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Baton Rouge, La – Two weeks ago, on an early Saturday morning, men and women clad in gold emerged from their RVs and began firing up grills and lighting pits, unpacking coolers and heating up jambalayas.

Here, under the majestic live oak and magnolia trees on the beautiful campus of Louisiana State University, more than one hundred thousand people turned out to celebrate one of Louisiana’s most sacred traditions, tailgating and football.

Hours before the number 1 ranked LSU Tigers strode on the field in Death Valley to face the Florida Gators; an even older Louisiana ritual began. Just a few miles east, a few citizens could be seen lining up outside the Louisiana Archives building to kick off the 2011 elections in Louisiana.

A rundown of some of these races is below.

Few places in the U.S. value tradition and heritage more so than Louisiana. From the state’s French and Spanish heritage to its Cajun and Creole cuisines to its own dialect in Cajun French, Louisiana and its residents embrace its colored traditions like few other places.

As such, it is especially surprising when Louisianans shed one of these traditions, especially when done rapidly. Yet last Saturday as so many fêted Louisiana football and cuisine, the state’s voters did just that. After almost a century and a half of effectively one party rule in the state by the Democratic Party, Louisiana voters will continue to surrender the state to one party rule, except this time to the Grand Ole Party.

Louisiana has seven statewide elected officials, all of which are up for election this year. Currently, Republicans hold all seven offices, and the Louisiana Democratic Party has failed to put forth a serious challenger in any of the races, even leaving four of them uncontested.

Gov. Bobby Jindal is a heavy favorite to surpass the 50% threshold in the Oct. 22 primary against nine other candidates, thereby avoiding the general election entirely due to Louisiana’s dysfunctional jungle primary system.

His main challenger is Democrat Tara Hollis, a teacher from northwest Louisiana. Ms. Hollis has essentially no chance of making the runoff or winning outright against Gov. Jindal, the popular Republican incumbent who has amassed a $10 million war chest. The race is Safe R.

The race for lieutenant governor is one of two competitive races statewide, both of which pit two Republicans against one another. This race has fast become the marquee race of the cycle. It pits Lt. Gov. Jay Dardenne against Plaquemines Parish President Billy Nungesser.

Lt. Gov. Jay Dardenne was elected last November in a special election to fill the seat left vacant after Mitch Landrieu was elected mayor of the City of New Orleans. Before that, he was elected in a 2006 special election to fill the vacancy at Secretary of State and was subsequently reelected in 2007 for a full term. Mr. Dardenne was also a four term state senator and East Baton Rouge Metro Councilman.

Plaquemines Parish President Billy Nungesser is the challenger in the race. Plaquemines Parish is a small parish (population wise) located just south of New Orleans. It was hard hit by Hurricane Katrina and the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Mr. Nungesser gained national attention for his response to the spill, appearing almost daily on cable news shows talking about the spill.

Billy Nungesser is challenging Jay Dardenne from the right, with the endorsement of the state’s junior senator and Republican kingmaker David Vitter. This endorsement is seen in some political circles as revenge against Mr. Dardenne for entertaining the idea of challenging Sen. Vitter last year in the Republican primary.

Dardenne has a history of facing Republican challenges from the right, most recently in the special election for lieutenant governor in 2010 when no less than three other significant Republican challengers, all positioned to Dardenne’s right, fought for one of the two positions in the runoff that ultimately went to Dardenne and Democrat Caroline Fayard. Mr. Dardenne also beat back a challenge from then state Republican Party Chairman Mike Francis in the 2006 special election for Secretary of State.

I would give the edge to Mr. Dardenne in the race. Mr. Nungesser has managed to upset much of the state’s Republican establishment by his challenge, and I believe Dardenne will win with a combination of the establishment wing of the Republican Party coupled with the support of Democrats, who have no candidate of their own. If I were to guess, look for Dardenne to rack up large margins in Baton Rouge, New Orleans proper and on the north shore. Mr. Nungesser should run well up north and along the coast in areas from Belle Chasse to Houma and probably all the way east to Lake Charles. Race is Lean Dardenne.

The only other statewide race to even mention is the race for Secretary of State. The current officeholder, Tom Schedler, ascended to the position after Dardenne’s election to lieutenant governor. Speaker of the Louisiana House of Representatives Jim Tucker is challenging Schedler.

This R vs. R affair has been far tamer than the other race. Polling shows neither are that well known across the state but gave a slight edge to Speaker Tucker. Both men are conservative Republicans, but neither comes close to being as bombastic as Mr. Nungesser. Race is Tilt Tucker.

In the legislature, the story is much the same. Democrats, whom only a year ago controlled the state senate, only fielded candidates in 17 of 39 districts. Republicans are looking to pad their majorities some and are set to do so significantly.

The marquee D vs. R races here are those for Districts 12, 19 and 28. In District 12, State Sen. Ben Nevers is running for reelection against a Tea Party backed Republican. Nevers is running in a historically Democratic area that is rapidly shifting away, one in which Sen. Landrieu lost 46-51 and President Obama lost 32-67. The district covers all of Washington Parish and parts of St. Helena, St. Tammany and Tangipahoa parishes. I’d rate it Tossup/Tilt D.

The race in District 19 pits State Rep. Gary Smith against Garrett Monti in the district of former Senate President Joel Chaisson. This district is largely based in the River Parishes around La Place between New Orleans and Baton Rouge. This race has seen heavy TV spending on both sides. This seat went 55-43 for Sen. Landrieu while going 58-41 for John McCain. It is Lean D.

Finally, District 28 sees a race between State Sen. Eric LaFleur and challenger Dr. Paul Miller. LaFleur is seen in some circles as a promising young legislator and is very much in the mold of the dying breed of Cajun Democrats. This district includes some of the heart of Cajun country, centering on Evangeline Parish and Allen Parish, with parts of Avoyelles and St Landry parishes as well. District 28 went 64-34 for Mr. McCain in 2008; however, Sen. Landrieu carried the seat narrowly, 51-47. The race is a Tossup/Tilt D.

The state house is much the same situation as the senate, although the starting point is farther back. Democrats failed to even contest a majority of seats here.

Originally posted to Stephen Schmitz on Fri Oct 21, 2011 at 04:49 AM PDT.

Also republished by Louisiana Kossacks and Community Spotlight.

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Comment Preferences

  •  Tomorrow (11+ / 0-)

    Election day is tomorrow! I encourage everyone to geaux vote.

    21, Male, LA-06, TX-08 (former), SSP: sschmi4

    by Stephen Schmitz on Fri Oct 21, 2011 at 04:51:24 AM PDT

  •  Louisiana would make an interesting experiment (4+ / 0-)

    ...at rebooting the Democratic Party in a more progressive way.  Clearly the party has no future--none, zero, zip--as a less-conservative party.  Whites don't like its commitment to racial justice, and Blacks don't like its lack of commitment to socioeconomic justice (and therefore, ironically, to racial justice).  At least a more-progressive party could start to claw back some Black votes, and start contesting the assumptions of White voters in a serious rather than hopelessly incremental way.

    But nobody's buying flowers from the flower lady.

    by Rich in PA on Fri Oct 21, 2011 at 06:10:26 AM PDT

    •  And just to be clear, by "claw back Black votes" (2+ / 0-)

      ...I mean from apathy rather than from Republicans :)

      But nobody's buying flowers from the flower lady.

      by Rich in PA on Fri Oct 21, 2011 at 06:11:27 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Rebooting the Democratic Party (6+ / 0-)

      I wholeheartedly agree that the Democratic Party needs a reboot in Louisiana, I just don't know about how you'd go along with that.

      I'd argue that the Democrats need a broad spectrum of voters to succeed. I think they should get back to the populist roots of decades past. Honestly, they should really fight hard for conservative, poor white voters in the rural areas.

      I also think that they need an infusion of youth to the party. Many of the faces of the Democratic Party here are too old and do not resonate with voters under 40.

      Democrats need to start competing in suburbs too. I think there are some great opportunities for pick ups in the inner suburbs of places like East baton Rouge Parish and in jefferson Parish.

      I think populism, rather than progressivism, would be what Democrats need to win. That said, it's hard to be a populist party when led by the very rich.

      21, Male, LA-02, LA-06 (former), TX-08 (home), SSP: sschmi4

      by Stephen Schmitz on Fri Oct 21, 2011 at 06:29:41 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Candidates (3+ / 0-)

        Someone has to actually run. The lack of any established Democratic politician running for any of the statewide offices is just pathetic. There are people who can - Mitch, Chaisson, and sure even Eric LaFleur could. But getting into whether populism or progressivism is a better theme is putting the cart before the horse. If no one is willing to run, well, the focus of a non-existent campaign doesn't matter.

      •  I imagine inner suburbs in general (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Louisiana 1976

        are going to become more and more like extensions of their central cities--culturally and politically--as the population of the country continues to suburbanize.  That's a guess, not something I've studied, but I think you can see it to an extent in some metro areas like Washington D.C. and Philadelphia.  Of course, those might not have many parallels to the situation in Louisiana.

        26, Dem, Dude seeing a dude, CT-04(originally), PA-02/NY-12(now)

        by Xenocrypt on Fri Oct 21, 2011 at 08:51:20 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Suburbs are changing, no doubt, but (0+ / 0-)

          in a very non-uniform way. You have both the deep, deep red suburbs of Milwaukee and the Maryland-side DC suburbs, which have always been fairly liberal. There are large differences in demographics between these suburbs, to be sure, but I think there is more to it than that.

          However, I do think that the evangelical heart of the Republican Party will continue to turn off many suburban voters, while many Democratic positions, like environmental protection, will attract them.

      •  The Democratic Party needs a reboot nationwide. (0+ / 0-)

        I believe that the true progressive values that are the bedrock of the Democratic Party do have the potential for majority support in the nation--if not majority support already. These values include economic populism, yes, which may appeal to some lower-class whites in Louisiana that used to provide solid Democratic support. But they also include social liberalism, which will turn off almost all of those voters.

        The old saying, "All politics is local," is simply not true anymore. All politics is national. And to combine economic populism with social conservatism, which is the only way Democrats could make a comeback in LA (if that is even possible), would confuse our national message and make Democrats the less unified, weaker party. Instead, Democrats need a unified platform for every state, and if that platform doesn't work in Louisiana, we should move our focus to more winnable areas.

        Of course, being from Louisiana, I'm sure you don't like that idea. But from a national perspective, I think it is the best way to achieve a Democratic majority, and it is the only way to achieve a progressive majority.

  •  As a very new LA resident (6+ / 0-)

    I could use some help.  I have been working 14 hour days for the past month or so, and quite frankly, know very little of all these candidates.

    I am LA-06 as well: Sen-16, House-66.  Any thoughts on where I can get info on the candidates running for office tomorrow, so I can at least make a semi-informed vote?

    Thanks.

    Omar: When you been doin it as long as I have, you do the thing on your name. OWS: Due to budget cutbacks, the light at the end of the tunnel has been turned off.

    by ten5v1lt4 on Fri Oct 21, 2011 at 06:43:29 AM PDT

    •  I'll encourage GF to post her voting recs here. (7+ / 0-)

      These represent our decisions, based on a lot of study.

      Sadly, most represent decisions made on the basis of whom to vote against rather than an endorsement of the rec'd candidates. (eg, Dardenne's no bowl of cherries, but Nungesser's utterly unqualified and bombastic, qualities already well-represented in state politics).

      All in all, a pretty depressing season, though some judicial candidates in NOLA make me cautiously optimistic, based on positions and personal encounters.

    •  Google? (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      ten5v1lt4, cv lurking gf, Odysseus

      I don't mean to sound patronizing but I would try Googling the candidates.

      House District 66 is uncontested, so you will continue being represented by Hunter Greene.

      http://theadvocate.com/...

      It appears Senate District 16 is also uncontested. I will say, Dan Claitor is probably the best Republican in the entire Legislature, for what it is worth.

      http://theadvocate.com/...

      I'd assume the major race in your district is the BESE race. Believe yours is between Chaz Roemer, son of the former Governor, and Ascension Parish Schools Superintendent Donald Songy.

      21, Male, LA-02, LA-06 (former), TX-08 (home), SSP: sschmi4

      by Stephen Schmitz on Fri Oct 21, 2011 at 10:17:34 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  No patronizing taken (3+ / 0-)

        Truly nothing more than me being unfamiliar with the locale (first election here), being swamped, and election sneaking up on me (I haven't seen TV in a month and was unprepared for a Saturday election).

        I haven't figured out yet if I can trust the Advocate for unbiased coverage, so really more looking for places to get takes on candidates here without the distortion that can be present, especially when most choices are likely between Bad, Worse, and Satan.

        Appreciate your time and help.

        Omar: When you been doin it as long as I have, you do the thing on your name. OWS: Due to budget cutbacks, the light at the end of the tunnel has been turned off.

        by ten5v1lt4 on Fri Oct 21, 2011 at 12:11:53 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Fair enough (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          anninla, Odysseus

          The Advocate isn't bad, they just are poorly managed, IMHO. You can trust their political coverage though.

          As for choices, I'd say to be in a Republican district with uncontested seats, you could be in a much worse position.

          Honestly, Sen. Dan Claitor is a great guy and a very hard worker. He is a moderate Republican and a reformist. Despite considering myself a progressive, I'd probably vote for him over half the Democratic caucus.

          21, Male, LA-02, LA-06 (former), TX-08 (home), SSP: sschmi4

          by Stephen Schmitz on Fri Oct 21, 2011 at 12:23:29 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

    •  Here's what I'm taking into the booth (5+ / 0-)

      with me (as will CV):

      VOTING GUIDE

      Governor:    "Niki Bird" Papazoglakis

      Lieutenant Governor:    "Jay" Dardenne

      Secretary of State: "Tom" Schedler

      Commissioner of Agriculture
      and Forestry:    Strain (other two sound nutty)

      Commissioner of Insurance:     Donald C. Hodge

      BESE District 1:  Lee Barrios

      BESE District 2:  Kira Orange Jones

      State Senator, 3rd District:  J.P. Morrell

      State Representative, 94th District:  Nicholas "Nick" Lorusso

      Judge, Civil District Court, Division B:  Regina Bartholomew

      Judge, Civil District Court, Division E:   Claire Jupiter

      Judge Criminal District Court, Section L:   Franz Zibilich

      Judge Traffic Court, Division A:  Herbert Cade

      CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENTS

      No. 1 - FOR.    TOPS amendment, redirecting tobacco lawsuit cash to tops tuition fund, and embed 4 cent tax set to expire, dedicating it to Health Excellence Fund.

      No. 2 - FOR.    All non-recurring state revenues, 5% initially, then 10% after two years, to go toward reducing LA's liabilities in its 4 retirement systems.

      No. 3 - FOR.    Keeps state from raiding the fund set up as a  source of revenue to pay medical malpractice claims; i.e. "will not be state property".

      No. 4 - FOR.    "Rainy Day" fund can be replenished the following year by the excess mineral revenues, instead of the year it is tapped.

      No. 5 - FOR.    Clarifies current policy for auction of property of delinquent taxes.

      Tax District - NO.    NOLA vote only. Vote against continuing taxation of the real estate owners in that area. The tax covers 1/3 of the administrator's salaries despite little progress over 20+ years. (Lack of progress infeasible due to land condition - too soft; infrastructure never really developed.)

      And here's the Secretary of State link to sample ballots and a link to the League of Women Voters.

      "The whole aim of practical politics is to keep the populace alarmed, and hence clamorous to be led to safety, by menacing it with an endless series of hobgoblins, all of them imaginary." H.L. Mencken, 1925

      by cv lurking gf on Fri Oct 21, 2011 at 02:41:35 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  What a sad, sorry state the party is in in LA. (4+ / 0-)

    Isn't it amazing when places that once, in the not too far off past, had uncontested Democrats, now have uncontested Republicans?

    But, that is politics for you.

    19, male, WI-03 (home), WI-02 (college) (voting in WI-03 because Madison does not need my Democratic vote as much as my home does), -7.88, -4.26, End the FitzWalkerstanian police state by recalling Scott Walker!!!!

    by WisJohn on Fri Oct 21, 2011 at 08:14:56 AM PDT

  •  (searches for a silver lining) (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Louisiana 1976, Matt Z, cv lurking gf

    LaFleur has a great name!  And he's "a partner in the law firm of Mahtook & La Fleur" which sounds like a show on TNT in between "Rizzoli and Isles" and "Franklin and Bash".  (Remember when we all speculated on the show based on Arlen Specter's law office name?  "Arlen Specter: Attorney at Law"?  That was fun.)

    26, Dem, Dude seeing a dude, CT-04(originally), PA-02/NY-12(now)

    by Xenocrypt on Fri Oct 21, 2011 at 08:42:19 AM PDT

  •  Excellent informative diary-- (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    KingofSpades, cv lurking gf, Floande

    republished to Louisiana Kossacks.

    "We are all New Orleans now."--Barbara O'Brien So many books--so little time. Economic Left/Right -7.88 Social Libertarian/Authoritarian -6.97

    by Louisiana 1976 on Fri Oct 21, 2011 at 10:01:54 AM PDT

  •  To me, the BESE Board races are (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Floande, WisJohn, cv lurking gf, Odysseus

    the most important races of this election.  Whether or not Jindal takes control of BESE will determine the future of public education in our state.  It is very necessary to beat back the candidates that Jindal is supporting.  Jindal just turned down federal aid for Early Childhood Education....the very program which offers the foundation for learning....too many strings attached, he said. No, the real reason is that he/Repubs WANT public education to fail, so they can institute taxpayer financed charter schools throughout the state, no more public school system. And that's what's behind the fake "grades" they say the schools earned. Gasp, my school earned a "D" or an "F?" Create a scenario in which the public thinks the public schools are failing, but not to worry....the solution is to make every school in the state a charter school, with little oversight from the state govt.  And who will administer the state-full of charter schools? Private companies....perhaps even White Hat Management Company, the company being sued by Ohio because they either won't or can't account for the taxpayer money they spend. Jindal tried to sell off the prisons to private companies, but they surprisingly beat him back. Now, he will sell off the administration of our schools to private companies.

    The BESE race in which I will vote is Boffy vs Bayard. Have you seen the ads running on TV against Bayard?? Now, I certainly have not always agreed with Mr. Bayard, but at least he will not hand over decision-making to Jindal & cronies.

    I pretty much trust The Advocate on political issues.  It goes out of its way to stay neutral (and they print my letters to the editor on occasion, lol)  On the amendments, The Advocate recommended 1. No, 2. Yes, 3. Yes, 4. Yes, 5. No.  Does anyone here have any different views on those recommendations???  

    I've lived here all my life, but at times I fantasize about what it would be like to live in a "liberal" place, where I could talk openly to friends, neighbors about politics. Where I wouldn't have to bite my tongue when I hear people spouting right-wing talking points. Oh well, sometimes the seafood makes up for it.

    This whole world's wild at heart and weird on top....Lula

    by anninla on Fri Oct 21, 2011 at 02:43:41 PM PDT

    •  I'm voting for Amendment 5 (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Odysseus

      because it clarifies action already followed in New Orleans; it's not changing anything. Amendment 1 I'm for, as I like the 4 cents on cigarettes, it expires next year, and TOPS will benefit.

      Then there's that continuing tax for one area on which New Orleanians only vote. You may have seen the article in Thursday's paper, which convinced me to vote against the tax. I like Clancy Dubos at the Gambit most of the time, so I tend to check it for information too.

      "The whole aim of practical politics is to keep the populace alarmed, and hence clamorous to be led to safety, by menacing it with an endless series of hobgoblins, all of them imaginary." H.L. Mencken, 1925

      by cv lurking gf on Fri Oct 21, 2011 at 04:01:20 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Thanks for the info on amendments (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        cv lurking gf

        and the link.

        This whole world's wild at heart and weird on top....Lula

        by anninla on Fri Oct 21, 2011 at 05:02:24 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  I disagree on Amendment 1 (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        cv lurking gf

        While I think that the 4 cent cigarette tax should happen (hell, make it 8 or 10) and TOPS is important, the method is wrong.  By tapping the Millennium Fund, which is supposed to be for children's health, it is likely to create a budget deficit down the road that will have to be dealt with.  This seems to be a fancy way of moving the TOPS program out of the state fiscal budget to create a phantom balance that in reality is just a passing of the buck.  My two cents.

        On a different note, despite just getting registered a couple months ago, my voter card has wrong info.  I am apparently in House District 101, which has 6 candidates running.  I wasn't able to get a lot on them last night.  Anybody here have any thoughts?  Thanks.

        Omar: When you been doin it as long as I have, you do the thing on your name. OWS: Due to budget cutbacks, the light at the end of the tunnel has been turned off.

        by ten5v1lt4 on Sat Oct 22, 2011 at 04:33:18 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Oops; just got home from work and (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          ten5v1lt4

          checked for replies. Hope you got that straightened out. CV was against it too, but I read it as funding the Millennium Fund. Anyway, too tired to think right now - I've been working on street tiles for days on end, for Magazine Street. I'm so tired of the alphabet.

          "The whole aim of practical politics is to keep the populace alarmed, and hence clamorous to be led to safety, by menacing it with an endless series of hobgoblins, all of them imaginary." H.L. Mencken, 1925

          by cv lurking gf on Sat Oct 22, 2011 at 04:02:54 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Took a swing (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            cv lurking gf

            on the D who walked the neighborhood and spoke to my wife.

            Side question - what kind of voting machines do we use and how secure are they?  First time I didn't have a paper ballot.

            As an aside, pulled into my voting location and Pearl Jam's Bu$hleaguer came on the radio.  It felt like the appropriate mindset.

            The aristocrat choir sings What's the ruckus?
            The haves have not a clue
            The immenseness of suffering
            The art of negotiation, a rarity

            Omar: When you been doin it as long as I have, you do the thing on your name. OWS: Due to budget cutbacks, the light at the end of the tunnel has been turned off.

            by ten5v1lt4 on Sun Oct 23, 2011 at 05:16:46 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  I don't know what kind, CV thinks (0+ / 0-)

              ES something or other, but he said not to quote him (so I'm not; really). The paper today was a downer, despite many decisions matching my votes. I miss blue.

              "The whole aim of practical politics is to keep the populace alarmed, and hence clamorous to be led to safety, by menacing it with an endless series of hobgoblins, all of them imaginary." H.L. Mencken, 1925

              by cv lurking gf on Sun Oct 23, 2011 at 09:22:42 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

  •  thx for the info... (0+ / 0-)

    I confess to not paying much attention to this low-key election. Just know that I'm voting against Nungesser and Bobby. Will do extensive research on the inter-tubes tomorrow AM. I think that the BESE board race is probably the most important. FWIW, Gambit is saying FOR on all the ammendments.

  •  Great, informative diary. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    WisJohn

    However I must say it would have been very funny if the diary, named "2011 Louisiana Elections Guide," had been left empty.

  •  Good Job (0+ / 0-)

    Tipped and rec'd. I love hearing reports from locals.

    The ABC's of voting in Kentucky A- Abramson B- Beshear C- Conway D- Democrats E- Edelen F- Farmer G- Grimes H- Hollenbach

    by drhoosierdem on Sat Oct 22, 2011 at 08:08:37 AM PDT

  •  Stephen, what is your opinion on (0+ / 0-)

    how the elections turned out?  All three Senate races you listed were up aces for Dems and incumbent Dems even won some House districts that some LAGOPers were expecting to win.

    'An eye for an eye makes the whole world blind.' -Mahatma Gandhi

    by KingofSpades on Sun Oct 23, 2011 at 10:06:51 AM PDT

    •  Eric LeFleur showed us real flower power. lol (0+ / 0-)

      'An eye for an eye makes the whole world blind.' -Mahatma Gandhi

      by KingofSpades on Sun Oct 23, 2011 at 10:07:23 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Posting a short recap diary (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      KingofSpades

      Planning on talking about this in a recap diary but didn't get a chance to finish due to LSU/Saints games this weekend.

      Short answer, Buddy Leach should be out of a job. The 3 big senate races and 2 big house races were all won by Democrats, and that is with only 20% black turnout statewide (a truly horrendous number).

      Nevers' race was a squeaker, but those numbers from LaFleur were impressive. I'd guess that if Mitch Landrieu declines a run for governor in 2015, LaFleur should be the next go to.

      21, Male, LA-02, LA-06 (former), TX-08 (home), SSP: sschmi4

      by Stephen Schmitz on Mon Oct 24, 2011 at 08:20:09 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  What is Leach's problem, I wonder. (0+ / 0-)

        Also, who would you recommend for his job?

        'An eye for an eye makes the whole world blind.' -Mahatma Gandhi

        by KingofSpades on Mon Oct 24, 2011 at 08:54:14 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  All things considered (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        WisJohn

        were the state legislative race results good for you?  All 3 Democratic Senators in old Dixiecrat seats won.  Also, Reps. James Armes, LeBas, and Robert Johnson won.  Robert Johnson actually won big, much to the surprise of James NOLA, who also predicted Nevers and LeFleur would lose.

        The one big gripe I have is that they did not contest an open Senate race in a district that was 46% Obama, 59% Landrieu.

        'An eye for an eye makes the whole world blind.' -Mahatma Gandhi

        by KingofSpades on Mon Oct 24, 2011 at 08:58:53 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

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