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I'd earlier found a light-hearted (headed?) topic, as so often the case, for tonight's SNLC.  But I found it before Thursday night/Friday morning.  Now it just feels wrong to write about that topic, although getting serious and somber here won't undo the evil acts of others out of my control.  This actually leads into the revised starting point today, a poem from the German folk collection Des Knaben Wunderhorn (The Youth's Magic Horn).  It's the poem "Des Antonius von Padua Fischpredigt" (St. Anthony of Padua Preaching to the Fishes).  What it has to do with events this week follows below the flip....

First, here is the German text of the poem:

"Antonius zur Predigt
Die Kirche findt ledig.
Er geht zu den Flüssen
und predigt den Fischen;

Sie schlagen mit den Schwänzen,
Im Sonnenschein glänzen.

Die Karpfen mit Rogen
Sind all' hierher zogen,
Hab'n d'Mäuler aufrissen,
Sich Zuhörens beflissen;

Kein Predigt niemalen
Den Karpfen so g'fallen.

Spitzgoschete Hechte,
Die immerzu fechten,
Sind eilend herschwommen,
Zu hören den Frommen;

Auch jene Phantasten,
Die immerzu fasten;
Die Stockfisch ich meine,
Zur Predigt erscheinen;

Kein Predigt niemalen
Den Stockfisch so g'fallen.

Gut Aale und Hausen,
Die vornehme schmausen,
Die selbst sich bequemen,
Die Predigt vernehmen:

Auch Krebse, Schildkroten,
Sonst langsame Boten,
Steigen eilig vom Grund,
Zu hören diesen Mund:

Kein Predigt niemalen
den Krebsen so g'fallen.

Fisch große, Fisch kleine,
Vornehm und gemeine,
Erheben die Köpfe
Wie verständge Geschöpfe:

Auf Gottes Begehren
Die Predigt anhören.

Die Predigt geendet,
Ein jeder sich wendet,
Die Hechte bleiben Diebe,
Die Aale viel lieben.

Die Predigt hat g'fallen.
Sie bleiben wie alle.

Die Krebs gehn zurücke,
Die Stockfisch bleiben dicke,
Die Karpfen viel fressen,
die Predigt vergessen.

Die Predigt hat g'fallen.
Sie bleiben wie alle."

You can read a translation here.  In its way, in so far as German literature can be snarky, it's snark is contained in the aftermath of St. Anthony's sermon, which the fish have 'listened to' so raptly (for lack of a human audience for St. Anthony to whom to preach).  Namely, it's in the last 12 lines, which translate (badly) as follows:
"The sermon has finished,
Everyone turns around,
The pikes keep on stealing,
The eels stay great lovers.

The sermon has pleased them.
They remain as they were.

The crabs amble backwards,
The cod, still overweight,
The carp engorge themselves,
the sermon forgotten.

The sermon has pleased them.
They remain as they were."

Thus, sad to say, that even after this week:

1.  A bigoted, ignorant, racist Minnesota congresswoman and failed presidential candidate, who wouldn't qualify to be a dog catcher in a truly meritocratic world, will win another term to the House this November, and thus get more chances to spew her Muslim-baiting inflammatory slanders against government staff, amongst other stupid utterances.  Of course, that also speaks a lot about the voters in her district, that they're willing to keep electing her.

2.  There will be no increased calls for gun control and better background checks on weapons and ammunition purchases.  The only major political figure to call for such measures is another failed Presidential candidate, NYC Mayor Michael Bloomberg.  OTOH, given the stupidity and sick worship of weapons of enough of the American electorate, fueled by the National Rifle Association (a true domestic terrorist organization such as ever existed), it's just as well that Bloomberg can speak out.  He's effed-up on a lot of things, but on the money on this one.  Leave it to The Guardian to remind us here and here how hopeless we are as a nation when it comes to guns.

I'd love to be wrong on both counts.  But I don't really expect so.

Getting back to the song, for those who don't already know, Gustav Mahler set that text to music, in his song cycle Des Knaben Wunderhorn (which obviously didn't set the whole collection).  You can watch him Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau, who died earlier this year, singing this selection here:

With that, if you want to observe the usual SNLC protocol, feel free, although even more than usual this week, such matters aren't important.  Even 3CM the loser realizes that, if nothing else.

Originally posted to chingchongchinaman on Sat Jul 21, 2012 at 08:30 PM PDT.

Also republished by DKOMA.

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Comment Preferences

  •  cover needed next Saturday night (7+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Chi, x, shari, cfk, Dumbo, Youffraita, oculus

    If anyone wants to write next week's SNLC, feel free to drop a line here tonight.  If not, I can write one in advance, but I'll be unable to reply to any comments and engage in Saturday night banter next weekend, so you'll be on your own (the few who stop by).

    Oh, and as you can tell by the time of this tip jar and the time of the posting, I'm not actually here at this moment, i.e. this is an autobot posting.  However, will hopefully be back fairly soon after said autobot posting.

    "It's only in books that the officers of the detective force are superior to the weakness of making a mistake." (Wilkie Collins, The Moonstone)

    by chingchongchinaman on Sat Jul 21, 2012 at 05:31:19 PM PDT

  •  hi (4+ / 0-)

    We went to see the three grandbabies who had been in a car accident...their car was stopped and a semi hit them and pushed their car into the car in front.

    They are OK, (some back stiffness, yet), but I needed to see them and hug them.  Then we used a gift card at a restaurant.  Beautiful day and not so hot.  Breezes up by the bay.

    My daughter is having her baby by c-section on the 29th, but if he comes early, we will go down so I keep grabbing up the phone every time it rings.

    Otherwise, we will go see him and celebrate the oldest grandbaby's 9th birthday on Aug. 4th.

    So we left the cave and that is always a good thing.  :)

    Best wishes to ccc, and to all here!!!!

    Join us at Bookflurries-Bookchat on Wednesday nights 8:00 PM EST

    by cfk on Sat Jul 21, 2012 at 09:07:53 PM PDT

    •  oh wait, that's the story that you mentioned..... (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      cfk, Dumbo, Youffraita

      ......a while back for SNLC last week, about being not-snarky loserly.  Dots starting to connect.  At least they're all reasonably OK.

      "It's only in books that the officers of the detective force are superior to the weakness of making a mistake." (Wilkie Collins, The Moonstone)

      by chingchongchinaman on Sat Jul 21, 2012 at 09:49:00 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Yes, it could have been just terrible (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        chingchongchinaman, Dumbo, Youffraita

        The whole window in the back where they were sitting was broken and one was showered in glass, but not cut.

        The girls are in good spirits.  This grandma was able to sleep well finally after they arrived back home in a rental vehicle.

        They had to drive through a terrible storm to get home, too.

        whew!

        Join us at Bookflurries-Bookchat on Wednesday nights 8:00 PM EST

        by cfk on Sat Jul 21, 2012 at 09:58:03 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  one wonders how fast the semi was going..... (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          cfk, Youffraita, Dumbo

          ......when it hit.  Obviously not at 45 mph or something like that, which would probably have not left anyone intact in the car.  I suppose I'm waiting for the day when something like that nails me.

          "It's only in books that the officers of the detective force are superior to the weakness of making a mistake." (Wilkie Collins, The Moonstone)

          by chingchongchinaman on Sat Jul 21, 2012 at 10:10:01 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  The stop and go traffic (3+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            chingchongchinaman, Youffraita, Dumbo

            suddenly stopped.  My son got stopped, but the semi driver said the floor mat got under his brake.  

            You are right that he must have been nearly stopped or there would have been carnage...makes me sick to think about it.

            I know every time we go out in a car, things can happen.

            But what can you do?

            My mother used to say that we could slip on a banana peel in our own kitchen.  

            But my dil who was nearly killed by a car when she was nine and was just starting to want to drive herself, is now back to square one and that is a shame.

            Join us at Bookflurries-Bookchat on Wednesday nights 8:00 PM EST

            by cfk on Sat Jul 21, 2012 at 10:16:22 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  true, accidents can happen anywhere (3+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              Youffraita, Dumbo, cfk

              It's just that when large objects with wheels in motion and weighing several tons are involved, the results of an accident can be that much more horrific.  Fortunately for all concered, that wasn't the case here.

              "It's only in books that the officers of the detective force are superior to the weakness of making a mistake." (Wilkie Collins, The Moonstone)

              by chingchongchinaman on Sat Jul 21, 2012 at 10:24:37 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

    •  Good grief... (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      cfk, chingchongchinaman, Youffraita

      How old are the grandbabies involved?

      I assume they got the full set of MRIs?

      •  Yes, they were checked at the local (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        chingchongchinaman, Dumbo, Youffraita

        hospital on Sunday and again when they got home on Wed.

        The oldest is 8 and the next is 5 and the 16th month old was in a really good car seat.

        They were still able to talk about the fun part of the vacation at the beginning, but the five year old said,  "We were going to see the ocean, only we didn't," in a sad voice.

        Join us at Bookflurries-Bookchat on Wednesday nights 8:00 PM EST

        by cfk on Sat Jul 21, 2012 at 10:20:14 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  I freaked a little at the word babies. (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Youffraita, cfk, chingchongchinaman

          Now that I think about it, there is that weird phenomenon you hear about where babies can sometimes fall from second story windows and come out unscathed.  Maybe the 16 month old in the car seat was the safest one.  Not to minimize anything.

          •  sorry (3+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Youffraita, Dumbo, chingchongchinaman

            I will probably be calling them grandbabies when they are 20.  

            Yes, I believe the little one was the safest and in the middle seat row, too.

            But she was disturbed when her mommy was on a board.

            They finally took her out of her seat and laid her on her mom's stomach and she slept for a while.

            Then, when mom went in for tests, she started screaming again and got a Popsicle.  Her mom said, "Her first Popsicle and I didn't get to see it."

            Scary, though, for a little one to not know what is happening.

            Join us at Bookflurries-Bookchat on Wednesday nights 8:00 PM EST

            by cfk on Sat Jul 21, 2012 at 10:41:13 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  The poor thing. (3+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              Dumbo, cfk, chingchongchinaman

              It must have been much worse for her than for the older grandbabies.  So very glad nobody was seriously injured.

              BTW, cfk, do you go read Ellid's Books So Bad They're Good on Saturday nights?  B/c she accidentally posted at 6 a.m. today -- it would be in your R&BL stream, but probably not on the recent list.  And I'm pretty sure it never made the rescue list, esp. since it was only half-finished when posted.

              snicker

              I like Ellid.  I like BSBTG, and read it every Saturday night.  But that's the kind of gaffe I would make -- so it's kinda snarkalicious to see someone as competent as Ellid do that.

              To make the argument that the media has a left- or right-wing, or a liberal or a conservative bias, is like asking if the problem with Al-Qaeda is do they use too much oil in their hummus. Al Franken

              by Youffraita on Sat Jul 21, 2012 at 10:51:23 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  Yes, I was there...very late (2+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                Youffraita, chingchongchinaman

                Ellid writes some great diaries!

                I had a diary publish at the wrong time, too, back a while.

                Some glitch or other.  It was a shock.

                Join us at Bookflurries-Bookchat on Wednesday nights 8:00 PM EST

                by cfk on Sat Jul 21, 2012 at 11:08:06 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

                •  Well, it's the sort of thing (2+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  cfk, chingchongchinaman

                  I might do...post and not notice AM or PM.  Or, at a Soapblox blog I belong to, accidentally post a work in progress to the front page.  And not (at the time I did it) know how to remove it from the fp.

                  I mean, I've done a bunch of stupid things (usually at that Soapblox blog) but Ellid is pretty competent.  So it was kinda humorous to catch her out in a dumb mistake.

                  I'm not LOLing b/c I'm not that kind of hypocrite.  But the occasional snicker did pass my lips.  ;-D

                  To make the argument that the media has a left- or right-wing, or a liberal or a conservative bias, is like asking if the problem with Al-Qaeda is do they use too much oil in their hummus. Al Franken

                  by Youffraita on Sat Jul 21, 2012 at 11:26:40 PM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

        •  Wow. That IS sad. (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          cfk, Dumbo, chingchongchinaman

          SO glad that they weren't badly hurt in what could have been a horrific accident if the driver of the semi had been a worse driver...but really sad they didn't get to see the ocean.

          I was probably only a few years older than that when I first saw it...it has been magical to me ever since -- even knowing its power -- and it's what I miss most, living inland.  In NYC, it's only a subway ride away.  sigh

          To make the argument that the media has a left- or right-wing, or a liberal or a conservative bias, is like asking if the problem with Al-Qaeda is do they use too much oil in their hummus. Al Franken

          by Youffraita on Sat Jul 21, 2012 at 10:36:20 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  They have seen Lake Michigan (3+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Dumbo, Youffraita, chingchongchinaman

            from two different places and I told her the ocean was like that.

            But...

            Not sure when they will get my dil to go on a long vacation again.

            A sort of funny thing I read in a book was that a man was stranded in his boat on Lake Michigan for several days and he was severely dehydrated and they asked him why he didn't drink the water and he said he thought it was salt...sigh.

            Join us at Bookflurries-Bookchat on Wednesday nights 8:00 PM EST

            by cfk on Sat Jul 21, 2012 at 10:43:38 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  well, that would have been a bit of a risk.... (0+ / 0-)

              .....to drink lake water, even if fish do just fine by it.  Who knows what's in it in its unfiltered state.

              "It's only in books that the officers of the detective force are superior to the weakness of making a mistake." (Wilkie Collins, The Moonstone)

              by chingchongchinaman on Sun Jul 22, 2012 at 09:44:10 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

    •  What a relief your family is ok. (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      chingchongchinaman, Youffraita, cfk
  •  I read a thing somewhere recently (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    chingchongchinaman, cfk, shari, Youffraita

    (I was researching Bohemian music for a diary I wrote), some letters between Mahler and a sympathetic reporter who asked him about Czech Jewish influences on his music.  Mahler said that yes, such influences were in his music, especially in the early work, the sermon to the fishes.

    The music that accompanies the sermon has a nice satirical sound to it that fits it well.  I've always wondered, though, what his real intentions were with the finale of his 4th Symphony (also based on Knaben Wunderhorn).  The lyrics can have a grim dual meaning, especially with the lowing of the cattle being slaughtered.  But the very ending doesn't seem to leave any room for that duality.  There's always the possibility that in the 19th century, with its shorter food production chain, people couldn't as easily see the irony of a heaven where animals were slaughtered for the pleasure of children.  I haven't read many program notes that focus on that as they must if it were the real meaning of the piece.

    Michelle Bachman... such a clown.  We're better off with her than with a sane Republican.

    Missed my diary last Thursday.  I usually leave a "Brief Dumbo Spam" in cfk's Bookflurries the Wednesday before, to give people a heads up about what's going to happen or not happen.  In this case, my sister came to town and stayed on for most of a week.  ... Perhaps stayed a bit too long for comfort.  I'm grateful for having a big family, but it's a pain when you don't want to have to deal with them.

    Still working on my Fugue.  Started an Adagio too.  I might upload some unfinished product as a test.

    •  speaking of the Mahler 4 final movement..... (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Dumbo, cfk, Youffraita

      ......I diaried about it almost exactly 2 years ago.  I missed that you missed your Thursday night opus just now.  Maybe what I'll do is to do those side possible "guest diaries" for Thursday night off and on, and when I'm ready to roll, will let you know.  I have another writing project off this site to deal with first.

      Actually, things are not better with the bigoted beeyotch B-chm-nn in the House.  Some people can be trusted with loaded weapons, i.e. political power.  She is not one of them.

      "It's only in books that the officers of the detective force are superior to the weakness of making a mistake." (Wilkie Collins, The Moonstone)

      by chingchongchinaman on Sat Jul 21, 2012 at 10:04:51 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Hmmm... Okay, read it. (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Youffraita, cfk, chingchongchinaman

        I still feel curious though about the way the ending is treated.  On the one hand, I'm ready to read more into it and am puzzled others don't.  On the other, I think I'm probably overthinking it.  

        Death, it seems, is obligatory if life is to be sustained, even in heaven...
        That's a nice simplistic reading.  It makes it out as death as subtext, a Mahler-OCD thing that always creeps into his music but isn't in this case really the dominant feature of the poem.

        I see another side to that, though.  Remember that Disney cartoon, The Lion King?  Remember the opening sequence, with the song, The Circle of Life (sung by Elton John)?  And it shows all the animals, the monkeys, the elks, the giraffes, the zebras, all standing down on ground below the plateau and roaring in approval of the young lion cub being held up in the air?  Did you ever wonder, what the fuck are those zebra cheering for?  I mean, it's a LION.  LIONS EAT ZEBRAS!  And there's that song, The Circle of Life, embracing the whole concept of zebras being eaten by lions.  

        I suppose, to the lions, that whole circle of life thing sounds like a profound concept to space out about.  But what about the zebras?  What should they think about it.  It's their fate to be eaten by lions?  What's so circular about THAT?  Oh, the lions would say.... well, we shit you out afterwards, and that fertilizes the fields and...  

        Oh, what dim comfort that would offer me if I were a zebra!  I get eaten, but that's okay, because I'll end up as lion turds while lion-philosophers rhapsodize about the beauty of it.  I can't just die naturally and fertilize the fields that way.  

        I'd love to see a zebra debate the merits of The Circle of Life with a lion.  It would probably be like Mitt Romney explaining the crystalline aesthetic beauty of unregulated financial markets to homeowners who lost their homes.

        So, back to the 4th finale... "Death, it seems, is obligatory if life is to be sustained, even in heaven..."  Well yeah.  That's the way A LION would put it.  There aren't any children in the poem being eaten by cattle and fish.  There's something more naive to it than that, a failure to recognize the pain of others.

        But, like I said, I'm probably overthinking it.  Maybe it's just about a child's view of heaven by somebody who didn't see all the shades of irony.  In a century where people were more used to seeing their dinner killed, such fine points might have been overlooked and thus not relevant to the intent of the poem nor to Mahler's reading of it.

        •  true that those poems were from a time when...... (0+ / 0-)

          .....life span wasn't as long.  In retrospect, given Mahler's original intention of making "Das himmlische Leben" the 7th movement of his Symphony No. 3, I wonder how it would have bit in after the great slow finale (not to mention the "Bimm, bamm" of the 5th movement).

          "It's only in books that the officers of the detective force are superior to the weakness of making a mistake." (Wilkie Collins, The Moonstone)

          by chingchongchinaman on Sun Jul 22, 2012 at 09:46:50 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

    •  "mit kindlich heiterem Ausdruck" (0+ / 0-)

      That is how Mahler tells the voice to sing. The problem is that "heiter" can mean either "serene" or "cheerful," so you have "with childlike serenity" or "with childlike cheer." So the child is content—or dreaming a wonderful dream.

      Of course, there is the little matter that Herod, the butcher of children, is the butcher in heaven. So I think Mahler is insinuating that death and destruction is a natural part of life. It's part of his message; it's a universal cycle, and we have to accept all of it, good and bad, to understand our role.

  •  I think you're wrong, 3CM, about (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Dumbo, cfk, chingchongchinaman

    publishing something lighthearted in the wake of tragedy.

    We are all aware of the gravity of 12 dead and scores wounded, some critically.

    And unfortunately, gun control appears to be no-go in the current political climate.

    But there are TONS of diaries devoted to the subject...it's good, if only for balance, to have something lighthearted to escape to from time to time.

    I nominate Ellid for the site's accidental Loser of the Day, btw, b/c she accidentally posted her weekly Books So Bad They're Good at 6 a.m. instead of 6 p.m. -- and it was only half finished.  (Caught it before work, lol, and went back after to read the rest of it.)  snicker

    To make the argument that the media has a left- or right-wing, or a liberal or a conservative bias, is like asking if the problem with Al-Qaeda is do they use too much oil in their hummus. Al Franken

    by Youffraita on Sat Jul 21, 2012 at 10:31:03 PM PDT

    •  point taken, but as I said..... (0+ / 0-)

      ....I personally felt just wrong about going ahead with the original idea, even though I knew that no one needed another diary alluding to, if extremely obliquely, that incident.  Life and the planet, in whatever damaged state, do go on, regardless.

      "It's only in books that the officers of the detective force are superior to the weakness of making a mistake." (Wilkie Collins, The Moonstone)

      by chingchongchinaman on Sun Jul 22, 2012 at 09:49:14 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Work in Progress... (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Youffraita, chingchongchinaman, shari

    This is an unlisted link.  I'll delete this later.  It has the fugue, unfinished, most of it, and the unfinished adagio.

    The sound of the Sibelius app strings in the adagio (starts about 3:05) is a bit disappointing, but it's better than what it would have sounded like some years back.

  •  Heh: so having (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Dumbo, chingchongchinaman, shari

    nominated Ellid for accidental Loser of the Day, I must in all fairness nominate myself for deliberate Loser of the Week.

    I mean it.

    My friend's 60th birthday was last Friday and I took him to the movies; he was throwing himself a party on the Saturday.  So I took both days off.

    When I was offered four hours of overtime, I took it, even though I knew I might be working eight days straight.

    Well.  I am working eight days straight.  As of tonight, I have completed 64 hours in seven days, and I've got another ten-hour shift to complete tomorrow.

    Loser: the FOUR hour shift is the only major overtime in that sked.

    And I'm so exhausted I feel like my IQ dropped 50 points.

    To make the argument that the media has a left- or right-wing, or a liberal or a conservative bias, is like asking if the problem with Al-Qaeda is do they use too much oil in their hummus. Al Franken

    by Youffraita on Sat Jul 21, 2012 at 11:05:09 PM PDT

    •  You know what you need? (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Youffraita, chingchongchinaman

      I've got it right here...

      •  Free coffee at work. (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Dumbo, chingchongchinaman

        I drink dark roast.  Believe you me, there is ALWAYS fresh dark roast coffee when I'm in this condition.

        How bad is it?

        It's SO bad that even coffee takes hours to penetrate the exhaustion.  And by "hours" I mean "the first half of my shift."

        It's going to be interesting tomorrow b/c I'll be working with a slacker (unlike today, when I was working with one of the best).  He's going to be dismayed to learn that HE has to do all the stuff I usually do b/c I'm just too tired.

        Unless, of course, he calls in sick.

        To make the argument that the media has a left- or right-wing, or a liberal or a conservative bias, is like asking if the problem with Al-Qaeda is do they use too much oil in their hummus. Al Franken

        by Youffraita on Sat Jul 21, 2012 at 11:17:22 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  so how did the slacker do? (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Youffraita

          Or did he call in sick?

          "It's only in books that the officers of the detective force are superior to the weakness of making a mistake." (Wilkie Collins, The Moonstone)

          by chingchongchinaman on Sun Jul 22, 2012 at 09:50:03 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  No, he showed up (0+ / 0-)

            I told him the situation early on: I was working on almost-empty and by the end of our ten-hour shift he'd be doing just about everything.

            You should have seen his eyebrows when I told him how many hours I would have logged by midnight.  Think Chuck Jones cartoon: his eyebrows practically jumped above his head and he did a classic double-take.

            Also, I bribed him with gas money for a ride home.  This helped: I got to sit down and ride, go upstairs and let in and feed fire escape cat, then sit the fuck down in front of computer.  sigh of relief

            Every muscle from the waist down is tired.

            I was drinking coffee and water all night...at one point I thought I finally could FEEL the caffeine, but that has long since worn off.  Indeed, it only lasted for about half an hour.

            So, yes, I made it, but I don't think the manager will be pleased with how we left the store.  Heh.  Let Day Shift do some work for a change.

            To make the argument that the media has a left- or right-wing, or a liberal or a conservative bias, is like asking if the problem with Al-Qaeda is do they use too much oil in their hummus. Al Franken

            by Youffraita on Sun Jul 22, 2012 at 11:54:33 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

  •  too tired to even lurk last night (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    chingchongchinaman

    that's my loser story of the week

    i'm intrigued about mahler. my kid's middle school orchestra attempted mahler's 4th, adagietto. even tho these were the best kids in the middle school, it was very difficult for them and just one really 'got it'. as for my kid, the best way to put it is, i really felt sorry for the neighbors. but this is middle school and i think a bit ambitious. i'm not well-versed in classical music and so this was my first up front experience with mahler. because it sounded so terrible, this got my curiosity: what is the big deal about this? and so i'm still in the middle of figuring out mahler as i know that many of the classical parent geeks i know swoon over mahler.

    •  Is this movement all string players, ~12 minutes? (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      shari

      If so, it might be the Adagietto from Mahler 5, although that movement also features harp with the strings.  But if it is the slow movement from Mahler 4, that's about 18 minutes, quite a feat.  You'd have to hear the whole work to get the full context.  YouTube has plenty of options, as well as the local library for CDs (presumably).

      "It's only in books that the officers of the detective force are superior to the weakness of making a mistake." (Wilkie Collins, The Moonstone)

      by chingchongchinaman on Sun Jul 22, 2012 at 09:52:50 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  oops (0+ / 0-)

        you are right, it is mahler 5, shows how much i know. this is still a difficult piece for middle schoolers. they did not end up performing this but it was probably a good exposure.

        looking at the youtube videos, one mystery to me about mahler 5 is that it seems each one is performed at different tempi (?), from just merely a normal slow tempo to performances that are at an amazingly slow tempo.  i wonder why that is?

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