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Chuck DeVore moves to Texas
Chuck DeVore, rejected by California Republicans in 2010 Senate primary, now paid to fluff Texas
Republican Chuck DeVore, rejected decisively by his home state's GOP voters in the 2010 Senate race, decided to head east to Texas instead and take a job at a conservative "think tank" whose job is to promote Texas-style conservatism. Getting right to work, he penned a love letter to his new state trotting out every tired wingnut stereotype of each of the two states. You know the ones, stuff like:
While California seeks more ways to tax success, it excels at subsidizing poverty.
I decided to take a look at his arguments more closely, to see whether his claims were true that people are fleeing California and that its business climate stifles job creation, unlike Texas.

Spoiler alert: He's full of shit. Details below the fold.

I moved to Texas late last year, joining the 2 million Californians who have packed up for greener pastures in the past ten years, with Texas the most common destination.
I couldn't confirm that 2 million number from some quick digging into Census data, but I did get their 2010 numbers (PDF). And it's true! Californians leave their state.

In fact, in 2010, 573,988 people left California, or 1.5 percent of its total population.

Then again, 411,641 people left Texas, or 1.6 of its total population.

So from a proportional basis, more Texans that year fled their state than Golden Staters.

But it's also true Texas is still the nation's preferred destination—486,558 domestic immigrants in 2010, compared to 444,749 for California. It just turns out that once they arrive, (slightly) more people want to leave Texas than California.

In his State-of-the-State address this January, California governor Jerry Brown said, “Contrary to those declinists who sing of Texas and bemoan our woes, California is still the land of dreams. . . . It’s the place where Apple . . . and countless other creative companies all began.”

Fast forward to March: Apple announced it was building a $304 million campus in Austin with plans to hire 3,600 people to staff it, more than doubling its Texas workforce.

1) That would only be relevant if Apple was leaving California, but it's not, and in fact, it's building a massive new HQ in Cupertino that will house 13,000 employees. Its current HQ fits 2,800, and Apple rents other buildings in the area housing another 6,700 employees. Oh, and the current campus isn't going away, so far more jobs are being added in California than any theoretical jobs in Texas; and

2) those Texas jobs are still theoretical. From March 15:

Earlier this month, we told you Gov. Rick Perry announced plans to double the size of Apple’s workforce in Austin, Texas with an investment of $304 million that would add up to 3,600 jobs. Apple will receive $21 million in incentives over 10 years through the Texas Enterprise Fund as part of the deal. According several reports from KVUE News and Austin news website Statesman, Apple representatives met with Austin City Council officials today for a formal proposal.
Are DeVore and Perry declaring victory before Apple even had a formal proposal? Looks that way.
As part of the deal, we also learned that City Council would offer Apple an extra $8.6 million over the 10-year period, but Apple is still apparently waiting for the City of Austin to come to a decision on whether to offer an incentive.

According to Dave Porter of the Austin Chamber of Commerce (via Kxan), Apple is considering other locations like Phoenix. That report claimed the city would have to offer Apple about $75 million in incentives to complete the deal.

So the deal isn't even done, and won't be done unless Austin (or Phoenix) throw tens of millions of dollars at a company sitting on nearly $100 billion in cash. Doesn't sound like a company that is roaring to go Texas because of its business climate, just one looking for the best deal.

And it's no accident that if Apple does decide to expand in Texas, that it'll do so in Austin—the most progressive, tolerant and educated part of the state.

Back to DeVore:

While the state struggles with interminable deficits caused by years of reckless spending, the argument in Sacramento isn’t over how to reduce government; rather, it’s over how much to raise taxes and on whom [...]

Meanwhile, lawmakers in Texas are grappling with a fiscal question of an entirely different sort: whether or not to spend some of the $6 billion set aside in the state’s rainy-day fund.

Yes, California faces serious budget difficulties, stemming from the economic collapse and a dysfunctional state government that allows a tiny GOP minority to block any solutions in the state legislature.

But Texas is debating that rainy day fund because it also has massive budget deficits to contend with! Indeed, the 2011 budget deficit in California was $25.4 million, less than Texas' $27 billion. Lone Star lawmakers were forced to make draconian cuts to social services and education.

At least 32,000 school employees, including 12,000 teachers, have lost their jobs, according to one estimate. More than 8,200 overcrowded elementary classrooms have more students than the limit set in state law, and schools are being marked for closure.
Only a Republican would brag about devastation on that scale. Even then, the state continues to face a $4.1 billion deficit, leading to calls to plug it with the rainy day fund, as well as restore education funding from the rainy day fund, and calls from everyone else to restore their cut spending from the rainy day fund.

DeVore thinks that debate somehow reflects positively on Texas, and that it's somehow different than the deficit issues California is grappling with. It does not, and it is not.

California’s government-employee unions routinely spend tens of millions of dollars at election time to maintain their hold on power. In Texas, the government unions are weak and don’t have collective bargaining, leaving trial attorneys as the main source of funding for Lone Star Democrats.
Keeping workers from organizing sure gets Republicans excited! But at least here, DeVore isn't spinning bullshit.
California’s habit of raising taxes to fund a burgeoning regulatory state isn’t without impact on its economy. Californians fork over about 10.6 percent of their income to state and local governments, above the U.S. average of 9.8 percent. Texans pay 7.9 percent. This affects the bottom line of both consumers and businesses.
In Texas, the median annual salary is $47,601. In California, it's $56,418. Subtract out the tax burden, and California residents still come out well ahead on earnings. And interesting that DeVore doesn't cite business tax numbers—that's because the effective tax rate of California businesses is 4.7 percent, compared to 4.9 percent in Texas.

There's more—Texas has fewer public employees! Trial lawyers suck! California should "Drill Baby Drill" more! You get the idea.

Now there are obviously advantages and disadvantages to both states. For example, If I were a Texas partisan (I'm not) I'd talk about its cleaner air (believe it or not!), its cheaper housing (and its avoidance of a housing bubble and collapse), and how Austin is one of the coolest cities anywhere. I'd talk about Tex-Mex food and the state's dynamic diversity. But yeah, I don't think Republicans care much about (relatively) clean air, Austin or diversity. This is about Republicans trying to puff up Texas Republicans at the expense of California to score political points. In fact, conservatives have a great deal of their ideology staked out on this Texas vs California battle—and so long as they perceive Texas to be on the rise, and California on the decline, they feel ideologically vindicated.

But truth is, when it comes to driving the new economy, no state—no COUNTRY—in the world beats California, where its culture of creativity, tolerance and innovation helps create and fuel the companies that change the world—from Disney and Levis, to eBay and Twitter, to Google and Apple. That's why California entrepreneurs received $8.6 billion venture capital in 832 deals the first nine months of 2010, compared to $833 million for 104 deals in Texas. Now Texas does exceedingly well with fossil fuels and companies like Halliburton, but those are exploitative industries, not innovative ones, and there's simply no place for innovation like California.

For Republicans eager to paint California as anti-business, the reality doesn't come close to matching their rhetoric. There is more to providing a positive business environment than the wholesale elimination of regulations and worker rights, and California—and other liberal business powerhouses like New York, Massachusetts, Illinois and Washington state—prove it.

Originally posted to Daily Kos on Sun Apr 01, 2012 at 01:00 PM PDT.

Also republished by Howard Dean 2016.

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Comment Preferences

  •  this simply proves the truism about (64+ / 0-)

    stereotypes: they become stereotypes because, at their heart, there is a tiny grain of truth.

    in this case, the stereotypical conservative being full of shit. this stereotype has lasted because, at their heart, every conservative IS full of shit.

  •  The illegitimate offspring of Grandpa Munster. (3+ / 0-)

    #occupywallstreet: Although I know the rhythm you'd prefer me dancing to, I'll turn my revolt into style.

    by xxdr zombiexx on Sun Apr 01, 2012 at 01:12:22 PM PDT

  •  He did California a favor (39+ / 0-)

    Texas is more suitable for looney toons like him. He did nothing in the Assembly but grandstand and most were glad when he was termed out.

    25, Male, CA-24, DK Elections Black Caucus Chair.

    by DrPhillips on Sun Apr 01, 2012 at 01:13:34 PM PDT

  •  Full of shit. Yeah. My late old man summed up (12+ / 0-)

    lots of people with that terse description. Still fits.

    What kills me is how much full-of-shitness there is around lately. My old man would have had a field day.

    "...be still, and cry not aloud; for it is an unholy thing to boast over slain men." Odysseus, in Homer's Odyssey

    by Wildthumb on Sun Apr 01, 2012 at 01:15:14 PM PDT

  •  I think "wingnut" WAS the spoiler alert n/t (6+ / 0-)

    The problem with going with your gut as opposed to your head is that the former is so often full of shit. - Randy Chestnut

    by lotusmaglite on Sun Apr 01, 2012 at 01:16:33 PM PDT

  •  Off topic KO, is he OK? I understand my question (5+ / 0-)

    is premature.  Please pass along my gratitude for all that he has done for us.  

    •  Seemed to be fine on Twitter (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Matt Z

      Was mostly busy with fantasy baseball auctions today. (Hasn't blocked me yet so that's a good sign.)

      The optimist sees the glass as half-full. The pessimist sees the glass as half-empty. The realist just knows she's thirsty.

      by Cali Scribe on Sun Apr 01, 2012 at 07:38:11 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Looks like his new license plate... (11+ / 0-)

    ...spells out GoDDaMn U.S. Army

    "I'm up on a tightrope/One side's hate and one is hope" --Leon Russell

    by turdraker on Sun Apr 01, 2012 at 01:17:47 PM PDT

  •  Texas; if you love it, please go there and stay! (31+ / 0-)

    I was born in Texas.  I grew up in Texas.  I am a proud alumnus of The University of Texas and an avid Longhorns football fan (basketball and baseball, not so much).  I left Texas in the mid '60s and moved to California in 1988.  I will never, ever go to Texas for any reason; for any length of time; to any destination.  The closest I ever want to get is 30,000' up in a jet.

    The weather is vile beyond belief.  There's not a lot to see and anything you can do there you can also do in most other states; you can do it in all of the states on the west coast where the weather isn't nearly as vile.  California has its problems - too many immigrants and tourists from Texas is one of them - but it's heaven on earth.  And after I'm dead, I'm being buried or scattered in California.  Don't even want to visit Texas as remains.

    I wish Mr. DeVore every happiness in Texas, but when he wants to travel, he can go Oklahoma.  He should stay the hell out of California.

    "The test of our progress is not whether we add to the abundance of those who have much. It is whether we provide enough to those who have little. " --Franklin D. Roosevelt

    by jg6544 on Sun Apr 01, 2012 at 01:18:02 PM PDT

    •  Cheers from another Texas expat! (15+ / 0-)

      Born in Dallas. I travel the entire country and much of Canada doing comedy, and you couldn't pay me enough to set foot back in Texas - unless it's Austin.

      I did go back a few times, and every time, I hated it even more. There were some great folks there, but they didn't make up for the swarms of batshit crazy people, the over-the-top machismo sexism, the widespread active racism... Well, let's just say it's my second least favorite state.

      I'm sure it's got lots of great qualities, but I just lost interest in finding out what they are.

      The problem with going with your gut as opposed to your head is that the former is so often full of shit. - Randy Chestnut

      by lotusmaglite on Sun Apr 01, 2012 at 01:25:52 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  there are parts (12+ / 0-)

      where the weather is somewhat better. But you have to put up with the other stuff: the church schools that get front page coverage for just about everything, the churches that think the Baptists are liberal, the Republican-run news broadcasts. And all the taxes: sales taxes, hotel taxes, utility taxes. Because Texas thinks that making people pay income taxes is a bad idea.

      (Is it time for the pitchforks and torches yet?)

      by PJEvans on Sun Apr 01, 2012 at 01:42:23 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Yep (0+ / 0-)

        We don't tax income but we don't tax polluters either.  Hell, the republicans here give 'em tax incentives.  But we have more than our share of property taxes (state and local) and sales tax (state and local) and gasoline tax.
        I haven't seen the "librul baptists" idea.  It used to be that church membership didn't necessarily indicate your politics but that was before the republicans tried to co-opt religion and unfortunately were successful with many churches here including most Baptists.

        Mr. Boehner, where are the jobs?

        by Tx LIberal on Mon Apr 02, 2012 at 12:58:43 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  And speaking as a West Coast Wingnut (11+ / 0-)

      I would like to point out that I believe a significant part of the budget issue is a result of the infamous Prop 13.

      And we had enough sense to elect: Brown, Boxer, Harris, McNerney, etc....

      I visited Austin briefly many years ago when I was considering relocating.  Austin is okay, but as we drove to get there through the rest of the State...well...if I never see another pickup truck with a gun rack...I would be just thrilled.

      Perhaps Mr. Devore would care to try one of the other Red States...where they reward success by using a disproportionate amount of the federal budget...

      I'm going to go eat my granola now...

      •  How is that going to work? (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Sychotic1

        With real estate values in places like the Inland Empire, the San Joaquin Valley, etc going down; how is it going to help to say that taxes can increase on appreciating home values?

        California doesn't have many places with appreciating property values.  Maybe that Minimart on the border with Nevada where they sell Powerball tickets.

        •  you raise an interesting point (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Cali Scribe, Jay C

          did some research and this is at least part of what I came up with: (from ABC7 news on March 12)

          "But some critics believe commercial building- and land-owners are taking advantage of a loophole that lets their property taxes be re-assessed only when a new owner acquires more than a 50-percent stake, leaving schools and local governments struggling to pay for basic needs. They say closing that loophole would generate $9 billion a year.

          "What we do is we blind our eyes from looking at this hole right in the middle of our tax system," said Lenny Goldberg, executive director of the California Tax Reform Association.

          A new report by the California Tax Reform Association gives the example of Silicon Valley: how some longtime companies barely pay $1,000 an acre, while newer companies pay $58,000 an acre.

          "How could the richest corporations in the world be paying virtually nothing on some of the most valuable property in the world?" said Goldberg."

          so....and my original comment was mostly in reference to the decades long effect of prop 13...

          best/sh

          •  The initial impetus for Prop. 13 (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Utahrd, Jay C

            was a noble one -- to keep older residents in their family homes rather than them having to sell and move to rental housing when they couldn't afford the property tax bills. Both my late mother and my in-laws were beneficiaries of that provision; if we'd been able to afford either house, we would have been allowed to take advantage of it as well.

            But the "loophole" (I put it in quotes because I think the writers put it in on purpose) granting similar protections to corporations should never have gone through -- that's been a major reason for California's budget woes.

            The optimist sees the glass as half-full. The pessimist sees the glass as half-empty. The realist just knows she's thirsty.

            by Cali Scribe on Sun Apr 01, 2012 at 07:46:43 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  A good idea in theory (0+ / 0-)

              Yeah, income taxes should probably go up on places like movie studios.  Even if the people that work there are mostly Democrats.

              But for some businesses like distribution, manufacturing or even office buildings; a corporation can say "keep my property tax the same or I'll be paying property tax in Arizona, Nevada or Utah."  These businesses operate in places that need jobs the most like the Inland Empire.

              •  of course (0+ / 0-)

                the last thing I would want is to send jobs out of California.  If there are any changes, both the economy and competition should be taken into account.  I'm thinking that that legislators need to make sure the tax rates are still competitive and perhaps in some way tied to job creation and/or the unemployment rate in a particular area.

                And, frankly, I more than empathize with the idea of keeping older homeowners in their homes...but the heirs...well...not so much...

                And remember, some of these businesses may have been making enormous profits...and getting decades of an again enormous tax break.

                excellent point you made...

    •  It's 90 degrees here today. (0+ / 0-)

      Just thought I'd remind you of what you're missing out on. ;)

      27, white male, TX-26 (current), TN-09 (born), TN-08 (where parents live now)

      by TDDVandy on Sun Apr 01, 2012 at 03:50:38 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  too many immigrants..? eom (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Shockwave

      What a Police State Looks Like: "On one side: soft human flesh, unprotected human skulls, cardboard signs, slogans they chant, armed with belief in 1st Amendment rights. On the other: helmets, body armor, guns, batons, chemical weapons." -- JanetRhodes

      by YucatanMan on Sun Apr 01, 2012 at 04:40:52 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Yes, we do, both legal and illegal and from (0+ / 0-)

        all over the world.  Somewhere I remember reading that something on the order of fifty percent of all immigrants choose California.  We are crowded, our agricultural land is being plowed over and we are running low on water...because we have such an awesome place to live.

        "I watch Fox News for my comedy, and Comedy Central for my news." - Facebook Group

        by Sychotic1 on Sun Apr 01, 2012 at 07:36:43 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  We have (3+ / 0-)

      more voting Democrats in Texas than in any states except Florida, New York, and California -- more than 3.5 million of us voted for Obama in 2008.

      Most of us in the cities are Democrats, except in the Panhandle and rural areas.  Dallas, where I live, has been blue since 2006.  

      You make what you want of life, and so these stories about gunracks and churches are silly.  That stuff rarely even enters my view.

      I've traveled extensively.  Texas is simply not what some of the comments here say it is.  Have you been to Kansas, Missouri, Oklahoma, Mississippi?  I lived in Palo Alto for 3 years, and had 6 months or more working stints in many cities, including New York, Atlanta, Denver, LA, and Little Rock.  I prefer Dallas over all except possibly Denver.

      And some of us like the challenge of helping people become more progressive.  We teach, we communicate, and we lead.

      I love the weather except for summer -- beautiful fall through spring.  

      One day Perry and the regressives will be out of power here.  You should plan to come visit around 2020.

      Mr. DeVore should go live on the edge of an active volcano.

      •  I agree, with a caveat (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        indie17

        The Texas I know is not the Texas we often imagine.  

        But I live in a very diverse area in the Metroplex, I work at a (majority-minority) university, and I hang out with people who are either liberal, well-traveled, or both.  

        But Texas is a big state.  Lots of room for lots of crazy.  Usually, it's well-meaning crazy.  But still, crazy.

        You're not stuck in traffic, you are traffic

        by nominalize on Sun Apr 01, 2012 at 09:04:30 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  Many Californians seem to be taking your advice (3+ / 0-)
      I moved to Texas late last year, joining the 2 million Californians who have packed up for greener pastures in the past ten years, with Texas the most common destination.
      I couldn't confirm that 2 million number from some quick digging into Census data, but I did get their 2010 numbers (PDF). And it's true! Californians leave their state.
      In fact, in 2010, 573,988 people left California, or 1.5 percent of its total population.

      Then again, 411,641 people left Texas, or 1.6 of its total population.

      So from a proportional basis, more Texans that year fled their state than Golden Staters.

      But it's also true Texas is still the nation's preferred destination—486,558 domestic immigrants in 2010, compared to 444,749 for California. It just turns out that once they arrive, (slightly) more people want to leave Texas than California.

      First, the actual numbers are that 574,000 people left California and only 411,641 people left Texas, so it seems substantially more people want to leave California.  If he is referring to net migration, then Texas had net IMMIGRATION of 75,000 people while California had net EMIGRATION of 129,000 people.  

      In political terms, since there are about 700,000 constituents per representative, California is losing a representative and a congressional vote about every 9 - 10 years while Texas is gaining one about every 5 - 6 years.

      Indeed, the 2011 budget deficit in California was $25.4 million, less than Texas' $27 billion.
      I will assume he meant "billion", not "million".

      I could not find 2011 numbers, but for 2012 (http://www.stateline.org/...) the projection is $13.4 billion for Texas and $25.4 billion for California.  California's economy is about 50% larger than Texas's so you should discount about half the difference - if you normalize for economic size then California's deficit is about 30% larger than Texas's.

      Those larger deficits have translated to higher debt.  I could only find 2008 numbers (http://www.census.gov/...).  In 2008 California had a debt of $122 billion compared to Texas's $33 billion.  I am sure both are worse now... but since California's deficits are proportionately larger its debt will have grown proportionately more.

      The really nasty issue, though, is unfunded pension liabilities.  http://www.statebudgetsolutions.org/...

      The Pew numbers do not use Mark to Market so we can ignore them.  Based on the others, California has an ~$380 billion shortfall while Texas has a $160 billion shortfall.

      In Texas the unemployment rate for February was 7.1%, compared to California's 10.9%.  (http://www.bls.gov/...)

      I'm currently living outside the US, but when it is time for my kids to go to high school I will have to explore returning.  I'm at a level where I can do a national job search using head hunters, etc. so I can pick and choose my location.  And if the offers are anywhere close to equal I will pick Texas over California.
      o No state income tax - that's the equivalent of a 10% raise
      o Far lower housing costs
      o Most likely real estate appreciation (a state with a declining population is obviously going to have more room, and lower prices for land vs. a state with a growing population)
      o A smaller debt and pension overhang (Realistically, those of us with high incomes and assets are going to end up paying for those overhangs.  Why should I go and assume a share of California's liability when I can instead assume a share of Texas's much smaller liability?)

      I am sure I am not the only reasonably well off person doing this kind of analysis.  The Facebook millionaires and billionaires are going to live in Silicon Valley while they work for Facebook, but when it's time to leave they're going to think about paying a 10% state tax on capital gains when they sell their shares and a lot of them will move somewhere where they won't pay that.  And then they will look for things to do with their money, and a lot of them will invest in early stage companies and mentor entrepreneurs.

      Don't be surprised if California's economic troubles snowball over the next 20 years because of these kinds of issues.

      •  I've lived in TX for 27 years. (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Wham Bam, v2aggie2, dalfireplug

        There are a lot of problems here.  But California is really not a paradise, either.  We do have kind of crap weather (I live in Houston, it's miserably hot at least 6 months of the year.). But we don't have earthquakes or mudslides....we do have hurricanes and wildfires.  At least you know when the hurricane is coming.  The cost of living, especially housing, is way cheaper than California.  My house, in a nice suburb, on a golf course, about 4500 square feet, is probably worth $400k, tops.  What would that cost in California?

        I'm not saying it's great here.  I am so tired of the Bible-thumpers and the wingnuts, but there are a lot of normal people too.  My daughter is at the University of Texas in Austin, the hotbed of normalcy in Texas!  My younger daughter is still in high school in our mostly right-wing suburb, but her school is about 40% white, and 20% each black, hispanic, and Asian (mostly Indian).  So she is exposed daily to a very diverse group of kids (generalizing, of course, but the Indian kids are kicking everyone's butts academically.).   Houston, in fact, was just named America's most diverse major city.  

        So yeah, we do have Rick Perry, God help us.  But as we continue to become more diverse, and create more jobs, and attract people from other states, maybe we will elect another Ann Richards in the near future.  And we still won't have to worry about the earthquakes (which is good, since we don't really have any building codes to speak of.).

      •  But if you look at it in percentages (0+ / 0-)

        of population, it's pretty much even -- and not all those folks leaving California are heading to Texas; some are heading farther north to Oregon and Washington, others to the East Coast, wherever they can find jobs in their particular field.

        But really, if you're a parent with high school kids, where do you want your kids going to school? Texas where they're re-writing the textbooks to take out all history that shows white people in a bad light and where your kids are taught abstinence-only sex education, or California where the schools might be a bit more crowded but you've still got a better chance at a diverse education? Or is it all about the money and screw the kids' education?

        (Native Californian and while I thought about the Northwest -- especially British Columbia -- at one time, really can't imagine living anywhere else.)

        The optimist sees the glass as half-full. The pessimist sees the glass as half-empty. The realist just knows she's thirsty.

        by Cali Scribe on Sun Apr 01, 2012 at 07:54:17 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  I can't figure out what percentages you (0+ / 0-)

          want to look at.

          By percentages, Texas is gaining population while California is losing population.

          But really, if you're a parent with high school kids, where do you want your kids going to school? Texas where they're re-writing the textbooks to take out all history that shows white people in a bad light and where your kids are taught abstinence-only sex education, or California where the schools might be a bit more crowded but you've still got a better chance at a diverse education? Or is it all about the money and screw the kids' education?
          I am sure Texas has some good school districts.  If not, well, when you look at the cost of living differential and a 9% tax rate on income and capital gains, private schools begin looking like a viable option.
  •  Please, don't discourage this! (17+ / 0-)

    The more wingers who leave CA the happier I am! We've got a city full of winger, gun nut, Limbaugh-lovin', should-be CA expats right here in San Diego. May they all go to Texas and lick the cowboy boots of Rick Perry.

  •  Several CA-based companies have TX campuses (39+ / 0-)

    including Apple, but you know what those jobs are?

    They are call centers and warehouses and fulfillment houses, staffed by low-paid workers with no room for advancement.

    Apple, Amazon, Activision-Blizzard -- and those are just the A's! -- all have job sites in Texas. Oh, yeah: Austin, Texas. They are multi-million-dollar corporations that are at the top of their corporate earnings.

    But they keep the developers, the execs, and all the other highly paid positions at home in California.

    Rick Perry's Texas jobs plan is just that: Keep your highly paid jobs in your home state, but outsource all the cheap work to Texas. And we'll throw in a tax break to boot! And if some of those folks in Texas start to make a little bank, just cut the jobs! That's what Activision did just last month. They had their highest earnings quarter ever -- and laid off 600 people.

    It's just like the "Houston Miracle" of standardized test scores that brought us No Child Left Behind: It's all based on lies.

    (Standard disclaimer: Long-term Texas resident despite my blog name.)

    "The difference between the right word and the almost-right word is like the difference between lightning and the lightning bug." -- Mark Twain

    by Brooke In Seattle on Sun Apr 01, 2012 at 01:20:03 PM PDT

  •  According to the Bee: (28+ / 0-)
    DeVore has accepted a new job as a visiting scholar at the nonprofit Texas Public Policy Foundation, where he will write a book on "the Texas Model of how low taxes and low government spending, a light and predictable regulatory environment, respect for property rights, and a business-friendly legal climate has turned Texas into America's jobs generating dynamo." Sac Bee
    Ah...
    So, how about those jobs?  Texas has the highest rate of workers paid at or below the federal minimum wage and our median hourly wage is 10% lower than the national average.  We are dead last in the percent of individuals with health insurance and are near the bottom in the percent of workers with employer-based health insurance. Texas Watch
    And that's just for starters. Workplace safety, home ownership, benefits, savings, etc. -- all at the bottom.

    stay together / learn the flowers / go light - Gary Snyder

    by Mother Mags on Sun Apr 01, 2012 at 01:21:26 PM PDT

  •  I didn't see any mention of education (13+ / 0-)

    comparisons and the type of workers available.
    Which may account partially, for the difference in number of venture capital deals.

    Lack of investment in/respect for education would also be a  reason people leave once they get here-besides
    the 100 degree summers without rain.

    I would think California to be a little more open
    to science, also.

    Today's problems are yesterday's solutions. Don Beck

    by Sherri in TX on Sun Apr 01, 2012 at 01:22:48 PM PDT

  •  What's the difference between a... (22+ / 0-)

    ...GOP "think tank" and a septic tank?

    One is buried and you don't have to look at its ugliness.

    "The best lack all conviction, while the worst
    Are full of passionate intensity." --W. B. Yeats

    by Pragmatus on Sun Apr 01, 2012 at 01:23:23 PM PDT

  •  Well ya gotta go where the jobs are... (13+ / 0-)

    ...and for wingnuts who have no skills other than trash-talking Democrats, Texas is a good place to find a job, funded by the Koch Brothers and that ilk.

    But he's right -- people are leaving California for greener pastures. I was born in California and lived there most of my life. But I left. I left California for a better climate and greener pastures.

    I didn't move to Texas though. I moved to Hawaii. And, thankfully, I find myself in the embrace of an even deeper blue.

  •  That's what to expect from a GOP droid (10+ / 0-)

    Smoke, mirrors, unabashed lies and total bullshit, and obfuscation of the truth - the simply truth is: the GOP knows how to campaign (lie) well, but they cannot govern worth a damn!

    If they COULD, we wouldn't have a demonstrated history of economic worsening EVERY time a Republican gets in the White House.

    Democrats try to build the nation - Republicans try to own it, and wind up destroying it in the process...

    8 disastrous years of Bush 43 = Q.E.D.

    For a better America, vote the GOP out of office whenever and wherever possible and as soon (and as often) as possible!

    by dagnome on Sun Apr 01, 2012 at 01:25:24 PM PDT

  •  It's Deja Vu all over again (10+ / 0-)
    Apple announced it was building a $304 million campus in Austin
    In 1982 a co-worker left a job in San Antonio to go work in Apple's new Mac factory in the Dallas Area.  Six months later Steve Jobs got bored with the commute and moved my friend and the entire operation back to Fremont.

    “that our civil rights have no dependence on our religious opinions, any more than our opinions in physics or geometry.” Thomas Jefferson

    by markdd on Sun Apr 01, 2012 at 01:27:02 PM PDT

  •  Thank you (17+ / 0-)

    1- for leaving California.  State IQ average went up by 20

    2 - for bashing California.  PLease, bash away.  Convince all your fiends to leave too.  The more people who leave, the more room on the beach.

    Im a soldier and I have lived all over the country and world, including three times living in Texas.  There is no place I would rather live than California, warts and all.  No one ever came to visit us in Texas, couldn't keep them away in California.

    It is well that war is so terrible -- lest we should grow too fond of it. Robert E. Lee

    by ksuwildkat on Sun Apr 01, 2012 at 01:30:15 PM PDT

  •  It could be the oxymoron of all time. (9+ / 0-)
    conservative "think tank"

    So I see only tatters of clearness through a pervading obscurity - Annie Dillard -6.88, -5.33

    by illinifan17 on Sun Apr 01, 2012 at 01:32:34 PM PDT

  •  Take a look indeed (4+ / 0-)

    Thanks Marcos.

  •  At the end of the day... (5+ / 0-)

    You'd still be living in Texas.

    California is the 8th largest economy on the planet.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/...

    As of 2010, the gross state product (GSP) is about $1.9 trillion, which is 13% of the United States gross domestic product (GDP).

    Texas comes in second "state wise"with 7.95%.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/...

    But you'd still be living in Texas.

    List by state:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/...

    F*ck those idiots and the voters they rode in on.

    by roninkai on Sun Apr 01, 2012 at 01:36:37 PM PDT

  •  More appropriate ...right wing "think" tank n/t (3+ / 0-)
    •  Heh, right... (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      pyegar

      Not a whole lot of thought goes on in those places.  It doesn't take a whole lot of thinking to print what the Kochs tell you to.

      27, white male, TX-26 (current), TN-09 (born), TN-08 (where parents live now)

      by TDDVandy on Sun Apr 01, 2012 at 03:47:10 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Yes, but then again, in CA we still have (13+ / 0-)

    Planned Parenthood.  And no state sponsored transvaginal rape.

    There's really no contest here.

  •  Wingnut, crazier than Rush? (3+ / 0-)

    And Rush is mainstream? What does wingnut mean anymore? Crazier than Savage? Crazier than Beck? That’s not crazy—that’s certifiable...  
    America went meshugenah a longtime ago...

    Nudniks need not apply.

    by killermiller on Sun Apr 01, 2012 at 01:38:25 PM PDT

  •  Great diary, Kos. (7+ / 0-)

    Yes, I sure do get tired of the RW simplistically pumping/pimping its "victories."

    I was just in Texas. I had the great misfortune to drive in Texas. I got a parking ticket for breaking a rule I had no idea about--and which a reasonable person from out-of-state wouldn't surmise the existence of. Also, I'm keenly worried right now (reasonably) about the state mailing some ruinous bill to me--fines for unpaid toll crossings I blew right through, not knowing to look for.

    Greedy, bought-and-paid for politician morons like Rick Perry feel no compunction in cynically gauging out-of-staters to pay for infrastructure because it's that or fairly tax wealthy people. I hate him.

    It's here they got the range/ and the machinery for change/ and it's here they got the spiritual thirst. --Leonard Cohen

    by karmsy on Sun Apr 01, 2012 at 01:49:02 PM PDT

  •  You know... (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    basket, wishingwell, Lefty Ladig

    ... I have to wonder what any conservative looking at this would respond. I have often seen them bragging about how great Texas is doing and How California is the Greece of the states (New York is Italy.). I wonder what rationalizations that would come up with when given proof that their ideological haven Texas still doesn't fair so well agianst what they consider their proverbial hell "Commiefornia."

  •  "Don't Fluff with Texas(sholes)" (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    basket, happymisanthropy
    Chuck DeVore, rejected by California Republicans in 2010 Senate primary, now paid to fluff Texas

    slutty voter for a "dangerous president"; Präsidentenelf-maßschach; Warning-Some Snark Above"Nous sommes un groupuscule" (-9.50; -7.03) "Sciant terra viam monstrare."

    by annieli on Sun Apr 01, 2012 at 01:59:04 PM PDT

    •  {{shudder}} at the imagery (0+ / 0-)

      fluffing assholes!   :-/

      What a Police State Looks Like: "On one side: soft human flesh, unprotected human skulls, cardboard signs, slogans they chant, armed with belief in 1st Amendment rights. On the other: helmets, body armor, guns, batons, chemical weapons." -- JanetRhodes

      by YucatanMan on Sun Apr 01, 2012 at 04:47:14 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  the best state to do business (4+ / 0-)

    for a number of years was purple Virginia -  when it had Democratic governors Mark Warner and Tim Kaine.

    "what the best and wisest parent wants for his child is what we should want for all the children of the community" - John Dewey

    by teacherken on Sun Apr 01, 2012 at 02:01:19 PM PDT

    •  And VA is realy a scenic, beautiful state much lik (0+ / 0-)

      my state except you have something we do not have...you have the mountains and the valleys but you also have the ocean and the beaches.  

      When there are Democratic Governors, it makes it even more appealling.

      I also have a special fondness for Delaware, for some reason, I just love our neighboring state. My husband and I said if we would could move anywhere, it would be Coastal Delaware. People look at us like we are Nuts.

      Follow PA Keystone Liberals on Twitter: @KeystoneLibs

      by wishingwell on Sun Apr 01, 2012 at 03:03:40 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  "Best state" rankings are generally meaningless... (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      v2aggie2

      ...because different organizations come out with completely different rankings based on whatever their own ideological axes are -- so even in the same year, you can see completely conflicting rankings.

      In recent years, I've seen rankings that place California as one of the better states to do business...and as one of the worst.  Same for Texas.  

      And in the end, while California and Texas have plenty of differences, they also share many of the same problems:  underfunded, deteriorating educational systems, high rates of poverty, and a high percentage of the population lacking health insurance.  Both also have a high percentage of poor immigrants, both legal and illegal.  

      Truthfully, I don't think that the two states are anywhere near the polar opposites that so many want to portray us as being.

      Political Compass: -6.75, -3.08

      by TexasTom on Sun Apr 01, 2012 at 07:25:59 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Lived both places. Chose to live in CA for (5+ / 0-)

    total of 22 years. Got out of TX as soon as I could get transferred by USAF. Was in TX fo about 2 yrs and go tshot at randomly while in uniform twice. Those quirky patriots in TX love thier military... to shoot at.

    Proud Slut...Fear is the Mind Killer

    by boophus on Sun Apr 01, 2012 at 02:01:42 PM PDT

    •  A friend of mine left FL for Corpus Christi TX and (0+ / 0-)

      said she actually finds the Gulf area of TX to be better overall than the wingnuttia all around here in Florida.

      But actually , I think she moved there because her husband was transferred from FL for TX through his job.

      She grew up in Hawaii and New York and PA.

      Follow PA Keystone Liberals on Twitter: @KeystoneLibs

      by wishingwell on Sun Apr 01, 2012 at 03:05:47 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  California vs Everywhere Else (11+ / 0-)

    I have lived in a bunch of different places including Australia, Colorado and Oregon, and even Southern California, but I keep coming back to the SF Bay Area. Why? Everything I need or want is here (including higher prices for everything, which I don't need or want), such as mountains (2 hours drive), ocean (1 hours or less drive), rural, urban, suburban, city, etc. I've visited Texas (Houston - swamp and bad air; Galveston - nice place to sing about; Austin - the bats under the bridge are the best part) and could not even imagine why anyone of the female persuasion would even want to live there.

    Back when I was younger, it was possible to go from kindergarten at good schools to Ph.D. without paying tuition at world class universities such as UCLA, UC Berkeley, etc. Once the republicans decided they didn't like the idea of even the lower classes getting a quality free education on their dime, that changed and we are faced with the problems of no longer having the scientists, mathematicians and other quality educated people to lead to the future. Even that has been outsourced!

    I reject your reality and substitute my own - Adam Savage

    by woolibaar on Sun Apr 01, 2012 at 02:03:06 PM PDT

    •  My nephew was stationed in the Bay Area of CA (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Sychotic1

      and met his wife there. So they go back to visit there frequently. He is now stationed in suburban Denver.
      But he asked for that transfer and to be trained in another specialty to get that particular assignment to be near his child from his first marriage.  He and his wife both said the most important thing was being near that child and for him to be a father to his child. But they miss the Bay Area of CA so much. He said once he retires from the Army , he would love to return there but the cost of living is so high.  He said they might retire in the East Coast either where he was raised ,Coastal NC or near family here in PA. ( mostly because of the lower cost of living in small town or rural PA or NC)

      Follow PA Keystone Liberals on Twitter: @KeystoneLibs

      by wishingwell on Sun Apr 01, 2012 at 03:10:17 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Yep. I spent 20 years in Texas one night... (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Lefty Ladig, Sychotic1

      “Science is like sex: sometimes something useful comes out, but that is not the reason we are doing it.” – Richard Feynman (-9.00,-8.86)

      by Jonathan Hoag on Sun Apr 01, 2012 at 03:13:02 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  The best thing California could do to shoot ahead (0+ / 0-)

      of wing-nut-landia would be to restore free university educations in public institutions.

      The outflow of creativity and invention would leave Texas and Florida in the dust.

      What a Police State Looks Like: "On one side: soft human flesh, unprotected human skulls, cardboard signs, slogans they chant, armed with belief in 1st Amendment rights. On the other: helmets, body armor, guns, batons, chemical weapons." -- JanetRhodes

      by YucatanMan on Sun Apr 01, 2012 at 04:49:39 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Or even just a graduated reduction (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        YucatanMan

        First, free education at the community college level (other than books and student activity fees); that would make at least a 2-year college education accessible to all, and those who desired could transfer to a 4-year institution such as CSU or UC. Then set reasonable tuition fees for both CSU and UC, with plenty of financial aid available.

        The optimist sees the glass as half-full. The pessimist sees the glass as half-empty. The realist just knows she's thirsty.

        by Cali Scribe on Sun Apr 01, 2012 at 08:03:28 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  So well written, so well researched- (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Naniboujou, GayHillbilly, YucatanMan

    could you possibly submit it as a guest editorial, maybe to the Dallas newspaper or their  website?

    (Would only help drive traffic to your website!)

  •  California has some major economic problems (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    v2aggie2, Wham Bam, VClib

    http://www.cfr.org/...

    From the mid-1980s to 2005, California's population grew by 10 million, while Medicaid recipients soared by seven million; tax filers paying income taxes rose by just 150,000; and the prison population swelled by 115,000
    California has a shrinking share of the tax base that pays for government.

    If high income tax payers see an end to the Bush/Obama tax cuts (from 35% to 39.6%) and the 2013 ACA taxes an addition 2.9% on investment income, combine with the proposed state income tax increase from 10.3% to 13.3% the combined tax rate will increase from 41.7% to 50.5%.

    This means a reduction of after tax marginal income of 15.2%.

    If the above comes to pass we will to to what extent the very wealth will actually move out of state or country to fight against increasing taxes.

    The most important way to protect the environment is not to have more than one child.

    by nextstep on Sun Apr 01, 2012 at 02:06:56 PM PDT

  •  What can I say... (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    AllanTBG

    .. other than that Texas' loss is California's gain!  

    Bye-bye, Mr. Devour!

    (-7.75,-5.64) Bush to the rich: "I call you my base". Obama to the rich : "When you do well, America does well".

    by Whirlaway on Sun Apr 01, 2012 at 02:09:07 PM PDT

  •  Anybody else think this guy looks like... (0+ / 0-)

    A creepy serial killer? Maybe he is changing his plates to throw the cops off.

    We lose if we choose to forget; the lives of men, and money spent.

    by DeanDemocrat on Sun Apr 01, 2012 at 02:11:11 PM PDT

  •  Spoiler Alert? (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    annieli, YucatanMan

    What that a wingnut is full of shit?  

    The real spoiler would be to find one that isn't full of shit.  

  •  Texas?????? (4+ / 0-)

    Live Here and Regret it:
    1. Air quality is unhealthy.
    2.Education for ordinary citizens is intolorable - private schools - Oh Yeah.
    3 Race is a big problem.  White folks don't want to admit that the state is becoming more brown than white and will do anything to combat it.
    4 Economic disparity - class separation is distinct iln cities.
    5 Politics is so corrulpt - "you scratch my back....".
    6.If you are not a evangical christian, you will pay for it by being shunned.  God help you if you are Gay.....  All shouted from the pulpit.
    7. Dallas is the home of radical, far right conservatives in this country and there are those here who use and think "swift boating" is the best thing since white bread.

    California has it's problems but not as many ignorant fools as there are in Texas.  Lived in SF for a time and now in purgatory - hope that I don't die here - then I would know it is Hell.

  •  Even here in Fresno, California rocks! (8+ / 0-)

    I've lived in San Diego, and visited Los Angeles and San Francisco plenty of times.  But now I live only two hours from one of the greatest National Parks in the country -- Yosemite.  I love California.

    "What Elephant?" - Jimmy Durante, "Jumbo"

    by FresnoBill314 on Sun Apr 01, 2012 at 02:27:34 PM PDT

  •  4 new House seats? (5+ / 0-)

    Where did those 4 new House seats for Texas come from?

    How did Paradise On Earth manage to lose one?

  •  "God's Own Country" (0+ / 0-)
    The phrase was also used to describe California in the 1860s...God’s Own Country, often abbreviated to Godzone or less often Godzown, is a phrase that has been used for more than 100 years by New Zealanders to describe their homeland. It has subsequently been adopted by some other countries, notably Australia

    slutty voter for a "dangerous president"; Präsidentenelf-maßschach; Warning-Some Snark Above"Nous sommes un groupuscule" (-9.50; -7.03) "Sciant terra viam monstrare."

    by annieli on Sun Apr 01, 2012 at 02:35:47 PM PDT

  •  Texas?? You gotta be jokin'. (0+ / 0-)

    My brother-in-law, math whiz and retired Air Force, was born in Dallas and escaped after high school into the Air Force. He's got one brother living outside of Dallas in some little one-horse town he shakes his head at. His 2 sisters,  and other brother (who worked for Gov. Ann Richards) all live in Austin.

    He met my baby sis, another math whiz, at Edwards AFB in CA. He was in the same Applied Math class she was in. They were both working on their Masters, his in Applied Systems, hers in MSEd in Math Ed. She worked for the DOD tracking radar. These 2 highly evolved math geniuses fell madly in love (they are soul mates).

    Fast forward to 2012. They are now back here in Florida living in the Panhandle (outside of Panama City). Their daughter (my beloved niece) was born there, a proud Florida cracker (of course she's a genius, too).

    Their take on CA vs. TX? CA is an economic basketcase, but TX is beyond a bad Perry joke.

    Enuff said.

    Inner and Outer Space: the Final Frontiers.

    by orlbucfan on Sun Apr 01, 2012 at 02:38:35 PM PDT

  •  Times are hard for many in California, but... (7+ / 0-)

    ..they'd be harder in Texas. A social safety net that's actively being dismantled, low-page jobs, lowest participation in health insurance from about anywhere.  And a giant budget deficit from cutting taxes in the middle of hard-times.  How are those job-creators working out for you?  Texas has to steal jobs from elsewhere; doesn't make so many new ones of its own.  Are you surprised?

    That said, we could use more widespread job creation here in parts of California -- not everybody can make a living sitting at a desk and coding.  And yet in my favored college/beach town on the coast, all the entrepreneurship that's being pushed by the city is the three-guys-a-computer-and-an-internet-connection sort.  Supposedly if one of these companies hits big, they'll hire locally.  But the odds are fairly good that if that ever happens they'll move straight to Silicon Valley, 20 miles away, where all the resources and contacts are.  So many have in the past.

    Wish we could start making more things locally again, aside from organic produce, beer, and baked goods.

    •  That sounds like Santa Cruz (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Ms Citizen, Sychotic1

      My favorite CA college/beach town; Monterey bay on one side, the redwoods on the other. How I miss that organic produce, and the rosemary-garlic sourdough bread!

      And the stars from end of the wharf on a clear summer night, with the seals barking beneath me.

      •  Yes, Santa Cruz (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Sychotic1, atana

        Still a lovely place.  As elsewhere, the opportunity gap between haves and have-nots, the lucky and the otherwise, continues to widen.

        •  Santa Cruz Boardwalk (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          atana

          about the only place left to find some of the classic pinball games; spouse and I have to head across the Hill sometime soon. Got to admit I miss the old pre-Loma Prieta Pacific Avenue though, and the late lamented Broken Egg for breakfasts.

          The optimist sees the glass as half-full. The pessimist sees the glass as half-empty. The realist just knows she's thirsty.

          by Cali Scribe on Sun Apr 01, 2012 at 08:08:36 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

  •  Spent Childhood Summers in TX. (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    YucatanMan, Lefty Ladig, Sychotic1

    This isn't new.

    Born in Santa Monica, raised in Santa Barbara, but I spent my summers as a child with relatives in West Texas and with my father when he had to work down in El Paso and White Sands N.M.

    My cousins alternated telling me that most Californians (unknown to me) were being kill in sexual-Satanic rituals.  Catholics (which I was raised) were not Christians (this somehow related to above), and the Texas was the greatest State in the Union.

    As I marveled at the beauty that was Odessa, I knew my cousins were insane.

    P.S. Watch any Discovery Channel murder investigation show? Any episode that takes place in the South, wait for the first cracker to suggest it was a Satanic killing. Happens every time.

    Oderint Dum Metuant.

    by Dunkerque on Sun Apr 01, 2012 at 02:53:04 PM PDT

  •  As for places I'd like to move to (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    scott5js, happymisanthropy, Sychotic1

    Texas ranks just a little higher than Somalia.  Just thinking the 50 states...  Texas is dead last on my list.  Austin could be OK if they could built a border fence to keep the rest of the state out.  I know there are many wonderful liberals who somehow survive in the red parts.  They are a hardy breed, and I admire them.

    Sunday mornings are more beautiful without Meet the Press.

    by deben on Sun Apr 01, 2012 at 02:54:09 PM PDT

    •  Stop it!!!! (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      The Empress

      This diary is making me feel defensive about Texas!  I am an import from the Midwest, but I've been here 27 years, and it's been very good to me.  I do complain about it a lot, but you people are being unfair, and, I feel, speaking mostly from ignorance.  It's a big state, and Amarillo could not be more different than Houston, which is different than Dallas, etc.  Quit bashing!  

  •  Neither is great right now -- and both are broke (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Americantrueandblue

    FWIW, I have live in both -- California for 8 years (1987-1995) and Texas for 17 years (1995-Present)

    Barack Obama for President '08

    by v2aggie2 on Sun Apr 01, 2012 at 02:57:07 PM PDT

  •  Apple is already in Austin. Austin is the home of (0+ / 0-)

    AppleCare.  It's the main base for all of Apple's customer service.

    Democracy is often an indictment of the voting populace.

    by electricgrendel on Sun Apr 01, 2012 at 03:00:13 PM PDT

  •  I join 25 million other Texans (8+ / 0-)

    in breathless anticipation of the day that Mr. DeVore decides to turn his back on us.

    We've withstood drought, wildfires, extreme heat, storms, and many other perils; we'll survive the mid-life crisis that brought him to the Lone Star State.

    Some drink deeply from the river of knowledge. Others only gargle. -- Woody Allen

    by cassandracarolina on Sun Apr 01, 2012 at 03:01:29 PM PDT

    •  Fowl Nesters. (3+ / 0-)

      Republicans always strike me as people who fowl the nest, bitch about it, then move on to some other place they can fuck up.

      California suffered though conservatives doing everything they could to have farmland paved over into houses and strip malls. ...greenbelts? Slow growth? Urban planning? Mass transit? Of course not. And don't even think about raising taxes to pay for maintaining the roads, schools, beaches or parks.

      Then the bitch about it being over crowded, that the schools are failing and the roads have pot holes. No shit Sherlocks.

      I give Texas, Arizona, Nevada 10 to 15 years, and they have the exact same problems as CA, only a order of magnitude greater.

      Oderint Dum Metuant.

      by Dunkerque on Sun Apr 01, 2012 at 03:21:09 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Agree absolutely, and your theory that... (2+ / 0-)
        Republicans always strike me as people who fowl the nest, bitch about it, then move on to some other place they can fuck up.
        may explain why Newt's so keen on colonizing the moon (but only with a population of fellow elites, no doubt).

        Some drink deeply from the river of knowledge. Others only gargle. -- Woody Allen

        by cassandracarolina on Sun Apr 01, 2012 at 03:40:14 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  Where would I want to live? (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Cali Scribe

    Where do I think I'd be most comfortable?  For me it would have to be where I would fit in.  I've been to both states, Texas for business, California for vacation.  As I look at who each state has chosen to represent them in elective office, the choice becomes starkly clear.  Obviously each state has notable exceptions but when a Senator or Congressman from Texas opens his or her mouth the stupid is almost invariably beyond overwhelming.  
    The bottom line is that I'd like to be able to have an intelligent conversation with my neighbors but Texas would seem to offer a very low probability of that being possible.
    Just as an aside, a couple of years ago I was preparing to relocate to Florida but waited to see how the 2010 election played out, I'm glad I did.  Think I'll stay in little Rhody a while longer.

    •  Thanks for the insult. (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      v2aggie2

      I don't want you for my neighbor either.

      •  I apologize deeply (0+ / 0-)

        Obviously there are millions of people in every area of the country whose values are at odds with the right wing agenda.  The way I see it though, when I see a state that's represented by such psychopaths as Perry, Gohmert, Cornyn et al. I have a pretty good idea that I might not be very much at home with a large part of the population, not everyone, but apparently a majority.
        I'm sorry if I offended you.

  •  if the wingnut's just now changing the plate.. (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    happymisanthropy, MeToo, YucatanMan

    it expired a couple months ago.

    Pay your taxes, creep.

    This Rover crossed over.. Willie Nelson

    by Karl Rover on Sun Apr 01, 2012 at 03:03:42 PM PDT

    •  He might have had a temporary (0+ / 0-)

      registration -- Perry's so busy executing prisoners there aren't enough left to make the new license plates.

      The optimist sees the glass as half-full. The pessimist sees the glass as half-empty. The realist just knows she's thirsty.

      by Cali Scribe on Sun Apr 01, 2012 at 08:13:10 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  If I was sentenced to live in Texas (0+ / 0-)

    but could choose where I live, of course I would pick Austin and be grateful.

    Cali has much more appeal, I will give her that. Especially on our delightfully grey drizzly Seattle days.....

    "What have you done for me, lately?" ~ Lady Liberty

    by ozsea1 on Sun Apr 01, 2012 at 03:03:51 PM PDT

  •  Went to San Francisco once (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    TDDVandy, Sychotic1

    it was nice. For some reason the whole concept of having more or less the same type of weather all year seemed unsettlignly mystical to me.  

    •  Go Inland to Sacramento (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Cali Scribe, Muskegon Critic

      Rent is cheaper and we have winter.  You can listen to me whine every time it dips below 60 degrees ;)

      "I watch Fox News for my comedy, and Comedy Central for my news." - Facebook Group

      by Sychotic1 on Sun Apr 01, 2012 at 07:51:14 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  I don't mind visiting snow (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Muskegon Critic

      but I'd hate to have to shovel it (or have my spouse drive a bus in it when he was working). We can drive a few hours to the Sierras most winters...and even get a nice little dusting on Mt. Hamilton (home to Lick Observatory) just about an hour's drive from our apartment on occasion. Now if we could just add a Stanley Cup winning hockey team to the mix...

      The optimist sees the glass as half-full. The pessimist sees the glass as half-empty. The realist just knows she's thirsty.

      by Cali Scribe on Sun Apr 01, 2012 at 08:16:23 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  I want more liberals in Texas (6+ / 0-)

    I could brag about Mary's Lounge at 1022 Westheimer, but it closed in 2009 (opened in 1970). Once rated by the Houston Press as Houston's best gay bar. One owner was Jim 'Fanny' Farmer, a long tall Texan.
    But Houston still has Pacifica station KPFT.

    Censorship is rogue government.

    by scott5js on Sun Apr 01, 2012 at 03:10:09 PM PDT

  •  Since Perry is fond of talking about secession... (6+ / 0-)

    ... what makes the most sense in his state in this regard is for Austin to secede from Texas and become it's own state.

    It's like different universe than the rest of the state and it is also the economic growth hub for the state, thanks to Dell and the many satellite businesses that have cropped up to service that market.

  •  Except for the weather being too cold sometimes (0+ / 0-)

    I much prefer New England to either of those states.

    Vermont, Maine, New Hampshire, MA, RI.

    But then again, I am a big fan of Delaware and people think I have lost my mind.

    Follow PA Keystone Liberals on Twitter: @KeystoneLibs

    by wishingwell on Sun Apr 01, 2012 at 03:17:10 PM PDT

  •  Isn't Apple also planning (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    varro

    large new facility in central Oregon?

    And the Austin location is not an HQ.  It's more like a call center isn't it?

    My heroes have the heart to live the life I want to live.

    by JLFinch on Sun Apr 01, 2012 at 03:33:14 PM PDT

    •  Server farms. (0+ / 0-)

      Apple, Facebook, and Google are all planning server farms in the high desert because of the dry, less extreme weather and inexpensive power.

      9-11 changed everything? Well, Katrina changed it back.

      by varro on Sun Apr 01, 2012 at 08:04:14 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  don't feed the trolls (0+ / 0-)

    see subject.

  •  So I wonder what this nut is going to do (4+ / 0-)

    When Texas turns Democratic, given the influx of Hispanic voters as well as the young and educated who do go there - but do not in fact become wingnuts. Plus, it is often pointed out that his demographic is old and shrinking, as well as plain stupid.

    I was in El Paso for two years and it seemed pretty Democratic to me.

    An empty head is not really empty; it is stuffed with rubbish. Hence the difficulty of forcing anything into an empty head. -- Eric Hoffer

    by MichiganChet on Sun Apr 01, 2012 at 03:49:16 PM PDT

  •  Just what Texas needs. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Sychotic1

    Another wingnut.

    27, white male, TX-26 (current), TN-09 (born), TN-08 (where parents live now)

    by TDDVandy on Sun Apr 01, 2012 at 03:51:34 PM PDT

  •  Retirees (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    indie17, Mariken

    Lots of retirees leave California for Texas.  No state income tax+low sales tax.  I used to be a real estate agent and have seen many Californians cash out, move to Texas and buy two+ houses--one to live in and others to cash flow with rent. Of course that is why Texas has no infrastructure investing--like education, health care, etc. Those who move here for work better hope it's for a big company with lots of bennies.  The small businesses don't have to give any benefits--few have health insurance, many give no or little vacation, sick leave and often no breaks or lunches.  Texas labor laws are for the 1%.  Just my opinion/observations from a 15 year resident.

    •  No income tax, but property taxes and sales taxes (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Sychotic1

      are high, in my opinion.  I don't see 8.25% sales tax as "low."

      What a Police State Looks Like: "On one side: soft human flesh, unprotected human skulls, cardboard signs, slogans they chant, armed with belief in 1st Amendment rights. On the other: helmets, body armor, guns, batons, chemical weapons." -- JanetRhodes

      by YucatanMan on Sun Apr 01, 2012 at 05:00:13 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Ummm....There is this little cost of living (4+ / 0-)

    problem.

    I regularly get inquiries about jobs around San Franscisco, for notably money than I've been able to earn in the Chicagoland area.

    And I can't afford to take them because California is so much more expensive a place to live than here in Illinois -- and, having lived in Texas before moving up here, I know that it's much more expensive here than it was when we lived in Dallas.

    The win in California comes from liking the lifestyle, not from the economics.

    LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

    by dinotrac on Sun Apr 01, 2012 at 04:34:49 PM PDT

    •  We work to live (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Cali Scribe

      not live to work and yes, I love the weather.  The jobs pay more in order to pay for your rent.  My Mom took a job in downtown SF some years ago.  She rented in a suburb that is served by the Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) and never had to drive into work. He two bedroom apartment was $1200 per month, but her job and benefits made up for the high cost of rent.  She also didn't need to maintain a car which saved a lot of money.

      "I watch Fox News for my comedy, and Comedy Central for my news." - Facebook Group

      by Sychotic1 on Sun Apr 01, 2012 at 07:55:23 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  When I look at that face (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Sychotic1, Matt Z

    I'm reminded of my what my (then young) teenaged nephew said upon first meeting his great uncle, my Mom's brother, an ordained Southern Baptist Minister:

    He seems like a child molester.
    Except in Mr. DeVore's case, that grin suggests to me it's probably not children but slow-moving yet dim-witted woodland creatures.
  •  Bravo! (5+ / 0-)

    I'm used to my home being a punching bag for the ignorant.  Fuck 'em.  Sour grapes as far as I'm concerned.  I'll just go ahead and keep waving my Bear Flag from the rooftops.

    One thing you didn't mention; there is something to a state that has Yosemite, Big Sur, wine country, the coastal redwoods and countless other examples of natural beauty that can't be cheapened by pointing out tiny differences in tax rates.   And we have vibrant cities like San Diego, the coolness of which I'd take over even Austin any day of the week.

    Yeah, California rocks.  From the largest mountain of the Sierra Nevada to the smallest wine grape.

    •  As someone who used to live in California for 8 yr (0+ / 0-)

      and now has lived in Texas for 17 years, I don't see myself going back.

      But that's just me.  Both places have their pluses and minuses.  The combination of these in Texas just happens to be combination that I live with easier

      Barack Obama for President '08

      by v2aggie2 on Sun Apr 01, 2012 at 10:06:17 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  California vs. Texas...ahh my experience (0+ / 0-)

      Truck stop comparison....
      Bakersfield (CA's truck stop and pretty much the worse spot in CA) versus Dallas (America's truck stop).  Difference for me:  If you get in your car in CA, in 2 or 3 hours, you can pretty much dial in any climate in the world. (mountain, beach, desert, spring-like, summer-like, winter-like).   If you leave Dallas and drive 2 or 3 hours in any direction....you're still at a truck stop with the same basic weather (good or bad).  There are just not that many places on planet earth where you can choose your weather with a 2 hr or less drive.

      People comparison...
      The vast majority of all non-Austin Texans that I've talked too keep this "don't mess with us" defensive attitude hanging in mid-air with almost any conversation.  If you point out almost any negative thing (expense/traffic/etc) about California to a Californian...they usually agree.  Almost no defensiveness what-so-ever.  I personally don't enjoy insecure people or entire state cultures, which seems to be the main point of focus for Texans.

      There's room at the top, they're telling you still, but first you must learn how to smile as you kill. -J Lennon

      by noelcor on Mon Apr 02, 2012 at 05:03:01 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  no one's quoted General Sherman yet? (4+ / 0-)

    If I owned Hell and Texas, I'd rent out Texas and live in Hell.

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