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The New York Times Editorial Board:

The Civil Rights Division of the Justice Department took an important stand last week, declaring that citizens have a First Amendment right to videotape the actions of police officers in public places and that seizure or destruction of such recordings violates constitutional rights.

The Justice Department made the statement in a federal lawsuit brought against the Baltimore Police Department by Christopher Sharp, who used his cellphone to take video of the police arresting and beating a friend at Pimlico on the day of the 2010 Preakness. The officers took Mr. Sharp’s cellphone while he was recording and wiped the phone clean of all videos before returning it to him. [...]

It is essential that the Justice Department and federal courts make clear that police departments will be held liable for violating this constitutionally protected right.

Yes. And could "held liable" please include some replacement personnel and jail time for the violators? Because otherwise any statement, no matter how clear, is worthless.

Paul Krugman takes on a pair of one-tenth of one percenters, the head of JPMorgan Chase and the figurehead of the Republican Party:

[...] it’s not O.K. for banks to take the kinds of risks that are acceptable for individuals, because when banks take on too much risk they put the whole economy in jeopardy — unless they can count on being bailed out. And the prospect of such bailouts, of course, only strengthens the case that banks shouldn’t be allowed to run wild, since they are in effect gambling with taxpayers’ money.

Incidentally, how is it possible that Mr. Romney doesn’t understand all of this? His whole candidacy is based on the claim that his experience at extracting money from troubled businesses means that he’ll know how to run the economy — yet whenever he talks about economic policy, he comes across as completely clueless.

Doyle McManus: On the one hand, it would be terrible for President Obama if health care reform were overturned by the Supreme Court. On the other hand, it could good for Obama if health care reform were overturned because it might anger and energize Democrats and liberals. On the third hand ...

Neal Gabler thinks the younger generation may be about to turn things upside down:

Disillusionment with partisan politics is certainly nothing new. Obama's fall from grace [among young voters, according to polls], however, may look like a bigger belly flop because his young supporters saw him standing so much higher than typical politicians. Yet by dashing their hopes, Obama may actually have accomplished something so remarkable that it could turn out to be his legacy: He has redirected young people's energies away from conventional electoral politics and into a different, grass-roots kind of activism. Call it DIY politics.

We got a taste of DIY politics last fall with the Occupy Wall Street sit-ins, which were a reaction to government inaction on financial abuses, and we got another taste when the 99% Spring campaign mobilized tens of thousands against economic inequality. OWS and its tangential offshoots may seem political, but it is important to note that OWS emphatically isn't politics as usual. It isn't even a traditional movement. [...]

The DIY impulse seems to start with the most basic politics of all: individual agency. If it takes hold it will be from the bottom up, translating a way of thinking into a way of doing. Already you can see DIY politics in action, not just in young people camping outside City Hall but in their joining service organizations and NGOs where they can do good and seemingly apolitical — or at least extra-governmental — work. They don't abide endless debate and tit-for-tat strategies that result in gridlock.

I have seen this firsthand in my family. One of my daughters has spent the last few years in the developing world working in healthcare and will be returning to this country this year to attend medical school. My other daughter spent a year in American Samoa in the World Teach program, another year in AmeriCorps, and is now in graduate school in social work. Neither cares one whit about the political system generally or electoral politics specifically. When we talk about their lack of interest in the current campaign or about legislative initiatives, they tell me, "We live our politics."

E.J. Dionne:
In this election, we’re not having an argument that pits capitalism against socialism. We are trying to decide what kind of capitalism we want. It is a debate as American as Alexander Hamilton, Andrew Jackson and Henry Clay — which is to say that we have always done this. In light of the rise of inequality and the financial mess we just went through, it’s a discussion we very much need to have now.
We aren't having an argument about socialism vs. capitalism because that would be unAmerican, or rather,  non-American because only those of us on the so-called fringes ever discuss it. Of course, the abolitionists and suffragists and unionists and environmentalists and anti-racists and feminists and gay activists were once on the fringes, too. That didn't stop us from having the discussion they all demanded.

Kenneth Roth:

A central problem, long avoided by Washington, is the rot at the heart of the Afghan government. In ousting the Taliban, the U.S. deliberately funded and financed power brokers and warlords, many of whom, such as Vice President Mohammed Fahim, have long histories of complicity in atrocities. Karzai is trapped by these men and dependent on them to remain in power.

The surest way for the international community to squander its decade of investment in Afghanistan is to withdraw troops, breathe a sigh of relief and walk away. What is needed in Chicago and thereafter is a renewed and deepened commitment to protect the rights of Afghans through properly trained and vetted security forces.

Chris Hedges:
When civilizations start to die they go insane. Let the ice sheets in the Arctic melt. Let the temperatures rise. Let the air, soil and water be poisoned. Let the forests die. Let the seas be emptied of life. Let one useless war after another be waged. Let the masses be thrust into extreme poverty and left without jobs while the elites, drunk on hedonism, accumulate vast fortunes through exploitation, speculation, fraud and theft. Reality, at the end, gets unplugged. We live in an age when news consists of Snooki’s pregnancy, Hulk Hogan’s sex tape and Kim Kardashian’s denial that she is the naked woman cooking eggs in a photo circulating on the Internet. Politicians, including presidents, appear on late night comedy shows to do gags and they campaign on issues such as creating a moon colony. “At times when the page is turning,” Louis-Ferdinand Celine wrote in “Castle to Castle,” “when History brings all the nuts together, opens its Epic Dance Halls! hats and heads in the whirlwind! Panties overboard!”
Katha Pollitt:
Was it just a few weeks ago that Time ran a cover story claiming women were poised to become “the richer sex”—getting more education than men, working up a storm and, in one out of four marriages, bringing home the fatter slice of bacon? That was followed by Katie Roiphe’s fact-free Newsweek cover story alleging that women have become so weary of being in charge, they long for men to dominate them in bed. Well, never mind all that. Now, according to Time, women are giving up on careers to embrace attachment parenting—breast-feeding their kids till age 3 or more; having Baby sleep in your room, if not your bed; and “babywearing”—carrying your baby in a sling every minute of the day and never, ever letting it cry. Corner office? Bondage and spanking? Turning yourself into a human kangaroo? It’s hard to keep up. [...]

Child-rearing fashions come and go, but they’re always about regulating the behavior of women—middle-class educated women. If these discussions were really about children, we would be debating the policies that affect them—what to do about our shocking level of child poverty, for example.

Larry Kudlow says extending the Bush tax cuts right now would be good for business, good for America.

Sure , Larry, whatever you say.

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Comment Preferences

  •  "We Live Our Politics" (18+ / 0-)

    That remark sent a shiver down my spine ...

    Not because these idealistic young people are living their lives in a way that reflects their high principles.

    But because they are unilaterally disarming themselves in the face of a the biggest threat to their ability to "live their politics" that any generation has faced in America in at least a century, and perhaps ever.

    Devastating.

    "I'll believe that corporations are people when I see Rick Perry execute one."

    by bink on Mon May 21, 2012 at 04:38:20 AM PDT

    •  Bingo! (9+ / 0-)

      I am so sick of this "I don't get into this messy politics stuff," I keep hearing from people.  What they are really saying is that they are too lazy or too stupid to engage.  We have a choice.  It may not be exactly what we want, but there is a choice.

      Power is not yielded freely.  You have to grab it.  Politicians will only respect you if you take their power and give it to someone else.  Do you hear that 99%ers?  Which politician is listening to you?  Which politician thinks you are going to take away their power and give it to someone who agrees with you?  I'll tell you- no one.  Because you've stayed on the sidelines and haven't made them.  Pick a race or two, and publicize how one candidate sucks.  Really fight against the politicians supporting the 1%, and then you'll get some action.

      But right now, no one fears them.

      In an insane society, the sane man would appear insane

      by TampaCPA on Mon May 21, 2012 at 05:05:08 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  My suspicion (4+ / 0-)

        It's a symptom of their age and their lack of broad experience.

        People in their 20's have spent over a decade developing their own personal capabilities to accomplish things and have not yet found themselves 'plugged into' broader social networks. They have 'a feel' for what they can accomplish themselves and have no similar 'feel' for how broader politics can expand - and much more important, limit - their ability to achieve what they need and want.

        That's not true for everyone, of course. Kids who grow up in politically connected families understand the political importance a lot sooner. But politics is not something individuals accomplish without being plugged into larger social networks, so it is not a particularly individual is likely to get a feel for earlier in life.

        I offer this as my personal anecdotal opinion, but I'll bet most disagreement will be from younger people who simply don't know what I am talking about. People of my age are more likely nodding their heads and wondering why I bothered to write something so obvious. :-}

        The US Supreme Court has by it's actions and rhetoric ceased to be legitimate. Whiskey Tango Foxtrot - over

        by Rick B on Mon May 21, 2012 at 07:18:37 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  Maybe They Don't Care (12+ / 0-)

      Because they sense that they will be taking care of. Working in third-world health care, or Teach for America are the prerogatives of affluent young people. Maybe they are high enough on the scale for the political future of this country to matter less to them.

      Now, imagine that you are a 24-year old single Mom in Alabama with two kids, trying to find a minimum wage job.

      How is she supposed to live her politics? What does that even look like?

      "I'll believe that corporations are people when I see Rick Perry execute one."

      by bink on Mon May 21, 2012 at 05:05:22 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Teach for America is funded (7+ / 0-)

        almost entirely from Dept. of Education grants, and the entire department is under fire from Republicans.  One of the first federal agencies expected to go on the chopping block under a Republican president will be the Dept. of Education.

        World Teach, a program sponsored by Harvard University's Center for International Development accepts money from, among others, the Inter-American Development Bank and the World Bank.  And who is the major contributor to those organizations?  The United States government through the U.S. State Department.

        Many "do good" programs young people like to be involved in will be turned over to the private sector to fund (or not) if Republicans are in control of the federal purse strings.  So being involved in these programs without working to elect those who will support them is the height of short-sightedness.

        "In this world of sin and sorrow there is always something to be thankful for; as for me, I rejoice that I am not a Republican." - H. L. Mencken

        by SueDe on Mon May 21, 2012 at 06:16:14 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  Kids have a great bullshit detector (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      glitterscale, Laconic Lib

      and since they don't have years of "Team Blue = good; Team Red = bad" filtering in their brain, they can take a look at the only two parties available and see the game for what it is:  Both service the 1% in slightly different ways, using social issues as the playing field.

      They're not disarming themselves, because to win this game is to not play it at all.  Is it any wonder that OWS is met with such third-world level brutality from our government?  It's a threat to the game.

      NOW SHOWING
      Progressive Candidate Obama (now - Nov 6, 2012)
      Bipartisan Obama returns (Nov 7, 2012)

      by The Dead Man on Mon May 21, 2012 at 05:31:53 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  So you "win" by taking whatever everyone (8+ / 0-)

        else decides for you?  You "win" by advancing the ball.  The USA is a better place today than it was in 1912.  It didn't get that way by people sitting on the sidelines.  It might take time, but only through engagement will things get better.

        In an insane society, the sane man would appear insane

        by TampaCPA on Mon May 21, 2012 at 05:42:06 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  They're not passive acceptors of the status quo (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          dilutedviking, Laconic Lib

          They advocate for issues over accepting party lines -- which can all too often be a trap for party stalwarts.  You can see it here a lot; people praising (at worst) or ignoring (at best) Obama admin policies/actions that under Bush would be decried.  They are less apt to get caught up in the "outrage of the day from the opposite party you are affiliated with" -- which is just entertainment.

          While far from perfect, it will be a net positive if they can shift the paradigm before they age into old sell-outs.

          NOW SHOWING
          Progressive Candidate Obama (now - Nov 6, 2012)
          Bipartisan Obama returns (Nov 7, 2012)

          by The Dead Man on Mon May 21, 2012 at 06:07:18 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  This isn't sports (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          joe wobblie

          This isn't about the notion that you have star players and you have a farm team and you have coaches and managers and life the life style of a celeb.

          This is about survival.

          We have mutant shrimp and crabs in the Gulf. We have Fukushima  getting worse instead of better with earthquakes an ever increasing possibility. We have pressures from the ever increasing army of lobbyists who want to do away with more and more regulations along with Republicans who want to cut and gut our government protections aided by dems who "cave" (how convenient for those army of lobbyists eh?)

          At what point will you wake up and smell the threat of extinction? If the oceans rise, as they must with all the glaciers and the arctic and antarctic melting, how will 10, 20 30 or 40 feet of rising sea water affect you? Think you'll be safe? Think you'll not have to deal with rising desertification, deforestation?

          What will you do for food for water?

          To live a creative life, we must lose our fear of being wrong. -Joseph Chilton Pearce

          by glitterscale on Mon May 21, 2012 at 06:09:12 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

      •  I don't understand (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        bink

        how does one win politics by not playing at all?  If liberals and progressives all decided to win using this method, wouldn't republicans just run everything without any checks or balances at all?  Is that winning?

        "When I was an alien, cultures weren't opinions" ~ Kurt Cobain, Territorial Pissings

        by Subterranean on Mon May 21, 2012 at 10:02:03 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  You don't play their game (0+ / 0-)

          Like a casino, it's rigged so the house always wins.  How many Bush-bots remained in Obama's administration?  How many Bush policies continued or even increased in the Obama administration?  Who profits from this? The people who "run" the government: corporations.

          NOW SHOWING
          Progressive Candidate Obama (now - Nov 6, 2012)
          Bipartisan Obama returns (Nov 7, 2012)

          by The Dead Man on Mon May 21, 2012 at 10:44:06 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

    •  bink (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      joe wobblie, Laconic Lib

      what is YOUR answer to our problems? The environment, the endless wars, the crony capitalism, the rising tide of anti democratic legislation led by billionaires (as long as they could do it in the dark like the Kochroaches they are!), the lack of true journalism, the lack of true dialogues about all of the problems I just mentioned and the prison industry with its lobbyists who fight again ending "the drug war" and reforms with our immigration policies are so overwhelming and yet our presidential campaign this year is all about the things Romney doesn't want to talk about and about Obama giving his support to teh gays.

      To live a creative life, we must lose our fear of being wrong. -Joseph Chilton Pearce

      by glitterscale on Mon May 21, 2012 at 05:58:36 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  I Don't Have an Answer, But a Process (0+ / 0-)

        Which is to fight, fight, fight, fight on all fronts for what I believe is right. This includes fulfilling my civic duty to observe, comment on, and participate in our electoral politics.

        "I'll believe that corporations are people when I see Rick Perry execute one."

        by bink on Mon May 21, 2012 at 07:49:04 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  They can afford to. (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      bink, Mistral Wind

      You can't make this stuff up.

      by David54 on Mon May 21, 2012 at 06:30:00 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  I think Gabler overstates the extent to which (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Mistral Wind

      young people are disengaged. There are ebbs and flows to be sure, but the disengagement of some well educated young people based on personal anecdotal experience doesn't convince me it is a universal movement. This will be my 14th time voting for a Democrat for President and while I think there is plenty to be concerned about this year I don't buy a broad sweep, "young people are going to stay home" scenario. Young people understand access to health insurance, who is blocking job creation, marriage equality and suppression of women's health choices as clearly as my geezer pals.

      Suppose you were an idiot. And suppose you were a Republican. But I repeat myself. Harry Truman

      by ratcityreprobate on Mon May 21, 2012 at 08:01:40 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Same reaction here (0+ / 0-)

      Partisan politics is how change happens in a democracy, since when is it a bad thing?  It seems these young people would rather volunteer time and leave the business of governing the country to republicans and corporate interests.  I guess that would be one way to end the partisan divide, just give the GOP everything they want and go do peace corp. work in Africa.  

      "When I was an alien, cultures weren't opinions" ~ Kurt Cobain, Territorial Pissings

      by Subterranean on Mon May 21, 2012 at 09:58:28 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Jail time for violators? (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    nomorerepukes, pythonS, tb mare

    Why is there this reflexive insistence, even among liberals, on putting people in jail?  Job discipline (if ever actually imposed) or job loss would certainly be adequate punishment in these cases.  And yet, the first thing out of your mouth is the demand for the most expensive, most cruel, least effective punishment (police officer get acquitted in criminal trials, found liable in civil cases, mostly).

    No wonder America is the land of excessive incarceration.  If even liberals reach for the jail stick at every infraction, over-incarceration will always be a problem with us.  In this case, unlike say, health care, liberals ignore the experience of other countries that shows that vastly less imprisonment is adequate for crime control purposes.

    So think before your "jail 'em" knee jerks.  

    •  I'd like to rethink the so-called War on Drugs. (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      OLinda, dilutedviking, lotusmaglite

      Too many drug addicts are taking up space in jail cells when they really belong in drug rehab.  This would open up prison space for actual criminals, like scumbags who steal our cell phones while perfectly sober.

      Dogs are people, but corporations aren't.

      by Greasy Grant on Mon May 21, 2012 at 05:16:34 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Oh, yes. (0+ / 0-)

        The War on Drugs, AKA The War on the People Who Don't Contribute to Finance-Industry Portfolios, Especially if They're Brown.

        One of the most spectacular okey-dokes in America history, from doing exactly the opposite of what we know works to allowing things like Purdue Pharma "reformulating" Oxycontin to make it "safer", which just by sheer coincidence eliminated all the generic competition, allowing them to keep the market cornered by fast-tracking an untested replacement that causes massive, widespread GI issues with the unsuspecting sufferers who have it prescribed to them.

        All while law enforcement is forced to act as little more than hired muscle for the new cartels, eliminating ironically cheaper competition (illegal drugs), rounding up the casualties of the Drug War and branding them criminals, and keeping those pesky citizens from thinking too much about the practicality and morality of such a deadly, off-the-rails "policy".

        I could go on for days. You can tell.

        The problem with going with your gut as opposed to your head is that the former is so often full of shit. - Randy Chestnut

        by lotusmaglite on Mon May 21, 2012 at 03:32:10 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  I think you can make the case either way (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      chmood

      I've never been to prison, but I have friends who have.  From what they tell me, the worst thing to be in prison is an abuser of women or children.  Right above that on the prison totem pole is a rat or a crooked cop.  Cops know this.  So I can see how the prospect of jail time would be a huge incentive to do things right.

      On the other hand, convicting them, firing them, and letting that serve as the punishment makes a lot of sense too.  So long as something that makes sense is done to combat this, it's a step in the right direction.

      •  To you, and everybody else below (0+ / 0-)

        It's so easy (for Americans particularly) to decide that the people who commit crimes they particularly don't like should go to jail, while crimes they don't care about so much (for liberals drugs) should not be punished so harshly.  But really, that response is just as bad as that of the people who think drug crimes are horrible and the police are just doing their job -- mirror images.  

        The problem is that both reactions result in a terrible situation, the vast over-incarceration of people.  Destroying a picture, a non-violent crime, gets jail time, so of course, punching somebody must get more, and so on up the line.  And the whole focus on sending people who piss us off to jail results in having the highest rate of incarceration in the world (maybe bar Russia or one or two others with whom we would like not to be compared).

        It's self-indulgent to wish excessive punishment on people, particularly where its not necessary.  If, for example, officers knew  that they would lose their jobs for destroying pictures, they would certainly be disinclined to do it, and they would be amply punished (loss of job, pension) for their bad actions.  But just to say, "send them to jail," because we're pissed off at the particular type of crime, regardless of such factors, is pointless and, indeed, economically and socially counterproductive.  

        Other countries don't incarcerate every little thing that pisses people off and have perfectly civil societies -- there's no reason to indulge the all-American punitive streak for every crime that aggravates us.  Expensive, pointless, and counterproductive.

    •  Ordinarily I would agree with you . . . (3+ / 0-)

      . . . but in the case of police officers destroying evidence of their own misdeeds, I think nothing less than incarceration would serve as a deterrent.  So, too, putting these miscreants behind bars is the only way to maintain what little  public trust remains in the criminal justice system as it now stands.

        Police destroying evidence is obstruction of justice, pure and simple.  They are of course entitled to the same constitutional protections as any other person accused of a crime, but if convicted, under the system as it currently exists, to be more lenient with them than we would be with any other person convicted of a felony would only confirm all of the criticisms that justice is only for those who can least afford it.  

        Only in the context of a complete overhaul of the entire system could alternatives to incarceration be considered for these scofflaws.

    •  If we were putting more abusers of power in jail (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      chmood, Meteor Blades, Laconic Lib

      as opposed to non-violent drug offenders, I would be happier.
      If the jail time went on the officers permanent record, that would also be good.
      Ultimately, they need to hit the officers and the municipal govs. in the pocketbook.

      You can't make this stuff up.

      by David54 on Mon May 21, 2012 at 06:10:35 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  ostruction of justice (4+ / 0-)

      By destroying evidence typically carries jail time.  It is far more serious when done by lw enforcement.  Equality before the law calls for jail time because that is what out laws call for

      So no job sanctions are not adequate.  

      Ask yourself this: would a black teenager who destroyed evidence of a possible crime get of with "job sanctions"?

      Courtesy Kos. Trying to call on the better angels of our nature.

      by Mindful Nature on Mon May 21, 2012 at 06:29:59 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Having been to prison, I DON'T reach... (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Greasy Grant, mimi, Laconic Lib, dadadata

      ...for "the jail stick at ever infraction." I weigh whether jail/prison time is likely to be a deterrent to the commission of crime or whether certain jail/prison time is given for something (like drug use) that should even be a crime.

      But the obstruction of justice involved in snatching away someone's video of, say, a police riot in Chicago needs, in some cases, to be handled with something more than job loss because it greatly affects the greater society in deeply pernicious ways.

       

      Don't tell me what you believe, show me what you do and I will tell you what you believe.

      by Meteor Blades on Mon May 21, 2012 at 08:25:26 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Bush tax cuts.... (0+ / 0-)

    I don't make much....$48,000 a year and if the Bush tax cuts are not extended, my tax rate goes from 10% to 15%.. I wish people would not generalize the "Bush Tax Cuts"...  I cannot afford my taxes to go up.  I hated Bush as much as the rest of us... but he did lower my taxes.

    •  And Obama lowered your taxes too! (4+ / 0-)

      Roughly by the same amount.

      At $48k, once you take standard deduction, personal exemptions, child credit (assuming married w/ 2 kids), you're taxable income would be around $20k.  Federal incom tax around $2,000 at 10%, $3,000 at 15%.

      That is a big jump.  That is why President Obama paid the hostage takers in 2010.  Unfortunately, the ransom is getting too high for the next round.  The choices are bad and worse.

      In an insane society, the sane man would appear insane

      by TampaCPA on Mon May 21, 2012 at 05:36:24 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  I will lose most of my child credit if Bush's (0+ / 0-)

        tax cuts are not extended also.  This better not happen.. I'm struggling as it is!  My S.S. tax reduction is $21 per month... although it helps... that's only $252 per year... and that has not been enough to cover the price of gasoline at $3.78 per gallon.  Hell, I was paying only $1.90 three years ago.  It's been tough for us.

    •  Politically speaking, the only way to repeal (4+ / 0-)

      the Bush tax cuts on those earning over $250,000* is to repeal the entire Bush tax cut package.  That's because the Republicans can then scream, "The Democrats raised your taxes!"  The Democrats then want to introduce a separate package to lower the tax rates again for those making less than $250,000/ year* so they can scream back to the Republicans, "We tried to lower taxes on the middle class, but you voted against it!"

      It's crazy, but all congressional maneuvering to try to accomplish anything is crazy right now.

      * A higher income level may be chosen.

      "In this world of sin and sorrow there is always something to be thankful for; as for me, I rejoice that I am not a Republican." - H. L. Mencken

      by SueDe on Mon May 21, 2012 at 06:27:06 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  It's helpful to acknowledge... (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Laconic Lib

      ...that just because your taxes don't go up, you really don't get to "keep more of your own money."

      We're being told we have more control over our money, but we don't. We're inundated with fees, penalties and hidden charges not just from financial institutions, but retailers and service providers. Those "financial gotchas" result in part from lack of regulation: the Financial Elites have in effect made constant raiding of what meager assets we have legal by their lobbying and support of politicians who enable  that "mining." Reasonable regulation would - from just my limited perspective - minimize that vacuuming of our collective wallets, accounts and other liquid-able assets to the point that you would actually have "more of your own money" all other things being equal.

      I will stipulate that it does nothing to ease your fear of increased taxation without (seemingly) countervailing benefit or compensation. Most of us believe that increased taxation should begin with those most able to increase their share of the cost of our civilization.  But all of us should eventually face the fact that were are significantly undertaxed AND underprovided by government at all levels: collective effort and assets are the only way we create a sufficiently powerful oversight and regulatory framework to deal with the Financial Elites.

      When you are right you cannot be too radical; when you are wrong, you cannot be too conservative. --Martin Luther King Jr.

      by Egalitare on Mon May 21, 2012 at 07:04:38 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Corrupt officials need to lose their pensions (5+ / 0-)

    when they commit fraud or abuse the public they have sworn to serve.    Malfeasance and corruption by public officials,  meaning every individual in government, and especially those who have sworn an oath - judges, representatives, law enforcement,  DAs, etc. is extraordinarily harmful to the welfare of our society.

    "Held responsible" should mean the equivalent punishment of a drug dealer with three strikes  plus the loss of pension and benefits.   Too often held responsible means only a slap on the wrist to the perp while we the taxpayers are held financially responsible for the ensuing law suit.    It needs to be personal, and there is nothing more personal than loss of a lucrative pension.

    Victims of bigotry are the poorest, least influential members of society.......never the wealthiest, most educated, most overrepresented in high levels, and most influential. Bigotry hurts the least influential. To claim or say otherwise is absurd.

    by dailykozzer on Mon May 21, 2012 at 05:00:44 AM PDT

  •  Very essential that police be held liable (7+ / 0-)

    I was listening to NPR a while back and heard that people had a constitutional right to loiter since something like the 1960's. Apparently it was an law passed against gays and another means of racial profiling. An activist group challenged the law and won.  

    So I'm listening to the person being interviewed and heard him claim that not only had the NYPD been enforcing this banned law for decaded, even judges were convicting people for being in neighborhoods where police figured they did not fit in.

    Then he talked about evidence that the police brass knew all along that the NYPD could not enforce a "No Loitering" law but trained cadets and instructed officers to use that law as a crime stopper.

    I don't remember the interview very well but I think the issue of "No Loitering" is addressed now. Probably they understand that they can't arrest anyone for standing in a particular place but can still threaten to arrest someone.  

  •  Krugman nails it with Romney (5+ / 0-)

    What?  Engaging in heavily subsidized liquidations of companies where gains are kept and losses are dispersed among investors doesn't lead to a vast understanding of macroeconomics?  Whodathunkit?

  •  The Kids are doing alright. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Laconic Lib

    It seems the younger gen gets it.  It's not a team sport.

    Something us old folks should glom on to.

    NOW SHOWING
    Progressive Candidate Obama (now - Nov 6, 2012)
    Bipartisan Obama returns (Nov 7, 2012)

    by The Dead Man on Mon May 21, 2012 at 05:21:40 AM PDT

    •  Well, they will get it... (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      on the cusp

      Right up the...  They get will get it when the gains the "team sports" people worked decades to achieve vanish.  They'll understand that working together for the common good is the only way forward.  But maybe they have to experience what our country was like before 1932 to understand.

      Sorry, but I have little patience for folks that can't think beyond the next two hours.  Maybe they should study history, study economics, sociology.  Put down the smart phone and stop being a dumbass! (not directly at you Dead  Man)  Kids who check out because politics are messy do so because their parents, grandparents, great grandparents struggled so they would have that luxury.  That may be lost if the younger generation doesn't figure this out soon.

      In an insane society, the sane man would appear insane

      by TampaCPA on Mon May 21, 2012 at 05:55:30 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Incrementalism isn't cutting it (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Laconic Lib

        we're got issues that have been ignored for decades.  I think attempting to change the status quo from a new direction instead of the current well-controlled pathways granted to us can have a better payoff.  I hope they succeed.

        NOW SHOWING
        Progressive Candidate Obama (now - Nov 6, 2012)
        Bipartisan Obama returns (Nov 7, 2012)

        by The Dead Man on Mon May 21, 2012 at 06:27:32 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  But succeed at what? They're not doing anything (0+ / 0-)

          Sit-ins and clicktivism are fine, but they aren't going to change anything. Do you think civil rights for African Americans was accomplished just from people sitting in lunch counters and holding signs? They organized. They voted. They boycotted. They held the system accountable. They used politics. By disengaging from the political process, they are forfeiting to whatever outcomes arise.

          •  Maybe instead of attacking them for trying to (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Laconic Lib

            find something new that will work, time could be used more constructively in helping them, or at the very least taking a hard, clear look at why the current system is not attractive to them and understand why the status quo parties have failed them.

            NOW SHOWING
            Progressive Candidate Obama (now - Nov 6, 2012)
            Bipartisan Obama returns (Nov 7, 2012)

            by The Dead Man on Mon May 21, 2012 at 07:49:09 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  Because they've bought into the media bullshit (0+ / 0-)

              that both parties are the same.

              •  Not completely the same, social issues are always (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                Laconic Lib

                up for back-and-forth kabuki ... but they are the same on core systemic issues.

                NOW SHOWING
                Progressive Candidate Obama (now - Nov 6, 2012)
                Bipartisan Obama returns (Nov 7, 2012)

                by The Dead Man on Mon May 21, 2012 at 09:27:47 AM PDT

                [ Parent ]

              •  And you've apparently (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                The Dead Man

                ...bought into the bullshit frame that pointing out how both parties propagate the transfer of wealth and power to those who already have it at the expense of those who need it most = "both parties are the same".

                Five words doesn't cover it. Of course both parties are the same - about some things. It just so happens that one of the biggest is the one being addressed by recent popular uprising.

                This is the source of discontent with "incrementalism". There are some problems it simply will not fix, because neither party has any interest in doing so.

                You're not going to find many people (unlikely you'll find any) here who doubt that, for the most part, Democrats on the whole are better for their interests than Republicans. No one here seriously makes any claim to the reverse, nor that the two are indistinguishable as a whole.

                You will, however, find many people who make the (accurate) claim that on some issues, Democrats are no better than Republicans. This is very different than "both parties are the same".

                The problem with going with your gut as opposed to your head is that the former is so often full of shit. - Randy Chestnut

                by lotusmaglite on Mon May 21, 2012 at 04:04:06 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

          •  Um (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            The Dead Man
            Sit-ins and clicktivism are fine, but they aren't going to change anything. Do you think civil rights for African Americans was accomplished just from people sitting in lunch counters and holding signs?
            They didn't just sit and hold signs. They marched, bussed in protesters, chained themselves to buildings, trees structures, organized teach-ins, formed massive demonstrations, etc. Don't invoke the lessons of history and then ignore what actually happened. Popular uprising requires the populace to rise up. So, yes, sit-ins and signs were a part of the popular protest that did change things.

            In fact, activism - particularly protest and resistance are the only way We The People have ever arm-twisted our government into giving us anything. Where do you think unions came from?

            "They organized", you say. Yes, they did. And then they went out into the streets and screamed bloody murder to drive the point home that the citizenry was unhappy, and they weren't going to go home and be quiet.

            The system has been in a century-long process of being rigged so that traditional, establishment means of change (voting) are marginalized and change nothing of substance for the powers that be. When the Democrats and Republicans both continue the transfer of wealth from those who have little to those who have almost all of it, whom do you vote for?

            The answer, for those whom you look down upon for "sitting in lunch counters and holding signs" is to vote for the lesser of two evils, run to the nearest toilet, and then take to the streets.

            I haven't voted "for" anyone other than Russ Feingold and Tammy Baldwin in all my voting life, and even those two were sometimes the lesser of two evils. It's all about activism, and always has been. No benevolent rulers ever gave us anything out of gratitude for our votes, campaign money, or support. We wrested it from them - or else.

            I find it very disconcerting that you think protests and the like aren't a part of the political process. There is nothing more political than activism, which includes taking to the streets, sign in hand, to let your representatives know in no uncertain terms how you feel about the policies they support.

            The problem with going with your gut as opposed to your head is that the former is so often full of shit. - Randy Chestnut

            by lotusmaglite on Mon May 21, 2012 at 03:54:52 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

  •  When is a bank not a bank? (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    on the cusp, Egalitare, tb mare

    I could buy into Romney's pitch -- if Glass-Steagall were still the law of the land.

    One little side effect of the way it segregated banking activities is that you could have a great big ol' investment bank without a bunch of FDIC insured accounts.  Such a thing wants to buckle a few swashes?

    Cool.  Not my money.

    You want me to guarantee your restless acts?

    Not so fast, me bucko.

    LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

    by dinotrac on Mon May 21, 2012 at 05:27:16 AM PDT

  •  Vidiotaping the police... (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    on the cusp

    ...is a right unless it has sound then it is wiretapping, a felony, at least in Illinois.  Go figure.  They can tape and listen in but god forbid you do.

    We Glory in war, in the shedding of human blood. What fools we are.

    by delver rootnose on Mon May 21, 2012 at 05:30:42 AM PDT

  •  Chris Hedges (8+ / 0-)
    Let the ice sheets in the Arctic melt. Let the temperatures rise. Let the air, soil and water be poisoned. Let the forests die. Let the seas be emptied of life. Let one useless war after another be waged.
    I've worked in the natural resource field all of my adult life.  As a kid, I played in the woods and camped next to Ozark streams.  The profound degradation that I have witnessed in my lifetime depresses me.  Even more depressing are the sentiments of the moneyed interests and the right-wing echo chamber.  

    Go to any online news source that allows comments, and see how readers respond to any article that deals with science and the environment.  As long as that point of view prevails, you'll never convince me to be optimistic about the planet's future.  Oh, the planet will survive, but many species, including possibly our own, will not make it through the next few centuries.

  •  High Water (for Charley Patton) - Bob Dylan (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    EdinStPaul, SueDe


    "Highwater - For Charlie Patton"

    Highwater risin', rising night and day
    All the gold and silver are being stolen away
    Big Joe Turner looking east and west from the dark room of his mind
    He made it to Kansas City, Twelfth Street and Vine
    Nothin' standing there
    Highwater everywhere

    Highwater rising the shacks are sliding down
    Folks lose their possessions, the folks are leaving town
    Reformation shook it, broke it, then she hung it on the wall
    Say you dance with whom they tell you to or you don't dance at all
    It's tough out there
    Highwater everywhere

    I got a cravin' love for blazin' speed
    I got a hopped up Mustang Ford
    Jump into the wagon, love
    Throw your panties overboard
    I can write you poems, make a strong man lose his mind
    I'm no pig without a wig, I hope you treat me kind
    Things are breakin' up out there
    Highwater everywhere

    Highwater rising, six inches above my head
    Coffin's dropping in the street like balloons made out of lead
    Water poured into Vicksburg, don't know what I'm gonna do
    Don't reach out for me, she said, can't you see I'm drowning too
    It's rough out there
    Highwater everywhere

    Well, George Lewis told the Englishman, the Italian and the Jew
    You can't open up your mind, boys, to every conceivable point of view
    They got Charles Darwin trapped out there on Highway 5
    Judge says to the high sheriff, I want him dead or alive
    Either one, I don't care
    Highwater everywhere

    Well, the cuckoo is a pretty bird, she warbles as she flies
    I'm preachin' the word of God, I'm puttin' out your eyes
    I asked Fat Nancy for someth'n' to eat, she said take it off the shelf
    As great as you are man, you'll never be greater than yourself
    I told her I didn't really care
    Highwater everywhere

    I get up in the mornin', I believe I'll dust my broom
    Keepin' away from the women, I'm givin' them lots of room
    Thunder rollin' over Clarksdale, everythin' a lookin' blue
    I just can't be happy, love, unless you're happy too
    It's bad out there
    Highwater everywhere

    The Hedges piece reminded me of this song, which references everything from old blues to Céline to a million other things.
  •  exactly. if ever, socialism will occur "naturally" (0+ / 0-)
    In this election, we’re not having an argument that pits capitalism against socialism. We are trying to decide what kind of capitalism we want. It is a debate as American as Alexander Hamilton, Andrew Jackson and Henry Clay — which is to say that we have always done this. In light of the rise of inequality and the financial mess we just went through, it’s a discussion we very much need to have now.

    slutty voter for a "dangerous president"; Präsidentenelf-maßschach; Warning-Some Snark Above"Nous sommes un groupuscule" (-9.50; -7.03) "Sciant terra viam monstrare." 政治委员, 政委!

    by annieli on Mon May 21, 2012 at 05:46:56 AM PDT

  •  Anyone recording the police should (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    David54, dilutedviking

    be streaming the video to another location so the police can't wipe it. The technology already exists. If the police are allowed to record their own activities, citizens should be able to record the police. It keeps everyone honest.

  •  Re DYI politics, is this a great unleashing of (0+ / 0-)

    political passion or a typical reaction of young people who feel they have not received what was advertised (or used to achieve a victory)? I felt very much like this during the Carter campaign run up and subsequent administration. Disillusioned with national politics, I worked local, through NGOs and CAPs until national politics cut my work off.

    “The first principle [in science] is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool.” Richard Feynman

    by the fan man on Mon May 21, 2012 at 06:03:55 AM PDT

  •  Now you're catching on.... (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    dilutedviking, Laconic Lib
    Yes. And could "held liable" please include some replacement personnel and jail time for the violators? Because otherwise any statement, no matter how clear, is worthless.
    That's the point.

    Obama's DOJ, run by Eric Holder, has other things to be concerned with.

    Recall that Eric Holder made his name by defending Chiquita against charges it paid right-wing death squads to murder indigenous organizers.

    Eric painted Chiquita as a victim.

    He is now the Attorney General.

    We should consider ourselves lucky we get lip service.

    There is a reason that Obama's Chiefs of Staff come from Wall Street Banks. And it has nothing to do with Change We Can Believe In.

    by Johnathan Ivan on Mon May 21, 2012 at 06:08:56 AM PDT

  •  Videotaping bad police behavior could be good TV (0+ / 0-)

    unfortunately if one merges TruTV with Fox

    Videotaping bad police behavior is a constitutional right

    slutty voter for a "dangerous president"; Präsidentenelf-maßschach; Warning-Some Snark Above"Nous sommes un groupuscule" (-9.50; -7.03) "Sciant terra viam monstrare." 政治委员, 政委!

    by annieli on Mon May 21, 2012 at 06:10:34 AM PDT

  •  Ultimately attachment to an -ism is its own (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    dilutedviking, Superpole, Laconic Lib

    path to destruction.
    It's pretty obvious what works: a hybrid system that allows "free enterprise" but also allows for collective efforts that sustain the civilization upon which the "free enterprise" enterprise thrives.
    What we have to develop are the adroit response mechanisms that have the sensitivity to know when and where to put the mojo.

    We've driven down the (phony) supply-side ideological path to the point at which the rich have almost all the money, and the middle class is being starved by the massive tumor called Wall Street. It has destroyed the demand side of the equation.

    Now there are some relatively simple and straighforward fixes to our condition. Provide demand in the form of investment in a 21st cent. infrastructure, new energy options, etc., and the education to create the workers for this new direction. In the meantime, sustain the social services that are needed until we get back to a sustainable level of revenue that is needed to continue our civilization. We need to handle all -isms with a light touch.

    You can't make this stuff up.

    by David54 on Mon May 21, 2012 at 06:25:48 AM PDT

  •  Kudlow is a hack (0+ / 0-)

    But here's a surprise- they actually posted my comment saying so. I wonder how long it will last. See "Ish K. Bibble."

    Done with politics for the night? Have a nice glass of wine with Palate Press: The online wine magazine.

    by dhonig on Mon May 21, 2012 at 07:22:22 AM PDT

  •  Karzai: "Thanks for Wasting, errr, I mean Thanks" (0+ / 0-)
    "I'm bringing to you and to the people of the United States the gratitude of the Afghan people for the support that your taxpayers' money has provided us over the past decade, and for the difference that it has made to the well-being of the Afghan people," Karzai said after his meeting with President Obama ahead of the start of the NATO Summit.
    What he meant to say: "I'm bringing to you foolish people in congress my and my family's personal thanks and gratitude for keeping my corrupt, errrr, I mean my administration in power (over part of Afghanistan) for as long as possible with your continued large infusions of no-strings attached cash. I really really appreciate it!"

    Meanwhile, in Afghanistan:

    “We all know what’s going on,” said Mohammad Khan, a property dealer who arranges sales and rentals for Afghans and foreigners in Kabul. “Right now in Afghanistan, corruption is a huge problem. I will say that, until we tackle this problem, there won’t be a change for the better in Afghanistan.”

    While he is glad to see the U.S. and others sign on to support his country’s security forces for another decade, he’d like to see nations put conditions on their support. If they don’t, he said, the billions that are supposed to go to the army and police might end up where most aid to the country has gone before: “to the pockets of the warlords, powerful people, officials, leaders.”

    http://abcnews.go.com/...

    http://www.stripes.com/...

    "I don't feel the change yet". Velma Hart

    by Superpole on Mon May 21, 2012 at 07:27:56 AM PDT

  •  UN-AMERICAN ?? (0+ / 0-)
    We aren't having an argument about socialism vs. capitalism because that would be unAmerican, or rather,  non-American because only those of us on the so-called fringes ever discuss it.
    Un-American?

    Sound familiar?

    This is the exact same methodology used by the GOP in 2004. Kerry & the Dems fighting against the Iraq invasion and Gitmo was "Un-American".

    Now, it is any gov't regulation or taxes that is "Un-American".

    And once again the MSM is letting the GOP get away with this sort of distortion and rhetoric.

    •  Demonizing socialism (or what the right... (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Laconic Lib

      ...characterizes as socialism) is a lot older than the last few election cycles. But, yet, the net regarding what socialism supposedly is gets cast a bit wider at every opportunity.

      Don't tell me what you believe, show me what you do and I will tell you what you believe.

      by Meteor Blades on Mon May 21, 2012 at 08:35:07 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  That constitutional right must be defended (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Laconic Lib

    with tooth and nails.

    Just look at this video and especially the part at TC 43:23
    I don't know if these images have been covered here yesterday, but what Luke Rukowski from WeAreChange.Org talks about at TC 43:40  in this video is happening too often, especially confiscation of video, photo and laptops and harddrives confiscations.

    Chicago Police Face Accusations of Entrapment, Brutality in Crackdown on NATO Protesters

    I think the whole show is worth to watch.

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