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[From the diaries -- a lesser Hunter. Edited to point to WaPo story.]

His son has made the announcement.

The best political journalist ever is dead.

It scares me.  Speculation isn't appropriate, but what did he know that we don't?  I mean, this guy was one crazy mother-fucker.  Absolutely fearless.   I hope he finds his lawyer friend and I hope he is memorialized in a fitting way.  He was a giant.

I've got nothing more to say right now.

[update]I'm sure nobody will have any trouble finding what they want on the web, but a very good place to start is the Salon directory.

[update]Please try to limit speculation. I've changed the title of the diary because all that has been reported is that he has died of "a self-inflicted gunshot wound".

Originally posted to Daily Kos on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 08:59 PM PST.

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Comment Preferences

  •  oh my god (4.00)
    He was one of the best writers ever.

    John Kerry 2008, the leader of the youth of America.

    by desiunion on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 08:22:41 PM PST

    •  His last article for Rolling Stone, I believe. (4.00)
      Fear and Loathing, Campaign 2004

      Dr. Hunter S. Thompson sounds off on the fun-hogs in the passing lane

      By DR. HUNTER S. THOMPSON

      Armageddon came early for George Bush this year, and he was not ready for it. His long-awaited showdowns with my man John Kerry turned into a series of horrible embarrassments that cracked his nerve and demoralized his closest campaign advisers. They knew he would never recover, no matter how many votes they could steal for him in Florida, where the presidential debates were closely watched and widely celebrated by millions of Kerry supporters who suddenly had reason to feel like winners.
      Kerry came into October as a five-point underdog with almost no chance of winning three out of three rigged confrontations with a treacherous little freak like George Bush. But the debates are over now, and the victor was clearly John Kerry every time. He steamrollered Bush and left him for roadkill.

      Did you see Bush on TV, trying to debate? Jesus, he talked like a donkey with no brains at all. The tide turned early, in Coral Gables, when Bush went belly up less than halfway through his first bout with Kerry, who hammered poor George into jelly. It was pitiful. . . . I almost felt sorry for him, until I heard someone call him "Mister President," and then I felt ashamed.

      Karl Rove, the president's political wizard, felt even worse. There is angst in the heart of Texas today, and panic in the bowels of the White House. Rove has a nasty little problem, and its name is George Bush. The president failed miserably from the instant he got onstage with John Kerry. He looked weak and dumb. Kerry beat him like a gong in Coral Gables, then again in St. Louis and Tempe -- and that is Rove's problem: His candidate is a weak-minded frat boy who cracks under pressure in front of 60 million voters.

      That is an unacceptable failure for hardballers like Rove and Dick Cheney. On the undercard in Cleveland against John Edwards, Cheney came across as the cruel and sinister uberboss of Halliburton. In his only honest moment during the entire debate, he vowed, "We have to make America the best place in the world to do business."

      Bush signed his own death warrant in the opening round, when he finally had to speak without his TelePrompTer. It was a Cinderella story brought up to date in Florida that night -- except this time the false prince turned back into a frog.

      Immediately after the first debate ended I called Muhammad Ali at his home in Michigan, but whoever answered said the champ was laughing so hard that he couldn't come to the phone. "The debate really cracked him up," he chuckled. "The champ loves a good ass-whuppin'. He says Bush looked so scared to fight, he finally just quit and laid down."

      Ali has seen that look before. Almost three months to the day after John Fitzgerald Kennedy was murdered in Dallas, the "Louisville Lip" -- then Cassius Clay -- made a permanent enemy of every "boxing expert" in the Western world by beating World Heavyweight Champion Sonny Liston so badly that he refused to come out of his corner for the seventh round.

      This year's first presidential debate was such a disaster for George Bush that his handlers had to be crazy to let him get in the ring with John Kerry again. Yet Karl Rove let it happen, and we can only wonder why. But there is no doubt that the president has lost his nerve, and his career in the White House is finished. NO MAS.

      **

      Presidential politics is a vicious business, even for rich white men, and anybody who gets into it should be prepared to grapple with the meanest of the mean. The White House has never been seized by timid warriors. There are no rules, and the roadside is littered with wreckage. That is why they call it the passing lane. Just ask any candidate who ever ran against George Bush -- Al Gore, Ann Richards, John McCain -- all of them ambushed and vanquished by lies and dirty tricks. And all of them still whining about it.

      That is why George W. Bush is President of the United States, and Al Gore is not. Bush simply wanted it more, and he was willing to demolish anything that got in his way, including the U.S. Supreme Court. It is not by accident that the Bush White House (read: Dick Cheney & Halliburton Inc.) controls all three branches of our federal government today. They are powerful thugs who would far rather die than lose the election in November.

      The Republican establishment is haunted by painful memories of what happened to Old Man Bush in 1992. He peaked too early, and he had no response to "It's the economy, stupid."

      Which has always been the case. Every GOP administration since 1952 has let the Military-Industrial Complex loot the Treasury and plunge the nation into debt on the excuse of a wartime economic emergency. Richard Nixon comes quickly to mind, along with Ronald Reagan and his ridiculous "trickle-down" theory of U.S. economic policy. If the Rich get Richer, the theory goes, before long their pots will overflow and somehow "trickle down" to the poor, who would rather eat scraps off the Bush family plates than eat nothing at all. Republicans have never approved of democracy, and they never will. It goes back to preindustrial America, when only white male property owners could vote.

      Things haven't changed all that much where George W. Bush comes from. Houston is a cruel and crazy town on a filthy river in East Texas with no zoning laws and a culture of sex, money and violence. It's a shabby sprawling metropolis ruled by brazen women, crooked cops and super-rich pansexual cowboys who live by the code of the West -- which can mean just about anything you need it to mean, in a pinch.

      Houston is also the unnatural home of two out of the last three presidents of the United States of America, for good or ill. The other one was a handsome, sex-crazed boy from next-door Arkansas, which has no laws against oral sex or any other deviant practice not specifically forbidden in the New Testament, including anal incest and public cunnilingus with farm animals.

      Back in 1948, during his first race for the U.S. Senate, Lyndon Johnson was running about ten points behind, with only nine days to go. He was sunk in despair. He was desperate. And it was just before noon on a Monday, they say, when he called his equally depressed campaign manager and instructed him to call a press conference for just before lunch on a slow news day and accuse his high-riding opponent, a pig farmer, of having routine carnal knowledge of his barnyard sows, despite the pleas of his wife and children.

      His campaign manager was shocked. "We can't say that, Lyndon," he supposedly said. "You know it's not true."

      "Of course it's not true!" Johnson barked at him. "But let's make the bastard deny it!"

      Johnson -- a Democrat, like Bill Clinton -- won that election by fewer than a hundred votes, and after that he was home free. He went on to rule Texas and the U.S. Senate for twenty years and to be the most powerful vice president in the history of the United States. Until now.

      **

      The genetically vicious nature of presidential campaigns in America is too obvious to argue with, but some people call it fun, and I am one of them. Election Day -- especially a presidential election -- is always a wild and terrifying time for politics junkies, and I am one of those, too. We look forward to major election days like sex addicts look forward to orgies. We are slaves to it.

      Which is not a bad thing, all in all, for the winners. They are not the ones who bitch and whine about slavery when the votes are finally counted and the losers are forced to get down on their knees. No. The slaves who emerge victorious from these drastic public decisions go crazy with joy and plunge each other into deep tubs of chilled Cristal champagne with naked strangers who want to be close to a winner.

      That is how it works in the victory business. You see it every time. The Weak will suck up to the Strong, for fear of losing their jobs and their money and all the fickle power they wielded only twenty-four hours ago. It is like suddenly losing your wife and your home in a vagrant poker game, then having to go on the road with whoremongers and beg for your dinner in public.

      Nobody wants to hire a loser. Right? They stink of doom and defeat.

      "What is that horrible smell in the office, Tex? It's making me sick."

      "That is the smell of a Loser, Senator. He came in to apply for a job, but we tossed him out immediately. Sgt. Sloat took him down to the parking lot and taught him a lesson he will never forget."

      "Good work, Tex. And how are you coming with my new Enemies List? I want them all locked up. They are scum."

      "We will punish them brutally. They are terrorist sympathizers, and most of them voted against you anyway. I hate those bastards."

      "Thank you, Sloat. You are a faithful servant. Come over here and kneel down. I want to reward you."

      That is the nature of high-risk politics. Veni Vidi Vici, especially among Republicans. It's like the ancient Bedouin saying: As the camel falls to its knees, more knives are drawn.

      **

      Indeed. the numbers are weird today, and so is this dangerous election. The time has come to rumble, to inject a bit of fun into politics. That's exactly what the debates did. John Kerry looked like a winner, and it energized his troops. Voting for Kerry is beginning to look like very serious fun for everybody except poor George, who now suddenly looks like a loser.

      That is fatal in a presidential election.

      I look at elections with the cool and dispassionate gaze of a professional gambler, especially when I'm betting real money on the outcome. Contrary to most conventional wisdom, I see Kerry with five points as a recommended risk. Kerry will win this election, if it happens, by a bigger margin than Bush finally gouged out of Florida in 2000. That was about forty-six percent, plus five points for owning the U.S. Supreme Court -- which seemed to equal fifty-one percent. Nobody really believed that, but George W. Bush moved into the White House anyway.

      It was the most brutal seizure of power since Hitler burned the German Reichstag in 1933 and declared himself the new Boss of Germany. Karl Rove is no stranger to Nazi strategy, if only because it worked, for a while, and it was sure as hell fun for Hitler. But not for long. He ran out of oil, the whole world hated him, and he liked to gobble pure crystal biphetamine and stay awake for eight or nine days in a row with his maps & his bombers & his dope-addled general staff.

      They all loved the whiff. It is the perfect drug for War -- as long as you are winning -- and Hitler thought he was King of the Hill forever. He had created a new master race, and every one of them worshipped him. The new Hitler youth loved to march and sing songs in unison and dance naked at night for the generals. They were fanatics.

      That was sixty-six years ago, far back in ancient history, and things are not much different today. We still love War.

      George Bush certainly does. In four short years he has turned our country from a prosperous nation at peace into a desperately indebted nation at war. But so what? He is the President of the United States, and you're not. Love it or leave it.

      **

      War is an option whose time has passed. Peace is the only option for the future. At present we occupy a treacherous no-man's-land between peace and war, a time of growing fear that our military might has expanded beyond our capacity to control it and our political differences widened beyond our ability to bridge them. . . .

      Short of changing human nature, therefore, the only way to achieve a practical, livable peace in a world of competing nations is to take the profit out of war.
      --RICHARD M. NIXON, "REAL PEACE" (1983)

      Richard Nixon looks like a flaming liberal today, compared to a golem like George Bush. Indeed. Where is Richard Nixon now that we finally need him?

      If Nixon were running for president today, he would be seen as a "liberal" candidate, and he would probably win. He was a crook and a bungler, but what the hell? Nixon was a barrel of laughs compared to this gang of thugs from the Halliburton petroleum organization who are running the White House today -- and who will be running it this time next year, if we (the once-proud, once-loved and widely respected "American people") don't rise up like wounded warriors and whack those lying petroleum pimps out of the White House on November 2nd.

      Nixon hated running for president during football season, but he did it anyway. Nixon was a professional politician, and I despised everything he stood for -- but if he were running for president this year against the evil Bush-Cheney gang, I would happily vote for him.

      You bet. Richard Nixon would be my Man. He was a crook and a creep and a gin-sot, but on some nights, when he would get hammered and wander around in the streets, he was fun to hang out with. He would wear a silk sweat suit and pull a stocking down over his face so nobody could recognize him. Then we would get in a cab and cruise down to the Watergate Hotel, just for laughs.

      **

      Even the Fun-hog vote has started to swing for John Kerry, and that is a hard bloc to move. Only a fool would try to run for president without the enthusiastic support of the Fun-hog vote. It is huge, and always available, but they will never be lured into a voting booth unless voting carries a promise of Fun.

      At least thirty-three percent of all eligible voters in this country are confessed Fun-hogs, who will cave into any temptation they stumble on. They have always hated George Bush, but until now they had never made the connection between hating George Bush and voting for John Kerry.

      The Fun-hogs are starving for anything they can laugh with, instead of at. But George Bush is not funny. Nobody except fellow members of the Petroleum Club in Houston will laugh at his silly barnyard jokes unless it's for money.

      When young Bush was at Yale in the Sixties, he told the same joke over and over again for two years, according to some of his classmates. One of them still remembers it:

      There was a young man named Green
      Who invented a jack-off machine
      On the twenty-third stroke
      The damn thing broke
      And churned his nuts into cream.

      "It was horrible to hear him tell it," said the classmate, who spoke only on condition of anonymity. He lifted his shirt and showed me a scar on his back put there by young George. "He burned this into my flesh with a red-hot poker," he said solemnly, "and I have hated him ever since. That jackass was born cruel. He burned me in the back while I was blindfolded. This scar will be with me forever."

      There is nothing new or secret about that story. It ran on the front page of the Yale Daily News and caused a nasty scandal for a few weeks, but nobody was ever expelled for it. George did his first cover-up job. And he liked it.

      **

      I watch three or four frantic network-news bulletins about Iraq every day, and it is all just fraudulent Pentagon propaganda, the absolute opposite of what it says: u.s. transfers sovereignty to iraqi interim "government." Hot damn! Iraq is finally Free, and just in time for the election! It is a deliberate cowardly lie. We are no more giving power back to the Iraqi people than we are about to stop killing them.

      Your neighbor's grandchildren will be fighting this stupid, greed-crazed Bush-family "war" against the whole Islamic world for the rest of their lives, if John Kerry is not elected to be the new President of the United States in November.

      The question this year is not whether President Bush is acting more and more like the head of a fascist government but if the American people want it that way. That is what this election is all about. We are down to nut-cutting time, and millions of people are angry. They want a Regime Change.

      Some people say that George Bush should be run down and sacrificed to the Rat gods. But not me. No. I say it would be a lot easier to just vote the bastard out of office on November 2nd.

      **

      BULLETIN
      KERRY WINS GONZO ENDORSMENT; DR. THOMPSON JOINS DEMOCRAT IN CALLING BUSH "THE SYPHILLIS PRESIDENT"
      "Four more years of George Bush will be like four more years of syphilis," the famed author said yesterday at a hastily called press conference near his home in Woody Creek, Colorado. "Only a fool or a sucker would vote for a dangerous loser like Bush," Dr. Thompson warned. "He hates everything we stand for, and he knows we will vote against him in November."

      Thompson, long known for the eerie accuracy of his political instincts, went on to denounce Ralph Nader as "a worthless Judas Goat with no moral compass."

      "I endorsed John Kerry a long time ago," he said, "and I will do everything in my power, short of roaming the streets with a meat hammer, to help him be the next President of the United States."

      **

      Which is true. I said all those things, and I will say them again. Of course I will vote for John Kerry. I have known him for thirty years as a good man with a brave heart -- which is more than even the president's friends will tell you about George W. Bush, who is also an old acquaintance from the white-knuckle days of yesteryear. He is hated all over the world, including large parts of Texas, and he is taking us all down with him.

      Bush is a natural-born loser with a filthy-rich daddy who pimped his son out to rich oil-mongers. He hates music, football and sex, in no particular order, and he is no fun at all.

      I voted for Ralph Nader in 2000, but I will not make that mistake again. The joke is over for Nader. He was funny once, but now he belongs to the dead. There is nothing funny about helping George Bush win Florida again. Nader is a fool, and so is anybody who votes for him in November -- with the obvious exception of professional Republicans who have paid big money to turn poor Ralph into a world-famous Judas Goat.

      Nader has become so desperate and crazed that he's stooped to paying homeless people to gather signatures to get him on the ballot. In Pennsylvania, the petitions he submitted contained tens of thousands of phony signatures, including Fred Flintstone, Mickey Mouse and John Kerry. A judge dumped Ralph from the ballot there, saying the forms were "rife with forgeries" and calling it "the most deceitful and fraudulent exercise ever perpetrated upon this court."

      But they will keep his name on the ballot in the long-suffering Hurricane State, which is ruled by the President's younger brother, Jeb, who also wants to be the next President of the United States. In 2000, when they sent Jim Baker down to Florida, I knew it was all over. The fix was in. In that election, 97,488 people voted for Nader in Florida, and Gore lost the state by 537 votes. You don't have to be from Texas to understand the moral of that story. It's like being out-coached in the Super Bowl. There are no rules in the passing lane. Only losers play fair, and all winners have blood on their hands.

      ***

      Back in June, when John Kerry was beginning to feel like a winner, I had a quick little rendezvous with him on a rain-soaked runway in Aspen, Colorado, where he was scheduled to meet with a harem of wealthy campaign contributors. As we rode to the event, I told him that Bush's vicious goons in the White House are perfectly capable of assassinating Nader and blaming it on him. His staff laughed, but the Secret Service men didn't. Kerry quickly suggested that I might make a good running mate, and we reminisced about trying to end the Vietnam War in 1972.

      That was the year I first met him, at a riot on that elegant little street in front of the White House. He was yelling into a bullhorn and I was trying to throw a dead, bleeding rat over a black-spike fence and onto the president's lawn.

      We were angry and righteous in those days, and there were millions of us. We kicked two chief executives out of the White House because they were stupid warmongers. We conquered Lyndon Johnson and we stomped on Richard Nixon -- which wise people said was impossible, but so what? It was fun. We were warriors then, and our tribe was strong like a river.

      That river is still running. All we have to do is get out and vote, while it's still legal, and we will wash those crooked warmongers out of the White House.

      Hunter S. Thompson's latest book is "Hey Rube: Blood Sport, the Bush Doctrine and the Downward Spiral of Dumbness"

      John Kerry 2008, the leader of the youth of America.

      by desiunion on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 08:44:16 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  His blood is also on Bush's hands (3.12)
        Probably just couldn't accept life with four more years of Bush.  Guess he chose to take the easy way out.  May he rest in peace.
        •  asdf (4.00)
          My wife and I knew someone - basically more acquaintance than friend - who committed suicide weeks after Bush stole the election of 2000. During those last weeks of his life he'd made numerous dire predictions as to what was coming down on us in the aftermath of that awful November. Eerily enough, our acquaintaince was spot on. I doubt he killed himself over Junior Caligula's ascencion to the throne (our acquaintance was suffering from asperger's syndrome and severe depression), but it no doubt was on the background. HST was no doubt battling plenty of his own demons. American pop culture will no doubt be a little poorer without HST's presence.
          •  yea its a dark world (4.00)
            Thats what makes me so angry about this election. I really did believe that with John Kerry winning the election, the dark curtain would slowly begin to move, and we would be on to better days.

            John Kerry 2008, the leader of the youth of America.

            by desiunion on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 09:20:42 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  I guess.. (none)
              it's just going to move more slowly.. One has to hope.  Thanks for the article.  How many cool people does Kerry know?  Maybe, at least, the fact that Kerry won by a pretty fair margin among the youngest generation of voters means that we're slowly moving away from the Republican 'fuck you, I got mine' kind of cool that grew out of the 80's and 90's.  Fight this generation, fight this generation, etc..
          •  Think before you write. (3.62)
            I'm sure you feel like you're making a hip political statement, but your comment is really disrespectful of a person who's life was the template for pushing the envelope.

            His political leanings would make some kossacks a little queasy; more libertarian than liberal.  But he was the real deal, completely up front about where he stood.

            The idea that he would take his own life because The Crackhead won a second term is as remote as you killing yourself because Kimberley got voted off American Idol.

            Read him and learn.

            "Don't play what's there, play what's not there." -Miles

            by jexter on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 10:14:35 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  be kind... (4.00)
              the man was an icon and people will naturally relate his death to their own experiences. Some may be better at capturing his spirit but it is human nature to see in our heroes a mirror into our own lives.

              "Washed my face in the rivers of empire..."--Sunken Waltz by Calexico

              by pacific city on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 10:27:42 PM PST

              [ Parent ]

            •  say what!?! (none)
              What fucking "hip political statement" was there in what I was writing? I merely reminiscing about a parallel I had seen between HST's suicide and someone who had been a personal acquaintance. Nothing more, nothing less.

              As far as that "read him and learn" line, well let's say I've been there and done that 20 years ago - so can the condescension already.

              •  James (none)
                It wasn't addressed to you;  did you make the comment:

                His blood is also on Bush's hands

                Probably just couldn't accept life with four more years of Bush.  Guess he chose to take the easy way out.  May he rest in peace.

                That's who I was addressing.

                "Don't play what's there, play what's not there." -Miles

                by jexter on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 10:50:33 PM PST

                [ Parent ]

                •  From the way it was threaded (none)
                  it looked addressed to me. No harm, no foul, I guess.
                •  Irresponsible. (1.21)
                  Now, first this guy had a son, and I don't know the relationship between him and his son, but that should have been reason enough for the average person not to commit suicide.

                  Second, just because Bush won re-election does not mean you have to commit suicide. Why die in a suicide? If you have nothing to live for why not dedicate your life to speaking out and wait to be assasinated?

                  The single most critical issue of the Democratic party Support Living Wages

                  by Lucian on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 11:49:40 PM PST

                  [ Parent ]

                  •  you (4.00)
                    You don't have a clue of what you're talking about if you can't even fathom that someone who kills themself might not be in a rational enough state of mind to consider their responsibilities to their family.
                    •  Well (1.50)
                      that means I simply cannot understand suicide. It's simply not rational. I also don't understand murder, thats not rational either.  There are only very rare cases where murder is the only remaining option, and I'd think we would weigh these options. The thought process goes like this "How many people will I hurt if I kill myself? How many lives will be destroyed?"

                      Why suicide victims don't go through this common thought process is something I don't understand. If it turns out they simply arent capable, then I apologize for making such harsh comments, but from my point of view suicide is very harmful.

                      The single most critical issue of the Democratic party Support Living Wages

                      by Lucian on Mon Feb 21, 2005 at 07:20:38 AM PST

                      [ Parent ]

                      •  wow... (none)
                        "... I simply cannot understand suicide. It's simply not rational."

                        Sorry, but there's one for the "no shit!" department. Do you not know anything about depression, or mental illness in general? Do you not have, or haven't you ever had, a friend or loved one who's suffered from depression?

                        Clinical depression is not the same as melancholy, or "feeling sad." You don't even have to be feeling particularly "sad" to be suffering from depression - though if you do suffer from it, and it persists, you will feel "sad" sooner rather than later, because you will be repeatedly asking yourself, "What the hell is wrong with me?"

                        When someone suffers from clinical depression, "rational" barely enters the equation. Not everyone with depression commits suicide - far from it. But when you have it, and it's either left untreated or not treated successfully, the filters of "rationality" that keep most of us from even giving it serious thought will begin to fall apart.

                        I strongly recommend, to you and everyone else reading this comment, to consider reading Darkness Visible, by William Styron (author of Sophie's Choice and other novels). It's only 80 pages long, and is one of the best personal descriptions of depression out there.

                        Oh, and one last thing - as has been stated already, we don't know why Thompson killed himself, or even if it was suicide (knowing Thompson, it very well could have been an accident facilitated by alcohol and drugs).

                        ...Freedom is on the march. Straight to the gas chamber. this is infidelica...

                        by snookybeh on Mon Feb 21, 2005 at 08:34:43 AM PST

                        [ Parent ]

                        •  I understand depression and mental illness (none)
                          I understand this. I know some people are always depressed 24/7 and never happy. I just don't understand suicide as the response to this. Many people who feel the same way choose better options so I'm trying to understand why a few choose the suicide option.

                          The single most critical issue of the Democratic party Support Living Wages

                          by Lucian on Mon Feb 21, 2005 at 09:29:58 AM PST

                          [ Parent ]

                •  then learn how to post (none)
                  Your posted a response to James.  But your comment is rude and offensive in any case.
            •  just for thinking (none)
              about on this issue:

              I am more than 25 years younger than HST.  I have followed his works & career for more than 20 years.

              His life his choice, and I miss him only a fraction as much as I am going to..

              Regarding the blood on prince W'z hands, it's about as fair as anything.

              It's not the four more years that make me want to snuff myself.  It's the next 20, and the real disasters that will begin after that due to this entire administration.

              If, (a REAL huge IF) this was one of his reasons, I relate & would support it.  I can expect 50 more years of living in this swilling hell of toxic chemicals and hatred brewed up by these monsters.  Being chewed alive by screaming meat eels for 50 years is going to be a pleasent daydream compared to what we are all about to live through.

              IF HST decided he didn't want to live through it in his last years, all the power to him.  I know I don't.

          •  Also remember (none)
            The fellow who tried to immolate himself in front of the Whte House, and the guy who threw himself off of the Empire State Building the day After Thanksgiving.

            "Help him...help the Bombardier!" "I'm the bombardier...I'm OK!" "Then help Him, help him!"

            by Bulldawg on Mon Feb 21, 2005 at 08:50:20 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

        •  I doubt it (3.42)
          This guy hung out with Hell Angels, I don't think a Bush presidency drove him to it. Maybe he had cancer or something related to all the drinking and drug use.
          •  I'm not sure... (none)
            what "hanging out with Hells Angels" has to do with anything. Especially since that was decades ago, and the Bush White House is just the latest mestastization of a cancer that's been growing for years with no end in sight. I have way more respect for the Angels than I do for the Bush Reich.

            But having said that... if in fact HST committed suicide (with him, it very well could have been accidental), it would more likely be due to an advancing, untreatable illness than anything else.

            (Though keep in mind, depression is an illness, too.)

            ...Freedom is on the march. Straight to the gas chamber. this is infidelica...

            by snookybeh on Mon Feb 21, 2005 at 08:46:21 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

        •  there is no reason (4.00)
          to troll rate this comment.

          "Washed my face in the rivers of empire..."--Sunken Waltz by Calexico

          by pacific city on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 09:34:58 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  I 'd have rated it Thoughtless rather than Troll.. (3.00)
            ...if I could have.

            If Hunter S. Thompson is just a name to you, at least concider how you would feel if it was implied that someone close to you had committed suicide because they were too weak to handle 4 more years of a particular administration.  Frankly, it's a sophmoric comment that's mostly about hating Bush with little concideration to the death of a cultural icon.

            "Don't play what's there, play what's not there." -Miles

            by jexter on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 10:39:58 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  he ain't just a name to me... (4.00)
              while I was never a huge follower of HST, he played a pivotal role in the development of my beloved husband's philosophy and view toward life. I have great respect for the man, his life, his works and his intellect. But his memory doesn't belong to you alone and I don't believe you should pass such harsh judgement onto expressions of sorrow at his passing.

              "Washed my face in the rivers of empire..."--Sunken Waltz by Calexico

              by pacific city on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 10:48:03 PM PST

              [ Parent ]

              •  I don't want to start a flame war. (4.00)
                But do you think it's possible that his suicide had nothing to do with George Bush?  Is it possible to have a simple rememberance of someone without tying it to George W, Bush?  Are we so set in our ideology  that everything bad is because of George Bush?

                I'm apologizing to anyone who feels I overstepped.  

                jexter out.

                "Don't play what's there, play what's not there." -Miles

                by jexter on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 11:03:44 PM PST

                [ Parent ]

                •  I know what you're saying... (none)
                  but he permeates this blog, I'm afraid.

                  I'm sorry for that.

                  "Washed my face in the rivers of empire..."--Sunken Waltz by Calexico

                  by pacific city on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 11:06:58 PM PST

                  [ Parent ]

                  •  More my frustration for a loss... (4.00)
                    ...than anger at anyone here. I just fear indoctrination more than almost anything else.  Sorry for the negative vibe.

                    "Don't play what's there, play what's not there." -Miles

                    by jexter on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 11:39:45 PM PST

                    [ Parent ]

                    •  Hunter S. Thompson's death is the negative vibe (none)
                      I found two authors I really liked reading back in the 1970's. One was Hunter S. Thompson and the other was Richard Brautigan. Both were innoculation against indoctrination and fun reading.

                      Thompson is the second of the two to commit suicide.

                      Yep. It's Monday.

                      Shit.

                      Update: There are Lies, Damned Liars and FOX News.' Politics Plus Stuff

                      by Rick B on Mon Feb 21, 2005 at 04:31:33 AM PST

                      [ Parent ]

                      •  Hunter and Brautigan two of my favorites. (none)
                        I found them in my Dad's books when I was just an 11 year old kid living out in the middle of nowhere (the nearest library was over an hour away). My Dad knew I loved to read and so he got out all of his and Mom's old paperbacks and College books (quite a weird collection between them). Talk about having my mind blown. I read Fear and Loathing, Trout Fishing in America, and Confederate General in Big Sur over and over trying to wrap my head around what they were saying. Loved those books and they beat the hell out of all the Dickens my Mom was trying to get me to read at the time.

                        Hunter was way more than a journalist, that's for damn sure.

                        There are always two parties; the establishment and the movement. -Emerson

                        by coconutjones on Mon Feb 21, 2005 at 03:01:58 PM PST

                        [ Parent ]

                •  well said (none)
                  at a sensitive time

                  "the prophet is a fool, the spiritual man is mad... for the multitude of thine inequity, and the Great Hatred" - violent femmes

                  by Tirge Caps on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 11:34:17 PM PST

                  [ Parent ]

            •  stop telling people how to think (4.00)
              you've expressed your own political point here (bush is not enogh reason for suicide) that is no more obvious than the ones you criticize, then you want to play hall monitor.
            •  Sweeping assumptions you're making... (4.00)
              yourself, there, buddy.

              "too weak to handle another 4 years."

              Does anyone here remember Abbie Hoffman? Remember how he died? Remember how long he suffered and worked and crusaded... before he just couldn't take it anymore and KILLED himself?

              Perhaps it was not merely the prospect of another four years. If, indeed, this was suicide born of depression (rather than preemption i the face of a horrible disease), then it was the culmination of just Too Many Fucking Things Gone Wrong.

              I've been on the brink of suicide -- seriously on the brink -- at least four times in my life. Had I not been properly medicated and absolutely protected in a cocoon I deliberately constructed last year, I can ALMOST guarantee that I would have committed suicide on November 3rd.

              The simple, painful fact is this: those of us they mock as "bleeding heart liberals" earned the name as more than mere metaphor. At times, oh, so often, it feels as though our hearts LITERALLY bleed, for the agonies wrought upon man by man.

              Liberals are, by definition, incredibly SENSITIVE human beings. Those very qualities that make us superlative specimens of humanity serve also as our Achilles's heel: our sensitive, liberal, empathetic, sympathetic, cautious, considerate, respectful and generous qualities turn against us in the hands of our enemies. Even without an enemy wielding the weapon forged in the fires of our bleeding hearts, we often fall prey to the overwhelming sadness of existence. The cadre of cretins now stampeding the earth, intent on destroying every enlightened aspect of human progress, need not attack us personally. All they need do is make their siren calls to the weak and selfish in their paths -- and as this malignant organism crawls inexorably toward the dark and away from the light... it drags behind it the bits and pieces of our shredded hope for humanity.

              What will you say if Duke wrote us a letter, explaining that though he tried to overcome it, his despair at the seeming inability of Americans to overthrow the Mewling Demon in the White House simply could not be defeated?

              Strong men lose hope every day. It does not make them weak. They simply grow too weary to fight on, and long for respite from the eternity of clashes they see on the horizon.

              I beg pardon for this bizarre purple prose. In my defense, it is 4:25 a.m., I slept three hours last night and it appears I am doomed to sleep deprivation yet another night.

              Rage, rage, against the lying of the Right.

              by Maryscott OConnor on Mon Feb 21, 2005 at 04:23:03 AM PST

              [ Parent ]

              •  No Reason (none)
                to beg pardon with me, Maryscott.

                I understand you perfectly.

                Those very qualities that make us superlative specimens of humanity serve also as our Achilles's heel: our sensitive, liberal, empathetic, sympathetic, cautious, considerate, respectful and generous qualities turn against us in the hands of our enemies.

                This is not the writing of someone who doesn't know.

                Strong men lose hope every day. It does not make them weak. They simply grow too weary to fight on, and long for respite from the eternity of clashes they see on the horizon.

                ~~snip~~

                Too Many Fucking Things Gone Wrong

                I myself have had the demon of wanting to commit suicide visit me more than once.  It is like nothing anyone who hasn't experienced it can understand.  It is total despair, total resignation, and total frustration.  The frustration for me gets so bad I just wonder what I might do if I wasn't seeing a doctor, because so many of my mentally ill brothers and sisters don't get the chance to.

                A great light in the world of writing and critical thinking has been lost.  Let's step back and really reflect on how many others may be feeling the same way, the utter despair, the powerlessness.

                Maryscott, you know how this hits home, I don't need to say another word to you about it, except, Be Well.

                Mark

              •  Maryscott (none)
                I think you are an artist, at least an artist with words (guess that's what a poet is). Your writing evokes Don McLean's "Vincent," which i think shows that artists are the true "bleeding hearts" of the world.

                HST was also an artist with words.

                What would this world be without our artists? Let us give thanks for them, cherish them, and protect them whenever we can.

                For it is your business when the wall next door catches fire. --Horace

                by marylrgn on Mon Feb 21, 2005 at 07:57:48 AM PST

                [ Parent ]

              •  You're a gifted writer (none)
                MaryScott. This might be a great diary topic for you. Write the hell out of it.

                Is nothing secular?

                by aitchdee on Mon Feb 21, 2005 at 09:08:16 AM PST

                [ Parent ]

              •  Abbe & Hunter (none)
                It's ironic you mention Abbe Hoffman.  I met both Abbe Hoffman and Hunter S. Thompson together, I think in 1986 when they appeared at a local university in some election political forum.  Abbe Hoffman was incredible.  Hunter S. Thompson showed up an hour late with a drink in one hand, and a fishing pole in the other...
            •  Given what Thompson thought of Bush, (4.00)
              he would probably be happy for people to think that Bush drove him to it.
              But neither you nor I know why he did, and your troll-rating people's opinions is counter to everything HST believed in.
          •  I agree..... (none)
            Why the hell are people being troll rated because they disagree with the thought that Thompson might have killed himself over Bush.
            This is a misuse of the ratings system if I've ever seen it.

            What is it?  To be a partisan lefty you have to agree that Thompson killed himself over Bush???

      •  Every phrase a call to dump ButchCo. (none)
        What more can a man do?
        _ _ _ _ _ _

        a scar on his back [...] That jackass was born cruel. He burned me in the back while I was blindfolded.

        _  _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

        Houston is a cruel and crazy town on a filthy river in East Texas with no zoning laws and a[n exhibitionist] culture of sex, money and violence.

        _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

        If there was a language which could stir Dead Souls, Hunter had it.

        •  correct (none)
          the notion bush doesn't underlie the depression here is specious, at best.
          •  Some perhaps, but really (none)
            he wrote that he had osteoporosis and his spine was being reconstructed. (See aticle quoted downthread).

            As I see it, the man gave his spine for the Nation - he was sedentary: lots of reading, telephoning, driving around in cars, not enough exercise.

            (A chap I knew fell apart from Osteoporosis at 63. He'd done opium in the East (way before I knew him) hated chorophyll and the countryside, fled the sun and lived after dark.)

            •  he was a brave man (3.00)
              i'm not going to hijack this thread, but at some point in time it would be nice for us to upgrade our understanding of suicide- it's a very brave thing to do. we want to mischaracterize it because we are uncomfortable with our own complicity in it.
              •  Excellent Idea (none)
                I have been working on some diaries on depression now for some time.

                Mark

                •  excellent notion (none)
                  there is a hell of a lot to be depressed about. frankly, if you're not depressed then there is a decent chance you are either clueless or a banal accomplice to it all.
                  •  it's always a delicate balance... (none)
                    between despair and hope. As you say, there's a hell of a lot to be depressed about. But there are things in life that can give one hope - not the least of which is the idea that things will get better.

                    As someone who has been treated for clinical depression for a long time now, I can honestly say that I've never been literally "on the brink" of suicide, but I've certainly thought long and hard on the subject. Frankly, for reasons I won't get into now, the older I get the more the barriers preventing it fall away. (But in case anyone out there is concerned, there are still barriers in place, for the foreseeable future. :-P)

                    Though it saddens me, for various reasons, when I hear of someone taking their life, there are many times when I can understand why that person reached the decision.

                    But by the same token, there's an element of truth to the old cliche, "It's always darkest before the dawn." Particularly with depression. I've seen enough "dawns" that it makes it easier to not be overcome by the darkness. Not completely, anyway.

                    ...Freedom is on the march. Straight to the gas chamber. this is infidelica...

                    by snookybeh on Mon Feb 21, 2005 at 09:23:50 AM PST

                    [ Parent ]

              •  hmmm... (none)
                I say yes AND no, heterodoxy. I think it depends entirely on the circumstances whether it's a brave thing to do. But I'm with you, in that calling suicide "cowardly," as most people seem to do, is an ignorant generalization.

                I'm not going to get into examples of what I think are "brave" or "cowardly" suicides. Either way, it's an individual's decision.

                Here is one thing I've mused about regarding suicide... I've wondered recently whether organized religions have called suicide a mortal sin, not so much because they really feel it is, but because the lives that people lived, especially many centuries ago, were often so brutal and full of hopelessness that in some cases it may have seemed very logical to end one's life before its natural termination. In other words, if you had no dependents to provide for, lived in miserable drudgery and toil with no hope of that ever changing, and simply found no enjoyment or purpose in life, what would possibly stop you from suicide? Perhaps the teaching of your religion - the one that was pretty much forced on you by society - that anyone who commits suicide will spend eternity in the pain and misery of hell.

                "Opiate for the masses" indeed.

                ...Freedom is on the march. Straight to the gas chamber. this is infidelica...

                by snookybeh on Mon Feb 21, 2005 at 09:10:32 AM PST

                [ Parent ]

      •  What a great writer (4.00)
        Reading this again just makes me so angry at the way the election turned out and the direction in which the country is going. Did HST write anything about the election after the result? That would be really interesting reading.
        He will be missed.
      •  Dude (none)
        You can't just copy and paste a whole article. Copyright law and all that. In the future just post a link, please.
    •  Thompson Equated Howard Dean with Janet Jackson (2.00)
      ...And sex scandals:

      Many things are disturbing these days. We live in ugly times, and some people and institutions are losing their grip. The list is long, from Janet Jackson to Howard Dean to the city of Boston and the disgusting sex scandal at the University of Colorado at Boulder.
      Well, both Howie and Janet Jackson are mindless, self-serving buffoons who poisoned the the water for Kerry and the Dems in the 2004 election by serving as convenient emblems of a "disgusting," screaming, loony left that were flogged by Fox News and all the right-wing radio yakkers, so I guess Hunter Thompson has a point.  Howie's election to the DNC chair may have driven Thompson over the edge...  
      •  oh, jesus h. christ... (none)
        with all due respect, on the assumption that you are not being ironic, what the fuck are you talking about?!? Where the hell do you get off calling Howard Dean a "mindless, self-serving buffoon..." etc.? You base this on what exactly? And what remote, bizarre stretch of imagination do you use to say that Dean "poisoned the waters" for Kerry and Democrats in general? (And please explain the role Janet Jackson had in this - I'm dying to hear your precious insight.)

        FOX and the other wingnuts would have created a "convenient emblem of... a loony left" out of anyone or anything. They would have spun political gold out of non-existant straw if they had to - that is their talent. Witness the mileage they got out of a silly "scream" of enthusiasm at a pep rally. Perception - and presentation and context - are everything.

        As I said, if you're being ironic, please let me know, and I apologize in advance. But if not, no offense, but your comment was one of the dumber things I've read lately...

        ...Freedom is on the march. Straight to the gas chamber. this is infidelica...

        by snookybeh on Mon Feb 21, 2005 at 09:36:57 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Geez, keep yer pants on. (2.00)
          Whoa, Snooky...  It was Hunter Thompson who characterized Howie (and Janet Jackson) as "ugly" and "disturbing" and "losing their grip."

          If you will sweep away your Deaniac Delusions and clearly recall the 2004 election, you will remember that the GOP profited from the values debate that portrayed Dems as depraved sinners.  Janet "Nipple" Jackson and Howie "Homo-Loving" Dean were part of that GOP imagery.

          Also, during the primary Howie shrieked "REPUBLICAN" at any Dem who challenged him, screaming that all other Dems were just Bush-Lite.  Dean was willing to poision the Dem pool to ensure his own nomination.  I cannot think of a surer way to fracture party unity in a primary than claiming all your opponents are crypto-fascists.  Dean's namby-pamby electioneering in the general election for Kerry seemed insincere and self-promoting after using the nuclear option in the primaries.

          Howard Dean never really asked voters to support him in the primaries as much as he besmirched the rest of the Dem field.  Perhaps if Howie were not so ugly, disturbing, and gripless -- as Hunter Thomspon puts it -- he would have had a bit more devotion during the primaries to the idea of electing the eventual Dem nominee.  

          •  no Deaniac here... (none)
            though my respect for Dean has only increased over time. I was a Clark supporter, and when he dropped out I gladly supported, with words, deeds and money, Kerry.

            If you'll note in my comment, I was referrring to what you said, not Thompson. You were the one who said "mindless, self-serving buffoon..." etc., unless Thompson said it somewhere in his piece and you failed to properly cite it.

            Dean had every right to call his primary opponents on their leaning away from Democratic ideals and towards being "Republican-lite" - this was a growing  problem in the Democratic Party going back at least to the `02 mid-terms, if not well before, and none of the frontrunners were giving any indications of bucking that trend until Dean's candidacy started catching fire. Dean never called anybody a "crypto-fascist," and all of the primary candidates engaged in some kind of attack against their opponents - Kerry and Gephart in particular.

            I don't know, maybe you're not familiar with how primaries work - opponents don't generally stand around talking about how much alike they are, they point out their differences. It often - actually, always - gets pretty heated. And when it's over, those who've lost generally suck it up and talk about how much they admire and support the guy who won.

            "Dean's namby-pamby electioneering" for Kerry is a rather bizarre choice of words. I've never seen a defeated candidate work harder or more enthusiastically for the guy who beat him. Hell, at times it seemed he worked harder than either Kerry or Edwards. I guess "insincere" is ultimately subjective - how do you guage sincerity? But given how much you inexplicably seem to hate Dean, I think that's going to cloud your opinion a wee bit.

            "Howard Dean never really asked voters to support him in the primaries..." WTF? That doesn't even make a lick of sense. And what is your point by calling him "Howie 'homo-loving' Dean?"

            Your apparent point that Dean somehow gave the Repugs ammo to use against Kerry, in addition to being utterly baseless, is very much like blaming a rape victim for her rape - let's demonize her for the way she was dressed, and forget about the sick fuck who raped her. As I said before, those bastards seize on anything, real or fake, to get the upper hand. Or do you think Dean was somehow responsible for the purple band-aids and the Swift Boat Liars?

            I know, let's just castrate ourselves, and never say or do or even think anything that the Repugs could possibly twist into a negative. Then let's watch them attack us for not standing for anything - which is what most people were saying about the Democrats until Dean came along.

            Given your obvious, irrational hatred of Dean, I bet you were just chomping at the bit for an opportunity to take a thread devoted to HST and his writings and tie it to an ad hominem attack on Dean. Bully for you for figuring out how, even though I would still characterize it as being off-topic and not contributing anything to the discussion.

            And the Janet Jackson thing - that's just utterly stupid. Remember how Newt Gingrich tried to blame Susan Smith's drowning of her children on Democrats? You're in good company.

            ...Freedom is on the march. Straight to the gas chamber. this is infidelica...

            by snookybeh on Mon Feb 21, 2005 at 11:02:30 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

      •  This is from Feb 04 (none)
        so I think he was referring to the scream when he said Dean was losing his grip. HST knew Kerry for a long time and was probably a Kerry supporter from the get-go.
  •  rest in peace n/t (4.00)
    •  Amen (4.00)
      from the obit on my blog:

      Firebrand of New Journalism, and twisted godfather to bloggers everywhere, Hunter S. Thompson is dead. Though shocked at its suddenness, few of his fans and readers can be completely surprised that it was apparently by gunshot, by his own hand. Dr. Thompson has been flirting with terror and death his whole career. His affair has now, it seems, been consummated.

      The best first paragraph of any book since Genesis:

      "We were somewhere around Barstow on the edge of the desert when the drugs began to take hold. I remember saying something like 'I feel a bit lightheaded; maybe you should drive...' And suddenly there was a terrible roar all around us and the sky was full of what looked like huge bats, all swooping and screeching and diving around the car, which was going about a hundred miles an hour with the top down to Las Vegas. And a voice was screaming: 'Holy Jesus! What are these goddamn animals?'

      Social Security Privatization is Welfare for Wallstreet
      CaliBlogger

      by CaliBlogger on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 11:37:48 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  whoa (4.00)
    That's all...whoa.
  •  Drudge Has His Exclusive (none)
    I haven't seen any of the wire services or any other more-reputable sources echoing the news, should it be found true. Did the son tell Drudge directly, and if so, why? Secondly, if he did not, how did Drudge get the news - why would it make sense to announce through him? Maybe a tertiary response, but curious, nonetheless.
  •  holy fucking shit (4.00)
    no no no no no.

    Left Is Port, Right Is Starboard.

    by lipris on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 08:24:32 PM PST

  •  So long Uncle Duke... (4.00)
    you will be missed...

    The Cognitive Dissonant... "Bringing Marshmallows to the Firestorms of Freedom!"

    by Dood Abides on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 08:24:57 PM PST

    •  in memoriam (none)

      A friend had written me the other day (and I hope he doesn't mind my posting this bit of his private email):

      I was fired for finishing Hunter S. Thompson's Chivas and water while doing fine dining in a tuxedo.  Oh, and I was drunk, very drunk.  Again.  Sean Penn and James Carville were crutches for the slumping Hunter who kept shouting, "Stairs.  I didn't come to a restaurant to walk up any fucking...Lights.  Jesus Christ these lights.  Stairs.  Fucking stairs."
  •  A moment of silence for Hunter (4.00)
  •  Fearless... (4.00)
    in the face of death by his own hand.

    He committed suicide. So does his committing suicide mean he feared life more than he feared death? That is a very sad thing, if that was the case.

    "Washed my face in the rivers of empire..."--Sunken Waltz by Calexico

    by pacific city on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 08:25:31 PM PST

    •  bleah (4.00)
      I don't like that sentiment.  I'm having trouble putting my finger on it, and maybe this isn't what you meant, but it reminds me of people saying things about how committing suicide takes courage or something.  From my experience with suicide, I know it's more about people being driven towards it kicking and screaming.  They try everything they can to avoid it and then just lose.
      •  well, your disagreement is noted... (4.00)
        I certainly meant no offense and I did not say that it was a brave act. I don't know if it was an act of courage or a failure on his part so I won't assume.

        I've never experienced suicide in my personal life but have always thought that those who do kill themselves must somehow find the pain of life to be so unbearable that death becomes the only option. Just an unfortunate reality of the human condition for some, neither brave nor cowardly. Something else, a leap in an entirely different direction.

        "Washed my face in the rivers of empire..."--Sunken Waltz by Calexico

        by pacific city on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 08:56:39 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Yes... (none)
          Life is more painful than death. I know because I've tried it once, came close to trying several more times but always chickened out, and wished on a daily basis that my previous attempts had suceeded. I came really super close once when I was 16 (my mother had Valium that she used to give me whenever she thought I was getting too uppity) and I took about 15 pills when I was 16 and ended up 3 days later in the hospital with my stomach having been pumped out. If I could get a prescription, I'd do it in a heartbeat. I can't get a prescription. I don't own a gun, and knives seem like a nasty way to go. I'll probably find a way to succeed one day, but I've spent many a day trying to figure out how to accomplish it. But you are correct, life is more painful for some people than the alternative.

          "Things will not calm down Dr. Jackson, they will, in fact, calm up!" - Tilk, Stargate SG-1

          by 2care4others on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 11:49:28 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  Wow. That's sad. (none)
            I hope you seek help.  I hear that depression treatments have become more effective than they were  even relatively recently.  Please try to get help before you're tempted to try again.  After all, our side can't afford to lose any more voters ;>).
            •  mraker (none)
              I don't think I'm going to be needed for another election (I seriously don't think there will be one, but that's just my opinion); BUT until I do succeed, I'll do my part to try to take these facist assholes down.

              "Things will not calm down Dr. Jackson, they will, in fact, calm up!" - Tilk, Stargate SG-1

              by 2care4others on Mon Feb 21, 2005 at 01:01:16 PM PST

              [ Parent ]

              •  i wholeheartedly agree (none)
                when the economy melts, rather is
                pushed over the edge by bush, all
                his cronies will have gotten out
                of the stock market. Martial law
                will be declared, 'TO PROTECT
                THE PRESIDENCY' and that will be
                the death knell of the U S of A.
                 
          •  I know how you feel (none)
            I've been there.  Remember that your actions affect others as well, especially those who love and care about you.  At the very least, you have friends here.  Also, you are obviously an intelligent and caring person and I don't doubt that you have a lot to contribute to society.  To deny yourself to the world would be wrong.  There IS joy in life, no matter what your situation is.  There is real beauty in this world.  I don't mean to sound preachy and I wouldn't blame you for not listening to me since you don't know me, but like I said, I've been there.  
            •  Thanks Andy (none)
              I appreciate it, the world IS a beautiful place, but there are a lot of not so beautiful people in it. The only thing that keeps me going is the fact that there are some like me that haven't gone over to the dark side. It pains me every day to see what some dark souls are doing to this world. As for family, I've got a spouse, two children out there who I have no contact with and a bunch of mostly rich Republican siblings (the one who isn't rich is an unemployed Rush Limbaugh fan).

              "Things will not calm down Dr. Jackson, they will, in fact, calm up!" - Tilk, Stargate SG-1

              by 2care4others on Mon Feb 21, 2005 at 01:08:22 PM PST

              [ Parent ]

      •  oh and just to clarify... (4.00)
        I used "fearless in the face of death" in a poetic sense, a play off of the diarist's comment that HST was utterly fearless. But I must say, the guy knew and embraced the dark side of life and so I doubt if he went cowering into his death.

        "Washed my face in the rivers of empire..."--Sunken Waltz by Calexico

        by pacific city on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 08:59:34 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  Suicide is for the weak. (1.00)
        Some people are too weak to live. In my opinion the strong are the ones who accept the responsibility of life.

        The single most critical issue of the Democratic party Support Living Wages

        by Lucian on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 09:43:32 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Some people (none)
          may simply be curious
          •  or may be in such intense physical (4.00)
            or psychological pain that the only relief is death. Can we fault someone for ending it, if that is the case?

            "Washed my face in the rivers of empire..."--Sunken Waltz by Calexico

            by pacific city on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 09:57:27 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  I agree (none)
              that fault should never factor into it...but I still disagree with the 1 that you gave above...he/  she is entitled to that opinion... I suppsoe
              •  entitled yes... (4.00)
                a 1 won't hide a comment. But it seemed very disrespectful in a memorial thread. Lucian has no idea why HST committed suicide. Maybe he was in great pain due to terminal illness. Lucian's comment, in this case, was inappropriate.

                "Washed my face in the rivers of empire..."--Sunken Waltz by Calexico

                by pacific city on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 10:15:49 PM PST

                [ Parent ]

            •  my belief (none)
              "fans" can't blame them... but sons and brothers, daughters, wives, these people can blame him.  We can only enjoy his works as works.

              but then again, it's hard not to search for meaning in it.

              Now Hunter was wild and not nec. someone you'd want to hang out with because he was really as chaotic as his writing suggests (aka "genuine" :), and yet I figured he was really quite far away from the edge and I have no idea what drove him to this after a life of writing a kind of fiction unique to him while still part of a historical cultural under-trend of the bohemian, the beat.  Plus, his analysis of the depravity of character was always so cynically clear it seems like he had it handled.  But like many artists that know... they still can be overcome.

              But then I have to return to the part of my that realizes we don't know Hunter's personal condition... for all we know Hunter had a bad back and couldn't stand the pain (as you suggest)...

              I don't think suicide is automatically morally wrong... but it weak.  That's not to say that someone should be faulted for all their weaknesses either.

              •  I take issue with the wording... (4.00)
                ...whenever suicide rears it's tragic head.

                One commits a crime.

                One commits murder.

                Suicide is not a crime.

                One does not commit suicide.

                Hunter S Thompson killed himself, he took action in order to stop himself from living.

                No crime, no committing of the dastardly act of suicide.

                That is unless you're all rabid followers of Biblical Law, in that case then I guess suicide is an crime one commits.

                I disagree, the Bible ain't my source of law and it sure as shit wasn't HST's either.

                Suicide is a deeply personal act, leave it that way.

                "We need to get back to basics and start listening to people from outside Washington." - Howard Dean

                by deafmetal on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 10:40:41 PM PST

                [ Parent ]

                •  I think I agree with your sentiment (4.00)
                  but while it is a personal act, like all acts it is done in our world and bears a lot of thought and rethought.
                  •  Absolutely. (4.00)
                    Re-reading my post there is a flippant edge that I wouldn't want to overpower the point.

                    Suicide is serious.

                    "We need to get back to basics and start listening to people from outside Washington." - Howard Dean

                    by deafmetal on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 11:12:41 PM PST

                    [ Parent ]

                    •  Alcoholism (none)
                      Alcoholism is an incurable, progressive, fatal illness.  Suicide is always a tragedy, no matter how you strain to couch it in noble terms, and it is nearly inevitable in chronic alcoholics.

                      For Hunter Thompson, the maddness is finally over.  For people who admire and emulate his lifestyle, the gun awaits...  

                •  One also commits acts of mercy. (none)
                  "committed suicide" is proper English usage, regardless of what you think of it.  "killed himself" doesn't establish that it's intentional.
                •  Commitment (none)
                  One also commits to a course of action, commits oneself to a person, commits a fact to memory.

                  But, hey, don't let your ignorance of English get in the way of a tendentious analogy.  Carry on.

                  Invisible airwaves crackle with life, ripe antennae bristle with the energy

                  by Ernest Tomlinson on Mon Feb 21, 2005 at 08:17:14 AM PST

                  [ Parent ]

              •  bleah (4.00)
                we're all "weak" past a certain point.  But it's a hell of a negative judgment to pass on someone who just lost the battle of his life.  A little compassion would be more in order than a discussion of how suicide is "weak".
                •  I have compassion (none)
                  Don't get me wrong on this. My goal is not to attack or insult the man. My goal is to voice my opinion on suicide.

                  The single most critical issue of the Democratic party Support Living Wages

                  by Lucian on Mon Feb 21, 2005 at 06:57:05 AM PST

                  [ Parent ]

                  •  Well, then (none)
                    perhaps you should write a diary about your "opinion on suicide".  This is not the place.  Let people whose lives were shaped by HST's writing have a place to grieve.

                    Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy. B. Franklin

                    by khowell on Mon Feb 21, 2005 at 07:27:20 AM PST

                    [ Parent ]

                  •  asdf (none)
                    Your "opinion" of suicide seems to be based on not much more than a stunning ignorance of the subject. Try reading a layman's study of suicide like Kay Redfield Jamison's Night Falls Fast. Compassion would seem to require some sort of knowledge and understanding and I don't see evidence of that in your original post.
                  •  Luckily, (none)
                    the successful suicide is safely beyond your know-nothing preachments. Only the grieving can hear you.

                    So tell me, how would you have a suicide's survivors deal with his or her grief? How would you have HST's son carry on? Should he think of his father as WRONG and WEAK? Would you suggest he work himself up into a lather of judgment, talk his father down, blame him, disavow him, negate his life and his work and just beat on him beat on him beat on him every day forever? What does one DO with your fault finding? What do you do with it? Does it have a constructive application? I'm not seeing one.

                    Is nothing secular?

                    by aitchdee on Mon Feb 21, 2005 at 09:39:43 AM PST

                    [ Parent ]

                    •  What I think (none)
                       What I think has nothing to do with what he would think. If my father did that to me then I'd be upset with my father for doing that unless my father were in extreme pain.

                      The single most critical issue of the Democratic party Support Living Wages

                      by Lucian on Mon Feb 21, 2005 at 10:11:11 AM PST

                      [ Parent ]

                    •  The purpose of finding fault (none)
                      Is to make it aware to anyone that suicide hurts many people. That suicide should be avoided in just about every situation, and to counter the views here that suicide is courage or that it somehow makes a person strong to do that.

                      The single most critical issue of the Democratic party Support Living Wages

                      by Lucian on Mon Feb 21, 2005 at 10:13:37 AM PST

                      [ Parent ]

                      •  but do you think (none)
                        your admonishments help anyone? As a depressive myself (medicated, doing well) I can tell you your remonstrations, if I'd heard them a year ago, could have been just the thing to put me over the edge.

                        I'm forty. I've been depressed all my life, all through childhood, young adulthood, right up through my thirty-ninth year. I have an above average IQ and other humble gifts (mostly artistic) but I've never achieved much professionally or academically; the "noonday demon" hung  forever overhead, making it hard at first and impossible as time went on to proceed normally through life's expected passages.

                        My father was like you--one strong mofo. When I was nineteen I started having panic attacks. I went to the doctor, was given medication, and wow, it helped a lot. But when I told my dad he said, "You don't need pills. No one in this family takes pills for their problems. Stop thinking about yourself all the time. Feel sorry for people who've have real problems. Now dump those pills in the toilet and flush 'em." And so I did. I limped along for another two decades in considerable psychic agony, underachieving, mortified. Not a birthday or a Christmas passed without my father weighing in with criticism and disappointment for my failures. I embarrassed him.

                        In 2002 I broke. I walked off my job because I couldn't stop crying. I had to go on disability. I had to start on medication again--heavier-duty stuff this time. I had to see a therapist--the disgrace of the century to hear my dad tell it (I felt disgraced at first myself; I absolutely bought into the guilt). What did my father say to me that day on the phone in July 2003 when I told him I was coming unglued? "There are no suicides in this family." What a moronic, unhelpful cliche from an otherwise intelligent man. But that was all he had to say to his only daughter who was clearly fighting for her life. A kind word would have meant so much. At that point he was so disgusted with me he severed all ties. I wasn't doing particularly well but I was trying very hard. His decision to abandon me at my weakest nearly killed me.

                        My father was diagnosed with cancer in 2003 died shortly thereafter. He chose not to reconcile with me before he passed away; didn't call, didn't write, had nothing to say. I heard from my stepmom he'd said I had neither the sense of propriety nor the moral rectitude to take care of my problems "in private" without "broadcasting my impairments to the world." He wondered what on earth he had done wrong raising me (my problems an everlasting reflection upon him). My family's values: you're hanging on by nary a fingernail but don't you dare speak of it, don't seek help, don't indulge in unnecessary gut-spilling sessions with a therapist, don't let your doctors etch psychotropic med prescriptions into your permanent medical record where someone might see it. If it got out the neighbors might look askance. A nurse you'll never see again might think ill. Don't rest, don't take care, don't confront the problem--if you're "feeling down" the best prescription is to take on MORE responsibility, MORE work, MORE frustration. Stay busy. Think of others. And be sure to talk to yourself as cruelly as possible. Remind yourself daily what a weakling you are for feeling bad to begin with. That's "strength."

                        My father was so strong. He never cried. The only time he came close to tears was when Bobby Kennedy was shot, but he caught himself, slapped himself around and was never seen being such a pussy again. He died a stoic and, from all accounts an exquisitely dignified death. He couldn't see me because it would have been "an emotional scene." Perhaps he meant he might have cried. Well thank God that calamity was averted. What an accomplishment.

                        Is nothing secular?

                        by aitchdee on Mon Feb 21, 2005 at 12:46:34 PM PST

                        [ Parent ]

                        •  That is understandable (none)
                          And I apologize if I've upset anyone. However we must speak out against suicide. No one else on this forum was willing to do it, and while I may not be the best with words, I feel someone needed to speak out against it.

                          The single most critical issue of the Democratic party Support Living Wages

                          by Lucian on Mon Feb 21, 2005 at 01:33:33 PM PST

                          [ Parent ]

                          •  apology accepted but, (none)
                            if anyone should confide in you a suicidal feeling, if you don't want to make the situation infinitely worse, do not bust out with all the shame and blame stuff. If you can't be gentle, call 911 and stay quiet until help arrives. Inasmuch as you feel it was your duty to take a stand against suicide, I feel it is mine to inform you that your methods could in fact cause one. Take heed.

                            Is nothing secular?

                            by aitchdee on Mon Feb 21, 2005 at 02:31:22 PM PST

                            [ Parent ]

                          •  The key is that suicide needs to be understood (none)
                            Suicide needs to be extremely rare, but people need to plan for their death and suicide is an option that needs to be understood within that context.

                            There are very few situations (if any) in which an otherwise healthy person should ever consider suicide seriously, and should always be discussed with others - discussed non-judgmentally.

                            Age and illness change the calculus. Only competent people with full knowledge of the existing facts should be permitted to be judgmental on the subject. People should understand what the options are for their death and prepare for it. Within that context, suicide should be understood and rare. Forbidding it absolutely simply limits the number of people someone considering suicide can allow themselves to talk to, and cutting off communication at that time can lead to unnecessary or premature suicide.

                            Update: There are Lies, Damned Liars and FOX News.' Politics Plus Stuff

                            by Rick B on Mon Feb 21, 2005 at 02:39:00 PM PST

                            [ Parent ]

                        •  I have a father like this (none)
                          My hat is off to you, HD
                •  the word "weak" (none)
                  >we're all "weak" past a certain point.  

                  certainly

                  >But it's a hell of a negative judgment to pass on someone who just lost the battle of his life.  

                  sorry you feel that way, I think weakness is a part of the equation.  I feel it's fine to mention this, I think the problem with mentioning this has little to do with suicide, it's because of this idea that being weak is a moral failing... when as you just said we are all weak.  Being pulled out to sea by a tsunami is because you were weaker than the waves, and there is no judgmentalism than that.  What waves pulled Hunter under?  Only that would lead to some kind of judgemental idea that he was "too weak"...etc...

                  >A little compassion would be more in order than a discussion of how suicide is "weak".

                  If I were to characterize what suicide is in just a word or two like that, I'd say it is a "personal decision".

                  •  yeah (none)
                    I basically agree with that.  I think caution is warranted though because if a description is limited to "weak" then without hefty disclaimers, then it can too easily reinforce others views that being weak is, you know, weak.  As in a bad thing.
                    •  yes (none)
                      I try to careful.

                      I have thought a lot about suicide and in fact think it's THE fundamental philosophical answer.  I know this is radical, but I think every introspective thinker owes themselves to think through suicide without moral blinders on.

                      To ask, "Is my life worth living" is really, in my narrow personal philosophy (not telling others how to think here), the only way to answer "yes, it is".

                      For those that answer "no, it isn't"... that's just a personal tragedy, and in this case, also a cultural one.

            •  Yes (1.00)
              All of us are miserable, only the weak ignore their responsibilities in life and quit. The guy had a son! He was a journalist! He had a MANY responsibilities in life. He was valueable to society and because of his own selfishness he quit being a father, he abandoned his job and the fans of his work.

              I'm sorry but I do not respect those who commit suicide. Suicide is a as selfish of an act as a human can commit.

              The single most critical issue of the Democratic party Support Living Wages

              by Lucian on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 11:37:30 PM PST

              [ Parent ]

              •  lucian (4.00)
                I just find this so ridiculous.  How could someone's motivations be selfish if the act results in no self to do the taking?  This isn't about their ego, it's obviously about your sense of entitlement.
                •  Many people (none)
                  many people close to them are harmed in a suicide. Now, if it turns out this man was dying anyway then I feel sorry for him and his family and I'll be more understanding. If it's just a suicide however, I see that as selfish. I believe everyone who is alive has certain responsibilities or reasons to live. Their families, their friends, even their jobs. When someone commits suicide everyone is hurt by this. It simply passes whatever pain they were feeling when they commit suicide on to many other people, and now many others will be depressed. Perhaps hundreds or even thousands of people. This is why I say its irresponsible.

                  If a person has to commit suicide like this then yes they owe an explaination to the fans, their family, their co-workers and everyone who cared about them.

                  The single most critical issue of the Democratic party Support Living Wages

                  by Lucian on Mon Feb 21, 2005 at 07:16:34 AM PST

                  [ Parent ]

              •  Lucian, (4.00)
                you are so completely and profoundly ignorant about suicide.

                You should try to learn something about the subject.  

                Bush's presidency is now inextricably yoked to the policies of aggression and subjugation. Mike Whitney

                by dfarrah on Mon Feb 21, 2005 at 06:26:14 AM PST

                [ Parent ]

              •  self-righteousness - arranged marriage ego + truth (none)
                one may speak of another's ego and be seen as forgetting he drives a similar model.  i do and i aim to try to minimize it here but it seems lucian's issue on this thread is selfishness.  

                in this context, to assert once that suicide is wrong because it's a selfish act is understandable.  but don't you see the ultimate selfishness in taking itad nauseum and the hypocrisy you make evident in doing so?

                who knows his reasons, none of us here is able to make the claim.  but making oneself a little god as evident in knowing the truth to the point of browbeating a crowd of mourners seems pretty damn selfish.  if you're unable to allow that circumstances arise leading a person to act differently than you would -- and it means they're weak -- it must mean that you're a closer relative to god than are the rest of us.  handing down this one of the commandments from the mount to the grieving throng is permissible since truth is more important than sorrow and you've been licensed to convey that truth to us.

                strength is right and good.  conversely, your categorical claim here that HST's suicide is selfish, weak and, so, bad betrays the seeming arrogation of omniscience most humans make available only to god.  

                beyond that selfishness motivates most/all(?) human action (is there any action that entirely excludes i want from the chain of thinking or emotion leading to that act?!), just what makes it weak/bad?  

                that it's not something a god would do?  sure, leaving others behind grieving the loss is a very sad thing and certainly includes an i want in its selfish motivation.  but arrogant self-righteousness is your knowledge of all circumstances that could lead someone to create that loss joined to the license you have taken to hammer that truth home here.  one statement is opinion (imho!), that you'd repeat it so makes you preacher.  that seems pretty damn selfish.

                I'm sorry but I do not respect those who commit suicide. Suicide is a as selfish of an act as a human can commit.

                please pardon me for the implied harshness but i find it difficult to accept the unwillingness of another to stop sermonizing from the mount in this context.  

        •  Utter Bollocks! (3.33)
          "Some people are too weak to live"

          Isn't that what Bush says about middle easterners?

          "We need to get back to basics and start listening to people from outside Washington." - Howard Dean

          by deafmetal on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 10:33:03 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  No (none)
            Thats what Darwin says. Anyway my main reason for using that meme was to counter the "Suicide is strength" meme that others by accident posted.

            Suicide is weakness not strength.

            The single most critical issue of the Democratic party Support Living Wages

            by Lucian on Mon Feb 21, 2005 at 10:15:14 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  You really like your black and white ... (none)
              ... analogies don't you lucian?

              Perhaps you'd be better off hanging out here.

              The world just ain't the way you see it son.

              Better learn to deal with it, before it deals with you.

              Don't let the door hit you on your way out...

              "We need to get back to basics and start listening to people from outside Washington." - Howard Dean

              by deafmetal on Mon Feb 21, 2005 at 11:20:08 AM PST

              [ Parent ]

            •  Suicide is termination (none)
              It is not necessarily either weakness or strength. It is merely the end for that person, and a major event for his significant others.

              Suicide is a choice. It requires a decision. Whether the decision is a good one or a bad one is a very different issue. If you can't make good decisions, suicide isn't one that should be taken because it is termination of all future choices and learning and love.

              And you mischaracterize what Darwin said.

              Update: There are Lies, Damned Liars and FOX News.' Politics Plus Stuff

              by Rick B on Mon Feb 21, 2005 at 02:48:38 PM PST

              [ Parent ]

        •  FUCK YOU! (3.57)
          As usual, you don't know one fucking thing about what you're saying.

          SHUT UP!

        •  this is a highly inappropriate thing to post (4.00)
          on a memorial thread.

          But I'm not going to come down hard on you because this comment just about confirms that you are some kid who has yet to get a clue.

          for future reference: it is disrespectful to say this kind of thing in the presence of mourners on the very day that someone they care about has taken his life.

          It shows a lack of respect for the person who is gone, a lack of respect to those in mourning, and a lack of respect for yourself that you would be caught tossing off something so insensitive in a public forum like this.

          Grow up and learn some common decency.

          Politics is like driving. To go backward, put it in R. To go forward, put it in D.

          by TrueBlueMajority on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 10:45:21 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

        •  I'm not a fan of social Darwinism (3.75)
          It's quite conceivable to me that people whom I'd consider strong could opt for suicide for many reasons - unbearable pain and/or the prospect for that pain to continue or possibly worsen indefinitely, terminal illness, etc. I can easily imagine contexts in which suicide could be viewed as rational and responsible. In any event, whatever his motivation, he'll be missed.
        •  What a stud you are (4.00)
          How can someone so concerned with the living wage of people be so oblivious to the mind set leading to suicide? One trick poney?

          "the prophet is a fool, the spiritual man is mad... for the multitude of thine inequity, and the Great Hatred" - violent femmes

          by Tirge Caps on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 11:38:45 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

        •  Sometimes ... (4.00)
          People have good reason to not want to live any longer, and it is not our place to judge.

          But of course, such a simple and obvious truth seems to have escaped you. As do most simple and obvious truths ...

          I can only assume that you know nothing of the Good Doctor, for if you did, you'd know that the man had no fear. "Weak" wasn't in him.

          You, on the other hand, lad, are, as far as I've been able to discern, are an ass, unadulterated.

        •  Not exactly a smart comment (none)
          I can think of several things to call the good doctor, but "weak" wasn't one of them. He suffered through a lot of physical pain, had ungodly amounts of titanium in his body, dared to do things that earned him the animosity of far too many, and kept right on doing it.

          Who are we to judge what caused him to quit the game (if indeed he has committed suicide). It might have been a whim that turned deadly, it might have been pphysical pain, it might have even been that he felt the Fear had grown too great in the country, that there was nothing left for him.

          I will give the good doctor the benefit of the doubt and presume that this was a stupid, tragic accident until I know more.

          This post is best understood if you look at the fnords first.

          by Saint Fnordius on Mon Feb 21, 2005 at 01:46:13 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

        •  dude. really, fuck you. (3.86)
          i know i'm probably inviting all kinds of hell here and i most certainly deserve to be troll rated for this because what i'm about to say is mean spirited and a vicious personal slander. but, hey, fuck you.

          i have been unfortunate enough to know a few folks who have chosen for one reason or another to take their own lives. a cousin, a former business partner, a former lover, a hero or two. all i have to say is this: does suicide leave all those left behind to pick up the pieces and try to make sense of it all? you bet. it sucks ass. no fun at all.

          that being said, should the time ever come for me, i shan't hesitate. not for a minute. look, im an athiest, a liberal and a total fucking libertarian on this issue. i don't feel i should have to explain to either a god or a government that i feel that it may be time to check the fuck out. i have no idea what the particulars of this situation are. and while i am beyond saddened to learn that such a fierce and eloquent voice has been silenced, i will say this with all the sincerity i can currently muster, "if the good doctor, for whatever reason, had decided that it's time to check out, than i will not second guess him." was it chronic pain, was it despair at our current political situation, was it a terminal condition we have no idea about? who knows? and, you know what? i don't fucking care. that decision was up to HST himself and i feel that i have to respect that decision as much as i can, because to do any differently would be such an affront to basically everything he had ever fucking written or said, that it would render meaningless anything i could possibly conjure.

          while i would certainly want both my family and my friends to understand (in fact, i would imagine that i would have to explain to at least a few folks why i felt that this may be a perfectly rational option) i feel that ultimately the decision would be mine and mine alone. i reserve the right to check out at anytime i feel i should. period. i hope that never happens, but i refuse to cede that decision to someone else's god, the government or anyone who isn't experiencing the chronic pain or terminal status that i hopefully will never encounter. period.

          oh, and, fuck you again.

          Left Is Port, Right Is Starboard.

          by lipris on Mon Feb 21, 2005 at 01:46:44 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  selfishness (1.25)
            If you have family that depend upon you and you decide to "check out any time you want to", it's a pretty cowardly and irresponsible act IMO.  This is the irony of people who kill themselves... it's the ultimate act of selfishness.  That notwithstanding a situation where you're better off dead, and your family may be as well, but I don't think that was the case with Thompson.  He probably arbitrarily did it and now his family is going to endure additional emotional suffering because of his irresponsibility.  Then again, if there was one thing he was known for, it was shirking responsibility, so it makes sense that HST would go out this way.  But in any case, I don't think suicide should ever be considered a noble way to go.
        •  maybe (none)
          they believe in god.

          cowards like george bush and dick cheney say they believe in god, but they don't act like it. they run from battle and they have no scruples- there can't be an afterlife in their minds.

        •  You have simplified this thought on 'life', Lucian (4.00)
          to the level of a simplified insult.  Very troubling.  I am thinking that you are either very young or very cold hearted.  I hope you can rethink this statement and apologize.

          Some very great people have committed suicide - a fact that I would have to believe is not lost on you...

          Are you suggesting here that Hunter was weak?  He wrote and lived bravely (and don't try and fool yourself and think what he did didn't take any courage...) We may never know why he chose what he did, but is was, undoubtedly, NOT because he was too weak to live.

          And Lucian - if you stand by this statement, well, I guess I'll feel sorry for you.

        •  Some people make judgements (4.00)
          about others that they are not competent to make. You are one of them, Lucian.

          Shut up.

          Update: There are Lies, Damned Liars and FOX News.' Politics Plus Stuff

          by Rick B on Mon Feb 21, 2005 at 04:41:56 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

        •  None of us can know (4.00)
          what another person's reality is.  We think that what we know of ourselves is true of everyone. Maybe it is, but how on earth would we know? Doctors know that we all experience physical pain differently -- what's tolerable to most of us is unbearable to some. So we must be careful when we make judgements about others based on our own experiences.

          "We're all of us prisoners inside our own skins, sentenced to solitary confinement for life." -- Tenesee Williams

          For it is your business when the wall next door catches fire. --Horace

          by marylrgn on Mon Feb 21, 2005 at 07:40:06 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

        •  Jeez dude ... (none)
          Emphathize much?
        •  you, sir, are an ass (4.00)
          Otherwise, you need to use your brain before you blurt out something.  Your comment is horribly ignorant and offensive to anyone who has seen the suicide of a loved one or contemplated it themselves.  Furthermore, as I think someone has said, this is totally inappropriate for a memorial page.  If you didn't have your head up your ass, you would know that Thompson was NOT weak.  This was a man who knew real pain, and anyone who has read his books can vouch for the fact that it wasn't life's hardships that drove him to it.  I am certainly not endorsing suicide for anyone, but looking at it from HST's somewhat warped perspective, it was simply his time.  As he said, according to someone on this thread, "I've done my part.  Now you do yours."
      •  I would be one of those who has said it (none)
        takes courage.  I had three friends from my early years, in a rather bleak hometown which seems to have a notoriously high suicide rate to this day, who shot themselves in the head before they were thirty.  One, I never quite knew the reason for, one had been sexually abused by her father, the other had apparently not been able to deal with the response when he acknowledged he was gay after keeping it secret unti shortly before he died.

        When I try to put myself in their shoes, the word courage comes to my mind as to what it takes to shoot yourself in the head, that's just my opinion though.

        What an excellent day for an Exorcism.... Social Security THERE IS NO CRISIS!

        by DianeL on Mon Feb 21, 2005 at 03:19:38 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  By the way, this certainly isn't an endorsement, (none)
          and it's certainly not a condemnation, it's just being honest about the fact the word courage comes to my mind without being summoned.

          What an excellent day for an Exorcism.... Social Security THERE IS NO CRISIS!

          by DianeL on Mon Feb 21, 2005 at 03:54:41 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  don't worry (none)
            what you said is true (see my own post uphill). i apreciate it when people say the truth.
            •  Dear Heterodoxy (none)
              Thank you, for pointing that out.  I think overall as a society, when we blink at injustice and cruelty, we are complicit in misery and therefore not in a position to make a judgement on someone who can no longer bear to live.

              What an excellent day for an Exorcism.... Social Security THERE IS NO CRISIS!

              by DianeL on Mon Feb 21, 2005 at 11:40:21 AM PST

              [ Parent ]

          •  courage (none)
            I do not know how you define courage, but your view of it certainly does not match up with any understanding I have of the word.

            In suicidal situations, the obstacle to overcome is the thing that is driving you to kill yourself.  Not the thing that is trying to keep you alive.

            In fact, even considering the act of suicide as something that "guts" or courage makes me sick to my stomach.

            In my experience of dealing with those close to me, suicidal thoughts are not constructed.  They come unbidden and feel like an attack.  Many expend every ounce of their soul in trying to ward it off, and lose anyway.  I see it as more of a demon.  It overtakes some people.  In most suicides, the person is a victim.  Their action is neither to be condemned nor honored.  They are victims of a tragedy.  It has nothing to do with courage.

            I mean no attack on you.  It is a common misunderstanding, but I feel that I know it to be a misunderstanding, and a damaging one, at that.

            •  I do understand your point of view, (none)
              Nonetheless, as I said, the word comes unsummoned.

              I've known people, who via thier life experience, find the world to be a lonely, heartbreaking, many times vile, experience and they want to die.

              On the other hand I've known people, as you have, who find that a demon has come, unbidden, in that circumstance, I agree with what you say.

              What an excellent day for an Exorcism.... Social Security THERE IS NO CRISIS!

              by DianeL on Mon Feb 21, 2005 at 11:01:01 AM PST

              [ Parent ]

        •  I see selfishness in suicide, not courage. (1.33)
          I think for healthy individuals there are much more honorable ways to die than by your own hands. Joining the military, becoming a hero police officer, dying as a fireman in 911, theres many ways to die.

          Suicide is not an act of courage in my opinion, its an act of fear and weakness. You have a right to believe its courage, but give it some more thought. I think it takes more courage to live a life of misery than to commit suicide.

          I think the majority (perhaps not all) who commit suicide had better options. Even if this were simply better options on how to die. Dying saving lives is an example. Who's life do you save in a suicide? Unless you are sick and have a terminal illness I think its wrong.

          The single most critical issue of the Democratic party Support Living Wages

          by Lucian on Mon Feb 21, 2005 at 07:08:54 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  That's your right Lucien, (none)
            and I responded to it in another post on this page.  Myself, I can't bring myself to make that judgement call, perhaps because I've lived longer than you.

            I know more than a few, who would probably never consider it, and hold it in contempt, some of them never really give a thought to others, aside from contempt and judgement.

            It's easy to not be blindingly depressed when the only concerns and understanding a person has is for their incredibly, small world.  Ignorance is bliss, that saying has lasted a long time, and there's a very good reason why it has.

            I'm not saying you fit that type, I'm just saying, just because a person wouldn't consider it, doesn't make them more courageous than someone who has.

            I have an uncle, who was in the 2nd wave at Normandy, and in the liberation at Dauchau.  He was an incredible artist, but always lived at the poverty level.  When he was set up to go on Dialysis at age 70, he decided if he could paint no further with the shunt in his arm, he would call it a day, and that's what he did, he opted out of the Dialysis.  You Lucien, could talk yourself blue in the face until the world stopped spinning, yet never convince me that my Uncle lacked courage.  He was one of the kindest people I ever knew.

            Lastly, there are millions of people who commit suicide, for you to claim knowledge of their options, makes you appear very, very young and unexperienced.

            What an excellent day for an Exorcism.... Social Security THERE IS NO CRISIS!

            by DianeL on Mon Feb 21, 2005 at 11:21:18 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

    •  Fearless yes, but... (none)
      He committed suicide. So does his committing suicide mean he feared life more than he feared death? That is a very sad thing, if that was the case.


      More importantly it is totally out of character.  If anything could push HST to suicide, I'd like to know what it could have been.  It seems very hard to believe that HST would suicide.  Not even in a moment of weakness.  Me, I could understand, but not him, he was such a better man than I. [No sexism intended].


      There must be more to the story than this.

      Truckle the Uncivil, Nullus Anxietas Sanguinae

      by Truckle on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 11:42:10 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Confirmed on Yahoo News (4.00)

    Fight the American Taliban

    by pontificator on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 08:25:39 PM PST

  •  RIP (4.00)
    May he rest in peace

    Evan Bayh 2008
    Miller for KY Governor 2007
    http://kydem.blogspot.com

    by dsolzman on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 08:25:41 PM PST

  •  I'll Lift a drink (4.00)
    and smoke a bowl

    With a big ol' lie And a flag and a pie And a mom and a bible Most folks are just liable To buy any line Any place, any time ~ FZ

    by f furney on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 08:26:19 PM PST

  •  Godfather of Gonzo (4.00)
    Man, this is sad.

    Rest in peace, Hunter.

    I just found this:


    Fear and Loathing in Houston

    Let the great world spin for ever down the ringing grooves of change. - Tennyson

    by bumblebums on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 08:26:56 PM PST

    •  Ah, yes, that was HST, eh? (4.00)
      "I'm not a regular sports writer. You gonna let me in your pool?" he said. I recognized him as Hunter Thompson, whom I had read was covering that Super Bowl for Rolling Stone.

      "Only if you've got a buck," I told him. He assured me he had, so I told him to record his entry on the board.

      "How about more than one pick, under different names?" he said. All of a sudden it dawned on me that this was a guy who was going out of his way to seek rejection from authority figures, and that's what I, of all people, must have represented to him.

      "A buck a pick," I told him. "Make 'em good names."

      He liked that. A fellow outlaw. None of his picks came close, and when his piece came out, he had done a real hatchet job on the writers, "Rozelle's hand maidens," he called them, except for yours truly. "Paul Zimmerman of the New York Post handled the writers' handicapping pool in a professional manner," he wrote.

      "...psychopaths have little difficulty infiltrating the domains of...politics, law enforcement, (and) government." Dr. Robert Hare

      by RubDMC on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 09:35:47 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  We lay belly down on the floor (none)
    reading "we had just left Barstow. . ." from Rolling Stone magazine

    ether fumes

    as your attorney

    want to buy some SCAG?????

    corners like a Lotus Elan

    tamborine man

  •  Called Bush the "syphilis" President (4.00)
    In November, Dr. Thompson said:

    "Four more years of George Bush will be like four more years of syphilis," the famed author said yesterday at a hastily called press conference near his home in Woody Creek, Colorado. "Only a fool or a sucker would vote for a dangerous loser like Bush," Dr. Thompson warned.

    •  I wonder if Bush's relection (none)
      Was a contributing factor in this. The guy's had problems for years, but he held on. Maybe Bush's reelection was when he lost site of the light at the end of the tunnel.

      How much will you lose with Bush's Social Security plan? Click to find out.

      by Goldfish on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 08:36:00 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  I had the same thought... (none)
        see my reply to Maryscott.

        "Washed my face in the rivers of empire..."--Sunken Waltz by Calexico

        by pacific city on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 08:36:52 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  Well, suicide is complicated. (none)
        Somehow I doubt Bush had much to do with it. Perhaps he added another layer to his depression, and certainly his re-election made most of us depressed.

        Thompson was a pretty intense man, and the artistic temperament has driven many to suicide. Probably best not to guess reasons why.

        I bet he left his family a letter.

        In the midst of life we are in debt, etc.

        by ablington on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 08:48:30 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  Probably not (none)
        Somebody who followed the Hell's Angels around and got his ass kicked by them, then went on the campaign trail with Richard Nixon isn't going to kill himself over politics.
        •  It's not just "politics" (4.00)
          Its losing faith in your fellow human beings. Losing faith in democracy. Losing Hope for the future.

          I can easily see how someone who tended toward depression anyway could get to that point with the things that are going on now.

          •  From someone who has... (none)
            Its losing faith in your fellow human beings. Losing faith in democracy. Losing Hope for the future.

            I answer you because I have done precisely that.

            I can easily see how someone who tended toward depression anyway could get to that point with the things that are going on now.

            I more than 'tend to'.  I don't work because of it.  But, no, it doesn't work.  I can't see it.  You are talking about Hunter S. Thompson, not someone like you or me.  If nothing else, pure hate would have kept him alive and kicking (out at them).  And even were I wrong do you not think that he would have arranged some blow, some glory from it?


            Hunter S. Thompson would go out with a bang not a whimper.


            There has been no immediate detonation.  Things look very suspect to me.

            Truckle the Uncivil, Nullus Anxietas Sanguinae

            by Truckle on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 11:57:07 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  Late Reply (none)
              Don't you imagine there's a difference between the HST he presented to the world -- and the man he really was? For most of us, there is but with him I think there was a real element of theatre and performance and that the difference was much greater than most.

              Sometimes people just get sick and tired of being <insert famous name here>.

          •  We all lost faith (1.50)
            I don't think thats reason enough to commit suicide.

            Either some piece to this puzzle is missing, or you guys are wrong about this guy being fearless and strong.

            The single most critical issue of the Democratic party Support Living Wages

            by Lucian on Mon Feb 21, 2005 at 12:24:39 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

      •  or: (none)
        the light BEFORE the end of the tunnel.

        RIP, Duke.

        A society of sheep must beget in time a government of wolves. Bertrand de Jouvenel

        by Little Red Hen on Mon Feb 21, 2005 at 08:52:56 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

    •  Wow! Thanks, I was looking for that (none)

      To thine own self be true - W.S.

      by Agathena on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 08:43:47 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  That's terribly sad. I was just thinking about how (4.00)
    great he was the other day. This always seems to happen. Back in 1997, I had a strange and overwhelming urge to buy a copy of Allen Ginsberg's collected poems, so I went downtown to the Union Square Barnes and Ignoble and picked up a copy. After sitting up reading it half the night, I woke up the next morning and learned that he had died the night before unexpectedly. In any event, if its true we've lost a giant and iconoclast.

    "If no one seems to understand / Start your own revolution and cut out the middleman" Billy Bragg

    by spot on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 08:29:13 PM PST

  •  asdf (4.00)

    "I told them on Inauguration Day. I said look into my eyes: no new enhancements." - President Johnny Gentle (Famous Crooner)

    by Johnny Gentle Famous Crooner on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 08:29:21 PM PST

  •  Photo of HST re Kerry (4.00)
    http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/O/OBIT_THOMPSON?SITE=MNBRA&SECTION=HOME

    The AP link above has photo of Hunter in Kerry motorcade.

    RIP HST.

  •  What a sad fucking day (4.00)
    There's really nothing else that can be said...

    How much will you lose with Bush's Social Security plan? Click to find out.

    by Goldfish on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 08:30:44 PM PST

  •  Holy motherfucking shit. (4.00)
    The Godfather of Gonzo.

    I read most of his seminal Rolling Stone pieces while on acid and mushrooms (not together... hmm... never tried THAT0.

    His latest crusade on behalf of the woman jailed for a murder she didn't commit -- and a murder no one SAYS she committed... Go look it up. WOuldn't fucking surprise me if the system finally got to him.

    Rage, rage, against the lying of the Right.

    by Maryscott OConnor on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 08:31:33 PM PST

  •  Farewell Hunter (4.00)
    I loved his writing and it really influenced me at a time when I needed it most.  I even have his freakpower logo as a tattoo. This is so sad. I thought he'd live to be 100, at least.

    There's no point for democracy when ignorance is celebrated...insensitivity is standard and faith is being fancied over reason.-NoFx

    by SairaLV on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 08:32:10 PM PST

  •  Can we be sure (3.66)
    That he really commited suicide? I am deeply suspicious of all the deaths of the people the neo-cons hate - like Wellstone - that have happened in the past few years.  It's so easy to fake a suicide or cause a plane crash. He was one of the great ones on our side.

    We'll probably never know.

    Come the rapture, can we have the White House?

    by MagentaMN on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 08:35:37 PM PST

  •  I wonder what he's saying to (4.00)
    Sandra Dee? Is that a strange duo to go out on the same day or what? And the superb John Raitt, father of one of the most committed activists and musicians of the past few decades, Bonnie Raitt.

    I keep thinking about when he was friends with Bill Murray. One time the were both so drunk that Hunter tied him to a chair and threw him in the pool. Bill almost drowned by the time Hunter swam in and pulled him to shore.

    That SNL special was on tonight, so I keep thinking about the SNL connection I guess. Sad.

    •  John Raitt (4.00)

      Bonnie's father was a wonderful performer.  Actually, my mom met him -- she was a dancer, briefly, after WW2.

      Anyway, I have an album John Raitt made after he was 70, Broadway tunes, a couple as duets with his terrific daughter.

      He'd lost almost nothing off one of the most wonderful baritones I ever heard.  I was a pretty good singer as a young man -- I'd like to sound as good, one day in my life, as John Raitt sounded on that album in his old age.

      RIP.

      "I did not like fascists when I fought them as a diplomat . . . and I don't like them now in my own country." (Joe Wilson)

      by proudtinfoilhat on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 08:55:14 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  John Raitt (none)
        I saw John Raitt once live touring "Shenandoah".  It's one of the reasons I rarely go to movies.  Movies are crap next to a talented performer who can make you suspend disbelief with a shrug or an arched eyebrow, even when you're in the balcony.
      •  Billy Bigelow ... (none)
        "Walk on, through the wind
        Walk on, through the rain
        Though your dreams be tossed and blown
        Walk on, walk on, with hope in your heart
        And you'll never walk alone..."

        For it is your business when the wall next door catches fire. --Horace

        by marylrgn on Mon Feb 21, 2005 at 09:51:26 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

    •  All I can think about now is (none)
      "Look at me, I'm Sandra Dee, lousy with virginity!"
  •  whoops, posted this on the copycat thread (4.00)

    We have become a Nazi monster in the eyes of the
    whole world--a nation of bullies and bastards who
    would rather kill than live peacefully. We are not
    just Whores for power and oil, but killer whores with
    hate and fear in our hearts. We are human scum, and
    that is how history will judge us...No redeeming
    social value. Just whores. Get out of our way, or
    we'll kill you.

    Who does vote for these dishonest shitheads? Who
    among us can be happy and proud of having this
    innocent blood on our hands? Who are these swine?
    These flag-sucking half-wits who get fleeced and
    fooled by stupid rich kids like George Bush?

    They are the same ones who wanted to have Muhammad Ali
    locked up for refusing to kill gooks. They speak for
    all that is cruel and stupid and vicious in the
    American character. They are the racists and hate
    mongers among us--they are the Ku Klux Klan. I piss
    down the throats of these Nazis.

    And I am too old to worry about whether they like it
    or not. Fuck them.

    -Hunter S. Thompson

  •  Hunter, the world is poorer for your absence. n/t (4.00)

    "... if you wish to know how libertarians regard the State and any of its acts, simply think of the State as a criminal band..." -- Murray Rothbard

    by bradspangler on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 08:36:32 PM PST

  •  RIP (none)

    Fight the American Taliban

    by pontificator on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 08:37:00 PM PST

  •  this is sad (4.00)
    and very strange to me, b/c I had been thinking about him lately. I had not thought about him in years, but lately with all these ex-Nixon people like Rumsfeld (and the the ex Ford/Reagan/Bush1 neocons) back in power, with their own bogus war like Vietnam, and then all the Guckert stuff (which is a HST story if ever there was one)...I was thinking just yesterday (seriously) that what's needed is the gonzo spirit of Hunter b/c the times we're in right now are returning to all the old themes of the 60s and 70s: Republican dirty tricks, a nation divided and at war, a president increasingly isolated and possibly under the influence, etc. By the way, was there not a piece by Hunter about Bush's cocaine days? I say we all light a joint, drink a bud, and think about how much we could use Hunter right now. Everything going on in American politics right now is due to some unresolved questions about the 1960s: the decade more than any other that the Republicans hate. Here's to Hunter, the inventor of gonzo journalism!
    •  [OT] You may just have a point here... (4.00)
      Please forgive me all of you but when I got this news (and I got it here) I did what a number of people have suggested, so I shall make this my last post tonight...

      Everything going on in American politics right now is due to some unresolved questions about the 1960s: the decade more than any other that the Republicans hate

      "Whatever happened to the revolution?"    
         Well, it seems to me that things started getting better (for one thing gays could come out of the closet) so we took it easy.  We thought we had won.  We made a mistake that we should not have made.  The Founding Fathers knew about that one.  We forgot that the fight for freedom is ongoing and so we quit and just got on with our lives.  In the meantime our enemies, our antithesis planned and enacted plans.

      Now we are behind the 8-ball.  We are more 'observed' than ever before.  We can't throw dead rats over the White House fence anymore.  We are in a losing position at a time when any of us can be made to disappear.

      All because we thought we had 'won'.  HST knew better and we let it be.  All our fault.  The real problem here now is not that it is too late for anything except blood on the streets but it is probably too late for even blood on the streets to work.

      Truckle the Uncivil, Nullus Anxietas Sanguinae

      by Truckle on Mon Feb 21, 2005 at 12:20:37 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  We (none)
        rested on our laurels. The price of freedom is eternal vigilance. I feel so sad. MaryScott spoke my bleeding heart and if I didn't have to teach a class I'd drown my sorrows in broad daylight. What I'm going to do is quote Hunter to my students and let the right wing stew in their bile.

        A society of sheep must beget in time a government of wolves. Bertrand de Jouvenel

        by Little Red Hen on Mon Feb 21, 2005 at 09:27:22 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  YES truckle (none)
        you put the point
        on it. We feel we were
        right, the 60's proved
        it; that there are stil
        those out there who would
        defend the vietnam war,
        after the 'FOG of WAR'and
        what I thot was our collective
        consciousness raising. Now
        I learn that many still view
        60's as free sex and drugs,
        with nary a nod to what I thot
        was the message...
        Lets communicate and break down
        the barriers that inhibit that.
        Communication is the only thing
        that will save us.
             I want to be an honorary
        european. Where rationality
        still holds sway.
  •  fuck... (4.00)
    I just don't know how to process this. Everything I've ever seen or read of and by him he comes across as abslutely fearless. No fear of anything, damn the man, let's keep barreling down this highway that is america and see where it takes us.

    For him to make such a sudden exit...

    it hurts. I hope he gets the memorialization that he deserves.

    lifts a drink to HST
    Mahalo, Hunter.

    (for those curious, here's his final column for ESPN.com's Page 2. The way I want to remember him, irreverent and fucking hilarious. http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/page2/story?page=thompson/050216 )

    A Dean Democrat and proud of it. We will work together to take our country back.

    by descolada99 on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 08:37:26 PM PST

    •  And his first article for ESPN.com (4.00)
      (at least the oldest in their archive)
      strangely enough, came only 6 days after 9/11.

      The part that struck me the hardest....

      The party's over, folks. The time has come for loyal Americans to Sacrifice. ... Sacrifice. ... Sacrifice. That is the new buzz-word in Washington. But what it means is not entirely clear.

      Winston Churchill said "The first casualty of War is always Truth." Churchill also said "In wartime, the Truth is so precious that it should always be surrounded by a bodyguard of Lies."

      That wisdom will not be much comfort to babies born last week. The first news they get in this world will be News subjected to Military Censorship. That is a given in wartime, along with massive campaigns of deliberately-planted "Dis-information." That is routine behavior in Wartime -- for all countries and all combatants -- and it makes life difficult for people who value real news. Count on it. That is what Churchill meant when he talked about Truth being the first casualty of War.

      How right he was.

      A Dean Democrat and proud of it. We will work together to take our country back.

      by descolada99 on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 09:03:08 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  forgot the link (4.00)

        A Dean Democrat and proud of it. We will work together to take our country back.

        by descolada99 on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 09:05:04 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  Aw fuck (none)
        Reading both of these articles has me in tears
        •  A powerful column right after Iraq invasion (4.00)
          I'm a huge college hoops fanatic, so I related to this - ironic opening, too, after what happened to the CNN guy -

          A sad week in America
          By Hunter S. Thompson
          ESPN Page 2 columnist
          Apr 10 2003

          This is a very bad week for the American nation, and next week will be even worse. The Kansas-Syracuse game was barely over when I learned to my horror that the United States Marines were killing journalists in Baghdad.

          Three journalists have died in Baghdad so far, and not one of them was killed by Enemy Fire. They were shot down like dogs by U.S. military personel, killed and wounded and mangled by Americans, who drive American M1 Abrahms battle tanks and eat all-American pie, just like the rest of us. American troops are killing journalists in a profoundly foreign country, under cover of a war being fought for savage, greed-crazed reasons that most of them couldn't explain or even understand.

          What the hell is going on here? How could this once-proud nation have changed so much, so drastically, in only a little more than two years. In what seems like the blink of an eye, this George Bush has brought us from a prosperous nation at peace to a broke nation at war. And why are we killing innocent people at point-blank range on the other side of the world -- with big guns and big bombs that kill everything in reach?

          . . .

          The war news from almost everywhere clamped a mean lid on coverage of the NCAA tournament this year, but that didn't prevent us hoops junkies from getting an adult dose of high-speed, high-style heart-jerking college basketball last weekend. . . .

          Nothing had really surprised me until then (with the glaring exception of those whimpering sots from Wake Forest, who failed so horribly against Auburn that I swore to myself, even before that vulgar game had ended, that I was going to drive at once to the sleepy fat village of Winston-Salem, N.C., and release a swarm of 900,000 full-grown Vulture fleas somewhere in the middle of the campus, or maybe in the basement of the team's practice facility).

          You can get anywhere from 250,000 to a million commercially grown breeding fleas -- or lady bugs, or chiggers or moles or even Black-Widow spiders -- for what might seem like a generous price, but your purchase will definitely Not be the end of it.

          The last time I experimented with this kind of political action, the controlled release process got away from me and bad things happened.... It was long after midnight when we crept the iron cherry-picker across the backyard and as close as possible to the tall brick chimney pipe that towered over the pompous, colonial mansion on the outskirts of Aspen.

          Our job, our mission, was to sneak up on the large family home of a crooked politician, not far away, and dump a half-million fully-grown Muscatel Fleas down the huge greek chimney into his plush living room.

          --------------------

          Ah, but that is another story, for another time. Now where was I? Yes, war and sports ...

          When Syracuse beat Kansas Monday night for the U.S. college championship of the world, it was a wildly exciting game that came down to a failed final shot, but it hardly seemed to matter, compared to the horrible news from Iraq, and basketball faded away. There was bigger entertainment on the screen, primarily in the form of bombs dropping on people -- mainly foreigners, or course -- and news-readers from CNN said we were winning. Is this a great country or what?

          Mahalo.

          SOURCE:
          http://espn.go.com/page2/s/thompson/030410.html

          ARCHIVE of HST's ESPN COLUMNS-
          http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/archive?columnist=hunter_s._thompson&root=page2

          Worth a look

    •  Yeah, we can play THAT (none)
      HST: "I'm working on a profoundly goofy story here. It's wonderful. I've invented a new sport. It's called Shotgun Golf. We will rule the world with this thing."

      BILL: "Mmhmm."

      HST: "I've called you for some consulting advice on how to launch it. We've actually already launched it. Last spring, the Sheriff and I played a game outside in the yard here. He had my Ping Beryllium 9-iron, and I had his shotgun, and about 100 yards away, we had a linoleum green and a flag set up. He was pitching toward the green. And I was standing about 10 feet away from him, with the alley-sweeper. And my objective was to blow his ball off course, like a clay pigeon."

      BILL: (Laughs.)

      HST: "It didn't work at first. The birdshot I was using was too small. But double-aught buck finally worked for sure. And it was fun."

      "...psychopaths have little difficulty infiltrating the domains of...politics, law enforcement, (and) government." Dr. Robert Hare

      by RubDMC on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 09:45:05 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  That fucking sucks (4.00)
    Sleep well, my man. Lord knows I've wanted to escape this circus myself, but damn, to actually do it, to actually throw caution to the wind and see what's happening in the great beyond...dammit, Hunter. Fucking fuck.

    I got nothing.

    "If you're dumb, surround yourself with smart people. If you're smart, surround yourself with smart people who disagree with you."

    by McBokonon on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 08:41:34 PM PST

  •  I don't have any tequila... (4.00)
    so Johnny Walker Black will have to do.

    (pc lifts her glass)

    Rest in Peace, brother. Thank you for the work you left behind for all of us.

    (pc drinks)

    "Washed my face in the rivers of empire..."--Sunken Waltz by Calexico

    by pacific city on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 08:42:21 PM PST

    •  Woodford Reserve (none)
      unless I can find some ether....

      I like to think of the Republican Party as an Iceberg--large, white, cold-hearted, not too swift, and can't change direction.

      by DyspepTex on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 09:11:55 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Woodford... (none)
        good choice. The favored small-batch bourbon for sipping around the beach fire and paying last respects to a great American writer.

        "Washed my face in the rivers of empire..."--Sunken Waltz by Calexico

        by pacific city on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 09:14:12 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Ibogaine n/t (none)

          "...psychopaths have little difficulty infiltrating the domains of...politics, law enforcement, (and) government." Dr. Robert Hare

          by RubDMC on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 09:46:33 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

        •  Damn I wish I could raise a worthy glass... (4.00)
          To you tonight mister Thompson!

          A shot of Scapa or perhaps a Highland Park, but finances and mental health being what they are right now I'm afraid it's with St. Ides Special Brew that you're being blessed...

          Somehow I don't think you'd really disapprove!

          "We need to get back to basics and start listening to people from outside Washington." - Howard Dean

          by deafmetal on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 09:53:24 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

        •  i knew there was a reason (4.00)
          to save the half bottle of absinthe. i just wish it had proved to be for some other occasion. any other occasion than this. poured a glass and went up to my roof where the snow is really coming down right about now. the city gets so quiet on nights like this...

          godspeed, you king-hell crazy motherfucker.

          i was just speaking to my roomie about how this just feels like my dad dying all over again.

          Left Is Port, Right Is Starboard.

          by lipris on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 10:15:23 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  that sucker's empty now... (4.00)

            maybe that's why i feel chemically emboldened enough to post a goddamn pic of it.

            scene: university of texas along about 1989-90.

            we were all waiting for HST. he was supposed to speak at 7pm. by half past 8, when he and jerry jeff walker finally made their entrance, more than half the hall had left. he and jerry jeff walked in holding rather large (like half gallon) bottles of chivas regal. they sat down at a table with mics that had been provided for them. jerry jeff went first and ranted for about 15 minutes about iran-contra and why there was no such thing as 'country music' on the radio anymore. then hunter, who was chain smoking the whole time in a non smoking building, took over. he wailed for a good 45 minutes on reagan, meese, ollie north, watt, how porn scares republicans because they fuckinglove it so damned much, the dumbing down of american society, he drew parallels between the critique leveled against "the spectacle" (a precursor to the 'mighty wurlitzer' argument one hears so often these days) argument put forth by the situanionist internationale, essentially arguing that this mighty media 'spectacle' was nothing more than a grand distraction perpetrated to blind the masses from what was really happening and to do so at a profit. (truer words were never spoken) he finished off with a blistering indictment of reagan, weinberger, north et. al as war criminals and how they should all be locked up for "the rest of their unnatural lives".

            after the rant, he signed books. after waiting in line for a few minutes, i finally presented him with my copy of "fear and loathing on the campaign trail '72". as he was scribbling i asked some question about some recent statements that timothy leary had made that seemed to imply that he was no longer so proud about his role in getting so many to "tune in, turn on and drop out" and his vocal advocacy of LSD experimentation. i can't remember exactly what it was leary had said, but whatever.

            hunter looked up and said, "LSD?". he pondered this for a moment and peaked one of those eyes over the top of his sunglasses and looked me dead in the eye and said, "LSD?.... ..... you got some?". sadly, i did not.

            my professional life can really be most accurately described as such:

            "When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. "

            Left Is Port, Right Is Starboard.

            by lipris on Mon Feb 21, 2005 at 12:09:16 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  Oh what I wouldnt give (none)
              To have my toes tingling with that sweet nectar right about now. How about your missed opportunity there to set yourself free with the good doctor himself! Ho! Ho! what a time that would have been.

              Its time to break out my copy of the "Shark Hunt". The worn and tattered cover reminds me of all the time spent at sea, curled up in a confined bed, reading the ramblings of HST, while silently longing for dry land.

              It is a sad day indeed...

               

      •  Find yourself a can of starter fluid.... (none)
        and a bit of water... mix 'em and drain it slowly out the bottom.

        Send more pretzels!

        by BullitNutz on Mon Feb 21, 2005 at 12:00:38 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  Damn... (4.00)
    Rest in peace. Your work really influenced me, and I am really sorry at your being gone. Was only 6 months ago that I met you at a book signing, meant a world to meet you.
    Chris
  •  Fear and Loathing on the Campaign Trail -- (4.00)
    one of the best ever.  He "got" Nixon and probably thought the country was only a bit stupid.  He may have thought how can anybody not "get" GWB and concluded that the country is now mad and stupid.  Only hope he knew that many of us would have preferred that he stay with us and help to record GWB's reign of terror that we now is coming.

    What FDR giveth; GWB taketh away

    by Marie on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 08:42:58 PM PST

    •  My favorite line from that book (4.00)
      "Sending Muskie out against Nixon is like sending out a three-toed sloth to seize turf from a wolverine."

      In politics, sometimes the jackasses are on your side.

      by Dump Terry McAuliffe on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 09:03:51 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Mine, too. (4.00)
        Mine, too... I tried to quote it from memory on my blog (click my link, dammit) but missed by a little bit. The image itself is hard to forget, though.

        "Animals are my friends--and I don't eat my friends." (G.B. Shaw) Click to read the 'Union'

        by Hudson on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 09:27:29 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  Or (to paraphrase) (4.00)
        "The worst thing that George McGovern has ever done in his life is nothing compared to what these thugs do, every day, without a second thought in the normal course of business."

        "...psychopaths have little difficulty infiltrating the domains of...politics, law enforcement, (and) government." Dr. Robert Hare

        by RubDMC on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 09:48:30 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  Vignettes from F&L 1972 (4.00)
        I reread the book so many times that for a while I had it half-memorized.

        The Muskie-on-Ibogaine story.  Christ, that was hysterical.  I'm still not sure how much of it was gonzo goof (though the Asian female assassin/keeper had to be made up).  Fabulous quote:  'Muskie's handlers never know from day to day if they'll be dealing with Abe Lincoln or Bobo the Simpleminded.'

        The McGovern kids singing that song about wolves on the hunt outside Humphrey's hotel room.

        And (always guaranteed to make me cry), his reminiscence about covering Bobby Kennedy's campaign in '68.  Yes, folks, if you want to know exactly when the US began its long gyre into darkness, look no further than 1968: the year we lost MLK and RFK.  

        Christ.  Hunter, we will miss you.

    •  On the Campaign Trail '72 (4.00)
      This book was what got me interested in politics,  Thompson's absolute genius, I mean he said that if McGovern failed that the Democrats would pick someone as old school as Jimmy Carter, and that  we would really be in trouble if Reagan got the presidency, this man was a visionary.  I loved him, and know not what to do now.
  •  Fear and Loathing (4.00)
    inspired the first trip I ever made to Vegas.

    RIP Hunter, you made my life a little better.

  •  Will this (none)
    Will this be the top news story? Or a side note? Im saying normal media: CNN, MSNBC...
  •  Holy crap (4.00)
    I'm in shock.

    "Take back the new millenium!" - Dan Bern

    by iambaytor on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 08:45:32 PM PST

  •  RIP Big Guy (4.00)

    Rarely have wit and courage been coupled together in one mortal.

    Very, very sad.

    "I did not like fascists when I fought them as a diplomat . . . and I don't like them now in my own country." (Joe Wilson)

    by proudtinfoilhat on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 08:51:17 PM PST

  •  Wow (4.00)
    That is awful.   I'm in shock.   What a loss.

    :-(

    Orwell is spinning in his grave

    by tlh lib on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 08:51:53 PM PST

  •  Peace out, HST (4.00)
    If any one author influenced my head and heart over the years, it's you.

    You were angry, inspired, honest, puzzled, self-assured, curious, scared, fearless, disgusted, intrigued, self-destructive, careful, and funnier than anything or anyone else I've ever known or likely ever will know.

    I think I own every book, in hardcover, that ever came out with your name listed as author. I've memorized passages from most of them, just because they're true. I'll be reading them again in the weeks ahead.

    Maybe now you and Dick Nixon can finish that obsessive football conversation you both started in that limo on the long ride from Manchester to Boston back in the early days of the '68 campaign.

    I already miss you.

    "...psychopaths have little difficulty infiltrating the domains of...politics, law enforcement, (and) government." Dr. Robert Hare

    by RubDMC on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 08:56:30 PM PST

    •  ahh yes.. (4.00)
      The infamous Football conversation. The only time Hunter could actually stand the guy. When he was drinking and talking football.  

      I can also say that I have owned every single book that Hunter wrote, unfortunatly, most have ended up in other's collections. I've had to purchase Fear and Loathing in LV about 6 times so far. It doesnt bother me, knowing that I have introduced many people to the good doctors work.

    •  From that story: (4.00)
      "Big Darkness, soon come. Take my word for it."

      We'll miss you, Gonz. No one will carry the torch like you did.

      Good men through the ages, tryin' to find the sun, still I wonder, still I wonder, who'll stop the rain? -J. Fogarty

      by RichRandal on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 09:39:35 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  But (4.00)
      He still liked drinking gin with the nurses.

      "...psychopaths have little difficulty infiltrating the domains of...politics, law enforcement, (and) government." Dr. Robert Hare

      by RubDMC on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 09:53:31 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  wow (4.00)
      But wow! This goofy child president we have on our hands now. He is demonstrably a fool and a failure, and this is only the summer of '03. By the summer of 2004, he might not even be living in the White House. Gone, gone, like the snows of yesteryear.

      The Rumsfield-Cheney axis has self-destructed right in front of our eyes, along with the once-proud Perle-Wolfowitz bund that is turning to wax. They somehow managed to blow it all, like a gang of kids on a looting spree, between January and July, or even less. It is genuinely incredible. The U.S. Treasury is empty, we are losing that stupid, fraudulent chickencrap War in Iraq, and every country in the world except a handful of Corrupt Brits despises us. We are losers, and that is the one unforgiveable sin in America.

      Beyond that, we have lost the respect of the world and lost two disastrous wars in three years. Afghanistan is lost, Iraq is a permanent war Zone, our national Economy is crashing all around us, the Pentagon's "war strategy" has failed miserably, nobody has any money to spend, and our once-mighty U.S. America is paralyzed by Mutinies in Iraq and even Fort Bragg.

      BUY THE BOOK

      Click here to buy Hunter S. Thompson's latest book, "Kingdom of Fear."

      The American nation is in the worst condition I can remember in my lifetime, and our prospects for the immediate future are even worse. I am surprised and embarrassed to be a part of the first American generation to leave the country in far worse shape than it was when we first came into it. Our highway system is crumbling, our police are dishonest, our children are poor, our vaunted Social Security, once the envy of the world, has been looted and neglected and destroyed by the same gang of ignorant greed-crazed bastards who brought us Vietnam, Afghanistan, the disastrous Gaza Strip and ignominious defeat all over the world.

      The Stock Market will never come back, our Armies will never again be No. 1, and our children will drink filthy water for the rest of our lives.

      The Bush family must be very proud of themselves today, but I am not. Big Darkness, soon come. Take my word for it.

      DR. THOMPSON IS BACK WITH US NOW, AND READY TO RUMBLE. HE IS FREE OF THE HIDEOUS PAIN THAT HAS PLAGUED HIM AND HIS LOVED ONES SINCE TIME IMMEMORIAL. BUT IT IS GONE NOW. THINGS HAVE CHANGED.

      Impeach Gary Bettman

      by Edanger6 on Mon Feb 21, 2005 at 12:02:53 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  To all you youngsters... (4.00)
    Nevermind this "gonzo" stuff. To any of us from back then, who read Mr. Thompson, his reporting was just that....Reporting...with a capital R. His reports were as good as, if not better than Walter Cronkite.  To us, it was the truth, and nobody can speak a better thing about a man, than to say, He spoke the Truth.

    The first duty of a revolutionary is to get away with it.. Abbie Hoffman

    by meagert on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 08:57:51 PM PST

    •  3 words (none)
      Jean Claude Killy

      HST's killer piece on him was straight-up and dead on. He saw what was coming down the pike, the horrid fusion of sport, celebrity, and BIG Money that is now the heart and soul of our culture.

      He saw it first, and he's still the only one to ever call it for what it was.

      "...psychopaths have little difficulty infiltrating the domains of...politics, law enforcement, (and) government." Dr. Robert Hare

      by RubDMC on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 09:56:47 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Damn (4.00)
    What a loss.  I saw HST speak when I was a student at U. of KY in 1980.  I always loved how he flouted all the social conventions.

    So long, old friend.

    Speaking the truth in times of universal deceit is a revolutionary act. - Orwell

    by TracieLynn on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 09:00:37 PM PST

  •  My favorite quotation, ever (4.00)
    This one came to mind often after 11/3, especially:
    "There was madness in any direction, at any hour. If not across the Bay, then up the Golden Gate or down 101 to Los Altos or La Honda... You could strike sparks anywhere. There was a fantastic universal sense that whatever we were doing was right, that we were winning...

    "And that, I think, was the handle -- that sense of inevitable victory over the forces of Old and Evil. Not in any mean or military sense; we didn't need that. Our energy would simply prevail. There was no point in fighting -- on our side or theirs. We had all the momentum; we were riding the crest of a high and beautiful wave...

    "So now, less than five years later, you can go up on a steep hill in Las Vegas and look West, and with the right kind of eyes you can almost see the high-water mark -- that place where the wave broke and rolled back."

    -- Hunter S. Thompson, "Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas", 1971

    RIP, Doctor.  Res Ipsa Loquitur.

    •  And his favorite T.S. Eliot quote (4.00)
      "Between the idea and the reality...falls the shadow."

      "...psychopaths have little difficulty infiltrating the domains of...politics, law enforcement, (and) government." Dr. Robert Hare

      by RubDMC on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 09:58:31 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  1970 (4.00)
    fellow student in art class in summer school lets me read her copy of the hell's angel book....

    "....a relative newbie (user ID in the 18,000 range).. "

    by Miss Devore on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 09:01:54 PM PST

  •  a very sad day (4.00)
    he was a great man. I had to buy another copy of fear and loathing in las vegas because i had read it so much my first copy was falling apart. don't even get me started on fear and loathing on the campaign trail, just a great book. The world will miss him, your right, he was fearless. A very sad day.

    The Kohlman Observer: If you don't know you better ask somebody...or go to The Kohlman Observer

    by kohlmanobserver on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 09:03:47 PM PST

  •  Sick to my stomach (none)
    First Arthur Miller, now him. The two writers I most admire, both gone.

    In politics, sometimes the jackasses are on your side.

    by Dump Terry McAuliffe on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 09:05:00 PM PST

  •  A true writer (4.00)
    a brilliant observationist,
    funny as hell

    Writers live longer than they write.

    Thank you Hunter for all those words I read of yours.

    I'm really at a loss

    "the prophet is a fool, the spiritual man is mad... for the multitude of thine inequity, and the Great Hatred" - violent femmes

    by Tirge Caps on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 09:05:30 PM PST

  •  Frontpaged. (4.00)
    Mike: Hope you don't mind, I edited your diary to point to the WaPo story instead, the other one was registration-only.

    And yes, while 'Hunter' is a fictitious name, it was chosen partly with Mr. Thompson in mind. There are some writers you admire for their composition, some for their output, some for their sense of story...

    Personally, I will always admire Mr. Thompson for his sentences.  The single sentences, inside his larger works, that so perfectly sum up the truth of something that there seems hardly any point in reading whatever comes next.

    Please, everyone, do not speculate on his death.  There is no reason to suspect anything but suicide.  We know he is dead; it is enough.

    •  hunter (none)
      if you don't mind my input I think that the appropriate thing would be to mention any editing in an editors note...

      don't get me wrong, it sounds like a very helpful edit.

      •  Edited to note the edit. (4.00)
        Just to clarify for others, Mike had originally cited Drudge and AP report.  Now that it's been confirmed, I have changed it to point to the WaPo story, which does not require registration and which refers to his son's statement.

        Normally I wouldn't make any such changes to a frontpaged diary, but I wanted to let people see the actual story as fast as possible, and wanted to specifically promote this diary since there was already a growing collection of heartfelt notes.

        Thanks pyrrho, I'm afraid I'm just phoning it in for a few moments here...

        •  thanks hunter (none)
          I think that's the right way.

          re: Hunter S and phoning it in... yep, know where you are coming from.

          Hunter was so far out there mixing up the culture that it's hard to place it... I thought he was past anything like this, his out of control was in control, but when you play with the edge...

    •  Thanks for frontpaging this "hunter". (4.00)
      And thanks for these words:

      Please, everyone, do not speculate on his death.  There is no reason to suspect anything but suicide.  We know he is dead; it is enough.

      Reading them as my mind spiralled ever downwards towards tin foil hattery, and my breath still woundn't catch right in my throat, was like a brown paper bag given to a hyperventilating Beatles screamer.

      In other words it calmed me down and put this tragic loss into perspective.

      I will now go and re-read my HST collection and try to get up to date on everything I've missed.

      Shit at least it's something fun to do while my whole culture fucks itself into oblivion around me.

      What a mother-huffing bummer.

      "We need to get back to basics and start listening to people from outside Washington." - Howard Dean

      by deafmetal on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 09:30:31 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Now that (none)
        sounds like something HST might say.

        "Take back the new millenium!" - Dan Bern

        by iambaytor on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 09:36:58 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  Yeah, that. (4.00)
        Most people don't understand suicide -- hell, anyone normal shouldn't understand suicide. It just happens. Sometimes it's for a reason. Sometimes it's for no reason at all.

        I understand it for more reasons than I'm going to admit to right now, and it's just... there. Like a sudden car crash inside a person's own soul, and then they're gone.

    •  Of course I don't mind... (4.00)
      In fact, thanks.

      In case anyone is interested (and perhaps you can add it to the diary entry), Salon has a pretty good memorial going - definately worth clicking through the ad for...

    •  speculation (none)
      Please, everyone, do not speculate on his death.

      But...but...what if he's Deepthroat?

      Trying for a little humor there to brighten things up.

  •  Lennon (4.00)
    At the moment I feel like I did when Lennon died.

    Hunter was to the written word what Lennon was to music.

    In moments when we needed to white knuckle and bend to the insanity in the world we would listen to John and read Hunter.

  •  asdf (4.00)
    Man, what I wouldn't give for there to be a "Fear and Loathing in the Afterlife" to read a year from now.

    This really sucks. I haven't been affected by a non-family death like this in a long while, if ever.

    "If you're dumb, surround yourself with smart people. If you're smart, surround yourself with smart people who disagree with you."

    by McBokonon on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 09:06:57 PM PST

  •  We have lost another truth-teller. (4.00)
    RIP Hunter.

    "Whether the British ruling class are wicked or merely stupid is one of the most difficult questions of our time." - George Orwell on the Spanish Civil War

    by Ramo on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 09:07:27 PM PST

  •  Damn. Goodbye Hunter. (4.00)
  •  unbelievable (4.00)
    literally unbelievable... god damm i will miss him
  •  Shit. (4.00)
    Sorry it's not more eloquent, but this fucking blows.

    "In such a world of conflict, a world of victims and executioners, it is the job of thinking people not to be on the side of the executioners." -Albert Camus.

    by BrianL on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 09:08:33 PM PST

  •  Last Sports Illustrated Column: Feb. 15 (none)
    I can't make anything of it....
    Shotgun Golf with Bill Murray

    The Republican Party: We get government off your back, and drop it on your head.

    by ben masel on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 09:11:15 PM PST

  •  I saw him speak (4.00)
    At UMass in the 90's. What a wierd and unforgettable experience. Halfway through his talk he removed his pants- without a break in the discussion or any acknowledgement that undressing was rare in lectures. I will miss him.
  •  Gut-punched (4.00)
    Oh man, that hit me like a ton of bricks right in the gut.  I feel sick.

    My dad first got me into HST a few years back (I'm 25).  One of my favorite writers, personalities, all-around crazy motherfuckers.  

    So much of his phrasing has become a part of my (and my friends' and family's) life.  He was one of a kind.  Many have imitated, but there will never be another Dr. Gonzo.

    Rest in peace, man.

    You tell me that it's gospel, but I know that it's only church--Tom Waits

    by Flagstaff Ian on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 09:12:27 PM PST

  •  Can't help but juxtapose (4.00)
    HST's journalism never failed to be honest, courageous, and damned entertaining.

    Current "journalists" in the news aren't worth his skanky bong water.

    You stand alone, sir.  Thank you for your words, and my you find peace.

  •  For about a year in college (4.00)
    every time I went to a party I'd play the role of Thompson. I jumped off a few roofs but really saw life in a beautiful and lovable way.

    Cheers Hunter, see you when I see you.

    Silent consent or active dissent, the choice is OURS.

    by Alphakafka on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 09:18:55 PM PST

  •  The bats (4.00)
    Fuckin' bats finally got him.

    It's a scary world.

    When H.S. Thompsom can't live in it.

    "Fuck The damned"-Nixon

  •  a bad trip (4.00)
    the bats finally got him.
  •  My favorite quote (4.00)
    "...The Edge...There is no honest way to explain it because the only people who really know where it is are the ones who have gone over. The others -- the living -- are those who pushed their control as far as they felt they could handle it, and then pulled back, or slowed down, or did whatever they had to when it came time to choose between Now and Later.

    "But the edge is still Out there. Or maybe it's In..."


    From the book Hell's Angels
    •  Interesting (none)
      How three of us thought of the same line within just a few minutes of each other. Just shows how much of an impact he had on all of us.

      I get the feeling he's screaming down the road to Las Vegas right now in a big convertible caddy...

  •  Bleat. (4.00)
    Just Bleat.
  •  This just sucks............... (3.00)
    While scum of the earth like the Bush admin keep sucking air, everyday, a good man is gone forever...
  •  THE EDGE (4.00)
    "THE EDGE...there is no honest way to explain it because the only people who know where it really is are the ones who have gone over. The others--the living--are those who pushed their control as far as they thought they could handle it, and then pulled back, or slowed down, or did whatever they had to do when it came time to choose between Now and Later."

    Hunter Thompson, Hells Angels: A Strange and Terrible Saga
  •  Bye Hunter, see you over "The Edge" (4.00)
    "The Edge... There is no honest way to explain it because the only people who really know where it is are the ones who have gone over. The others --- the living --- are those who pushed their control as far as they felt they could handle it, and then pulled back, or slowed down, or did whatever they had to when it came time to choose between Now and Later.  But the edge is still Out there. Or maybe it's In."
    -- Hunter S. Thompson

    We'll miss you...

  •  asdf (none)
    God bless my good friend.
  •  Damn! oh damndamndamn (4.00)
    I read that headline and felt as if I'd been kicked in the stomach.

    Best. Political. Journalist. Ever.

    I cherish this quote picked up from HST years ago:

    Yesterday's weirdness is tomorrow's reason why.

    It explains almost everything.

    Words to live by.

    There's a nice-ninny priest/at tea in everyone,/all cozy and chatty as auntie,/but a saint comes/and throws rocks through the window. -- John Ciardi

    by Mnemosyne on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 09:27:18 PM PST

    •  Hunter vs. Crawdaddy (4.00)
      I was editor at Crawdaddy throughout the 1970s while Hunter was killing us over at Rolling Stone...

      However, last November, I had Steadman do our E&P election cover--did Bush carrying an axe, dripping with blood, and screaming, "Four More God-Awful Years!"

      •  As your lawyer, I advise you (4.00)
        to keep going after the Gannon/Guckert story. And know that Hunter will be looking over your shoulder, muttering obscenities through the haze of smoke from his cigarette.

        I'm waiting for "Duke" in Doonesbury to pick it up. Any day, now.

        There's a nice-ninny priest/at tea in everyone,/all cozy and chatty as auntie,/but a saint comes/and throws rocks through the window. -- John Ciardi

        by Mnemosyne on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 10:17:44 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  Speechless (4.00)
    Words fail me. I'm too young to have lived in the world he did, but his works stand as bar none, the most brilliant journalistic writing of the 20th century.

    No one's ever going to see the world the way he did. No one.

  •  What HST would have hated most (4.00)
    Is that Jenn Wenner outlived him and will get to write his obit.

    That would really piss the old genius/nutcase off.

    I knew Ted Hitler. Ted Hitler was a friend of mine. Ted Hitler ate my panda. You're no Ted Hitler.

    by nightsweat on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 09:31:33 PM PST

  •  Fear and Loathing in the Afterlife (4.00)
    If there is an afterlife, whoever gets him better get the hell out of his way... what a tragic loss.

    FnL on the Campaign Trail '72 was my first real education in presidential politics and I'll be forever greatful to the man.

    RIP Dr. Gonzo

    We must go forward, not backward, upward, not forward, and always twirling, twirling, twirling towards freedom! - Kodos as Clin-ton - The Simpsons

    by Czarvoter on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 09:31:46 PM PST

  •  Well (4.00)
    Unlike he said of Nixon, at least Hunter's own funeral won't be illegal.

    I just hope his love of shotguns didn't finally get the better of him.

    I had kind of hoped he'd hold on and show this Doomed Generation what it meant to go down swinging.

    But, yeah, as it is...damn.  I hate to see one who loved the game so hard and well go down.  RIP, Hunter.

  •  I just (4.00)
    logged on before bed to check my email and I can't believe what I'm reading.

    I'm in shock. This is so horribly sad. What an incredible loss.

  •  still inspiring to read....... (4.00)
    Back in June, when John Kerry was beginning to feel like a winner, I had a quick little rendezvous with him on a rain-soaked runway in Aspen, Colorado, where he was scheduled to meet with a harem of wealthy campaign contributors. As we rode to the event, I told him that Bush's vicious goons in the White House are perfectly capable of assassinating Nader and blaming it on him. His staff laughed, but the Secret Service men didn't. Kerry quickly suggested that I might make a good running mate, and we reminisced about trying to end the Vietnam War in 1972.

    That was the year I first met him, at a riot on that elegant little street in front of the White House. He was yelling into a bullhorn and I was trying to throw a dead, bleeding rat over a black-spike fence and onto the president's lawn.

    We were angry and righteous in those days, and there were millions of us. We kicked two chief executives out of the White House because they were stupid warmongers. We conquered Lyndon Johnson and we stomped on Richard Nixon -- which wise people said was impossible, but so what? It was fun. We were warriors then, and our tribe was strong like a river.

    That river is still running. All we have to do is get out and vote, while it's still legal, and we will wash those crooked warmongers out of the White House.

    John Kerry 2008, the leader of the youth of America.

    by desiunion on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 09:34:05 PM PST

  •  Bush Family:2 Populist Revolutionaries:0 (4.00)
    "It's too late. We can't win, they've gotten too powerful."

    Abbie Hoffman
    (November 30, 1936 - April 12, 1989)


    Hoffman (author of Steal this Book) killed himself the year George the First took office.
  •  Thompson (4.00)
    My 23-year-old daughter was in the car when she heard the news on Air America's top of the hour news bite. She cried.

    That's my girl.

  •  I'm shocked (4.00)
    that my mom didn't know who he was. Fuck, he's a liberal from HER generation. Never heard of Fear and Loathing, never saw Where the Buffalo Roam.

    Jesus Christ I feel old.

    I saw him a year or two ago on the Conan O'Brian show. It was about as clear cut a warning against the heavy useage of hard drugs as one could make. Very strange interview.

    In any case, he was a great writer and this is a great loss.

    --- If I were employed, my opinions would be my own and not my employer's.

    by Aexia on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 09:34:37 PM PST

  •  Fear and Loathing (4.00)
    The book that drew me into politics.

    I'm far too boring to have personally participated in exploits similar to his, but Hunter S. Thompson...

    Hunter S. Thompson.

    There is no subsitute.  There is no one like him.

    There is no void like this.

    Damn.

  •  Depp (4.00)
    I'll bet he's on a plane right now.
  •  shit (4.00)
    Thats all... shit, I just watched Fear and Loathing last night as well, How odd.

    We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars. - O.W.

    by Chris Dub on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 09:37:53 PM PST

  •  He's been seen... (4.00)
    partying in New Orleans not long ago. He lived hard...until the very end, it seems.
  •  An ode to Hunter, my true love (4.00)
    From my Diary of a Campaign

    February 29, 2004

    Perhaps today isn't the best day to start wondering about what kind of dreadful pale of gloom will descend on the country come the fall, if it becomes clear that President Bush is going to be reelected.  The day started off well enough, with plenty of anguish on Fleet Street. Talk of British spooks bugging Kofi Annan, Boutros-Boutros Ghali, Hans Blix, Jacques Chirac, and probably anyone else even remotely associated with the anti-war movement.  Tony Blair doesn't exactly deny that he did this, but he does think it bad form to talk about in public.  Meanwhile, the Washington Post ran a piece on how the Brits sexed up their dodgy dossier, based on one confused Iraqi soldier making vague speculations about something truly sinister in the desert.  Yellow and red boxes, gas masks, treachery, potential doom to Cypriots and those unwise enough to holiday there.  Somehow a truckload of boxes out near the Jordan border became an ICBM anthrax-tipped menace, capable of bringing sudden and senseless death down in 45 minutes or less.  

    I grabbed myself some coffee and perused the New York Times.  FORNICATORS...THIEVES...GOD HATERS...HOMOS...DRUNKARDS...ADULTERERS...LIARS...The Week in Review.

    Two happily married dykes are swapping spit under the ominous banner of an outraged Christian...PREPARE TO MEET THY GOD.

    That the Southern Baptists have a convention is not surprising.  That they have an Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission is, perhaps not a shock, but let's say...interesting.  The President of the ERLC is one Dr. Richard Land.  Dr. Land assures us that he hasn't "seen any issue that mobilizes (his) constituency like same sex marriage, not even the abortion issue.  Once you start redefining marriage, where do you stop?"  Where indeed?

    One potential answer of where all this shit is going, and a big hint at where it has already been, came moments later when I tuned into Meet the Press.  With Super Tuesday looming I expected some talking head blather about what kind of attack dog turnabout would be required of Sen. John Edwards to stave off his doom.  Ten primaries are set to come off in two days, and currently it looks like Sen. John Kerry might win all of them.  If this happens, only some horrifying skeleton out of Kerry's closet...some long-lost footage of Kerry bayoneting gooks and machine gunning babies...can possibly prevent him from gathering the delegates to be crowned the contender in his hometown Boston when August rolls around.  Edwards has been consistently both losing primaries and beating expectations ever since Iowa got this election rolling, but his "yes, maam" "aw shucks" politeness campaign has now run into an immoveable object.  The Democrats have looked at the candidates and they have rejected them all.  They saw Lieberman as a hopeless retread, and in any case a centrist.  General Wesley Clark was too prone to saying weird things, filled with dark implications.  Gephardt was tossed aside as a throwback to George Meany, Hubert Humphrey, and the politics of ward-heeling head crackers.  Governor Howard Dean, for so long the front runner, has dropped out without winning a single primary.  For so long the party bosses had fretted that Dean was the new McGovern, electrifying the grass-roots only to set up the party for a generation in the wilderness.  When the shit went down he couldn't even match Ed Muskie...who at least won New Hampshire before having a nervous breakdown on national television.  So, it was much to my surprise when Tim Russert introduced a duo of Catholic priests to explain why 10,000 boys had accused 4,000 priests of groping their balls over the last half century.  I couldn't really muster any enthusiasm or sustained attention for such a degrading spectacle.  The priests seemed reasonable.  They said some things about standing up for the flock, addressing their concerns about 50 years of unpunished pederasty.  Just as I was beginning to disengage and get down to business on a very heavy article on Palestinians changing their tactics and "holding peaceful protests", the Bishop of Washington said something that snapped me rudely back to attention.  Apparently he was admitting to having long objected to the one strike and you're out policy.  To paraphrase, he was saying that he thought, at least in the past, it was a gross injustice and overreaction to defrock a priest based on only one incident of molesting a child.  

    But before I could fully digest the disgusting, and no doubt devastating ramifications of this mind-numbing moral relativism...it was time to switch over to CBS for the last four-way debate of the campaign.  

    The debate was co-sponsored by the New York Times, but they didn't send out any heavies to question the candidates.  They offered up Elisabeth Bumiller, a hopeless hack and an utterly outclassed buffoon.  It wasn't long before she had offended the right Reverend Al Sharpton to the point that he accused her of a blatant attempt to marginalize him.  "I think that your attempt to do this is blatant, and I'm going to call you out on it, because I'm not going to sit here and be window dressing," he said.  A flustered Bumiller responded, "Well, I'm not going to be addressed like this."

    It was all downhill from there, as the debate descended into cross-talk and mutual accusations.  But that is neither here nor there.  Before it was over, the whole exercise had the visceral feel of a pointless waste of time.  Clearly none of the participants would ever go on to shape global affairs or have the remotest influence on the fate of the world.  Coming quickly on the heels of this realization, came a far more awful consideration.  If this is what we're doing over here on the left...in New York City, with the NY Times, with Dan Rather...blathering around about nothing at all...then that must mean 4 more years of this Bush/Cheney fear-mongering, jack-booted, Jehovahism.  

    The implications of such a dead weight, truly wretched, and intolerable circumstance...the idea that Hunter S. Thompson was right all along...the idea that I might have to console myself with the same consideration he used in 1972...all come back in some Groundhog Day karmic circle of hell..."we are really just a nation of 220 million car salesmen with all the money we need to buy guns, and no qualms at all about killing anybody else in the world who tries to make us uncomfortable."  That is what Hunter told himself in September of '72 when it became clear that nothing...not Kent State, not Cambodia and Laos, not Watergate...could prevent the eventual reelection of Dick Nixon.  And let's be honest with ourselves with the benefit of hindsight.  Hunter was being generous.

    It's too early to tell whether America, circa 2004, is equally unenlightened and useless when compared to our parallel version of 32 years ago.  But a quick view of network TV does not immediately inspire confidence.

    John Kerry doesn't exactly inspire reassurance either.  A country that is willing to put the screws to an eminently decent South Dakotan decorated bomber pilot, in favor of a ticket like Nixon/Agnew...well...let's just say that anything can happen in our great Republic.   Including the mass conclusion that only a weasel like George Dubya Bush can keep us safe from a wave of truly paralyzing suicide attacks in the shopping malls of King of Prussia and Minneapolis.  Surely Kerry is helpless in the face of such an inevitable menace.   We might as well call in the Foreign Legion.  

    Currently, Kerry is ahead of Bush in hypothetical polls.  So, panic may seem both untimely and unseemly.   The whole political process may seem an idle point and a hopeless bore.  Yet, I doubt the Fenway faithful have failed to calculate to combined threat of Shilling and Martinez, despite the voice in their gut...that perennial voice...that both presages their doom and  precludes their triumph.  And our Masshole candidate and his Masshole convention, and A-Rod in the Bronx.  So, the gut-rock feeling of something amiss...well...it is hardly avoidable for someone with long and sensitive antennae...and a long history of summers and autumns following the pennant race.

    Maybe the Patriots are the talismans here.  Maybe the Red Sox have nothing to do with it.  But there is a definite whiff of putrefaction.  Something familiar that only a true Red Sox fan can truly understand.  It is the empty sunny hope that simmers, ineluctably, just before Bucky Dent shakes that foul ball off his shin.  Oh....we can feel the vindication...but we KNOW that it will somehow be denied.

    Oh, yes, it is very hard to imagine how exactly Bush will make an above 50%  pitch for his economic policies.  But it is also hard to imagine planes slamming into the World Trade Center.  And so...

    Aristide Flees After a Shove From the U.S.

    And so goes the Democratization of the civilized world.  Onward and upward we march...


    The Oval Office: Because there are no corners, there is nowhere to make the President sit when he has shamed the nation.

    by BooMan23 on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 09:39:42 PM PST

  •  Wow.... (4.00)
    I am in shock.

    A contemporaneous great is lost.

    Rest in peace HST.  I'll be drinking one for you tonight...

    I have no valid complaint against hustlers, no rational bitch, but the act of selling is repulsive to me. --Hunter S. Thompson

  •  Thompson / Gannon (4.00)
    If anyone ever needs clarification of credentials: compare and contrast.
  •  Uhg... (4.00)
    Tonight I go to sleep in mourning.

    The re-enlightenment is late.

    by sinistral on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 09:41:41 PM PST

  •  He's not dead... (4.00)
    As long as each of us still remember him, he lives on in our hearts and minds. I hope his death sparks a fire in us to hold our politicians to the fire the way he did.

    I think he might have liked that idea. A couple thousand Kossacks kicking ass, pointing out the bullshit, and sending this gang of thugs back to Texas with thier tails between thier legs.

    Ride on Hunter...

     

  •  Gonzo (4.00)

    In 1970 Thompson ran for Sheriff of Pitkin County, Colorado on the Freak Power ticket. He announced that he would spearhead several reforms:

       1. rename Aspen to "Fat City, Colorado"
       2. tear up the downtown streets and replace them with bike paths
       3. decriminalize drug possession
       4. decriminalize the sale of drugs (but only at cost)
       5. reintroduce the stocks for drug dealers working at profit

    As the Republican sheriff he was running against sported a crew cut, Thompson shaved his head bald and referred to the other candidate as his my long-haired opponent. Even so, he lost the election.

    [From the Rotten.com Library]

    The man has no equal, nor will he ever.

    "No man is so foolish but he may sometimes give another good counsel, and no man so wise that he may not easily err if he takes no other counsel than his own. He that is taught only by himself has a fool for a master. " - Hunter S. Thompson

    I wish I could have learned more.

    •  HST - Ode to Jack Keroac [audio] (4.00)
      Ode to Jack [.mp3]

      Dunno where its from or why he did it, but I just love to hear his voice.

      "The Edge... there is no honest way to explain it because the only people who really know where it is are the ones who have gone over." - Hunter S. Thompson

  •  He was fearless. (4.00)
    Youngsters should read Hell's Angels for insight on how to get inside a story.  Between paperback covers, you became an outlaw biker.  No one else could have done it.

    Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas was pure candy for the drug experimenting generation who lived through the time when most psychoactive drugs were concidered physically harmless. No apologies, no regrets; living life right up to the razor-sharp edge.

    If he was facing a slowly diminishing existence on earth, my guess is that he simply decided to dive head-first into the afterlife.

    He was fearless.

    "Don't play what's there, play what's not there." -Miles

    by jexter on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 09:44:11 PM PST

  •  RIP the man, long live the legend (4.00)
    Two Hunter S. Thompson quotes:

    "Myths and legends die hard in America. We love them for the extra dimension they provide, the illusion of near-infinite possibility to erase the narrow confines of most men's reality. Weird heroes and mould-breaking champions exist as living proof to those who need it that the tyranny of ''the rat race'' is not yet final."

    "The Edge... there is no honest way to explain it because the only people who really know where it is are the ones who have gone over."

    There are always two parties; the establishment and the movement. -Emerson

    by coconutjones on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 09:45:51 PM PST

  •  Kurt Vonnegut (none)
    is still with us, isn't he?

    Good men through the ages, tryin' to find the sun, still I wonder, still I wonder, who'll stop the rain? -J. Fogarty

    by RichRandal on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 09:45:58 PM PST

  •  RIP, Hunter (4.00)
    He will indeed be missed, but writers do indeed live on and we still have his work with us.

    <Downs a shot of tequila in his honor>

    "I'm going to dance the dream, and make the dream come true." -Kate Bush

    by ellisande on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 09:53:21 PM PST

  •  Devastation (4.00)
    We're doomed.

    The Life, the Anger, the "Fuck You" that would not be censored is gone.

    Now a journalism already neutered by the style-over-substance Fox formula will rot at an accelerated pace.

  •  Late night vodka (4.00)
    Here's to you, Uncle Duke.

    Doing it right is what fascism is all about. -- Lynda Barry

    by pedant on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 09:54:16 PM PST

  •  X-Posted From Eschaton (4.00)
    I wrote this under the name "Apophenia" (my Eschaton pseudonym...) in response to a troll's despicable comment over at Atrios' place. I figured it might provide a bright spot amidst the mourning, so that's my motive in x-posting it and so sorry for any appearance of vanity. Just figured it's something good and happy to think about in the wake of HST's suicde:

    Hunter S Thompson would've been happy with the thought of thousands of bored earthworms with humdrum lives getting a massive, life-changing buzz off the myriad of residue chemicals in his body. Some Coloradan worms are gonna see the universe from the outside in a few weeks, man...
  •  it's up to us (4.00)
    to fill his shoes, take the reigns, (insert idiom here) in his memory.
    RIP man.
  •  Oh man (4.00)
    Reading that headline just took the wind out of me.

    I'm numb.

  •  There's only one fitting memorial (4.00)
    Aspen, Colorado, will henceforth and in fact be known as Fat City.

    No, of course, there's no good memorial except raising a glass, as I'm doing now.

    It was always somehow good to know that he was up there in Woody Creek. Good to know that he was there in all his wild wisdom and excess. Good to know that, whatever else happened, Hunter S. Thompson remained Hunter S. Thompson.

    Crap.

  •  Ave atque vale (4.00)
    At a time in my life, which I certainly would not want to repeat, he was an icon, but also a model which allowed a young man such as myself to both indulge in America's sensual roundelay and yet bray loud objections to its soul sucking cynicism.  

    Not an easy job, but he did it well.  

    And at times, his prose made sparks fly, in the tradition of Whitman and Kerouac and Ginzberg, and on that basis alone he's worth a moment of silence.

    He was an American original.  I'm sorry this was the only way he could find peace.

  •  To quote someone from another forum: (4.00)
    "With first Cash and now Thompson gone -- what's the fucking point of being an American?"

    Nobody lends money to a man with a sense of humor -- Peter Tork, "Head"

    by Field Marshall Stack on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 10:02:24 PM PST

  •  Rage on good Doctor (4.00)
    May there be no giant lizards and loathing where you head now. Only mad mad joy and laughter.

    Oh, I'm really sad.

    Dubya, yer momma may think yer cute, but I sure don't

    by cosmic debris on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 10:04:13 PM PST

  •  Like Ken Kesey and Jack Keruac, (4.00)
    Hunter blazed his own trail.

    He wasn't ever trying to be anything but the crazy rebel he was.

    May his spirit live on forever.

  •  Fearless and Loathing. (4.00)
    I've only read a handful of his books, but shit. If only this man could be as important to my generation as it was to my parents.

    I'm angry, saddened, and happy for him all at the same time. It's a goddamn circus and he finally got the ticket outta here.

    I'm not going to contemplate why he did it. With his rough lifestyle, it only comes as a mild surprise, like any rock star. But god fucking damn it.

    Hunter: truly the most fearless journalist, author, and human being if ever there was one. And probably the last of the most important and influential authors of his time.

    "Don't blame me, I voted for Kerry." - liberal. geek.

    by gonzo on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 10:06:19 PM PST

  •  My favorite quote of his... (4.00)
    ...isn't political:
    The music business is a cruel and shallow money trench, a long plastic hallway where thieves and pimps run free, and good men die like dogs. There's also a negative side.
    I miss him already.
  •  Old enough to make his own decisions, I guess. (none)
    But still ...
  •  Goodnight Hunter (4.00)
    We'll never see his like again.
    But the next time I feel this fascist shitpile rising up to cover me, I'm gonna remember him and find some courage to keep digging.
  •  A great writer, a great human being (4.00)
    I am speechless and sad.

    While he was alive, he Lived.

    "Think. It ain't illegal yet." - George Clinton

    by jbeach on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 10:10:59 PM PST

  •  the wave has crested...and fallen back... (4.00)
    ...bad paraphrase of the pivotal moment in "Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas."

    Two things I think of on hearing this news. One is how my now-husband and I used to go around in our dating days as Uncle Duke and Honey, he in his aviator sunglasses, bucket hat and jauntily-tilted cigarette holder and me with my little round glasses and china doll bob.

    The other is this:


    Warren Zevon is attended by his personal physician, Dr. Hunter S. Thompson

    Dammit. Dammit. Dammit.

    The revolution starts now--in your own back yard, in your own home town--so whatcha doin' sitting around?

    by LynnS on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 10:11:25 PM PST

  •  Spooky. (4.00)
    My friend Matt and I talked for about half an hour last night about how much we loved Thompson's writing and ideas.  

    Damn.

  •  Bad TV coverage on HST death (4.00)
         Just watched several local TV stations for 10 p.m. news, here in Los Angeles area, I saw no Thompson coverage...
         ...But they did mention Sandra Dee. Hm.
  •  Cheers to the good Doctor...My his soul find peace (4.00)
    I sit here with a bottle of bushmills, a pack of camels, and loathing in my heart. The man who inspired me to live life to the fullest has died.

     Do I cry? Fuck no! Get drunk and write a little epataph of the man who changed my life seems a bit more fitting.

     Shocked, dammit, SHOCKED was I when I read on some impersonal web site that Fucking HUNTER S. THOMPSON killed himself. FUCKING KILLED HIMSELF!!!!! and only god knows why.

     This is the man who opened my eyes to the corruption of American society. The same man who inspired me to question everything "the man" has to say. I owe a part of myself to Hunter, and I vow to keep that part alive.

     Today will be forever etched into my mind. Today a hero died.

  •  At least (none)
    he will live on in Doonesbury.

    "It is the duty of the patriot to protect his country from its government." --Thomas Paine "And the world from this President"--BOHICA

    by BOHICA on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 10:17:34 PM PST

  •  he must have been sick (4.00)
    there is no way a healthy HST offs himself.  He must have found out he had cancer that was going to kill him, because this guy fought the fights, and took on the establishment at every step.  

    I first discovered HST back in the early 80's when I was 12, I saw "Where The Buffalo Roam", and after that I had to find out everything I could about this  crazy rebel, and his lawyer.  

    I'm stunned, he had to have been terminal, because there is no way he kills himself, there has to be an explanation, fuck!!!!!!!

    absolute freedom for one individual undoubtedly limit's the freedom of another.

    by jbou on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 10:21:09 PM PST

    •  That's my take on it too (4.00)
      I saw him on Charlie Rose this last year and he truly did not look well.

      It's not pretty to think about, but I can understand why someone would avoid the last moments of a terminal disease. The quality of life can be a prison, and God knows Hunter wouldn't despise that kind of confinement.

      He was a voice of the America I love and fight for: brutally honest, creative and uncorrupted, freedom loving, freedom living and blessed with humor like a thousand lightning bolts...

      So, so sad.

      Rest in Peace, teacher. You will be missed deeply.

    •  Of course he was sick. (none)
      He was Hunter S. Thompson.  He was never "healthy", was he?  That was the point.
    •  Hopefully (none)
      Hopefully the family will release some information to the general public because as things are right now its a senseless suicide. At least with that information out there it will bring it to closure as people will gain a proper understanding of his suicide.

      The single most critical issue of the Democratic party Support Living Wages

      by Lucian on Mon Feb 21, 2005 at 12:46:22 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  That's it. You're done. (none)
        Clue upload, so that the farts in your cranium don't get lonely:  Nobody owes you any excuse or information about Hunter S. Thompson's life or death.

        They are not yours to judge, you ignorant shitsplatter.

        God you make me sick. Hopefully you're gone.

        There is no way you should be able to look at yourself in a mirror, much less be part of this community, after this stunt.

        About a dozen people have told you to shut your fucking pie hole, that you're bringing stupidity and offensive sanctimonious moralization to a tragic situation. But no, we get to endure a putrid little puke like yourself  injecting all your moral judgments about a great man's death. You must be some sort of diseased twisted sack of shit to have to make yourself feel good by putting down a person in obvious pain.

        Shut up. Go away. Die and rot for all I care.

      •  senseless (none)
        Not a damn thing makes sense, buddy - not life, death, selfishness, sacrifice, cruelty, love--not the exploding proton this place we call home evidently sprang from. What can you mean by sense? Is this inexplicable universe, and this inexplicable life, which by stunning chance contains you and me and the hearts and minds and fortunes and tragedies and twists of fate of every living soul that walks the earth--is life not mysterious enough for you to be humbled and shamed out of any facile judgementalism about death? Don't you ever want to just fall to your knees? How little we are and how little we know--of each other, of where we come from or where we're going from here. Least of all why. Why anything.

        To me the ultimate unknowableness of another human soul--the absolute mystery there--is a solemn, serious thing, and I gather that this is true of many dkos posters. You have managed not only to diminish Hunter S. Thompson but to make a rather puny thing of life itself. You boil down and boil down, ignorantly, without perspective. It's frankly hard to hear. So instead of waiting to decide whether or not this man's suicide can be justified in your eyes, what about simply being quiet and inward for a spell. Sometimes the only thing to do is to drop your jaw and gape. Dwell silently in the senselessness of it all.

        Is nothing secular?

        by aitchdee on Mon Feb 21, 2005 at 04:56:23 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  I just want to be sick. (4.00)
    This fucking sucks. I can't even begin to articulate the stupid obscene heartbreak of this.
  •  Threes (4.00)
    Sandra Dee ("You'll want her for your Valentine")

    John Raitt ("My boy, Bill! He'll be tall and as tough as a tree..."}

    Hunter Thompson {"When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro.")

  •  Not bad (4.00)
    "Events of the past two years have virtually decreed that I shall wrestle with the literary muse for the rest of my days. And so, having tasted the poverty of one end of the scale, I have no choice but to direct my energies toward the acquisiton of fame and fortune. Frankly, I have no taste for either poverty or honest labor, so writing is the only recourse left for me."  (Hunter S. Thompson, to Mr. Arch Gerhart, January 29, 1958)

    The person who doesn't scatter the morning dew will not comb gray hairs- Hunter S. Thompson- (RIP)

    by BooMan23 on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 10:21:46 PM PST

  •  Bigger than the Gipper (4.00)
    This is HST, we need to show him the respect he deserves.
    •  HST had this to say about RWR (4.00)
      From ESPN column Apr 10 2003

      . . . War has always been a hard act to follow, and this rotten little masacre in Iraq is no exception. It is like that permanent shitstorm that Ronald Reagan talked about in his letters to Frank Sinatra. They both believed very deeply in the book of Revelation. Reagan even went so far so to say to his buddy, "We are screwed, Frankie. We are the ones who will have to face the end of the World."  

      They had a good time for sure, those rouges. They were life-long sports fans, but Wars kept getting in their way.

      I used to laugh when good old Dutch said ominous things like that -- but no longer. It is becoming clearer and clearer that he was right, dead right, if only because he was drawing up the blueprints himself, right in front of our eyes, and we loved him for it.

      I had a soft-spot in my heart for Ronald Reagan, if only because he was a sportswriter in his youth.


      . . .

      SOURCE-
      http://espn.go.com/page2/s/thompson/030410.html

  •  Damn (4.00)
    "He was one of God's own prototypes-a high-powered mutant of some kind who was never even considered for mass production. We was too weird to live and too rare to die. . ."

    One of my favorite writers.

  •  And (4.00)
    I'm listening to "The End" from the Doors and commencing to get drunk.

    Fuck death. Fuck suicide. Fuck George Bush's America which is a toxic place to live and die.

  •  Last column (4.00)
    for ESPN

    Shotgun Golf with Bill Murray

    By Hunter S. Thompson
    Page 2

    The death of professional hockey in AMERICA is a nasty omen for people with heavy investments in NHL teams. But to me, it meant little or nothing -- and that's why I called Bill Murray with an idea that would change both our lives forever.

    It was 3:30 on a dark Tuesday morning when I heard the phone ring on his personal line in New Jersey. "Good thinking," I said to myself as I fired up a thin Cohiba. "He's bound to be wide awake and crackling at this time of day, or at least I can leave a very excited message."

    My eerie hunch was right. The crazy bugger picked up on the fourth ring, and I felt my heart racing. "Hot damn!" I thought. "This is how empires are built." Late? I know not late.

    Genius round the world stands hand in hand, and one shock of recognition runs the whole circle round.

    Herman Melville said that in the winter of 1914, and Murray is keenly aware of it. Only a madman would call a legend of Bill Murray's stature at 3:33 a.m. for no good reason at all. It would be a career-ending move, and also profoundly rude.

    But my reason was better than good ...

    * * * * *

    BILL: "Hello?"

    HST: "Hi, Bill, it's Hunter."

    BILL: "Hi, Hunter."

    HST: "Are you ready for a powerful idea? I want to ask you about golf in Japan. I understand they're building vertical driving ranges on top of each other."

    BILL (sounding strangely alert): "Yes, they have them outdoors, under roofs ..."

    HST: "I've seen pictures. I thought they looked like bowling alleys stacked on top of each other."

    BILL: (Laughs.)

    HST: "I'm working on a profoundly goofy story here. It's wonderful. I've invented a new sport. It's called Shotgun Golf. We will rule the world with this thing."

    BILL: "Mmhmm."

    HST: "I've called you for some consulting advice on how to launch it. We've actually already launched it. Last spring, the Sheriff and I played a game outside in the yard here. He had my Ping Beryllium 9-iron, and I had his shotgun, and about 100 yards away, we had a linoleum green and a flag set up. He was pitching toward the green. And I was standing about 10 feet away from him, with the alley-sweeper. And my objective was to blow his ball off course, like a clay pigeon."

    BILL: (Laughs.)

    HST: "It didn't work at first. The birdshot I was using was too small. But double-aught buck finally worked for sure. And it was fun."

    BILL: (Chuckles.)

    HST: "OK, I didn't want to wake you up, but I knew you'd want to be in on the ground floor of this thing."

    BILL: (Silence.)

    HST: "Do you want to discuss this tomorrow?"

    BILL: "Sure."

    HST: "Excellent."

    BILL: "I think I might have a queer dream about it now, but ..." (Laughs.)

    HST: "This sport has a HUGE future. Golf in America will soon come to this."

    BILL: "It will bring a whole new meaning to the words 'Driving Range'."

    HST: "Especially when you stack them on top of each other. I've seen it in Japan."

    BILL: "They definitely have multi-level driving ranges. Yes."

    HST: (Laughs.) "How does that work? Do they have extremely high ceilings?"

    BILL: "No. The roof above your tee only projects out about 10 feet, and they have another range right above you. It's like they took the façade off a building. People would be hanging out of their offices."

  •  Res Ipsa Loquitur (4.00)
    It was not Hemingway's wave, and in the end he came back to Ketchum, never ceasing to wonder, says Mason, why he hadn't been killed years earlier in the midst of violent action on some other part of the globe. Here at least, he had mountains and a good river below his house; he could live among rugged, non-political people and visit, when he chose to, with a few of his famous friends who still came up to Sun Valley. He could sit in the Tram or the Alpine or the Sawtooth Club and talk with men who felt the same way he did about life, even if they were not so articulate. In this congenial atmosphere he felt he could get away from the pressures of a world gone mad, and "write truly" about life as he had in the past.

    From such a vantage point a man tends to feel it is not so difficult, after all, to see the world clear and as a whole. Like many another writer, Hemingway did his best work when he felt he was standing on something solid--like an Idaho mountainside, or a sense of conviction.

    Perhaps he found what he came here for, but the odds are huge that he didn't. He was an old, sick, and very troubled man, and the illusion of peace and contentment was not enough for him--not even when his friends came up from Cuba and played bullfight with him in the Tram. So finally, and for what he must have thought the best of reasons, he ended it with a shotgun.

    HST National Observer, May 25, 1964

  •  You can't blame him (4.00)
    My only familiarity with Hunter Thompson is having read Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas. On the basis of that, I conclude that he felt like the whole country had become like that police convention in Las Vegas that he wrote about: one bad trip. At his age, he must have seen no possibilities for an exit, other than the one he took.

    We can't know if he wasn't right. It may take one or two generations to set this country on a civilized path again. He wouldn't have lived to see that.

    To make abstractions hold in reality is to destroy reality. -- Hegel
    modern times

    by Alexander on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 10:25:01 PM PST

  •  no bourbon in the house (4.00)
    nothing to toast with except some lame-o Bacardi light rum and three bottles of Killian's Irish Red.

    I guess the beer is a better choice under the circumstances.

    I wonder what Doonesbury's column (hmm, I meant cartoon but I think I'll leave it as an inspired typo) will say via Uncle Duke?  Too late for tomorrow's papers but maybe Trudeau can get something done by Tuesday.

    Politics is like driving. To go backward, put it in R. To go forward, put it in D.

    by TrueBlueMajority on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 10:26:09 PM PST

  •  Damn (4.00)
    I just have no words, except to say that Thompson had genuine sanity in his insanity, and devastating clarity.

    That he had the prodigious literary gifts to share those razor-sharp insights afforded by his outlaw spirit was a gift to us all.

    Swing the Bat! Track our contributions to the DNC here at SpareChangeForAmerica.

    by Malacandra on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 10:28:39 PM PST

  •  Well that was Unexpected. (4.00)
    I intend to die with still having a few more HST books to read.  That way, I will always have a quality book to read in a pinch (its hard not just to read them all now).  Needless to say, only HST raises to this level with me.

    That being said, it is my opinion that he must have been diagnosed with some bad shit.  Alzheimer's, kill-you-dead cancer, or the such.  I just hope his asshole-ness didn't prevent him from writing a note.  No one is even bothering to mention accident, so it must have been overt or perhaps a note...

    A great writer.  Hugely personally influential.  RIP.

  •  Hunter was my hero (4.00)
    He told it from the head, the heart, and the gut, with no apology for any of it. He wasn't "detached." He was involved and committed, and with a vengeance.

    Every journalist worth a shit that I ever knew in 33 years in the business wished they could be like Hunter. Those who didn't were, and are, steaming sacks of shit.

    But we still have Joe Bageant to give the bastards hell, just like the man in my .sig file says.

    "Lash those conservatives and traitors with the pen of gall and wormwood -- let them feel -- no temporising!" -- Andrew Jackson to Francis Preston Blair, 1837

    by Ivan on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 10:37:02 PM PST

  •  is this for real?? (none)
    A friend just sent this link to me: http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=29223&item=6947274352&rd=1

    It's a signed copy of his last book. Read the last paragraph of the description:

    "This copy is in 'as new' F/F condition, in mylar, and soon the value will be at least twice what I'm selling it for. Signed copies will become extremely  rare and unattainable in the near future - don't miss out on this collector's beauty!"

    It says the auction ended three days ago. Is this some(really fast) sicko hoax or real?

  •  My understanding is that he was a manic depressive (none)
    For which he "self-medicated."

    I admire his writing, and his guts.  But given the tone of his writings from the beginning, is this a major shock to anybody?

    •  Why didnt he seek help? (1.20)
      If he had mental illness why didnt he seek help? After the election I think if he were feeling suicidal he should have told someone. I just don't understand why he'd commit suicide unless he had some health issue. If he had a health issue I hope his family sets the record straight.

      The single most critical issue of the Democratic party Support Living Wages

      by Lucian on Mon Feb 21, 2005 at 12:49:38 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  why? (none)
        they don't owe you a damn thing.
      •  Help isn't necessarily help. (none)
        Speaking from personal experience, self-medicating for manic-depression sometimes makes as much sense as anything. And I say this as someone who works closely with my medical team, and is medication compliant. What the drugs have done to my body is...  if I didn't have my kids, I'd be outta here. Until you've been here, you can't understand.

        "History repeats itself, first as tragedy, second as farce." -Karl Marx

        by Lainie on Mon Feb 21, 2005 at 03:03:31 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  I witnessed my mother living in pain (none)
        Seeing someone suffering day in a day out crying out for help from anyone, just someone to take away the pain was one of the hardest things in my life that I've had to endure.  Watching her in that state still hunts me years later.  Can you imagine- getting up each day with only having to look forward to the feeling of being TORTURED.  I read the article in his own words about the pain he had to endure.  
        I pray that none of you find yourself in a situation where you get up each morning and watch a loved one wither away SLOWLY in agony.

        RIP Hunter, no more pain

      •  Let Hunter set you straight (none)
        Read his stuff recently. Someone quoted it above, if I recall correctly. He was in pain, some sort of spinal replacement surgery, from the gist of his article.
      •  Will someone ban this fucking troll, already?? (none)
    •  Personally (none)
      I couldn't imagine Hunter dying in any other way than in a high-speed car chase involving sporadic gunfire, and the tossing of contraband.

      The person who doesn't scatter the morning dew will not comb gray hairs- Hunter S. Thompson- (RIP)

      by BooMan23 on Mon Feb 21, 2005 at 04:39:40 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  With great humility (4.00)
    He was an American, he was good, and he was one of us.  

    I am sorry that when in the depths of whatever troubled him recently he did not reach out to someone who supports him, but that was his choice.  

    He will be missed.  

  •  Sad...and something erie (4.00)
    This is depressing as hell. RIP Hunter. You made me want to become a writer.

    The odd part is this - someone put a signed copy of Hey Rube on ebay on February 14...and said this about it in the description:

    This copy is in 'as new' F/F condition, in mylar, and soon the value will be at least twice what I'm selling it for. Signed copies will become extremely  rare and unattainable in the near future - don't miss out on this collector's beauty!

    http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=29223&item=6947274352&rd=1

    That's just weird.

  •  Hunter S. Thompson quotes (4.00)
    • A word to the wise is infuriating.
    • America... just a nation of two hundred million used car salesmen with all the money we need to buy guns and no qualms about killing anybody else in the world who tries to make us uncomfortable.
    • Call on God, but row away from the rocks.
    • Going to trial with a lawyer who considers your whole life-style a Crime in Progress is not a happy prospect.
    • I have a theory that the truth is never told during the nine-to-five hours.
    • I wouldn't recommend sex, drugs or insanity for everyone, but they've always worked for me.
    • If I'd written all the truth I knew for the past ten years, about 600 people - including me - would be rotting in prison cells from Rio to Seattle today. Absolute truth is a very rare and dangerous commodity in the context of professional journalism.
    • It was the Law of the Sea, they said. Civilization ends at the waterline. Beyond that, we all enter the food chain, and not always right at the top.
    • No man is so foolish but he may sometimes give another good counsel, and no man so wise that he may not easily err if he takes no other counsel than his own. He that is taught only by himself has a fool for a master.
    • Publishers are notoriously slothful about numbers, unless they're attached to dollar signs - unlike journalists, quarterbacks, and felony criminal defendants who tend to be keenly aware of numbers at all times.
    • That was always the difference between Muhammad Ali and the rest of us. He came, he saw, and if he didn't entirely conquer - he came as close as anybody we are likely to see in the lifetime of this doomed generation.
    • The Edge... there is no honest way to explain it because the only people who really know where it is are the ones who have gone over.
    • The music business is a cruel and shallow money trench, a long plastic hallway where thieves and pimps run free, and good men die like dogs. There's also a negative side.
    • The person who doesn't scatter the morning dew will not comb gray hairs
    • There is nothing more helpless and irresponsible than a man in the depths of an ether binge.
    • When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro.
    • You can turn your back on a person, but never turn your back on a drug, especially when its waving a razor sharp hunting knife in your eye.

    Composing The News While The Media Is Decomposing - www.NewsCorpse.com

    by KingOneEye on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 10:47:11 PM PST

    •  And now? (none)
      If I'd written all the truth I knew for the past ten years, about 600 people - including me - would be rotting in prison cells from Rio to Seattle today. Absolute truth is a very rare and dangerous commodity in the context of professional journalism.


      So I wonder where his notes are?  How could he not have left a few landmines.

      Truckle the Uncivil, Nullus Anxietas Sanguinae

      by Truckle on Mon Feb 21, 2005 at 02:03:09 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Peace, brother. n/t (4.00)
  •  NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!!!!!!!!!!!! (4.00)
    But, in a funny way, this fits.  He was the weird of the weird.  Perhaps he was looking for something new.  Wanted to see what Hemingway saw.

    Maybe it's a big joke.

    goodbye.

  •  Last time I felt this way (4.00)
    was Joe Strummer.  Just terrible, terrible sadness.  He probably understood Propagannon at an intuitive level better than anyone else in the country.  If he'd been 20 years younger in 2000, he would have gone down to Florida for Roling Stone and won a Pulitzer, or gotten himself sent to Gitmo.

    I echo comments above mine about the brilliance of Fear and Loathing on the Campaign Trail 1972 -- his contempt for Humphrey, his ridicule of Muskey, and his amazing play-by-play of the procedural manoeuverings at the Democratic Convention that showed the Old Guard that the McGovern folks had their shit toghether.  Read HST and Gore Vidal and you'll understand American politics and culture.

    Earlier tonight, about 7:00 EST or so, my 5-and-a-half year-old daughter looked up at one of our bookcases -- and this bookcase has probably 400 books on it, at least -- and said, "Why is there a skeleton on that book?"  I said "What are you talking about?"  She said, "That American flag skeleton."

    She was looking at the stars-and-stripes, red-white-and-blue skull on the spine of my copy of Fear and Loathing on the Campaign Trail 1972.

    "Run, comrade, the old world is behind you!" -- Situationist graffito, 1968

    by Pesto on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 11:05:44 PM PST

  •  Only one way to celebrate (4.00)
    The good doctor wouldn't want us to cry.

    He would want us to get a lot less sober, quickly, and throw a world-wide wake.

    I'm raising my glass.

    "And life is grand/And I will say this at the risk of falling from favor/With those of you who have appointed yourselves/To expect us to say something darker."

    by Oregon Bear on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 11:06:20 PM PST

  •  Bush critic history of unseen suicides (none)
    yeah, I'm in no position to say whether or not his suicide was real, but we should all recognize that there is a history of suicide amongst Bush critics.  Most recently, Gary Webb, the investigative journalist that uncovered the links between the CIA and drug trafficking, caught a case of the suicides that resulted in two gunshot wounds to the head.  Yeah, it's possible, but is it likely?  Given the history of suicides of Bush Crime Family critics, I'd say the changes are low.  Just keep that in mind folks.  These guys are BAD news.
    •  Agreed, but (none)
      He was in pain. The ebay item I mentioned in an earlier post that was for sale Feb 14 -19 and came with the ominous warning about how signed copies wouldn't be available in the near future? The seller's listed through Google as a theraputic massage healer in Washington state. Based on her ebay auction, seems she had some good early information about Thompson's impending demise. If that's as it looks, it supports the official account.
    •  Do you think (none)
      DO you think they'd take it this far to the point of killing journalists? Was Hunter S Thompson healthy around the time he commited suicide?

      The single most critical issue of the Democratic party Support Living Wages

      by Lucian on Mon Feb 21, 2005 at 12:52:33 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  If ever there was somebody (none)
      you couldn't put a hit on without arousing suspicion, it would be HST. He lived/lives in the middle of goddamn nowhere. He's good friends with the Sheriff. He's armed to the teeth. I sincerely doubt this was the result of foul play unless there is some evidence provided by his immediate circle otherwise; they're probably all way more paranoid than we ever will be.
    •  Thats just paranoia (none)
      And a fitting tribute to Hunter S Thompson. He would have liked the idea of CIA agents hunting him down and shooting him, and if he liked the idea, he wouldn't have cared if it was true.
    •  Given this... (none)
      ...story excerpted from John DeCamp's Nebraska pedophilia book, I don't have any trouble believing HST would commit suicide. His life is its own cover story. If I'd seen things like that I wouldn't stay sane long, either.
    •  Taken one with him (none)
      If you think some poor bastard could sneak up on Hunter in his own kitchen without at least taking some lead himself, then you need to drink some booze to clear your head.  
  •  Bat Country (3.75)
    As someone who loved Hunter S. Thompson's writing, words cannot express the sadness of his loss.

    His books were inspiring and humurous; but most importantly his words were truthful.  

    He was a unique, genuine and truly American voice...

    GONZO

  •  A word from the wise (4.00)
    HST explains it all. From the WaPo obit: "Objective journalism is one of the main reasons that American politics has been allowed to be so corrupt for so long," Thompson told interviewers in a characteristic pronouncement on both institutions.
  •  Whenever (none)
    I read Thompson, I think of Lester Bangs.  RIP.
  •  Rest in Peace Hunter Thompson (none)
    you were a remarkable person.

    "Things will not calm down Dr. Jackson, they will, in fact, calm up!" - Tilk, Stargate SG-1

    by 2care4others on Sun Feb 20, 2005 at 11:54:28 PM PST

  •  very sad to read this (none)
    I have long been a great respecter of HST, was very sad to read this this morning.

    "Even a new day starts in darkness."

    by markbar on Mon Feb 21, 2005 at 12:09:24 AM PST

  •  A profoundly horrible omen. (4.00)
    He always teetered between nihilism and joie de vivre, and here again it seems the forces against hope have won the day.

    Madness, genius, whatever. Something positive is gone forever.

    RIP, you crazy fucker.

  •  BBC News (4.00)
    now has a tribute page set up for readers to leave tributes on.

    BBC.... Hunter S Thompson: Your tributes

    We were somewhere around Barstow on the edge of the desert when the drugs began to take hold. I remember saying something like "I feel a bit lightheaded; maybe you should drive. . . ." And suddenly there was a terrible roar all around us and the sky was full of what looked like huge bats, all swooping and screeching and diving around the car, which was going about a hundred miles an hour with the top down to Las Vegas. And a voice was screaming: "Holy Jesus! What are these goddamn animals?"

    Orwell is spinning in his grave

    by tlh lib on Mon Feb 21, 2005 at 12:20:11 AM PST

  •  I never read much of Thompson... (none)
    but any guy who compared another four years of Bush to four years of syphilis is a good man in my book.

    Rest in peace brother.  You will not be forgotten.  I raise my beer, To Hunter S. Thompson.

    I promise the next book I read will be one of yours, friend...

    •  good idea (none)
      May I suggest "The Great Shark Hunt" or "F & L on the Campaign Trail '72'.

      Those are my favorites.

      The person who doesn't scatter the morning dew will not comb gray hairs- Hunter S. Thompson- (RIP)

      by BooMan23 on Mon Feb 21, 2005 at 04:36:31 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  I'm at a loss for words (4.00)
    All I can really say is that "Fear and Loathing on The Campaign Trail '72" is waht got me interested in domestic politics.  Up until the time Iread that I had just been interested in International politics.  Rest In Peace Hunter.
    •  Father of a New Generation (4.00)
      Fear and Loathing on the Campaign Trail is the book that got me interested in U.S. politics as well. Hunter S. Thompson not only was a political junkie by himself, he also helped create a whole new generation of political junkies. He made an indispensable contribution to the vividness of political journalism and American democracy. As for me, I regard myself as a member of that generation Hunter S. Thompson helped to create.
  •  O Captain my Captain (none)
    n/t
  •  RIP Dr. Gonzo (4.00)
    Kick Nixon in the nuts for me - and may you have the most beautiful ladies always at your side as you place your bets...

    "now this is not the end, it is not even the beginning of the end. But it is, perhaps, the end of the beginning." W. Churchill

    by Thor Heyerdahl on Mon Feb 21, 2005 at 01:27:42 AM PST

  •  Okay, I'll come out and say it (none)
    What if Hunter didn't commit suicide -- what if he was disappeared?

    In any case, has anyone heard anything about a note?

    I can't imagine that he'd take himself out without having the last word. He would leave a message, probably a LONG message. Look at his writings, his years of writings, even his most recent, always impassioned.

    I won't come close to understanding this until I hear Hunter's own explanation. I'm sure it exists somewhere. Unless he was disappeared.

  •  Anyone else... (none)
    [Letting (way too much of) the Honorary Bacardi speak]

    Anyone else, and I'd hand it over to mental illness, despondancy, depression; but not The Duke.

    Doesn't it strike one that the most personal journalist has past just when personal journalism has taken down corruption.  Maybe, just maybe, he's past with the joy of knowing that the masses have taken on their mantle, taken on their responsibility, taken on their role as humans, taken on the truth of gonzo.

    If I'm right, know he left us with the joy of knowing that masses are the media.

    Maybe, just maybe.

  •  Sad news--sad day (none)
    He was one of the best.  RIP, old friend.
  •  My bummed out musings.... (4.00)
    I watched the 2 hour special on tv tonight... SNL - the first 5 years 1975 to 1980 (which, of course, were the ONLY years anyone should speak of.  John Belushi, Gilda Radner - Gone.  Shoot....in the wild partying days in high school... no one did anything that would keep them away from the TV past 10:30pm on a Saturday night.  Ever.  You didn't miss SNL.

    And no HIV/AIDS.

    And a society that recognized that people were people, and they had let their hair down, and there was no fucked up morality crap from the right.

    and Jimmy Carter... LORD, Jimmy Carter and his mind-numbing, never-ending speeches to the country!  I was in high school, and I would force myself to watch, listen to the mugwump drone on for what seemed like centuries... because, for some reason, SOME reason, I had some notion that it was my civic duty to listen when the president of the USA had something to say.

    Funny thing... the one thing Carter had to say that truly impacted me was his call to the people to conserve energy.  Turn the thermostats down. I remember vividly that he told us the exact temps at which we should keep our houses during the day and during the night.  Of all things to remember.  And that he was going to lower the speed limit on highways.  Gee, never dawned on me that  we could collectively reduce energy consumption by just slowing down. (Of course, being from Texas... driving 55 is a nightmare.  It takes 18 hours at a high speed just to north to south in that state....but it was our civic responsibility).

    And then there was that really cool thing called the Equal Rights Amendment.  How could that not be ratified, I wondered?  Women - total equals.  Funny that you would even need to put that IN the constitution.  Seemed to be a given to me at the time.  Helen Ready was a hit.  I could just walk into a planned parenthood office and pick up some birth control, and, importantly, be treated like a responsible adult by those older physicians.  Boy was I wrong.  In just a few short years, I would be called a Feminazi.  I would have employers make the most transparent attempt to discover if I was gay with the only ground that I toted that I was a member of the National Organization for Women (and that was in 1994!  "She must be a dyle...NOW.. come on.. has to be.  Of course, why did I bother with birth control?)

    Those are the just some of the things I remember from the late 70s.  Seems my memory only goes as far back to December 1976 - the day I got my driver's license, the day life really took off.

    Shit, Abby Hoffman gave the commencement speech at my high school in 1979.  And I had no friggin idea what a big deal that was.  Something about a monkey farm. Ignorant that I was.

    And now Hunter Thompson is gone from our midst.

    I just want to go back. I want my old hair style back. I want the funky clothes (bell bottoms!).  I want to watch Saturday Night Fever for the first time, again.  But, most of all, I want to wake up with a sense that we have a damn good fighting chance to change the fucked-upped-ness of the world.  I want to have the sense that the ERA is a given......... that people will be allowed to love whoever their heart tells them to love..... and have a sense that I can leave this earth knowing it's going to be a kick ass place for the generation who is just now being born.

    Where are the dems heading? Not left, not right -- but FORWARD! Chaaaaaarrrrrggggge!

    by Zapata28 on Mon Feb 21, 2005 at 02:47:50 AM PST

  •  RIP (none)
    Given the performance of the American media over the past few years, I think it's safe to say Hunter Thompson's spirit has been dead for some time now...

    He was one of a kind.

  •  Semper Fi, Bro (4.00)
    You are right, Hunter, it does all look like some sort of experiment involving whiskey and gorillas.
  •  Damn! (none)
    I've enjoyed Thompson's writing since I first stumbled across him in Rolling Stone back when it was lively and exciting.

    Then I read "Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas" and began to really understand how humor mixed with angry insight could be extremely effective. Then "Fear and Loathing on the Campaign Trail" came out. His skewering of the Nixon campaign was a classic not to be missed, presented in his own special Gonzo style.

    I'll miss him.

    Update: There are Lies, Damned Liars and FOX News.' Politics Plus Stuff

    by Rick B on Mon Feb 21, 2005 at 04:11:44 AM PST

  •  Thompson (none)
    God, I'm gonna miss reading his stuff.
  •  I'm not as sad as I thought I would be. (4.00)
    I had the opportunity to sit with Thompson and his wife some eighteen months ago, and we talked politics for hours. The guy was SHARP as a whip, right there with his A-game, completely hinged and writing some total genius for Playboy's 50th Anniversay issue about the Democrats being the modern day equivalent of the House of David, the all-white basketball team who the Globetrotters used to carry around to help them look good. I tell you, it was the night of my life.

    So why did he kill himself? Did he even?

    Yeah, I reckon so. There's long been rumors that he once held a party that George W Bush attended, where the cocaine was flowing like Coca Cola, but I can't imagine Dumbya had reason to off the Doc.

    No, I honestly think it was good old fashioned "I'm ready" time. Thompson's hero was Hemingway, and Hemingway took his life the same way, at about the same point in his career. There's no way HST would have wanted to kick on through illness, or with his body starting to give out, and he'd been in hospital for extended stays twice in the last couple of years.

    He was only 67, but his body was 108. His brain, sadly, was still 32.

    Regardless of how or why he died, he had one passion in life, and you'll find it here. Lisl Auman is a Denver girl who was riding in a car with a guy she barely knew, who turned out to be a wanted psycho driving a stolen car, and wielding a rifle. Auman had accepted the guy's help to move her things out of an abusive boyfriend's apartment, but before long he was speeding away from the law and readying his rifle.

    The car pulled over and the guy ran, leaving Auman to be arrested, cuffed, put in the back of a cruiser, and driven a short distance to keep her clear of any gunfire. While in the car she gave a description of the guy, and his gun.

    While Auman was sitting in that cruiser, the guy shot a police office. And some weeks later, Auman was charged with felony murder as an accessory... A murder that had taken place while she was cuffed in a police cruiser.

    She's doing life. Thompson had struck up a correspondence with her when she wrote him a fan mail and he explored her situation. He was VERY much passionate about getting justice for this girl, and if you want to pay tribute to the Doc, please go visit the site, read up, and do what you can to help.

    The last words Thompson ever spoke to me were, "I did my part... now you do yours."

    Those words weren't meant for me. They were meant for all of us.

    SANTORUM: 1. Frothy mix of lube and fecal matter, a byproduct of anal sex. 2. Senator from Pennsylvania.

    by HollywoodOz on Mon Feb 21, 2005 at 04:18:41 AM PST

    •  Hunter & Dubya (none)
      <!>"Yeah, I reckon so. There's long been rumors that he once held a party that George W Bush attended, where the cocaine was flowing like Coca Cola, but I can't imagine Dumbya had reason to off the Doc."<!>
      I don't have the exact quote with me right now, but it was something along the lines of first meeting Dubya in a Houston hotel in '73, where Dubya tagged along with a drug-dealer Hunter was meeting at his hotel room. Dubya apparently wound up using most of the stuff Hunter was buying and ended up passing out in the bathtub, the dealer and Hunter left him there, locked the room up and checked out of the hotel without paying the bill.
  •  Just wondering (none)
    I wonder what P.J. O'Rourke's thoughts are on Thompson's death.  Although I don't know this for a fact, I have to believe that HST was a role model for PJ in PJ's early days.

    PJ sold out to to money and fame and went over to the dark side.  I don't know how the guy can look himself in the mirror.  PJ excuses his sellout by saying he "grew up."

    Thank goodness Hunter S. Thompson didn't.

    George Bush vacations in Texas; he LIVES in Denial.

    by Joon on Mon Feb 21, 2005 at 05:22:34 AM PST

  •  This makes me so sad. (4.00)
    I loved Hunter.  I posted his quote on the past election far and wide:

    "We have become a Nazi monster in the eyes of the whole world--a nation of bullies and bastards who would rather kill than live peacefully. We are not just Whores for power and oil, but killer whores with hate and fear in our hearts. We are human scum, and that is how history will judge us...No redeeming social value. Just whores. Get out of our way, or we'll kill you.

    Who does vote for these dishonest shitheads? Who among us can be happy and proud of having this innocent blood on our hands? Who are these swine? These flag-sucking half-wits who get fleeced and fooled by stupid rich kids like George Bush?

    They are the same ones who wanted to have Muhammad Ali locked up for refusing to kill gooks. They speak for all that is cruel and stupid and vicious in the American character. They are the racists and hate mongers among us--they are the Ku Klux Klan. I piss down the throats of these Nazis.

    And I am too old to worry about whether they like it or not. Fuck them."

    He must have been overwhelmed with sadness.  Poor Hunter.  R.I.P.

    Help me please! Bad bad people have stolen my country!

    by JulieIde on Mon Feb 21, 2005 at 05:28:09 AM PST

  •  Bummer x 1,000 (none)

      Will re-read "Fear & Loathing on the Campaign Trial '72", starting this week, in memorium.  Damn best take no prisoners, tell it like it is (and then some) political, and oft times otherwise, writer . . .  In the political writing pantheon with Swift, Paine, Sinclair, Twain, Mencken . . .  Hell, Shakespeare's probably wondering how Dr. Thompson came up with some of those railroad-spike-through-the-heart-of-bullshit similes.

     BenGoshi
    _________________

    "If a nation expects to be ignorant and free, in a state of civilization, it expects what never was and never will be." T.J.

    by BenGoshi on Mon Feb 21, 2005 at 05:37:23 AM PST

  •  The Arsonists (none)
    "The worm turns, the wind shifts one-eighty, and the firestorm turns back on the arsonists, who had been operating with impunity for so long that they'd forgotten the feeling of Heat."

    - Hunter S. Thompson.

    One of my favorite HST quotes. RIP, Gonzo, and Mahalo. There was no one else like you, and there never will be. We'll really miss you.

  •  HST (none)
    Its true that he was the best for 25 years. Read his books and be inspired to speak the truth.
  •  My mother committed suicide (none)
    32 years ago. Its something you never get over.

    I feel great sorrow and empathy for his son.

    When the PEOPLE lead, the LEADERS follow!

    by mlkisler on Mon Feb 21, 2005 at 05:58:36 AM PST

  •  Rest In Peace? I don't know about that... (none)
    Does that sound like anything the Doctor ever aspired to?
    Maybe rocket off of the cosmic billiard table, a million volt bank shot that never ends.
  •  Hunter S. Thompson (none)
    It's said that Thompson invented a style, but I don't think that's true. To my ears, his style sounds much like H.L. Mencken's -- the deflation of a target with exotic conjunctions of epithets. It is THE style of American political writing in the 20th century. The voice is dry in contrast to the savagery of the attack. Evidence is disdained: the authority to make these judgments is presumed by right. The exotic, humorous selection of imagery provides all the bona fides the writer needs. Think PJ O'Rourke, William Safire, Ann Coulter. Among others. It is pre-eminently a conservative's voice. So, when Thompson employed the style in the service of mind exfoliating drugs and such, it sounded more novel than it was.

    The trouble with the style is that one quickly runs out of epithets, and repetition sets in. Thompson's great triumph (Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas) should have been sui generis. Instead, it became a career. And a prison.

  •  A true badass. (none)

    Goodnight, Dr.

    Louisville mourns.

    •  Yeah (4.00)
      We're pretty bummed out here in Nashville, too.

      You know, the fact that Thompson was a Southerner is never far from my mind while reading his work.

      He had that love of the game that is politics, that gets bred into you down here.  

      His predictions were sometimes off, but the enthusiasm and insights were always there, right up till the end.

      If the right people had been in charge of Nixon's funeral, his
      casket would have been launched into one of those open sewage
      canals that empty into the ocean just south of Los Angeles.
      He was a swine of a man and a jabbering dupe of a president.
      Nixon was so crooked that he needed servants to help him screw
      his pants on every morning. Even his funeral was illegal. . . . His
      body should have been burned in a trash bin.

      -- Hunter S. Thompson

    •  yes, we do mourn (none)
      I can say that as a Louisvillian.

      Senator Chris Dodd went to law school in my hometown of Louisville.  I just noticed your user ID.  are you Senator Dodd?

      Evan Bayh 2008
      Miller for KY Governor 2007
      http://kydem.blogspot.com

      by dsolzman on Mon Feb 21, 2005 at 07:04:57 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Wow (none)
    Y'all, I just printed this page - I think it's the most fitting tribute to the good Doctor I'm ever likely to read.

    Well done.

  •  I Met Him Once (4.00)
    And spoke to him for about 2-3 minutes.  He came to my college to give a talk, I arrived late with some friends (we'd been at a play rehearsal), there were only about 10-15 people there and the thing ended up being far more intimate than such event usually are.  I asked him what he thought about George Wallace's chances in the next presidential election (this was April 1974).  I was convinced Wallace had a great chance of getting the Democratic nomination (don't ask why, at the time it seemed likely), he said it wouldn't happen, we went back and forth about it briefly.  He was remote, but not unfriendly, and not the least bit condescending.  He ranged over his entire career in a shambling, casual manner, talking about Neal Cassady screaming abuse at the police at La Honda the night the Merry Pranksters turned the Hells Angels on to LSD, about sharing drugs with NFL players as they bitched about the sport they played and the coaches who ruled over them like tyrants, and described what it had been like to sit 10 feet from Alexander Butterfield the day he revealed that Nixon had the Oval Office wired with a recording system whose tapes contained the truth about the whole Watergate affair.

    His was an erratic intelligence frequently clouded by rage and drugs, but it was capable of great insights about our society and its place in the world.  I always felt that underneath it all he was an idealist who carried great wounds from the terrible things that have happened to our country and our world in his lifetime.

    So long, Hunter, say hello to Raoul Duke for me.  You'll be missed at least as much as you'll be remembered.

    "L'enfer, c'est les autres." - Jean Paul Sartre, Huis Clos

    by JJB on Mon Feb 21, 2005 at 06:50:28 AM PST

  •  ah shit (none)
    that's all.  Shit.
  •  We lost a giant of journalism this weekend... (none)
    It's a sad day for all the real hard-nosed independent journalists and sports writers out there.. We lost one of the best, one of the most dynamic and challenging, and yes even one of the craziest reporters ever to grace this world. Hunter exposed more than just counterculture - he brought out the darkest, most secret hopes of mankind in his work, simply by putting himself on the front line to experience such hope, and the ebbing disappointment that ensued.
  •  Journalist or Novelist? (none)
    Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas was always a hard book to find in the library or bookstore. It would end up in Political Science or Sociology.

    LIke a lot of great American writers(Henry Miller, Joseph Heller) he had one great shining achievement early, and never managed it again.

    Excepting Hell's ANgels, I cant see any of his work as journalism or even non-fiction. In another time, all of his works would have been printed as novels based on thinly disguised real people(like On the Road).

    It was sad that he became a larger than life figure, a cult figure. He ended up doing impersonations of himself.

    Is Steadman still alive? I would like to see Steadman's tribute/elegy.

  •  My Favorite Quote (none)
    "When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro."

    -- Hunter S. Thompson

  •  VIGIL TONIGHT-TOMORROW (none)
    All,

    Go to the nearest Liquor store, purchase a bottle of Wild Turkey (one of Hunter's favorite drinks), pour yourself a glass (on the rocks), drink, repeat.

    Read a good book, take his words to heart.

    -b

    Get out of control, but appear under control. It's not bad to alarm other people, though - it's good for them.
    - Hunter S. Thompson

    by bisenbek on Mon Feb 21, 2005 at 08:41:01 AM PST

  •  Nothing good lasts forever. (none)
    Rest in Peace, good Doctor.

    Looks like we're all living in Bat Country, now.

    Your voice will be missed, but not forgotten.

  •  New York Times (none)
    Has a pitiful few words for him at the bottom of the obit page.
    While g-ddamn Gidget and some crooner we thirtysomethings have never heard of headline the page, with more words than had been written about either of them in forty years, for sure.
    Pathetic.
    Shame on you, New York Times.
    It's one thing to be weak, but the New York Times is willfully weak in these times when the world needs them help the heart of the REAL good ole US of A beat again.
    Poor show, you lazy, cowed bastards at the New York Times.
    In the name of Hunter S. Thompson I proclaim you irrelevant.
  •  a favorite: (none)
    "I am a famously Patriotic American writer, and I am personally embarassed by the fascist behavioral sink that these shit-eating greedheads from Texas have deliberately plunged us into. Those pigs deserve to be boiled in their own oil."
  •  Who says it was suicide? (none)
    Could it be something else?
  •  Hunter S. Thompson, RIP (4.00)
    I will let Hunter speak for a moment...

    Q: So what took place during this past election?

    HST: I believe the Republicans have seen what they've believed all along, which is that this democracy stuff is bull, and that people don't want to be burdened by political affairs. That people would rather just be taken care of. The oligarchy doesn't need an educated public. And maybe the nation does prefer tyranny. I think that's what worries me. It goes back to Fourth Amendment issues. How much do you value your freedom? Would you trade your freedom for some illusion of security? Freedom is something that dies unless it's used.

    Q: Is there anything you regret?

    HST: That goes to the question of would you do it again. If you can't say you'd do it again, it means that time was wasted -- useless. The regrets I have are so minor. You know, would I leave my Keith Richards hat, with the silver skull on it, on the stool at the coffee shop at LaGuardia? I wouldn't do that again. But overall, no, I don't have any regrets.

    Hunter S. Thompson, chronologer of the death of the American Dream, was 67 years old when he died Sunday in Aspen, Colorado. The official cause of death is suicide. The real cause of death was a broken heart.

    - Badtux the Saddened Penguin

    Religions conservatives are motivated by the suspicion that someone, somewhere, is having fun.

    by badtux on Mon Feb 21, 2005 at 09:31:00 AM PST

  •  god Dammit (none)
    He was no less a man than a god and no more a god than a man.  Jeesus fucking christ on a crutch people do you realize what this means?

    Hell, I hope to be in barbados this time tomorrow sucking down some half-assed homegrown whiskey that tastes like they have dogs swim in it before they even slap on a label.

    Maybe I'll stand there all day and feel the cold dead weight of the sea on my toes and the sand slapping me in the face like some angry monk yelling about what a crock celibacy is...

    No, I'll just sit there and think about how they sold us out and how the bastards wouldn't let the last honest man alone.  Fuck em.. the bastards should all be lined against the wall...

    He who fights beasts should be prepared to be taken down like a wounded one, or verse vica.

    And then, just before the sun dips down on this armageddon evening, right through the tears of extreme sorrow; I'll laugh hard, I really will folks.

    Selah HST Selah

    -Q

  •  We've Got To Prove Thompson and Hoffman Wrong (none)
    We've got to make them wish they stuck with us.
    We've GOT to turn this thing around.

    We've got to be strong, coherent, and risk-taking.
    No more soft-pedaling and compromise in the misapprehension that could ever lead to victory.

    Russ '08.

    Kerry for moderate Elder Statesman running mate.
    Not as a compromise to the middle but as an in-your-face to the Neo-Cons.

    •  Russ (none)
      Russ '08.  Yes.

      At any street corner the feeling of absurdity can strike any man in the face. - Albert Camus

      by ubergeib on Mon Feb 21, 2005 at 01:01:46 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  NewDirection... (none)
      Not attaching specifically to your comment; just want to be part of this archive for future descendants and researchers in general.

      What a gift we are leaving future generations?  An archive of how we feel -- Kos, whatever you do, you protect these archives.

      W.r.t. Hunter, I have known him all my life or so it seems.  Hunter's biggest gift to us all was to teach us what 'bullshit' was all about.

      Hunter is King of anti-Bullshit.  He will always be a mentor of my generation, and his style of realism in a world of paper roses and mother goose rhymes, will always shine through the generations as Mozart's melodies have made it to ours.

      When you are wearing the new Federal ID's; with computer chips that you do not understand; think of Hunter S. Thompson.  He will be in his grave with his hand on his cock, laughing, and enjoying the afterlife.

      I don't blame him.  What's the use?; the Earth is in an irreversible, probably, environemtnal tailspin.  The Evangelicals are praying for the Rapture (like that's gonna do some good) -- Bush has heading toward's WW III.

      Who knows.  Perhaps Hunter knows of, or senses something we do not.  Whatever, it if it indeed was a suicide, he had determined that his work in this world was finished; and so it must be time to move on; and he did.

      But his legacy to us; to future generations, is simply this.

      "When they tell you a lie, tell them simply to just go fuck themselves, and tell them that "...while you're there stick a goddamn dildo up your ass."

      That is my take on Thompson.

      "Violence is the last refuge of the incompetent." - Asimov

      by louislemire on Mon Feb 21, 2005 at 05:06:38 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Thanks HST (none)
    www.dannydoom.com (The Booze Cabinet):

    The Good Doctor Says No More, Thank You ... Where The Buffalo Roam Vs. Johnny Depp ... Aspen Widows And Booze-Filled Hot Tubs ... Nixon Becomes Bush, Repeat Every Four Years ... Songs Of The Doomed ... We Should Have Known Better ... All Apologies ... RIP Hunter S. Thompson ...

    I suppose it's fitting to put on some Nirvana, disc 3 of the box set, as I sit here and think about the news that Dr. Thompson shot himself on Sunday. One shotgun suicide deserves another. Big difference between 27 and 67 though, very big difference. Still, it's shocking news to me --

    (I got this far before I banged my head with my hand, V-8 style, and realized this was hardly a tribute without a glass of booze for accompaniment; head to the kitchen, grab a glass, get back to my seat and find the cat has taken my place at keyboard).

    Maker's Mark, three ice cubes, splash of water, I carry on. No, not shocking that he finally died, or even that he died by his own hand, in a way it makes perfect sense that the only way this guy was going to die was by suicide, seeing as how he'd seemingly tried every other way and was unsuccessful. But still ... the guns. So efficient. So cold and efficient. They really get the job done.

    I had no idea, I just got back from Wisconsin today and heard the news, saw the news actually, on the front page of the Sun-Times as I sat on the pot. It was truly a shock to gaze over the page and see that headline, small as it was, and below the "Cop Shoots Husband, Daughter, Kills Herself" on the left side, that Hunter S. Thompson was dead. Of a self-inflicted gunshot wound, near Aspen. How had I not heard this? I briefly saw a crawl on CNN this morning before I left that said Sandra Dee had died, and Bonnie Raitt's dad, John, but I guess I had not really paid much attention to the televison otherwise. It's hard not to, this t.v. is the size of my car, but I missed it. I don't really know who those other two people are, besides the "Grease" song and Bonnie's dad, respectively. The movie "Network" was on when we turned it off to leave for Chicago around noon. "I'm mad as hell and I'm not gonna take it anymore!"

    The Doctor has killed himself, no medicine, no cure, he's dead. Shot himself in the head. There will be no gun rants here, I've done that to no end, and it doesn't matter anyway; they keep going off.

    I have always preferred the Bill Murray-as-Thompson film "Where The Buffalo Roam" to the Johnny Depp version, but I will now have to give "Fear And Loathing" another viewing, just to tie this all up, see where I stand. But since I own the former, I will throw that in as tribute tonight. The first half is so great, but then ... it just falls apart. Still, the midgets playing football in the hotel room is classic. Depp's movie tries so hard to recreate the book that it pained me to watch it the first time; I don't know that the book can ever be properly put to film, but it's a noble effort, I suppose. Christ, Thompson's dead, what the hell happened?

    When I went to Aspen a couple of years ago we didn't know where the Thompson hangouts were; really, we were just freaked to be existing in this land of the extravagantly wealthy and famous, staying in a condo for free, a block from the mountain, and hanging in the hot tub outside, drinking and throwing snowballs in the 30 degree weather wearing nothing but shorts. And skiing, of course. It was great fun, and we were way out of our league. Knowing that is the first step. The rest is just like goofing off in the back of class in high school, laughing at the way they look at you. For the record, the look is one of petulant disgust, and it usually comes from a sun-wrinkled fur-wrapped rich widow. Awesome.

    We later found out that the Dr. would frequent a pub in Aspen, name I can't recall, and we kind of kicked ourselves for not researching before we went. But we would be back, we knew we would, and so we would be prepared this time. Although we did mention at the time that it might be frightening to actually see Thompson in person, he'd probably be a monster and ruin my/our glorification of the man. With anyone famous, it's a toss-up whether it's worth it to try and talk to them, especially if you admire them; it's a sure-fire way to pop the balloon. Or to just feel dumb when you have nothing to say. But now we'll never know.

    The trip was, and is still, scheduled for March, St. Pat's weekend, less than a month from now. We'll be heading out to Aspen once more, condo and skiing, the whole deal, and now the Dr. is gone. He killed himself! I really have to process that for a second. He didn't O.D., he didn't drink his liver away, he didn't crash his car or crash in a plane; he shot himself in the head. He must have had a good reason, if there ever is one (yes, there are), but I don't really care, that won't change anything. I respect his decision, but, like other great suicides, I want more, and now I can't have it. So it's selfishness. That's how it goes with people you don't know, it's more about you than them, and what they did for you. Or me.

    I didn't expect Hunter Thompson to die, not for for quite some time. Not ever, really. He was truly one of my favorite writers that there ever was. Where would this Booze Cabinet be without that combination of politics, doom, bullshit and, of course, booze? Inspiration, all of it, to the end, much thanks and respect to the Good Doctor. I am sad that he is gone now.

    You know, we should have known better. Replace Nixon with Bush and all this starts to sound the same:

    "I understand, along with a lot of other people, that the big thing, this year, is Beating Nixon. But that was also the big thing, as I recall, twelve years ago in 1960 - and as far as I can tell, we've gone from bad to worse to rotten since then, and the outlook is for more of the same."

    - Fear And Loathing On The Campaign Trail, as excerpted by William Rivers Pitt, Truthout

    Nixon is Bush, and Bush is Nixon. They elected him then anyway and we elected him again and again, and bad gets worse and even rotten, and we should have known better, but ... we didn't.

    All apologies, says Cobain now, and the disc ends.

    www.dannydoom.com (The Booze Cabinet)

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