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View Diary: Updated: Florida Students Protest Koch Influence Over College Professors (104 comments)

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  •  Just one point (1+ / 0-)
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    mcstowy

    This is a small digression, but it must be made, imo.  You claim that the best way to change corporate culture and behavior is to do it from the inside--from the top of the inside, that is.  That might be the best way to change things, but it will never happen.  That's because once you get there, you have already lost your way regarding what is good for ordinary workers as well as for ordinary people in the country.  

    I have worked with top managers for many years, and there are very, very few who would, or could, actually effect any positive change.

    Change is more likely to come from the society in which the corporation operates--IF the general public has enough power to vote in a government who is willing to make those changes.  The U.S. has already passed the time when we could do that, I think.  But some countries have done it, for example, the Scandinavian countries.

    •  reasonshouldrule - I grew up in a walkup tenement (1+ / 0-)
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      reasonshouldrule

      the son of a depression era high school dropout. My parents lived paycheck to paycheck. I went to public schools from K through graduate school. I had no family connections or network to introduce me to Corporate America.  I was lucky, but also very good at my job and became a Fortune 500 corporate officer just after I turned 30. Please don't assume that I have "lost my way". I have started numerous companies, three of which became public companies. In those companies I was able to determine the culture and how we treated employees and we treated them very well. That's much easier to do from the top than the bottom.

      I have also been the Chairman of the Compensation Committee of five public companies. If you want to restrict corporate executive pay, only reward real performance, and create compensation policies that treat all employees fairly,  that's a place where you can actually make that happen.

      "let's talk about that"

      by VClib on Tue Apr 22, 2014 at 06:07:14 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Yes, you make a good point (1+ / 0-)
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        VClib

        However, there are very, very few people like you.  99% of the top management of companies believe and act differently.  In fact, they believe that it is NOT A GOOD THING to treat employees well or provide them with a decent life because that would, in their (false) rationalizations, "lead to a dependent kind of person."  Stifle innovation.  Etc. etc.

        For the reality of how most companies operate, we need a government willing to enact and enforce strong regulations.

        Both my husband and I have worked with companies all our lives, my husband as an environmental attorney, and truly, most companies WILL NOT take even the most basic of safety measures until forced to do so by law.

        If most companies were run by people like you, we wouldn't have this problem.

      •  Really seriously t (1+ / 0-)
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        reasonshouldrule

        The old boy network nurterd all executive pay committees look at yahoo yesterday.I dont doubt that you made a difference in the companies you set up but fortune 500 companies in the early eighties were much different to the companies today after all when was Gass-siegal repealed?
        Unions were stronger then. Voodoo economics as invented by Milton had few supporters till Regan and Thatcher,the press was less biased and there were still traces of the shame culture and when people got caught out they resigned or better still got sacked without the size of golden parachutes now.Sorry i rate your claim that pay deals that were unreasonably high based because of performance as totally false/Look at what fund managers get paid and a lot even under perform the market i.e  you could do better yourself and save the huge fees

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