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President Obama sets aside politics this week for an Easter and Passover message to Christians and Jews:

For millions of Americans, this weekend is a time to celebrate redemption at God’s hand. Tonight, Jews will gather for a second Seder, where they will retell the story of the Exodus. And tomorrow, my family will join Christians around the world as we thank God for the all-important gift of grace through the resurrection of His son, and experience the wonder of Easter morning.

After recounting the Christian background and meaning of Easter, Obama includes all Americans in the lessons that can be taken from this day:

Christ’s triumph over death holds special meaning for Christians. But all of us, no matter how or whether we believe, can identify with elements of His story. The triumph of hope over despair. Of faith over doubt. The notion that there is something out there that is bigger than ourselves.

These beliefs help unite Americans of all faiths and backgrounds. They shape our values and guide our work. They put our lives in perspective.

And if not that, there's always candy.

Complete transcript below the fold.

For millions of Americans, this weekend is a time to celebrate redemption at God’s hand. Tonight, Jews will gather for a second Seder, where they will retell the story of the Exodus. And tomorrow, my family will join Christians around the world as we thank God for the all-important gift of grace through the resurrection of His son, and experience the wonder of Easter morning.

These holidays have their roots in miracles that took place thousands of years ago. They connect us to our past and give us strength as we face the future. And they remind us of the common thread of humanity that connects us all.

For me, and for countless other Christians, Easter weekend is a time to reflect and rejoice. Yesterday, many of us took a few quiet moments to try and fathom the tremendous sacrifice Jesus made for all of us. Tomorrow, we will celebrate the resurrection of a savior who died so that we might live.

And throughout these sacred days, we recommit ourselves to following His example. We rededicate our time on Earth to selflessness, and to loving our neighbors. We remind ourselves that no matter who we are, or how much we achieve, we each stand humbled before an almighty God.

Christ’s triumph over death holds special meaning for Christians. But all of us, no matter how or whether we believe, can identify with elements of His story. The triumph of hope over despair. Of faith over doubt. The notion that there is something out there that is bigger than ourselves.

These beliefs help unite Americans of all faiths and backgrounds. They shape our values and guide our work. They put our lives in perspective.

So to all Christians celebrating the Resurrection with us, Michelle and I want to wish you a blessed and Happy Easter. And to all Americans, I hope you have a weekend filled with joy and reflection, focused on the things that matter most. God bless you, and may God bless the United States of America.

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Comment Preferences

  •  It is nice to see a Democratic President (12+ / 0-)

    able to take back the hill from religious ideologues for the rest of America. Considering how often George W Bush invoked God prior to some godless policy/reaction/etc....

    It's just another reason to be glad that President Obama is exactly where he is supposed to be.

    Above Grecian mantles were chiseled these words... Know Thyself... Nothing in Excess... the pop philosophy of its day.

    by ravagerofworlds2 on Sat Apr 07, 2012 at 07:35:04 AM PDT

    •  It would be even nicer if a Democratic President (5+ / 0-)

      refused to allow religious ideologues to set the terms of public discourse.

      •  If you are silent... whoever is shouting loudest (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        NoFortunateSon, AaronInSanDiego

        runs the discussion.

        Above Grecian mantles were chiseled these words... Know Thyself... Nothing in Excess... the pop philosophy of its day.

        by ravagerofworlds2 on Sat Apr 07, 2012 at 09:20:48 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  Because of course those terms... (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        NoFortunateSon

        ...are entirely under the President's control.

        "When I give food to the poor, they call me a saint. When I ask why the poor have no food, they call me a communist." --Dom Helder Camara, archbishop of Recife

        by JamesGG on Sat Apr 07, 2012 at 09:24:21 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Tell me, what terms of public discourse ARE (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Medium Head Boy

          under the president's control?

          •  Entirely under the President's control? (3+ / 0-)

            None of them.

            The public discourse, as a rhetorical landscape, can't be controlled by any one person; it's an organic entity produced by and within the combination of every public rhetorical act that takes place within a given public.

            The President has more rhetorical power than most, certainly, but he doesn't have anywhere near the power to singlehandedly determine the terms of the public discourse. If Presidents did have that power, none of them would ever lose reelection or fail to get what they wanted out of Congress.

            "When I give food to the poor, they call me a saint. When I ask why the poor have no food, they call me a communist." --Dom Helder Camara, archbishop of Recife

            by JamesGG on Sat Apr 07, 2012 at 09:40:43 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  I agree (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              grover, Observerinvancouver

              As someone who did their masters on disaster rhetoric of the OKC Bombing and 9-11... your statement is completely in line with the rhetorical world. Usually, the Presidency is a reactionary entity rather than a pro-active office due to intransigence in our representative democracy, and the multitude of voices.

              There are a lot of dictatorships in the world where the leader has sole control of the culture's discussions. They get statues of themselves and stuff.

              Above Grecian mantles were chiseled these words... Know Thyself... Nothing in Excess... the pop philosophy of its day.

              by ravagerofworlds2 on Sat Apr 07, 2012 at 09:57:18 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

          •  Completely? None. (0+ / 0-)

            Drew Westen, is this you?

          •  Judging from your original comment, you seem (0+ / 0-)

            to think there are such terms.  And I'm interested to know how you were thinking he could "refuse[] to allow religious ideologues to set" them.

            We must, indeed, all hang together, or assuredly we shall all hang separately. B. Franklin

            by Observerinvancouver on Sat Apr 07, 2012 at 12:06:40 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

      •  Oh shut it. (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Observerinvancouver, TFinSF, askew

        Seriously. I regret the harsh tone, but not only has this President engaged in tremendous push back against religious extremism (see: Women, War On), he's done more than any President before him.

        He's not your daddy. He can't end all the horrible things in this world. He can only fight against them as much as public mandate gives him.

        •  I thank 'god' the president isn't my daddy... (0+ / 0-)

          Now NFS, tell me, are you not even the least bit disappointed with his performance in office? Of course, if you think the president is your daddy, you might draw a blank on that question.

          •  Now that's just fatuous. I should be ashamed (0+ / 0-)

            that I'm being so generous to you.  

            We must, indeed, all hang together, or assuredly we shall all hang separately. B. Franklin

            by Observerinvancouver on Sat Apr 07, 2012 at 12:10:10 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

          •  "Five Fundamentals" of Christian Fundamentalsim (0+ / 0-)

            "Five Fundamentals" of Christian Fundamentalism were established by the Niagara Bible Conference and the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church, in 1910 (reference at link):    

            1) The divine inspiration of the Bible and the inerrancy (incapability of being wrong) of scripture.  

            2) The virgin birth of Christ.

            3) The belief that Christ's death was the atonement for sin.

            4) The bodily resurrection of Christ.

            5) The historical reality of Christ's miracles.

            Today, in his public address, President Obama echoed the foregoing when he pointedly stated his belief in biblical miracles; his belief that Jesus died for our sins; and that Jesus was, indeed, resurrected from the dead:
            These holidays have their roots in miracles that took place thousands of years ago...Yesterday, many of us took a few quiet moments to try and fathom the tremendous sacrifice Jesus made for all of us...Tomorrow, we will celebrate the resurrection of a savior who died so that we might live.
            President Obama has expressly reminded us that he is decidedly not a proponent of liberal theology: he does not question whether the bible is the absolute and infallible word of god; he does not favor a non-dogmatic approach to scripture; nor does he favor a non-literal interpretation of biblical events, or a metaphorical view of Jesus' miracles.

            In short, President Obama made clear that he seeks fellowship with those who preach a more conservative theology in keeping with the "fundamentals" of Christianity. This is nothing new of course, especially for those of us who recall that evangelical mega-church Pastor Rick Warren was invited to give the invocation at the presidential inauguration in January 2009.

    •  Where is he supposed to be anyway? (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      PreciousLittle, Medium Head Boy

      Near the alter? Pastor Obama?  
      Not sure what your last line means exactly.
      What should make us glad?
       

      It's just another reason to be glad that President Obama is exactly where he is supposed to be.
      And tomorrow, once again, I look forward to a family member letting me know how Christians are persecuted and the war on religion goes on.
      Led by President who says:
      God bless you, and may God bless the United States of America.

      We consume the carcasses of creatures of like appetites, passions and organs with our own, and fill the slaughterhouses daily with screams of pain and fear. Robert Louis Stevenson

      by Christin on Sat Apr 07, 2012 at 08:35:18 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Please take your negativity somewhere else. (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        NoFortunateSon, askew

        Above Grecian mantles were chiseled these words... Know Thyself... Nothing in Excess... the pop philosophy of its day.

        by ravagerofworlds2 on Sat Apr 07, 2012 at 09:22:48 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Oh, is this post only open to fundamentalists (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Christin, Medium Head Boy

          and their apologist symapthizers? That's not at all what Jesus of Bethlehem would do, is it.

          •  I'm sorry, what? (6+ / 0-)

            "Fundamentalists and their apologist sympathizers"?

            Please do point out to me who in this thread is expressing fundamentalist beliefs, or "apologist sympathy" for fundamentalist beliefs.

            Of course, in order to point that out, you're going to have to demonstrate that the beliefs being expressed are, indeed, consistent with the historical movement of fundamentalist Christianity.

            Thus, any reference you present should also contain a direct citation of exactly which portion of The Fundamentals you're seeing expressed here. Please include a volume and page number. Direct quotations are preferable but not necessary.

            "When I give food to the poor, they call me a saint. When I ask why the poor have no food, they call me a communist." --Dom Helder Camara, archbishop of Recife

            by JamesGG on Sat Apr 07, 2012 at 09:33:44 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  i am also sorry - what? (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              Medium Head Boy, PreciousLittle

              why not respond to the person PL was commenting too.
              who goes and tells others to get lost if they don't agree with an opinion.

              We consume the carcasses of creatures of like appetites, passions and organs with our own, and fill the slaughterhouses daily with screams of pain and fear. Robert Louis Stevenson

              by Christin on Sat Apr 07, 2012 at 09:44:11 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  Because the person PL was responding to... (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                Observerinvancouver

                ...wasn't engaged in what appeared to me to be a rather blatant misuse of the word "Fundamentalist," insofar as PL appears to believe that anyone who has posted in this thread thus far is expressing beliefs that are indicative of connection with the historical religious movement of Fundamentalism.

                "When I give food to the poor, they call me a saint. When I ask why the poor have no food, they call me a communist." --Dom Helder Camara, archbishop of Recife

                by JamesGG on Sat Apr 07, 2012 at 09:47:27 AM PDT

                [ Parent ]

                •  ahhhh. i see. (1+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  PreciousLittle

                  but me asking a question, gets this crap.
                  to get lost.
                     and a rec!
                  brilliant.

                  Please take your negativity somewhere else. (1+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  NoFortunateSon

                  We consume the carcasses of creatures of like appetites, passions and organs with our own, and fill the slaughterhouses daily with screams of pain and fear. Robert Louis Stevenson

                  by Christin on Sat Apr 07, 2012 at 09:50:05 AM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

                  •  I reply to what I reply to. (1+ / 0-)
                    Recommended by:
                    Observerinvancouver

                    I'm under no obligation to reply or respond to every comment in this thread.

                    I chose to respond to the particular comment to which I responded because (a) American religion happens to be an area of my expertise, and (b) I saw what appeared to me to be a rather significant error that attempted to apply a historically-inaccurate pejorative to comments within this thread.

                    "When I give food to the poor, they call me a saint. When I ask why the poor have no food, they call me a communist." --Dom Helder Camara, archbishop of Recife

                    by JamesGG on Sat Apr 07, 2012 at 09:54:55 AM PDT

                    [ Parent ]

                    •  ahhh yes. the cherry pick defense. (1+ / 0-)
                      Recommended by:
                      PreciousLittle

                      of being just a bit hypocritical.  
                      well played.
                      i shall not let your insult slide!
                      the insult that began this duel i care not!
                      good day sir.
                        funny.

                      american religion happens to be an area of expertise by my brother also.
                      you two sound very much alike.
                        (not an insult.)

                      We consume the carcasses of creatures of like appetites, passions and organs with our own, and fill the slaughterhouses daily with screams of pain and fear. Robert Louis Stevenson

                      by Christin on Sat Apr 07, 2012 at 10:06:35 AM PDT

                      [ Parent ]

                  •  Christin, I'm sorry you have family members (0+ / 0-)

                    who think Christians are persecuted and that there's a war on religion.  I think it's forbearing of you to bother having anything to do with them.

                    However, even though I'm an agnostic I find Pres. Obama's message inspiring.  There are many beautiful and positive lessons in Judaism and Christianity and, at the risk of sounding Panglossian, recognizing them is a boon.  

                    We must, indeed, all hang together, or assuredly we shall all hang separately. B. Franklin

                    by Observerinvancouver on Sat Apr 07, 2012 at 12:21:44 PM PDT

                    [ Parent ]

            •  Obama said he believes in the RESURRECTION (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              Christin

              of Jesus Christ from the dead.

              Evidently, you are completely unaware that the resurrection is a key tenet of fundamentalist Christianity. Otherwise, you would not have asked me to:

              demonstrate that the beliefs being expressed are, indeed, consistent with the historical movement of fundamentalist Christianity.
              Cripes, you even 'challenged' me with a link to The Fundamentals text you found at Wikipedia. Had you actually read the list of contents you would have seen the resurrection in Volume V. Here tis, sparky: Volume V: The Certainty and Importance of the Bodily Resurrection of Jesus Christ from the Dead - R. A. Torrey.

              Maybe I'm amazed that you are so deeply invested in something you appear to know nothing about.

              •  I must say. (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                PreciousLittle

                Joli coup!
                  :-)

                We consume the carcasses of creatures of like appetites, passions and organs with our own, and fill the slaughterhouses daily with screams of pain and fear. Robert Louis Stevenson

                by Christin on Sat Apr 07, 2012 at 10:10:11 AM PDT

                [ Parent ]

              •  You missed my addendum comment below... (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                ravagerofworlds2

                ...which stated that you're also going to have to demonstrate that the beliefs you see being expressed are exclusive to the historical movement of Fundamentalism, rather than held in wider contexts by others in addition to Fundamentalists.

                Fundamentalists also believe that the sky is blue and that water is wet; that doesn't make those "fundamentalist" beliefs.

                The Resurrection is not in any way exclusive to fundamentalist belief; rather, it's a key tenet of Christian belief in general.

                At my Episcopal church, as in every other Episcopal church in the country, we say the Nicene Creed every week—which includes the line "on the third day He rose from the dead, in accordance with the Scriptures."

                We are not in any way, shape, or form linked to the historical movement known as Fundamentalism.

                Ergo, belief in the Resurrection is not sufficient evidence of Fundamentalist belief.

                So you have three choices:

                A. Show something else expressed within this thread that is indicative of fundamentalist belief (which will require both a page reference from The Fundamentals and a demonstration that the belief is unique to or in some other way indicative specifically of Fundamentalism);

                B. Declare all Episcopalians and other mainline Christians, who do believe in the resurrection of Jesus Christ, to be Fundamentalists, which would not only be a rather massive historical error but would also be problematically dehumanizing, in your denying us the basic right to define ourselves and imposing your definition of who we are onto us; or

                C. Admit that you are unable to produce evidence to substantiate your claim that there are "fundamentalists and their apologist sympathizers" within this thread, and that in light of the lack of such evidence, you are retracting the claim.

                "When I give food to the poor, they call me a saint. When I ask why the poor have no food, they call me a communist." --Dom Helder Camara, archbishop of Recife

                by JamesGG on Sat Apr 07, 2012 at 10:22:08 AM PDT

                [ Parent ]

                •  Hold up on the witch hunt, JG. (0+ / 0-)

                  I knew it wouldn't take long before you resorted to charging that we non-believers are persecuting and "dehumanizing" Christians on this thread.

                  Belief in the resurrection is one of the fundamentals of fundamentalist Christianity as referenced in "The Fundamentals: A Testimony To The Truth" (Volume V). President Obama has said that he believes in the literal resurrection and, evidently, he also holds a literal belief in the biblical "miracles" of the bible.

                  If that is not fundamentalism by your definition, please tell me, how would you define fundamentalism? That would be a good starting point.

                  •  Fundamentalism is a distinct movement. (1+ / 0-)
                    Recommended by:
                    Observerinvancouver
                    I knew it wouldn't take long before you resorted to charging that we non-believers are persecuting and "dehumanizing" Christians on this thread.
                    Neither I nor my church are Fundamentalist; if you chose to label us as such, contrary to our express wishes, you would be objectifying us by denying our own subjectivity and agency to define who we are. The ability to define oneself is a basic human right.
                    Belief in the resurrection is one of the fundamentals of fundamentalist Christianity as referenced in "The Fundamentals: A Testimony To The Truth" (Volume V). President Obama has said that he believes in the literal resurrection and, evidently, he also holds a literal belief in the biblical "miracles" of the bible.
                    Those are also among the basic beliefs of non-fundamentalist Christianity, as expressed in the Nicene Creed which is recited at many mainline churches each and every week. So, again, you are forced to either define all Christians who recite the Nicene Creed as "fundamentalists," or admit that there is something more to the definition than that.
                    If that is not fundamentalism by your definition, please tell me, how would you define fundamentalism? That would be a good starting point.
                    Well, to start with, let's dispense with the notion that definitions of fundamentalism are somehow a personal thing, such that you could have a definition of fundamentalism that somehow includes all orthodox Christianity.

                    Fundamentalism is a distinct historical, theological, and cultural movement; as George Marsden, who is recognized by scholars of American religion as one of the preeminent experts on American fundamentalism, states on page 3 of Fundamentalism and American Culture, "to understand fundamentalism we must also see it as a distinct version of evangelical Christianity uniquely shaped by the circumstances of America in the early twentieth century." In other words, not all Christianity, or even all evangelical Christianity, is Fundamentalism; Fundamentalism is a subset of Christianity as a whole.

                    Theologically, Fundamentalism is defined by adherence to all of what they understand as the "fundamentals of the faith"—which start with the notion of the inerrancy of Scripture.

                    Fundamentalism depends upon the proposition that the Bible is the inerrant word of God, which means that it is completely without error or contradiction and that it must be read literally. Thus, fundamentalism seeks to repeat without rhetoric what it perceives as God’s commonsensical, unmediated, and unembellished Word. (Barbara Biesecker-Mast, "Fundamental Gaffes," from Communication and Critical/Cultural Studies, vol. 4, no. 1 [2007]:98)
                    In the disestablishment of nineteenth-century Evangelicalism into liberal and Fundamentalist factions, few issues were more important to the Fundamentalist self-identity than the belief in the inerrancy of the biblical literature. (James Davison Hunter, Evangelicalism: The Coming Generation: 20)
                    From the basis of inerrancy/literalism come further theological commitments, including not only beliefs held by all orthodox Christians like the resurrection, but also things that aren't quite so universal, like six-day creationism, spiritual warfare, and premillennial dispensationalism—the latter of which is a view Marsden agrees is held by today's fundamentalists (Fundamentalism and American Culture, p. 5).

                    Fundamentalism is also defined culturally by a general commitment to militancy and separatism. From Marsden's Understanding Fundamentalism and Evangelicalism:

                    A more precise statement is that an American fundamentalist is an evangelical who is miltant in opposition to liberal theology in the churches or to changes in cultural values or mores, such as those associated with "secular humanism." In either the long or the short definitions, fundamentalists are a subtype of evangelicals and militancy is crucial to their outlook. Fundamentalists are not just religious conservatives, they are conservatives who are willing to take a stand and to fight. (1)
                    Fundamentalism then has become a rather specific designation. Though outsiders to the movement sometimes use the term broadly to designate any militant conservative, those who call themselves fundamentalists are predominantly separatist Baptist dispensationalists. (4)
                    Please do indicate where in this comment thread you see these particular tenets being expressed, such that they can be understood as distinct and clear references to the historical, theological, and cultural phenomenon of Protestant Fundamentalism, rather than to the basic tenets of faith held by all orthodox Christians.

                    "When I give food to the poor, they call me a saint. When I ask why the poor have no food, they call me a communist." --Dom Helder Camara, archbishop of Recife

                    by JamesGG on Sat Apr 07, 2012 at 12:18:50 PM PDT

                    [ Parent ]

                    •  Props for the complete, imho, rout. :) (0+ / 0-)

                      P.S. Beautiful sig.  I just noticed it.  

                      We must, indeed, all hang together, or assuredly we shall all hang separately. B. Franklin

                      by Observerinvancouver on Sat Apr 07, 2012 at 12:35:41 PM PDT

                      [ Parent ]

                    •  JG, at the risk of prolonging the discussion... (0+ / 0-)

                      Would you explain for us how you define the difference between "Orthodox Christians" and "Fundamentalist Christians"? In other words, at what point does your "Orthodox Christian" cross over the line and become a "Fundamentalist Christian".

                      You cited religious scholar George Marsden:

                      Fundamentalism depends upon the proposition that the Bible is the inerrant word of God, which means that it is completely without error or contradiction and that it must be read literally.
                      Doesn't the President believe that the bible is the "inerrant word of God"? Moreover, if the President believes the bible is accurate on the subject of Jesus being literally resurrected from the dead, what's your beef with six-day creationism?

                      Marsden says American fundamentalists are "in opposition to liberal theology in the churches or to changes in cultural values or mores, such as those associated with secular humanism." Isn't the President's opposition to same-sex marriage based on his understanding of Christian doctrine?

                       

                      •  Again, Fundamentalism is a distinct movement. (0+ / 0-)

                        It's not a catch-all for all orthodox Christianity, or even for all conservative Christianity.

                        Would you explain for us how you define the difference between "Orthodox Christians" and "Fundamentalist Christians"? In other words, at what point does your "Orthodox Christian" cross over the line and become a "Fundamentalist Christian".
                        When they take on the worldview and tenets of Fundamentalist epistemology, theology, and cultural thought.

                        It's not as if "orthodox" and "Fundamentalist" are two separate groups; Fundamentalists are a small subset of the larger set of orthodoxy. It is possible to be orthodox without being Fundamentalist, but it isn't possible to be Fundamentalist without being orthodox.

                        Orthodox Christianity is a broad movement, comprised of all who hold to (or would hold to, if they were creedal) the Nicene Creed; it includes Roman Catholics, Eastern Orthodox, mainline Protestants, evangelicals, Anabaptists, and most other major Christian denominations (with the exception of Mormonism).

                        Fundamentalism is a subset of just one of the branches of orthodox Christianity, an extremely conservative version of evangelical Christianity.

                        Doesn't the President believe that the bible is the "inerrant word of God"? Moreover, if the President believes the bible is accurate on the subject of Jesus being literally resurrected from the dead, what's your beef with six-day creationism?
                        I haven't quizzed him specifically on the topic, but "inerrancy" has a very specific theological meaning; I'd be surprised if the President was an inerrantist, given his background in the theologically-liberal UCC, and his having never espoused things like six-day creationism.

                        There are many Christians who don't hold to inerrancy or six-day creationism, who do believe in a literal resurrection. Just because one believes that some things in the Bible are literally historical, does not mean that one must accept that all of them are.

                        Marsden says American fundamentalists are "in opposition to liberal theology in the churches or to changes in cultural values or mores, such as those associated with secular humanism." Isn't the President's opposition to same-sex marriage based on his understanding of Christian doctrine?
                        Again, there are many people who oppose same-sex marriage based on religious beliefs who do not hold to the whole of the Fundamentalist worldview.

                        I disagree with the President and his continuing opposition to same-sex marriage, in part based on my own religious worldview, but that doesn't mean that one of us is a Fundamentalist and the other of us is a liberal.

                        The Fundamentalist worldview goes much deeper than mere opposition to same-sex marriage; it involves resistance to just about all of the past 50 years of social progress, including feminism, increasing religious pluralism, and expansion of civil rights for LGBT people.

                        If the President were a Fundamentalist, he wouldn't have been a member of the UCC (a decidedly non-Fundamentalist denomination) and he wouldn't go to St. John's Episcopal when he does go to church here in DC. Given that separatism is a major tenet of the Fundamentalist worldview, no Fundamentalist would willingly subject him- or herself and his/her family to what Fundamentslists believe is "false doctrine."

                        "When I give food to the poor, they call me a saint. When I ask why the poor have no food, they call me a communist." --Dom Helder Camara, archbishop of Recife

                        by JamesGG on Sat Apr 07, 2012 at 05:00:06 PM PDT

                        [ Parent ]

                  •  Jaysus H. Christ on a cracker! If there's any (0+ / 0-)

                    persecuting and dehumanizing going on here, it's not JamesGG doing it.

                    We must, indeed, all hang together, or assuredly we shall all hang separately. B. Franklin

                    by Observerinvancouver on Sat Apr 07, 2012 at 12:30:22 PM PDT

                    [ Parent ]

              •  It's a key component of Christianity, period (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                Observerinvancouver

                ... and that's a bit of an understatement :-)

                Sarah Palin: The Palin plan is quite simple. My elderly mother (drily): It would have to be.

                by Juliann on Sat Apr 07, 2012 at 10:55:21 AM PDT

                [ Parent ]

              •  Erm, I think believing in the Resurrection is the (0+ / 0-)

                basic tenet of every form of Christianity, not just fundamentalism.  

                We must, indeed, all hang together, or assuredly we shall all hang separately. B. Franklin

                by Observerinvancouver on Sat Apr 07, 2012 at 12:25:28 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

                •  No, belief in the Resurrection is NOT a (0+ / 0-)

                  "basic tenet of every form of Christianity". Where do you get your information?

                  You must be altogether unacquainted with Liberal Christianity. It's only been around a couple of hundred years.

                  •  I go to a church.... (0+ / 0-)

                    ...that's liberal even for an Episcopal church—which makes us very, very liberal indeed.

                    Each and every Sunday morning, we stand in the pews and read the Nicene Creed—which includes the statement that "We believe [...] after three days [Jesus] rose again, in accordance with the Scriptures," a clear statement of belief in the Resurrection.

                    The Nicene Creed (or its theology, in non-creedal denominations) is a central tenet of every branch of orthodox Christianity—including the traditionally liberal denominations like the Episcopal Church and the United Methodist Church.

                    "When I give food to the poor, they call me a saint. When I ask why the poor have no food, they call me a communist." --Dom Helder Camara, archbishop of Recife

                    by JamesGG on Sat Apr 07, 2012 at 05:08:48 PM PDT

                    [ Parent ]

          •  Oh, I forgot to add... (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            grover, Observerinvancouver

            ...that you're also going to have to demonstrate that the beliefs you see being expressed are exclusive to the historical movement of Fundamentalism, rather than held in wider contexts by others in addition to Fundamentalists.

            "When I give food to the poor, they call me a saint. When I ask why the poor have no food, they call me a communist." --Dom Helder Camara, archbishop of Recife

            by JamesGG on Sat Apr 07, 2012 at 09:43:21 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

          •  Yes, because all religious people are fundies. (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Juliann

            I seriously question the intelligence and sanity of the downers who rush the weekly radio address.

            •  bring on the insults. (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              Medium Head Boy, PreciousLittle

              why not?
              jesus would approve.

              I seriously question the intelligence and sanity of the downers

              You question their intelligence. And sanity.
              Meaning they are stupid an mentally unwell.
                Jesus would love this, for sure.

              We consume the carcasses of creatures of like appetites, passions and organs with our own, and fill the slaughterhouses daily with screams of pain and fear. Robert Louis Stevenson

              by Christin on Sat Apr 07, 2012 at 09:47:31 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

            •  People self select for certain conversations (0+ / 0-)

              because they typically have an ideological impetus. Research has shown that those with a negative impulse are far more likely to participate than those who have a negative impulse (meta study here, but you need a subscription to get at the good stuff).

              Above Grecian mantles were chiseled these words... Know Thyself... Nothing in Excess... the pop philosophy of its day.

              by ravagerofworlds2 on Sat Apr 07, 2012 at 09:52:58 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  do you want me to overnight the shovel? (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                PreciousLittle

                or you okay with two day?    

                We consume the carcasses of creatures of like appetites, passions and organs with our own, and fill the slaughterhouses daily with screams of pain and fear. Robert Louis Stevenson

                by Christin on Sat Apr 07, 2012 at 10:01:29 AM PDT

                [ Parent ]

                •  And this is why Dailykos needs an Ignore feature (0+ / 0-)

                  Please have a nice weekend. I will no longer respond to you.

                  Above Grecian mantles were chiseled these words... Know Thyself... Nothing in Excess... the pop philosophy of its day.

                  by ravagerofworlds2 on Sat Apr 07, 2012 at 10:07:37 AM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

                  •  :-) (0+ / 0-)

                    awwwwwww.
                    after all those insults...i get a please have a nice weekend.
                    so very very sweet!

                    We consume the carcasses of creatures of like appetites, passions and organs with our own, and fill the slaughterhouses daily with screams of pain and fear. Robert Louis Stevenson

                    by Christin on Sat Apr 07, 2012 at 10:11:53 AM PDT

                    [ Parent ]

          •  You appear negative. Here, take one of these (0+ / 0-)

            and call me in the morning.

            But in case you want to know what the Judeo-Christian wisdom is in this case;

            Proverbs 22:24-25

             24 Do not make friends with a hot-tempered person,
               do not associate with one easily angered,
            25 or you may learn their ways
               and get yourself ensnared.

            Above Grecian mantles were chiseled these words... Know Thyself... Nothing in Excess... the pop philosophy of its day.

            by ravagerofworlds2 on Sat Apr 07, 2012 at 09:45:45 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  You appear to be ignorant. (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              PreciousLittle

              so i guess we're even.
              and yes, quoting some words from a book which I know  is not based on facts, science, or reality.  because that makes your case.  
              (hint - we are not friends, so have no fear and be not afraid!)

              “You are not entitled to your opinion. You are entitled to your informed opinion. No one is entitled to be ignorant.”
              ― Harlan Ellison

              We consume the carcasses of creatures of like appetites, passions and organs with our own, and fill the slaughterhouses daily with screams of pain and fear. Robert Louis Stevenson

              by Christin on Sat Apr 07, 2012 at 09:56:02 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

          •  "Precious Little" indeed. nt (0+ / 0-)

            We must, indeed, all hang together, or assuredly we shall all hang separately. B. Franklin

            by Observerinvancouver on Sat Apr 07, 2012 at 12:11:57 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

        •  LOL. i'm not miserable. (0+ / 0-)

          so please take your willful ignorance someplace else.

          We consume the carcasses of creatures of like appetites, passions and organs with our own, and fill the slaughterhouses daily with screams of pain and fear. Robert Louis Stevenson

          by Christin on Sat Apr 07, 2012 at 09:41:59 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

      •  So, hey, here's a thought: (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Observerinvancouver

        Skip the family holiday dinner. Stop by for dessert or just coffee and then head out quickly.

        I don't mean to be flip but year after year, there's bemoaning about Christian holidays and religion because fundie relatives are so tedious.

        So do what my husband and I do: don't go. Help out at a homeless shelter instead. If you have a job, offer to work so others can have the day off. Walk dogs at your local  shelter Or, ask the people you do like to not invite the miserable people. Spend the day with people who don't celebrate Easter. Or have holidays at YOUR place and control the guest list.

        Everyone has tedious annoying relatives. And for all we know, they complain to their friends about us, which is fine because I don't deal with mine in situations when I'm stuck with them for hours. I simply don't put myself in that position anymore.

        Anyhow, my mini rant is over -- I hope your relatives behave themselves and you have a nice time. We'll be having a wonderful dinner for two with flowers, wine and a decadent dessert.

        Life's what you make of it.

        © grover


        So if you get hit by a bus tonight, would you be satisfied with how you spent today, your last day on earth? Live like tomorrow is never guaranteed, because it's not. -- Me.

        by grover on Sat Apr 07, 2012 at 11:45:18 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  Bush 'godless'? (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      PreciousLittle

      I don't think so.
      Bush was pretty much the poster child for that unique combimation of piety and ignorance that is the hallmark of the god-full, not the god-free.

      Don't try to foist your religionists off on atheists.  

      •  Sigh (0+ / 0-)

        I'm sorry, did the word "Easter" mean to you "Please come and bash religious people?"

        Bush's policies were very much against the God of Judah and followers of Christ.

        Proverbs 12:22-23

        22 Do not exploit the poor because they are poor
           and do not crush the needy in court,
        23 for the LORD will take up their case
           and will exact life for life.

        Bush tax cuts. Indefinite detention. Just to name two.

        Above Grecian mantles were chiseled these words... Know Thyself... Nothing in Excess... the pop philosophy of its day.

        by ravagerofworlds2 on Sat Apr 07, 2012 at 10:04:48 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  Bush is pretty much the poster child of everything (0+ / 0-)

        Jesus criticized in the Gospels.  "Whited sepulchre" sums him up most accurately, imho.

        I'm merely an agnostic and not a full-fledged atheist so I don't feel foisted upon in this discussion.   I got exposed to religion as a kid.  I think I'm blessed to retain the positives from that rather than the negatives.  

        We must, indeed, all hang together, or assuredly we shall all hang separately. B. Franklin

        by Observerinvancouver on Sat Apr 07, 2012 at 12:50:13 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  Is it really Easter already? (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    JML9999, lovelyone, rebel ga

    Damn, those poor caged chickens.

    First, Serve the People - Second, Defend the Community - Always, Organize to Take Power

    by mpjh on Sat Apr 07, 2012 at 07:36:07 AM PDT

  •  How (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    PreciousLittle, snoopydawg

    can he be a Christian where he let torturers go free?

    CIA Exhales: 99 Out of 101 Torture Cases Dropped

    New Bush-Era Torture Memo Released, Raises Questions About What Has Changed And What Hasn't

    Somewhere in his Bible must be the passage: as long as it doesn't happen to you, turn your head the other way on torture.

  •  Happy Easter Kos Nation (7+ / 0-)

    It is gonna be a good Day, Month, Year.

  •  BHO:"Jews will gather for a second Seder" (14+ / 0-)

    Romney Responds:I like Cedars they're just the right hight

    Response: If you "got it" you wouldn't be a republican

    by JML9999 on Sat Apr 07, 2012 at 07:45:33 AM PDT

  •  The First Amendment says what? (8+ / 0-)

    Maybe he can make a proclamation about atheism or humanism later, you know, that even to people who believe in one or more gods, atheism teaches us valuable lessons about critical thinking, science, and math, or that humanism teaches us that we are all part of the human family regardless of our religious beliefs.

    (Or something like that). No, he would never do that, one might say?

    The President should quit being the theologian in chief. It's not as if he doesn't have a lot of other work to do.

    (-5.50,-6.67): Left Libertarian
    Leadership doesn't mean taking a straw poll and then just throwing up your hands. -Jyrinx

    by Sparhawk on Sat Apr 07, 2012 at 07:52:33 AM PDT

  •  I'll just take the candy and leave the rest (9+ / 0-)

    I suppose he has to do this to convince some people he's not a Muslim (I don't think those folks are going to vote for him anyway), but I'd be happy to see him take a step back from the religious stuff altogether.

    Eliminate tax breaks that stimulate the offshoring of jobs.

    by RJDixon74135 on Sat Apr 07, 2012 at 07:52:57 AM PDT

    •  Or maybe he did it... (8+ / 0-)

      ...because he honestly believes it?

      "When I give food to the poor, they call me a saint. When I ask why the poor have no food, they call me a communist." --Dom Helder Camara, archbishop of Recife

      by JamesGG on Sat Apr 07, 2012 at 08:13:32 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Yes that is my opinion of it all, he has said he (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Fireshark

        not raised in a religious home but he became a Christian after he moved to Chicago. The right wing seems to think he was raised a religious Moslem, apparently by a mother who was not religious and grandparents who were not religious. They make no sense.  As even his father whom he did not know at all really was an Atheist.

        Follow PA Keystone Liberals on Twitter: @KeystoneLibs

        by wishingwell on Sat Apr 07, 2012 at 08:44:32 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  If Obama believes this he's a religious ideologue. (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Medium Head Boy

        If doesn't believe it, he's a bald-faced liar.

        Thomas Paine put it rather more eloquently:

        All the tales of miracles, with which the Old and New Testament are filled, are fit only for impostors to preach and fools to believe.
        Indeed, it is deeply disturbing to hear Obama profess a fundamentalist belief in religious doctrine:
        These holidays have their roots in miracles that took place thousands of years ago. Tomorrow, we will celebrate the resurrection of a savior who died so that we might live.
        I wish some enterprising journo would query the president as to how many biblical "miracles" he believes to be factual accounts of real events. I mean, if you're going to say you believe in a literal resurrection from the dead, the immaculate conception must be quite doable.
        •  Those aren't "fundamentalist" beliefs. (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Juliann
          Indeed, it is deeply disturbing to hear Obama profess a fundamentalist belief in religious doctrine:
          The quotation you highlight there is not by any means unique to fundamentalism among Christians; many members of mainline Christian denominations also believe in miracles and in the literal resurrection, including me.

          Or are you going to objectify us by denying us our right to self-definition, imposing your label of "fundamentalists" on us whether we like it or not?

          I wish some enterprising journo would query the president as to how many biblical "miracles" he believes to be factual accounts of real events. I mean, if you're going to say you believe in a literal resurrection from the dead, the immaculate conception must be quite doable.
          Do you even know what the immaculate conception is? Please do tell me what you think it is, and where you believe it's found in the Bible.

          "When I give food to the poor, they call me a saint. When I ask why the poor have no food, they call me a communist." --Dom Helder Camara, archbishop of Recife

          by JamesGG on Sat Apr 07, 2012 at 09:37:42 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  JG, as the resident DK theologian... (0+ / 0-)

            Why don't you weigh in on this?

            Several commenters on this thread seem to be ignorant of the fact that not all Christians denominations subscribe to a belief in the literal resurrection of Jesus from the dead.

            It's as if they never set foot in a church, or a library -- which is fine by me, except when it comes to the statement of uninformed opinion.

            •  Find me one that denies it. (0+ / 0-)
              Several commenters on this thread seem to be ignorant of the fact that not all Christians denominations subscribe to a belief in the literal resurrection of Jesus from the dead.
              Please name for me an orthodox Christian denomination whose official statements of faith don't express this belief. There are some that are quasi-officially agnostic on the question in that they demand few if any theological commitments from those who carry their name, and others that affirm the Nicene Creed in name but have cultures that are open to some forms of heterodoxy, but I can't think of one Christian denomination that denies a belief in the literal resurrection of Jesus.

              Furthermore, that's not my point; my point is that there are numerous Christian denominations that do believe in the literal resurrection of Jesus while not subscribing to the tenets and tendencies of the historical movement of Fundamentalism (including but not limited to Biblical inerrancy, separatism, premillennial dispensationalism, six-day creationism, penal substitutionary atonement, etc.).

              Therefore, the President expressing his belief in a literal resurrection does not make him a Fundamentalist; in fact, as those who are familiar with the tenets and tendencies of Fundamentalism will attest, there are a great many things about the President's philosophy, theology, lifestyle, and politics that, when taken together, are completely incompatible with adherence to a Fundamentalist worldview.

              "When I give food to the poor, they call me a saint. When I ask why the poor have no food, they call me a communist." --Dom Helder Camara, archbishop of Recife

              by JamesGG on Sat Apr 07, 2012 at 05:17:36 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  Eminent Episcopalian Bishop John Spong... (0+ / 0-)

                Bishop Spong expressly denies a literal interpretation of several key Christian doctrines: including, the historical truth of the Virgin Birth; the bodily resurrection of Jesus; and biblical miracles.

                Bishop Spong served as rector of St. Joseph's Church in Durham, North Carolina from 1955 to 1957; rector of Calvary Parish, Tarboro, North Carolina from 1957 to 1965; rector of St. John's Church in Lynchburg, Virginia from 1965 to 1969; and rector of St. Paul's Church in Richmond, Virginia from 1969 to 1976. He has held visiting positions and given lectures at major American theological institutions, most prominently at Harvard Divinity School. (Wikipedia)
                Likewise, Episcopalian Priest and Columbia University Professor of Religion Gary Dorien has published numerous books and hundreds of essays with a focus on liberal theology. So clearly, even within the Episcopalian Church, there are examples that contradict your assertion that all "Orthodox Christian" religions preach a conventional understanding of the resurrection, biblical miracles, etc.

                Of course, beyond these immediate examples from the Episcopalian faith, there is the broad field of Liberal Christian Theology proper, with a history dating back more than 200 years.

                James, I'm surprised to see you denying any knowledge of these things, considering that you give the impression of being extensively informed on the subject.

                Thomas Paine: All the tales of miracles, with which the Old and New Testament are filled, are fit only for impostors to preach and fools to believe.

                by PreciousLittle on Sat Apr 07, 2012 at 10:05:40 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

                •  Did you read what I wrote? (0+ / 0-)
                  ... and others that affirm the Nicene Creed in name but have cultures that are open to some forms of heterodoxy...
                  While Bishop Spong did have a more symbolic interpretation of many of the tenets of orthodox Christianity, each and every parish in his diocese said the Nicene Creed each and every week. Bishop Spong does not set Episcopal doctrine—and Episcopal doctrine does continue to hold that the bodily resurrection of Christ took place.

                  Nevertheless, even that still fails to address my original point, which is that belief in the bodily resurrection of Jesus Christ is not sufficient grounds for suggesting someone is a Fundamentalist, as many other non-Fundamentalist Christians also affirm such a tenet—and thus, that the President's affirmation of what continues to be one of the basic parts of Christian doctrine throughout the religion does not mean that he is a Fundamentalist, particularly given that there are no other indications of any kind that he affirms the theology, epistemology, worldview, or culture of Fundamentalism.

                  Perhaps you'd like to address that, rather than continuing to go off on other tangents...?

                  "When I give food to the poor, they call me a saint. When I ask why the poor have no food, they call me a communist." --Dom Helder Camara, archbishop of Recife

                  by JamesGG on Sat Apr 07, 2012 at 10:27:14 PM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

                  •  JG, your definition of Fundamentalism is arcane... (0+ / 0-)

                    Moreover, you are seeking to eliminate vernacular use of the term "Fundamentalist" as it is commonly applied in everyday usage.

                    You insist that an "Orthodox Christian" cannot be deemed a Fundamentalist until s/he completely adopts "the whole of the Fundamentalist worldview and all the tenets of Fundamentalist epistemology, theology, and cultural thought". So, evidently, you have an agenda to restrict the use of the term to only the most extremist subset of textbook Fundamentalists  -- which conveniently allows the vast majority of right-wing Christian ideologues to forgo the  discomfort of being characterized as Fundamentalists.

                    Fortunately, you don't get to dictate the terms of this debate. When politicians (including President Obama) publicly espouse the previously cited "Five Fundamentals" of Christian Fundamentalism, there are those of us who find it justifiable to use the vernacular and say 'there goes a Fundamentalist'. All the more so when religious doctrine is used as a cudgel to beat down legislation that would expand social/economic/political liberty and justice for all of "god's children". If you go out of your way to defend politically-opportunistic fundamentalism, don't be surprised when you're called out for being a fundamentalist sympathizer.

                    BTW, in your profile, the first word you use to describe yourself is "ideologue", which suggests that you have no qualms about being uncompromising and dogmatic. Discussing the subject of religion with a self-professed ideologue has become exceedingly tedious to me. Peace out.

                    Thomas Paine: All the tales of miracles, with which the Old and New Testament are filled, are fit only for impostors to preach and fools to believe.

                    by PreciousLittle on Sat Apr 07, 2012 at 11:35:01 PM PDT

                    [ Parent ]

      •  Given the space occupied by religion in the (0+ / 0-)

        U.S., it may be a good thing to have someone as consequential as a President pushing back on the rightward drift of religious orthodoxy in the last 40 years.  I can remember when many of the religious leaders in the public sphere were on the left, not the right.  MLK, for starters.  William Sloane Coffin.  Father Robert Drinan.  You don't have to be a wingnut to be devout.

        We must, indeed, all hang together, or assuredly we shall all hang separately. B. Franklin

        by Observerinvancouver on Sat Apr 07, 2012 at 01:15:49 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Observer, you said President Obama is... (0+ / 0-)

          "pushing back on the rightward drift of religious orthodoxy".

          Please, give us some detailed examples of what you mean.  Are you talking about some lines Obama may have said in a speech, or are you thinking of actions he has taken while in office. I'll take either, although the latter is infinitely preferable to the former.

          •  He fought for and won the repeal of DADT... (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Observerinvancouver

            ...and has directed his DOJ to stop defending DOMA. No, he's not where many of us (including many liberal orthodox Christians) wish he were on marriage equality, but it's impossible to deny that he has worked for LGBT rights.

            He has continually supported reproductive choice, even to the point of picking a fight with conservative Roman Catholics and conservative evangelicals on contraception coverage.

            And despite the claims of both conservatives (who claim that he's a closet Muslim) and some atheists (who claim that he's too smart to be anything but a closet atheist), he has done those things while espousing religious orthodoxy, as he did in today's address.

            "When I give food to the poor, they call me a saint. When I ask why the poor have no food, they call me a communist." --Dom Helder Camara, archbishop of Recife

            by JamesGG on Sat Apr 07, 2012 at 05:24:31 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

          •  I guess your nickname describes your brain (0+ / 0-)

            size.  

            We must, indeed, all hang together, or assuredly we shall all hang separately. B. Franklin

            by Observerinvancouver on Sat Apr 07, 2012 at 05:46:55 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  No, the nickname isn't due to a mental disability. (0+ / 0-)

              It stems from a childhood physical handicap. If you still want to be an asshole about it, please, feel free.

              "All the tales of miracles, with which the Old and New Testament are filled, are fit only for impostors to preach and fools to believe." ~ Thomas Paine

              by PreciousLittle on Sun Apr 08, 2012 at 11:32:10 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

    •  e, I'll take the candy too. As an atheist (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      PreciousLittle

      I enjoy spending an extra day with my kids.

  •  Ah ha! This proves Obama is a secret Muslim. He (5+ / 0-)

    said "For millions of Americans" implying there are tens of millions or hundreds of millions of non-Christians and Jews in the U.S.

    This has to be clinching proof for any Arizona or NJ sheriffs seeking the "truth" of Obama , including his "birth certificate". Of course, there is that hold up of Trump's investigators findings in Hawaii. Well, it should be out any day now.

    •  I think his in-your-face invocation... (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      wishingwell, grover

      ...of Christianity proves that he's Kenyan.  In Kenya that kind of thing is very popular.

      But nobody's buying flowers from the flower lady.

      by Rich in PA on Sat Apr 07, 2012 at 08:07:24 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  If Obama was born in Kenya (6+ / 0-)

      why did Trump send his investigators to Hawaii to look for the birth certificate?

      www.tapestryofbronze.com

      by chloris creator on Sat Apr 07, 2012 at 08:23:49 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

        •  Barbara, when you authored this post... (0+ / 0-)

          How in the world did you arrive at your opening remark:

          President Obama sets aside politics this week for an Easter and Passover message to Christians and Jews.
          Where is the President's "message to Jews"? In the entire 350 word address the President parses out one measly sentence, 16 words, 'for the Jews', as it were:
          Tonight, Jews will gather for a second Seder, where they will retell the story of the Exodus.
          The rest of it is bible-thumping sop, with a pointed emphasis on the affirmation of conservative Christian fundamentals; and this is what you called "setting politics aside"? I think not.
          These holidays have their roots in miracles that took place thousands of years ago...Yesterday, many of us took a few quiet moments to try and fathom the tremendous sacrifice Jesus made for all of us...Tomorrow, we will celebrate the resurrection of a savior who died so that we might live.
          As another commenter has noted: the highly divisive arguments on this thread are a clear indication that the President's approach to this subject is anything but "unifying" -- domestically and globally.
          ------------------------------------------------------------------

          Thomas Paine: All the tales of miracles, with which the Old and New Testament are filled, are fit only for impostors to preach and fools to believe.

          by PreciousLittle on Sun Apr 08, 2012 at 10:58:32 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Actually (0+ / 0-)

            I'd say the highly divisive arguments on this thread are a clear indication of something entirely different.

            •  B, thank you for the reply... (0+ / 0-)

              although it is not clear what you mean.

              Five years ago, the majority of progressive Democrats were "unified" in their opposition to the office of the president being used as a pulpit. It is also safe to say, we were unified in our belief that this principle was non-negotiable, irrespective of whether there was a Democrat or Republican in the White House. More to the point, there was an expectation that a Democratic president would move to purge the fundamentalist Christianist element that had taken hold during the Bush years.

              However, we now see that many in our community are willing to "compromise" not just on the separation of church and state but also on numerous other Democratic values that were long-held to be sacrosanct.

              From my perspective, many of the comments on this thread are reflective of a current division of opinion as to whether the president should be held to a certain progressive Democratic standard.

              May I ask how you see it differently?

              "All the tales of miracles, with which the Old and New Testament are filled, are fit only for impostors to preach and fools to believe." ~ Thomas Paine

              by PreciousLittle on Sun Apr 08, 2012 at 07:29:53 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

  •  Easter (5+ / 0-)

    Have a good and safe Easter - from one Aussie to all you Americans out there. Obama 2012.

  •  I find this funny, for a FP post. (2+ / 0-)

    Based upon what has gone on here the past week, at least a third of all kossacks find this message to be disingenuous pandering or evidence of the President's unfitness for office!

    [T]here is no more dangerous experiment than that of undertaking to be one thing before a man's face and another behind his back. - Robert E. Lee

    by SpamNunn on Sat Apr 07, 2012 at 08:15:16 AM PDT

  •  sweet! (8+ / 0-)
    But all of us, no matter how or whether we believe, can identify with elements of His story.
    As an atheist, I seriously cannot get enough of this President acknowledging my existence and including me in his reindeer games.

    Thanks, Mr. President!

    Prison rape is not funny.

    by social democrat on Sat Apr 07, 2012 at 08:32:29 AM PDT

  •  I read some fundy posting on a news site, that (4+ / 0-)

    said

    Without Easter, there is no Christmas.
    I am stilll pondering that one. LOL

    If that means if Easter gets cancelled, we lose Christmas too...eee gads, I best look into that one. As I do enjoy the Christmas.  LOL

    Follow PA Keystone Liberals on Twitter: @KeystoneLibs

    by wishingwell on Sat Apr 07, 2012 at 08:48:26 AM PDT

    •  it makes sense, WW. (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      wishingwell

      If we lose Easter, we lose a whole day in the year. Then Christmas slips back to Christmas Eve and is lost forever.

      See how that happens? On the other hand, I believe that gives us a big black 24 hour hole after New Years Eve , before the new year gets started, in which we can  sleep and recover from the prior day's partying.

      So there might be a silver lining.

      © grover


      So if you get hit by a bus tonight, would you be satisfied with how you spent today, your last day on earth? Live like tomorrow is never guaranteed, because it's not. -- Me.

      by grover on Sat Apr 07, 2012 at 12:11:57 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Did the chicken or the egg cross the road first? (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      wishingwell

      We must, indeed, all hang together, or assuredly we shall all hang separately. B. Franklin

      by Observerinvancouver on Sat Apr 07, 2012 at 01:19:10 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  A shout out to all the religious voters. n/t (0+ / 0-)

    Rick Perry is George Bush without brains.

    by thestructureguy on Sat Apr 07, 2012 at 08:48:38 AM PDT

  •  Easter and Passsover? (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Observerinvancouver

    Wait. I thought he was Muslim.

    Let us think the unthinkable, let us do the undoable, let us prepare to grapple with the ineffable itself, and see if we may not eff it after all. -Douglas Adams

    by rambler american on Sat Apr 07, 2012 at 08:50:27 AM PDT

  •  "These beliefs help unite Americans of (4+ / 0-)

    All faiths and backgrounds"
    Not so much, Prez.  You can find proof that "these beliefs" actually go a very long way toward DIVIDING Americans right here on these comment pages.
    I don't give a double damn what anyone's religious beliefs are, so long as they don't stick them into my government.  But I sure wish we could avoid having to listen to the hypocritical pieties of those asserting that it's their religion that wants to bring us all together.  (and no, that's not a slam at the prez, or Christians. Just a general wish for good wil towards all)

    •  I respectfully disagree. (2+ / 0-)

      It's an Easter/Passover message, and millions of Americans really do feel united by things like this. I know people here might say he went too far, and I know fundies might say he didn't go far enough or that he's a secret Muslim. But the core elements he talked about, like hope and the belief that there are things greater than oneself, really are uniting in my opinion.

      Health care is a right.

      by Fireshark on Sat Apr 07, 2012 at 09:16:11 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  FS, what "fundies" are you talking about? (0+ / 0-)

        If you show your head upthread, JamesGG will mortify your flesh for using that term. He certainly didn't show me the "unity".

        Thomas Paine: All the tales of miracles, with which the Old and New Testament are filled, are fit only for impostors to preach and fools to believe.

        by PreciousLittle on Sat Apr 07, 2012 at 11:55:11 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  Another pagan holiday (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    PreciousLittle, snoopydawg

    Co-opted.

    PS

    Its too damn cold here in PDX for the usual dancing naked around the bonfire thing.

    "White-collar conservatives flashing down the street. Pointing their plastic finger at me."

    by BOHICA on Sat Apr 07, 2012 at 09:05:37 AM PDT

  •  Leave the religion. Take the candy. n/t (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    KathleenM1
  •  Right. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Medium Head Boy

    Cause nothing says 'hope over despair' than stories about human sacrifice handed down by the world's great superstitions.  

  •  There is something out there bigger than ourselves (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Crazy like a fox, PreciousLittle

    ...  It's called the government, and it apparently thinks it should be allowed to strip search us, detain us indefinitely, monitor all our communications, control our reproductive processes, and even KILL US.  Would Jesus have done any of these things?  I don't think so.

    •  Social Security, Medicare, Medicaid, Unemployment- (0+ / 0-)

      Insurance, National Endowment of the Arts, Research Grant Funding, DirectLoans, Pell Grants, Civil Rights Act and Addendums...

      Yeah, these all seem like social justice policies to me.

      Above Grecian mantles were chiseled these words... Know Thyself... Nothing in Excess... the pop philosophy of its day.

      by ravagerofworlds2 on Sat Apr 07, 2012 at 10:43:43 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Big shout out to Eastr, Celtic fertility goddess, (2+ / 0-)

    without who we would not have easter bunnies and easter eggs. I do have to wonder, though, why christians have not taken umbrage at the fact that this holiest of feast days is named after a pagan goddess. Why have they - for so many centuries now - failed to protect christianity from this pagan assault? Do they just not care about any aspect of christianity besides Christmas? And don't get me started on the names of the week and months of the year. It's all pagan all the time there!

    Fructose is a liver poison. Stop eating it today.

    by Anne Elk on Sat Apr 07, 2012 at 11:11:33 AM PDT

  •  Celebrating Easter must be a Socialist Activity... (0+ / 0-)

    ...now that Obama & his family are observing it.  

  •  What do Mormons do on Easter, Christians' most (0+ / 0-)

    holy day...?

    They don't believe that Jesus is the sole mediator between man and God, as expressed in 1 Timothy 2:5.  

    Joseph Smith's birthday is on December 23...so that gives them a holiday around Christmas.

    Brigham Young's birthday is on June 1...so that gives them the Memorial Day holiday....

    Just asking.....

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