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View Diary: A DEMOCRATIC legislative & regulatory WIN you didn't know about (236 comments)

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  •  Thanks, missed this and am really pleased... (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    filby, Eclectablog, sjterrid

    ...you reported here. I'm curious if the "Katrina" trailer CH3O contamination was a market oddity, crime, or a poor materials quality issue, or if it represents a state of the general market.

    My question is based on OSHA regs which have been strict for CH3O containment in labs and science apps for over a generation. Don't know why I'd be surprised home building materials would have lower/no standards but I was and RV's have not been otherwise identified as being particularly polluted.

    I'd appreciate a pointer if you've run by such info.  

    Anyway, good diary. Thank you. And kudos to Sen Klobuchar and Congress for passing.

    Also, do the standards cover hair and nail salons and hair and manicure/pedicure products which I consider toxic waste? OSHA and the CDC need to get control over hair and nail products.

    •  It may well be that... (6+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      walkshills, kck, filby, allep10, AnnetteK, sjterrid

      ...these trailers were made the shoddiest way possible which makes them more likely to have high HCHO (not CH3O) emissions. The cheapest formaldehyde-based binder out there is urea-formaldehyde which also has the highest emission rate. Melamine-formaldehyde and phenol-formaldehyde resins have less emissions but still emit some.

      This wouldn't have been covered by OSHA because that's a workplace standard. This is why the USEPA ruling is so important: it paves the way for more stringent indoor air/formaldehyde limits. Should say, I guess, that it requires more stringent rules if it's considered a carcinogen.

      The stupid part is that there are several bodies that make determinations about carcinogenicity in chemical compounds and they don't all (so far) call HCHO a carcinogen.

      Also, do the standards cover hair and nail salons and hair and manicure/pedicure products which I consider toxic waste? OSHA and the CDC need to get control over hair and nail products.

      These standards cover ONLY engineered wood/wood composites situations. However, if USEPA goes through with its current process and calls HCHO a carcinogen, THAT would impact any situation where the air we breathe or the materials we use contain the chemical (including your examples.)

      To be clear, it's "EClectablog", not "Electablog".
      Become a fan of Eclectablog on Facebook.

      by Eclectablog on Sun Jul 18, 2010 at 10:36:44 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

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