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View Diary: Not the Anniversary You're Thinking Of (105 comments)

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  •  wow, first I've heard (6+ / 0-)

    I read news pretty voraciously, and remember the story well.

    But this is the first time I have heard that there were repair problems and the gun was unfit to be fired.

    They managed to completely submerge the truth in their lies.

    Can we see courts martial of the top brass responsible for the cover-up? Probably not. sigh.

    (There is a saying that a lie travels around the world three times before the truth can get its boots on. Seems to apply.)

    Why must Republicans lie all the time? Because if they told the truth, they'd be Democrats.

    by Robert Ullmann on Mon Apr 19, 2010 at 05:10:10 AM PDT

    •  I've heard some of this since the event (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Crashing Vor, elwior, Eric Nelson

      I don't recall where I read it, though.

      For those familiar with black powder, the idea of using powder that old is frightening. It becomes unstable and much more dangerous to use. I was also under the impression that much of the work on the Iowa was rushed and incomplete. Any complex machine that sits for a long time is going to be hard to return to service. When you add old ammunition to the mix, a disaster is almost inevitable.

      I was just infuriated when the rumors came out that it was caused deliberately.

      OTOH, there was nothing on the high seas to match a fully-operational Iowa-class battleship then and there isn't today. Short of a nuclear weapon, I can't imagine any ship remotely capable of going one-on-one with one of these ships.

      If you ever get the chance to visit one (The USS Massachusetts or USS Wisconsin, for example), do it. It's hard to believe it's a ship...

      "Ridicule may lawfully be employed where reason has no hope of success." -7.75/-6.05

      by QuestionAuthority on Mon Apr 19, 2010 at 07:02:20 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Though the propellant bags were WWII era, (3+ / 0-)

        I read one account that said some of the powder was 1917 vintage.  I did not include that tidbit as I've only seen it sourced once.

        •  Good God...If that's true... (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Crashing Vor, elwior, Eric Nelson

          That powder would be so unreliable, it would be either useless or deadly to the user.

          I can see why they decided to retire them, then. Unless they can come up with a safer ammo that can be fired from a 16 inch gun, they're useless.

          "Ridicule may lawfully be employed where reason has no hope of success." -7.75/-6.05

          by QuestionAuthority on Mon Apr 19, 2010 at 07:34:00 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

      •  How would the Iowa stand up to an Exocet missle? (3+ / 0-)

        And it feels like I'm livin'in the wasteland of the free ~ Iris DeMent, 1996

        by MrJersey on Mon Apr 19, 2010 at 10:14:00 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Or how would the Iowa stand up to any one of (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Crashing Vor

          the next generation of anti-ship missiles that seem to pry ships of modern construction apart like a can opener?  For any actual naval combat, the Iowa would seem to be the same type of white elephant that it was the day of those tests in which the ex-German battleship was sunk that led to the Mitchell court martial.  

          And it feels like I'm livin'in the wasteland of the free ~ Iris DeMent, 1996

          by MrJersey on Mon Apr 19, 2010 at 10:28:32 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  Might do fairly well (2+ / 0-)

          the British destroyer Sheffield that was destroyed in the Falklands war was hit in an area that damaged electric power generation and the water mains needed for fire fighting; the fires from the impact thus spread rapidly.  A cargo ship was sunk by two Exocets, it was loaded with helicopters and Harrier jets, it caught fire and was gutted.  The destroyer Glamorgan was hit by an Exocet, which set off a fully fueled and armed helicopter resulting in a sever fire; the ship was damaged but continued in service.

          The Iowa has four engine rooms and is designed so that electric power can be rerouted; it also has several auxiliary generators.  The Iowa has a 45,000 tons displacement, a length of 270 m,  and roughly 12 inch armor. The Sheffield displaced 4,820 tonnes, a length of 125 m, and much lighter armor - destroyers are built for speed not slugging it out.

      •  Any decent frigate (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Crashing Vor

        or guided missile ship could just stand out of range of the 16's and demolish it.

        The Iowa class was obsolete in the 50's.

        My life is an open book, and I want a rewrite!

        by trumpeter on Mon Apr 19, 2010 at 10:27:31 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  The USS Mass is indeed a special ship (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Crashing Vor

        I went a few times as a child and wasn't terribly impressed, but then I went 2 years ago and it was really amazing. Huge just doesn't seem like a big enough word to describe it.

        Interested in identifying and eating wild plants? Check out my foraging diaries.

        by wide eyed lib on Mon Apr 19, 2010 at 11:07:16 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

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