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View Diary: DA Angela Corey Now Seeks 60 Years Against Marissa Alexander In 2nd Trial (227 comments)

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  •  Exactly... (7+ / 0-)

    The problem is with Florida's draconian laws and their misapplication in this case. Alexander committed a crime, that much is clear. But under the circumstances a suspended sentence and probation would have been appropriate. 20 years for recklessly discharging a firearm is a ridiculous sentence, and Corey's decision to now seek 60 years cannot be seen as anything but vindictive arrogance on her part.

    Florida... where committing the largest Medicare fraud ever can get you elected governor, shooting someone can get you acquitted, and missing can get you 60 years. Inbreeding, or something in the water?

    "A lie is not the other side of a story; it's just a lie."

    by happy camper on Sun Mar 02, 2014 at 06:30:24 AM PST

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    •  Neither (0+ / 0-)
      Inbreeding, or something in the water?
      It's called government corruption, and this state is, in my estimation, the most corrupt in this country right now (with the possible exception of Wisconsin).

      This all started with "what the Republicans did to language".

      by lunachickie on Sun Mar 02, 2014 at 07:34:44 AM PST

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      •  Hmmmm.... (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        lunachickie
        It's called government corruption, and this state is, in my estimation, the most corrupt in this country right now (with the possible exception of Wisconsin).
        Please don't forget NJ on the wall of shame for corrupt states.  Should be right up there with FL.

        I think, therefore I am........................... Plus ca change, plus c'est la meme chose....AKA Engine Nighthawk - don't even ask!

        by Lilyvt on Sun Mar 02, 2014 at 08:25:15 AM PST

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        •  Oh yeah! (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          tobendaro, Lilyvt

          Boy, Chris Christie took a flying leap right into the Top Five, didn't he? Heh--sorry, didn't mean to imply otherwise ;)

          Then again--much as I hate to say it--he's got a long way to go before he's as good at being a Bad Guy as Rick Scott is. Scott skates through the courts in a single bound. I guess the one thing that's worse than a bully in a top political office is an obscenely-, literally-criminally rich bully in a top political office.

          This all started with "what the Republicans did to language".

          by lunachickie on Sun Mar 02, 2014 at 08:51:46 AM PST

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    •  Mandatory sentencing... (0+ / 0-)

      you probably know the judge had no choice in the length of sentence, but that's not clear in your comment. Or I'm not fully awake yet. I fully agree with your comment, otherwise.

    •  Since the population of Florida consists mostly (0+ / 0-)

      of people who moved here from other states or other countries, you can rule out inbreeding.
         I don't think that 10-20-Life is an unreasonable law given that there is usually an opportunity to plead to a lesser charge, which Melissa Alexander refused to do.
         In real life, she was obviously guilty of aggravated assault. She either received catastrophically bad legal advice or she was too stubborn to understand that she had committed a crime.
         

      •  Well of course you would think that a 20 (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        FrankRose

        or even 60 year sentence is perfectly appropriate in this case.  After all, she refused the plea deal so she should spend the rest of her life in a maximum security prison if not solitary in a supermax.  After all, now she has nothing to lose by escaping, right?

        You have watched Faux News, now lose 2d10 SAN.

        by Throw The Bums Out on Sun Mar 02, 2014 at 08:24:47 AM PST

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        •  It's not like 10-20-life is a secret. The state (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          happymisanthropy

          has a huge PR campaign with billboards and TV ads around it.
             Ms. Alexander chose to bring a gun into the house and fire a "warning shot." With those facts against her, why would she roll the dice?
             It's interesting that so many on this thread hate the 10-20-life law now, but are all for it when it gets applied to the Dunn case.
             Likewise, so many hate the SYG law when it protects Dunn and Zimmerman, but would love for it to be broadened to apply to women who go over to the ex's house and open fire.
             While the 20 year sentence is harsh given the facts of the case, Ms. Alexander has shown herself to be willing to settle an argument with gunfire. IMHO, the best outcome would be for her to plead, serve a prison sentence of, say, 3 years, and never go near a gun again.

          •  Actually, it is 60 years. Of course, since (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            FrankRose

            grabbing the baliff's gun and shooting the prosecutor dead right there in the courtroom would not result in a longer sentence (you can't get longer than life, after all) I am surprised such a thing hasn't happened yet in some of these cases.  I do wonder how the hell she is out on bail given that it is now going to be a life sentence if convicted.

            You have watched Faux News, now lose 2d10 SAN.

            by Throw The Bums Out on Sun Mar 02, 2014 at 10:02:54 AM PST

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            •  Actually, the 60 years isn't new. The original (0+ / 0-)

              sentence was 20 years for each of three counts. The trial judge ruled that she could serve them concurrently, but there is some dispute as to whether he had the legal power to do that rather than have her serve them consecutively.

      •  10-20-life (0+ / 0-)

        is completely unreasonable because it takes away the judge's discretion in favor of a one size fits all law.

        "A lie is not the other side of a story; it's just a lie."

        by happy camper on Mon Mar 03, 2014 at 05:40:39 AM PST

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