippery-slope fallacists, and I said nothing. The End.

    by Cream Puff on Thu Nov 28, 2013 at 07:20:39 AM PST

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    •  Unfortunately there's another option (15+ / 0-)

      if you're a libertarian/conservative: Repeal the Federal law that requires ERs to treat (or at least stabilize) all comers. No ability to pay, no treatment -- Unless, of course, you bring a dead chicken and three apples, since the doctor will gladly take those in lieu of his regular fee, or else treat you for free out of the goodness of his heart.  (Why is it that US hospitals and doctors are happy to donate the millions of dollars of services to separate conjoined twins or do organ transplants for people flying in from all over the world, but not to donate the services patients like John and Emily need? I've never understood this, nor how it is that those expenses are truly "donated" rather than rolled into all of our insurance premiums & Medicare/Medicaid costs.)

      Otherwise, you don't deserve it. Health care is not an "entitlement," it's a privilege for those who can afford it.

      I haven't heard of any of the House GOPers suggesting this out loud, but I'm sure some of them and some of the far-right think tanks have it on their wish-list.

      •  insurance companies stop doctors (5+ / 0-)

        from providing free care, a doctor friend explained to me. If you provide care to anyone for free, then they say you are committing insurance fraud when you charge for that same care given to one of their customers.

        If you act out of anger, the best part of your brain fails to function. - the Dalai Lama

        by beverlywoods on Thu Nov 28, 2013 at 03:35:38 PM PST

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        •  I don't think this is true -- unless it's law in (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Dragon5616, ladybug53

          a particular state.
          There are doctors who donate their care to clinics and plenty who see at least some patients for free. Our pediatricians found Medicaid difficult to deal with so they volunteered at a homeless shelter instead, giving free care. They never mentioned any problem with insurance because of this.

          While Democrats work to get more people to vote, Republicans work to ensure those votes won't count.

          by Tamar on Thu Nov 28, 2013 at 03:43:43 PM PST

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          •  not sure of the exact circumstances but (6+ / 0-)

            it might make a difference if the doctor provides the care through a clinic or shelter, or it might have to do with a particular state or insurance company.

            What my friend described to me was a situation in a particular state, where doctors experienced severe repercussions from insurance companies, and had to stop providing care without charge, which up until then they had done a lot of. The doctors still could provide care to people who could not pay, but they had to at least do their best to bill people and say that they were trying to collect on these bills.

            I know this is just hearsay at this point, but I have no reason to doubt my friend's veracity. I have tried before to persuade my friend to write about this. I will post a diary about it if that becomes a reality.

            If you act out of anger, the best part of your brain fails to function. - the Dalai Lama

            by beverlywoods on Thu Nov 28, 2013 at 03:55:05 PM PST

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            •  Please do. This is just more disgusting behavior (4+ / 0-)

              from insurance companies and it should be made public.

              While Democrats work to get more people to vote, Republicans work to ensure those votes won't count.

              by Tamar on Fri Nov 29, 2013 at 06:46:02 AM PST

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            •  Asked my husband about this and he said (0+ / 0-)

              "horseshit." He's a psychiatrist and has never had a problem with deciding not to charge a patient, nor has he seen anything from any insurance company saying this would be a problem.
              Once again -- maybe it's only in a particular state or a certain insurance company. But my husband has dealt with many different insurance companies and Medicare and Tricare and has never run into a problem with choosing to treat a patient for free.

              While Democrats work to get more people to vote, Republicans work to ensure those votes won't count.

              by Tamar on Sat Nov 30, 2013 at 05:49:11 PM PST

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          •  The "fraud" would be free care (5+ / 0-)

            provided in the doc's private office or care provided in the hospital with the charges waived. Care provided under the auspices of a free clinic is legit.

            -7.25, -6.26

            We are men of action; lies do not become us.

            by ER Doc on Thu Nov 28, 2013 at 09:18:05 PM PST

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            •  see my comment above. According to my (0+ / 0-)

              husband, there's no problem with treating a patient in his private office for free (I know he's done it quite a lot).

              While Democrats work to get more people to vote, Republicans work to ensure those votes won't count.

              by Tamar on Sat Nov 30, 2013 at 05:51:27 PM PST

              [ Parent ]

            •  My doctor does it all the time... (0+ / 0-)

              for my husband when he comes along for one of my appointments. I have Medicare, and until today he wasn't insured at all (well, actually Jan 1, but thank you ACA), so when he had anything crop up he had to pay full price to see her.

              She'll see me for my thing, then she asks him if he has any issues, and he'll get a checkup and scripts if necessary, all under just my Medicare copay.

              I think it depends on how human and humane the doctor in question is.

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