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With his faithful Indian companion, Tonto, the daring and resourceful masked rider of the plains led the fight for law and order in the early western United States. Nowhere in the pages of history can one find a greater champion of justice. Return with us now to those thrilling days of yesteryear. From out of the past come the thundering hoofbeats of a fiery horse with the speed of light, a cloud of dust, and a hearty "Hi-Ho, Silver!", The Lone Ranger rides again! (cue: "cavalry charge" finale of Rossini's William Tell Overture)

-- opening of The Lone Ranger television series, 1949-1957

It can't be denied: the reason I grew up to become a pinko libtard pantywaist and socialist fuck-knuckle can be laid at the door of television. Everything I know about truth, justice and fair play I learned from The Lone Ranger.

That and the importance of having your horse dry-cleaned on a regular basis.

Continues beneath the Boehner Orange® tumbleweed of saddle-sore rectitude

Perhaps I'm exaggerating a little but The Lone Ranger, the first television show that I'm aware of seeing and the seed of my life-long love of Westerns, was my introduction to a clearly moral universe.

I've been reminded of the seminal role The Lone Ranger played in my personal evolution by recent news of a new Lone Ranger film; produced by Jerry Bruckheimer, it stars Armie Hammer as The Lone Ranger and Johnny Depp, wearing a stuffed crow on his head, as Tonto (making explicit the hitherto unremarked connection between taxidermy and vigilante justice). I can't pretend that I'm expecting great things from the film.

I guess I must have been 5 or 6 when the masked rider of the plains (played by Clayton Moore) and his second-banana Tonto (played by the incomparably wooden Jay Silverheels) first rode into my life.

Everything about The Lone Ranger enchanted me, from the stirring introduction (until the day I die, the finale of The William Tell Overture will mean only one thing to me: the thunder of hooves and a masked man in a white hat) to the show’s unvarying ending (“...who was that masked man?...cain’t say but he left this here silver bullet..."). The show utterly absorbed me.

Watching it now one can only laugh. Clearly meant to represent our view of ourselves in the 1950’s--just, egalitarian and heroic--it (presumably) unwittingly nods approval to a subtle (-ish) racist, misogynistic and imperialist agenda. More obviously, the whole premise was laughable.

Week after week, the show followed a formula as rigid and preordained as a Japanese Noh play.

Every episode would open at The Lone Ranger’s campsite. The LR, who presumably subscribed to some sort of wire-service for heroes, would inform Tonto that nefarious doings were afoot in Putzville but his information was vague. In every episode, The LR would instruct Tonto (which means ‘fool’ in Spanish) to:“...ride into town and see what you can find out.”

Whereupon Tonto would gallop into Putzville or Scum City and take up position outside the saloon. Standing immobile and expressionless, he would await developments. They were never long in coming.

Within minutes, the villains would congregate roughly 2 feet from Tonto’s flapping ears and outline their dastardly scheme.

Now, given that they were surrounded by millions of square miles of empty Old West where a man could, if he chose, recite the complete works of Edgar Allen Poe at the top of his lungs without being heard, the choice of venue seemed odd. But it never varied.

 When the bad guys decided to huddle, nobody ever suggested riding out into the sagebrush for the confab: oh, no. Evidently, someone said “...let’s stand next to that Injun outside the saloon and be really indiscreet.” Maybe they thought Tonto was a wooden cigar-store Indian...an excusable mistake.

Having absorbed the intel, Tonto would ride back to the campsite where The LR was waiting for his horse to come back from the local Dryclean Depot.

Seriously, Silver was so eye-wateringly white that dry-cleaning was the only explanation. Ditto The LR’s outfits.

By all accounts, the Old West was a dirty, dusty place and sartorial splendor was not a priority but The LR always looked like he’d just had a shave, haircut and manicure and his clothes were just back from the cleaners. Even as fastidious an old maid as Henry James would have been happy to bunk with him. It was a long way from Al Swearingen's Deadwood.

Tonto would bring The LR up to speed, employing the standard 'injun-speak' of 1950’s Hollywood: “ Keemo-Sahbee, bad men drinkum fire-water, talk bad medicine with forked tongue, they go rob great iron horse...” etc. etc. (apparently, Johnny Depp employs the same frankly offensive gibberish in the new film...plus ça change...).

Having taken in this double-talk, The LR would, for no logical reason, slip into disguise.

According to wikipedia:

"...he (The LR) was a master of disguise. At times, he would infiltrate an area using the identity of "Old Prospector", an old-time miner with a full beard, so that he can go places where a young masked man would never fit in, usually to gather intelligence about criminal activities."
Where '...a young masked man would never fit in...'? As opposed to where? The Venice Carnevale?

In point of fact, the Old Prospector disguise is the only one I ever remember seeing but no matter. As to gathering intelligence...well, he pretty much knew what there was to know already. I'm guessing that it was just a chance for The LR to demonstrate his versatility and to put a gloss on the McCarthy-era penchant for spying on people.

After various tiresome machinations and stratagems, the villains would be thwarted, order would be restored and The Lone Ranger and Tonto would ride off into the sunset, leaving people scratching their heads before heading to the local pawnshop with the silver bullet.

The Lone Ranger was absurd, inept and laughable; badly written, badly acted and badly directed.

The premise was risible. A masked man who roams the Old West doing good and leaving behind silver bullets? How and by whom was this being funded? Silver bullets cost money, you know, and his dry-cleaning bill must have been startling.

Why the mask? Nobody knew who the hell he was anyway.

And why did Tonto, a genuine Native American seem so implausible an Injun and so much more plausible as a guitarist for Buffalo Springfield? I have no answers.

But I still regard The Lone Ranger with great affection. He taught me that it’s the duty of the strong to defend the weak, that evil must be fought, that there are better reasons than money for our actions.

He stood for loyalty, justice, honesty, bravery and selflessness...and the value of efficient dry-cleaning.

He set my feet on the path to being the deluded, Kenyan/Muslim/Socialist-loving, Obama-supporting douchenozzle 47%-er that I am today...and that can’t be a bad thing...can it?

Hi-Ho Silver... Away! (to de-Romnify America at nearest voting booth...)

Originally posted to Retroactive Genius on Sun Sep 30, 2012 at 11:36 AM PDT.

Also republished by Community Spotlight.

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Comment Preferences

  •  To answer your question... (12+ / 0-)
    And why did Tonto, a genuine Native American seem so implausible an Injun and so much more plausible as a guitarist for Buffalo Springfield?
    Because he was a Young man in a Furay?

    Let us all have the strength to see the humanity in our enemies, and the courage to let them see the humanity in ourselves.

    by Nowhere Man on Sun Sep 30, 2012 at 12:04:42 PM PDT

  •  Ever see "Thank You Mask Man" (9+ / 0-)

    Lenny Bruce's take on The Lone Ranger?

    Free: The Authoritarians - all about those who follow strong leaders.

    by kbman on Sun Sep 30, 2012 at 12:28:35 PM PDT

    •  Thanks for that (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      kbman, Aunt Pat, Blueiz, old wobbly

      I know the routine but I hadn't seen that. It's funny; I had never even heard of Bruce until I was 16 and a friend's older brother, a jazz drummer and student at the Berkley school in Boston, lent me an LP he had. The same guy introduced me to Lord Buckley:

      Lightly Seared On The Reality Grill

      by Retroactive Genius on Sun Sep 30, 2012 at 12:41:24 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  My favorite "Lone Ranger" story. (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      kbman, KenBee

      On his last show before the Xmas break every year for the past 15 or more, one of David Letterman's guests has been comedian and DJ Jay Thomas.  And every year, he is REQUIRED to tell the same story.

      It's the early 70's, and he's working as a DJ, doing a live gig at the opening of a car dealership, and Clayton Moore is there, in full Lone Ranger getup (apparently, Moore NEVER did appearances any other way!).

      They're wrapping things up, but Moore's limo is late, so Thomas and his producer offer Clay a ride.  He gets in the back seat, still "in uniform".  On the way, they have a bit of a fender-bender ... some guy runs a stop sign & hits them.  No one is hurt, but things get kinda nasty between the two "dirty hippies" from the radio station and the belligerent construction worker who was driving the other car as they are exchanging their information.

      Eventually, the producer says "Listen man - just cool out, or we'll have to call the cops."

      The other guy says "Oh yeah?  Well, who do you think they're gonna believe - you two hippies, or ME?"

      And the back door of the car opens ... and out steps Lone Freakin' Ranger, who says to the other driver "I think they'll believe ME, citizen!"

      Needless to say, the episode ended without further incident.  I've  heard this story often enough that I can recite it right along with Jay Thomas as he tells it every year, but it STILL cracks me up!

      OF COURSE the New Right is wrong - but that doesn't make WRONG the new RIGHT!

      by mstaggerlee on Mon Oct 01, 2012 at 12:31:27 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  and then there's this (11+ / 0-)

    If you recommend a book, and provide an Amazon link, you are never, ever allowed to bitch about book stores closing up.

    by SeattleTammy on Sun Sep 30, 2012 at 12:50:58 PM PDT

    •  Does anyone remember a.... (6+ / 0-)

      ...cartoon in the mid sixties called "Roger Ramjet?"

      Roget got his his super powers by popping a pill.

      As an impressionable youth of 12 or 13, I assumed popping pills was a good thing.

      I want to sue the production company for showing this on TV. My life-long struggle with pills is all their fault. (I never HAVE found the one he used. But there were some others that made me FEEL like I had super powers...)

      Like my friend's daughter says, "Bad decisions make good stories."

      "Wealthy the Spirit which knows its own flight. Stealthy the Hunter who slays his own fright. Blessed is the Traveler who journeys the length of the Light."

      by CanisMaximus on Sun Sep 30, 2012 at 06:19:56 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  i do indeed. (6+ / 0-)
        Does anyone remember a cartoon in the mid sixties called "Roger Ramjet?"
        i seem to recall watching it a few times, thinking it was kind of idiotic, and going and watching (do NOT laugh at this!) The Galloping Gourmet,  and Dark Shadows, which said mr. depp recently made into a movie. the problem with Dark Shadows is it kept bouncing back and forth between different time periods, making it at times difficult to keep track of. but my older brother and i were huge dracula fans (the bram stoker version), and barnabus collins was actually kind of close.

        don't ask why a 12 year-old boy would be watching The Galloping Gourmet, except i actually did (and do) like to cook, so i thought it was a cool show.

        •  Hey...I loved The Galloping Gourmet, too (5+ / 0-)

          There was just something about the way he seemed to be enjoying himself and always poked gentle fun at himself. Graham Kerr (I haven't checked but I think that was his name) was just fun to watch.

          Lightly Seared On The Reality Grill

          by Retroactive Genius on Mon Oct 01, 2012 at 12:20:54 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  That's right (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            GreenMother, CanisMaximus

            I watched it, too, it was on after school in Miami.  I watched Graham Kerr more than some girls watched the afternoon soaps.  Although, I think I got hooked on The Edge of Night, because it was on right after the Galloping Gourmet!

            Enjoyed your diary, RG - brought back lots of memories!!  I'm torn about whether or not to go see the movie.  I would hope that Depp would upgrade Tonto beyond the stereotype from the '50's, but I guess we'll have to wait and see.  

            "Focusing your life solely on making a buck shows a certain poverty of ambition. It asks too little of yourself. Because it's only when you hitch your wagon to something larger than yourself that you realize your true potential." - Barack Obama

            by Ricochet67 on Mon Oct 01, 2012 at 03:48:07 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

          •  I nevere watched cooking shows (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            CanisMaximus

            as a kid. For my siblings and I, it was always re-runs of "Star Trek" after school.

            As of right now, I loathe all anti-choice politicians with an intensity greater than the radiation output of a thousand suns. 3.13.12

            by GenuineRisk on Mon Oct 01, 2012 at 12:32:50 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

      •  Ah, and the theme song too (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        BlackSheep1, CanisMaximus

        Roger Ramjet and his eagles, fighting for this nation.
        For his adventures just be sure to tune in to this station.

        Maybe it is retro-sophisticate of me but I believe that we were supposed to be aware, much like Rockie and Bullwinkle, that he was a mocking send-off on the adult sensibilities of the time.

        I believe I watched it in the mid-60s when it originally ran but my memories of it are probably from re-runs during the early 70s.

        "You know, just because the thing I saw wasn't there doesn't mean there wasn't something there that I didn't see." Ann Althouse, Conservative Thoughtmeister

        by Bill Section 147 on Mon Oct 01, 2012 at 10:34:48 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  ... (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        CanisMaximus

        Yes, his "Proton Energy Pill". Which is either "PEP", or (physically, proton = H+) acid, which has always amused me.

        The show was dippy enough, but Roger Ramjet tripping might make it more interesting.

    •  I thought the show always ended with ... (0+ / 0-)

      ... "We never had the chance to thank him."?

      OF COURSE the New Right is wrong - but that doesn't make WRONG the new RIGHT!

      by mstaggerlee on Mon Oct 01, 2012 at 12:00:28 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Silver bullets (14+ / 0-)

    The Lone Ranger and his late brother owned a silver mine, so cost was no problem, and the Lone Ranger's friend molded the silver into bullets on the stove.  See, easy peasy, and you had to go and question it.  Here's the cool part about those bullets:

    Friend: Silver bullets?! Doesn't lead kill good enough?
    Lone Ranger: I told you, I don't shoot to kill. I want a silver bullet to be a symbol of justice.
    In those days, except for the racism, it seems TV was as clean and tidy as the Lone Ranger's clothes.
    •  the silver bullets thing (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      dwayne, ChemBob, GreenMother, texasmom

      was explained in the first episode, i believe, as well as how he got into the "masked western hero" business to begin with. i believe it had to do with (kind of like batman, actually), friends or relatives having been injured or killed during the course of a robbery of some sort. the silver mine was also the source of his income, making him independently wealthy (ala bruce wayne), and able to afford the dry cleaning bills for both his clothes and his horse. i believe tonto was an indian he saved from being killed by a bunch of bad guys, who decided to hook up with this crazy white guy, who seemed to have a lot of money, or something to that effect.

      hey, you never know when you might end up at the venice Carnevale, so it's good to have a mask handy!

    •  Chick flick fan here (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      ChemBob, GreenMother, skyounkin, KenBee

      The Lone Ranger made me a pacifist before he made me a liberal. He always shot the gun out of the bad guy's hand,  captured him, and sent him to jail. He never killed anybody.

      To this day I won't go to a movie where somebody gets shot.

      No, Mr. Ryan, Mitt was not "obviously inarticulate." He made it perfectly clear he believes 47% of the electorate is a bunch of leeches.

      by ebrann on Mon Oct 01, 2012 at 12:44:42 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  You can see it for yourselves online (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      BlackSheep1, KenBee

      The first episodes of The Lone Ranger seem to be in the public domain.  Thirteen episodes from the first season are available on hulu and some episodes are also available elsewhere. The first 3 episodes contain the ambush of Texas Rangers in which TLR's brother and others died (leaving TLR the "Lone" survivor), the arrival of Tonto, the acquisition of the horse Silver, the silver bullets, the mask, and TLR's decision to carry on a fight for justice.  Years after the original broadcasts, the first two or three episodes were combined as a TV special that made a big impression.

  •  diction (9+ / 0-)

    Something I appreciated about the Lone Ranger was his diction as well as his excellent English grammar--a rarity among westerns and, indeed, "pop culture."

  •  Fantastic diary, you made my day "libtard" n/t (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Aunt Pat, GreenMother, BlackSheep1, KenBee
  •  Thanks for the memories :) (11+ / 0-)

    Now I hear "Out of the blue of the Western sky comes.... Sky King!" Must have been on near the same time, which I think was Saturday morning.

    The one episode that I never saw of TLR is the story of how he became TLR. My grandfather - Dad's Dad - was visiting, and as a result (not wanting to be disapproved of) Mom insisted we come to the table for lunch instead of watching TV, and it was right when the episode was starting. Note that I still remember the frustration of this moment, which clearly was more than half a century ago...

    We didn't have Youtube back then, as I recall ;) Perhaps I should go look that up.

    We all understand that freedom isn't free. What Romney and Ryan don't understand is that neither is opportunity. We have to invest in it.
    Julian Castro, DNC 4 Sept 2012

    by pixxer on Sun Sep 30, 2012 at 04:04:00 PM PDT

    •  despite growing up on the lone ranger (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Aunt Pat, pixxer, texasmom, KenBee

      i've never seen one episode of sky king. or maybe i've just forgotten. it must have not been very impactful to me. (where i live we have a small airport called sky king, tho.)

    •  I remember Sky King (9+ / 0-)

      And what I remember about it was that the only female cast member would sit in the back  of the airplane and ask endless, often obvious, questions of the pilot, the star of the show, which he patiently answered.  She never had any ideas, opinions or analysis of her own.  I was offended at that!  It was my first glimmer of feminism.

      •  I think she was his daughter, though (4+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Heart n Mind, ChemBob, texasmom, KenBee

        so there was some logic to the relationship. I don't remember anything else about the show except he flew a plane!

        We all understand that freedom isn't free. What Romney and Ryan don't understand is that neither is opportunity. We have to invest in it.
        Julian Castro, DNC 4 Sept 2012

        by pixxer on Sun Sep 30, 2012 at 09:01:19 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  She was his niece. (7+ / 0-)

          Her name was Penny.  

          I only remember seeing it as reruns.  My dad would watch it with me and critique the piloting of the plane (dad was a pilot and flight engineer and we had a Cessna that we owned with a group of pilot friends) :)

          "Focusing your life solely on making a buck shows a certain poverty of ambition. It asks too little of yourself. Because it's only when you hitch your wagon to something larger than yourself that you realize your true potential." - Barack Obama

          by Ricochet67 on Mon Oct 01, 2012 at 03:53:52 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

    •  geez, i remember sky king too. (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      pixxer, ChemBob, texasmom, KenBee

      came on saturday morning, with the cartoons. guy flew a twin engine, prop plane (i'm guessing it was a cessna), at least i think so, i may be thinking of another show. in either event, i was never real clear on exactly what the hell he was doing bopping all over the place in that plane. obviously, i was too young.

      •  It was a Cessna 310 (4+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        pixxer, texasmom, BlackSheep1, KenBee

        I wasn't born until 1957, but they reran it on Saturday mornings when I was a little kid in kindergarten - watched it with my dad.  

        We had a Cessna, but I don't remember what model it was.  I just remember the call letters ended in 50Tango :)  We had a share in it with a group of dad's airline friends.  Dad was teaching me to fly (and land) - we did touch & go's at Opa Locka Airport when I was in middle school.  Never got to finish my lessons, one of the other guys had an accident in it one day (didn't clear the fence at the end of the runway and ripped the landing gear off).  Dad decided to sell his share in it.  

        I loved that little plane - a high wing Cessna is fun to fly and you can really see everything when you take people up, because the wings aren't in your sight line when you fly over their houses so they can see their family waving out in the back yard :)

        "Focusing your life solely on making a buck shows a certain poverty of ambition. It asks too little of yourself. Because it's only when you hitch your wagon to something larger than yourself that you realize your true potential." - Barack Obama

        by Ricochet67 on Mon Oct 01, 2012 at 03:59:35 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  I watched Sky King in the early 60's, (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        BlackSheep1, KenBee

        mostly because it ran right before my favorite, Sgt Preston of the Yukon.   I loved watching that Mountie and his splendid dog Rex.  Besides, it had horses and everything was snow- covered, while I was sweating in Texas with a swamp cooler.

        The truth always matters.

        by texasmom on Mon Oct 01, 2012 at 08:11:26 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  the Lone Ranger, Rin Tin Tin, (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      BlackSheep1, KenBee

      Lassie, Superman, and Roy Rogers, taught me a lot about moral behavior, loyalty, fair play, justice-------but I identified with Annie Oakley....had a complete outfit with cowgirl skirt and blouse and six shooter......I had a black and white TV and since she was dark haired....I could pretend that she was really a light skinned black girl.....and I could relate.......:)

      "Fear is the Mind Killer"--Frank Herbert

      by vmm918 on Mon Oct 01, 2012 at 07:37:22 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Jerry Bruckheimer (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Aunt Pat, blueoasis, ichibon, dwayne
    Bruckheimer is one of the few cinema personalities who supported President George W. Bush outspokenly.  He donated funds to John McCain's 2008 presidential election campaign. In 2007 it was reported that he donated 29% of his $20,700 in political contributions to Republican candidates.  He gave $5,000 to a joint fundraising committee on John McCain’s behalf.  Bruckheimer has donated more than $50,000 to Republican campaigns and committees. Bruckheimer has donated to the 2012 Mitt Romney Victory Fund - $25,000.
    Gonna have to say a big NO to any film by this jackass.

    "I'm sorry, I have no pithy, insightful, enlightening quote for my signature." --- Me

    by liberalagogo on Sun Sep 30, 2012 at 04:10:35 PM PDT

    •  The turning point seems to be 2002 (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Aunt Pat, dwayne

      Before then, he'd contributed to only two Republicans, both pretty moderate - Susan Collins (ME) and John Danforth (R).  He gave $500 to John Kerry in both the primary and the general elections and also contributed to the campaigns of Max Cleland (GA), Dianne Feinstein (CA), Tim Wirth (CO), Mel Levine (CA0, Robert Mrazek (NY), Bill Bradley (NJ - twice), Michael Dukakis (presidential primary), Bob Graham (FL), Alan Cranston (presidential primary).  He also contributed to Voters for Choice/Friends of Family Planning.

      Then, in 2002, he starts leaning the other way with $2,000 to the President's Dinner Committee and just keeps going, contributing a bit to Bush in the primary in 2004 and loads to McCain in 2008. He supported Collins again that year and no Democrats.  

      In later years, it's all GOP, except in 2009, he gave Democrat Jack Conway $1,000 for the Senate primary in Kentucky.

      Details

      Was he a 9/11 convert, perhaps?  

      "Injustice wears ever the same harsh face wherever it shows itself." - Ralph Ellison

      by KateCrashes on Sun Sep 30, 2012 at 04:30:43 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Probably (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Aunt Pat, ichibon, dwayne

        when  he started making money and  turned into a greedy bastard.  Or maybe it's just brain damage or, most likely, a pod in his basement.

        "I'm sorry, I have no pithy, insightful, enlightening quote for my signature." --- Me

        by liberalagogo on Sun Sep 30, 2012 at 04:42:22 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  9/11/01 ... (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        BlackSheep1

        Made some people, but especially some white men of a certain age, totally freaking batshit crazy.

        While I think a lot of Republicans are just greedy, I did see a shift in many that all of a sudden their entire view of politics shifted to fear and revenge.

        www.stacysmusings.wordpress.com

        by Magenta on Sun Sep 30, 2012 at 07:29:33 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  bruckheimer's a jack ass, but the LR is 4evah (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      BlackSheep1

      No System of Justice Can Rise Above the Ethics of Those Who Administer It. (Wickersham Commission 1929)

      by No Exit on Sun Sep 30, 2012 at 07:27:26 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Those 0.5%'ers sure are cheap sonsabitches. (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      KenBee

      JB is like a multi-billionaire, makes more in one year than Mittsies (published) net worth, and all he coughs up for his Repuke heroes in a given year is pocket lint like $20,700?

      "Double, double, toile and trouble; Fire burne, and Cauldron bubble... By the pricking of my Thumbes, Something wicked this way comes": Republicans Willkommen auf das Vierte Reich! Sie Angelegenheit nicht mehr.

      by Bluefin on Mon Oct 01, 2012 at 09:56:08 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  we Indians didn't see it that way (9+ / 0-)

    Just like blacks weren't very fond of "Stepin-fetchit" character. I won't bother to explain further but I will mention we also don't care for your use of the word "Injun" when you mean Indian.

    America could have chosen to be the worlds doctor, or grocer. We choose instead to be her policeman. pity

    by cacamp on Sun Sep 30, 2012 at 04:11:43 PM PDT

    •  Seconded- "injun" and "libtard" (5+ / 0-)

      in the same diary- and this is in the community spotlight?

      •  The bad guys (8+ / 0-)

        always called Tonto "Injun" - which told us impressionable kids it wasn't a good word.

        Interestingly, Jay Silverheels was one of the few Indians who actually played an Indian on TV. Most others of the era were white guys with makeup. (Ed Ames, to name one.) Jay was a much better actor than the part allowed, but he was memorable in the role.

        No, Mr. Ryan, Mitt was not "obviously inarticulate." He made it perfectly clear he believes 47% of the electorate is a bunch of leeches.

        by ebrann on Mon Oct 01, 2012 at 12:36:22 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  We loved Tonto as kids and when the (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          GreenMother, wildweasels, BlackSheep1

          bad guys called him "injun" it helped us to question our parents who always referred to Indians as "injuns."

          In that respect the show was subversive in that it helped the younger generation to question the backward views of their parents. At least in our family.

          We were huge LR fans as little kids. Perhaps that's when we first began to question their hateful attitudes. And my questioning of them only got worse the older I got.

          WE NEVER FORGET Our Labor Martyrs: a project to honor the men, women and children who lost their lives in Freedom's Cause. For Sept: Viola Liuzzo Voting Rights Martyr

          by JayRaye on Mon Oct 01, 2012 at 06:39:19 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  There is nothing more dangerous that innocent (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            JayRaye, BlackSheep1

            children questioning bad social constructs.

            The adults then have to choose, what they will teach that child. Will they lie and make it like it's a good or acceptable behavior? Or will they blush for decency's sake and explain the painful truth?

            •  THAN! not that--fat fingers! (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              JayRaye
            •  sadly, our parents doubled down (6+ / 0-)

              which only made me more of a rebel.

              I realize that the LR show can be given very mixed reviews, but the emotional connection to the Lone Ranger and Tonto is still strong to this day. And still love the two horses as well. And the way they both rode those horses! Total athletes!

              Just having an Indian for his best friend, made the Lone Ranger practically a radical back in the day, even tho the relationship was not exactly equal.

              Tonto was never weak, he was great on horse back, could handle weapons, & fight when he had to.  And he always showed courage no matter how many attackers.

              WE NEVER FORGET Our Labor Martyrs: a project to honor the men, women and children who lost their lives in Freedom's Cause. For Sept: Viola Liuzzo Voting Rights Martyr

              by JayRaye on Mon Oct 01, 2012 at 07:38:55 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

        •  Michael Ansara played at least one (0+ / 0-)

          Comanche, two Sioux, and about a dozen other "Indians."
          I remember him as a Klingon, but he also turned up on Babylon 5 as a techno-mage.

          LBJ, Lady Bird, Anne Richards, Barbara Jordan, Sully Sullenberger, Ike, Drew Brees, Molly Ivins --Texas is no Bush league! -7.50,-5.59

          by BlackSheep1 on Mon Oct 01, 2012 at 02:32:59 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

  •  Libtard Pantywaist (6+ / 0-)

    Okay, when I read the title, I thought - Good God, let's not do the conservative's work for 'em by calling ourselves - Libtard Pantywaists!!  But you redeemed yourself in the writing; and it was worth the read.  I'm still smiling & I was outright laughing; good satire!  I am old enough to remember "the LR", so I know of what you speak.

    And Hi-ho Silver, to the voting booth to stop the "Romney-fication" of our land - you betcha!!  Thanks for the fun.

  •  hey, I LIKED Jay Silverheels. (11+ / 0-)

    In my memory, he had dignity.  Everybody else seemed a buffoon or a putz, including the LR.

    •  Tonto was my second crush. (8+ / 0-)

      Jonny Quest was first, though.

      I've been a Lone Ranger fan for years, and actually own many of the books from the early days of the radio series.  And the silver bullets -- a reminder never to take a human life -- were Tonto's idea.  So was the mask.

      •  Jonny quest had his Indian friend (0+ / 0-)

        Hajib or sum sh!t

        No System of Justice Can Rise Above the Ethics of Those Who Administer It. (Wickersham Commission 1929)

        by No Exit on Sun Sep 30, 2012 at 07:29:17 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Hadji was his name (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          skyounkin, BlackSheep1

          but he was from India and not a Native American Indian.  Always thought it was stupid that Native Americans were called Indians just because Columbus was apparently a lousy navigator and thought he'd already gotten all the way around the world to India when he landed on our shores... :)

          Cartoons were full of cringe worthy racist stereotypes in the 50's and 60's, although at least Hadji was apparently pretty equal to Jonny and wasn't talked down to.  

          I always thought there was more to Tonto than we saw on the LR - but like Negros of the time, Native Americans were treated as second or third class citizens in movies and on TV.  I think Dances with Wolves did a lot to correct those perceptions, ridiculous that it took until the 1980's....

          "Focusing your life solely on making a buck shows a certain poverty of ambition. It asks too little of yourself. Because it's only when you hitch your wagon to something larger than yourself that you realize your true potential." - Barack Obama

          by Ricochet67 on Mon Oct 01, 2012 at 04:09:42 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  An old girlfriend used to say she was Indian (0+ / 0-)

            With a dot.  Not a feather.  Lol.

            The history of racist Stereotyped sidekicks to the noble white man is strong in this country.

            No System of Justice Can Rise Above the Ethics of Those Who Administer It. (Wickersham Commission 1929)

            by No Exit on Mon Oct 01, 2012 at 09:48:24 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

  •  So many decent heroes back then for kids (7+ / 0-)

    I liked have gun will travel
    Btw, many episodes written by gene Roddenberry

  •  I thought you were going Firesign Theatre (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Nowhere Man, Aunt Pat, alicia, KenBee

    Head them off at the past was from "We're All Bozo's on this Bus".  But here is some current comedy instead from Rocky Mountain Mike, I'm a Moooocher

    Really don't mind if you sit this one out. My words but a whisper -- your deafness a SHOUT. I may make you feel but I can't make you think..Jethro Tull

    by RMForbes on Sun Sep 30, 2012 at 04:54:20 PM PDT

  •  You know you're an intellectual if... (13+ / 0-)

    You can listen to the William Tell Overture and not think of The Lone Ranger. I heard that somewhere, and I have never passed that test.

    No one in this world has ever lost money by underestimating the intelligence of the great masses of the plain people. H. L. Mencken

    by jim0121 on Sun Sep 30, 2012 at 05:11:01 PM PDT

  •  The Lone Ranger was my hero in kindergarden :-) (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Aunt Pat, blueoasis, ChemBob, BlackSheep1

    thanks for the memories!

  •  I loved, loved, loved The Lone Ranger, at about 4 (5+ / 0-)

    and went from that to rushing up to the TV screen to kiss Rory when "The Texan" came on--Clint Eastwood, Clint Eastwood, how thou has fallen.  

    In a dark time, the eye begins to see. Theodore Roethke

    by bibble on Sun Sep 30, 2012 at 05:22:06 PM PDT

  •  Interesting factoid tidbit: (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    blueoasis, texasmom

    Johnny Depp was adopted by members of two different Native American tribes (Comanche and Navajo, iirc) while he filming here in New Mexico :)

  •  The nicknames (3+ / 0-)

    "Tonto" and "Kimosabe" were both insults.

    "Tonto" is somewhat fractured Spanish for "idiot," or "dummy."

    "Kimosabe" is slurred Spanish -- "Quien no sabe" -- He who knows nothing.

    So Tonto and the Lone Ranger go around calling each other "idiot" and "know nothing" all day...

    Some of the episodes have come out on "classic collections" type DVDs, but the one we have had only HALF the 2-part origin and then a couple of random episodes out of sequence, spanning over a decade.  Rather disappointing.

    The TV show, like all TV and movies, works with the credulity of the audience.  The Lone Ranger gets Silver by rescuing the stallion (wild, mind you) from being gored (yes, you read that right) by a bison.  Now, why two herbivores would even bother with each other, let alone what a bison was doing all by its lonesome in Western Texas is beyond me, but the audience didn't know any better, so there you have it.  

    Then he tames Silver (once recovered from being gored) by sheer human kindness and his profound knowledge and utter mastery of horses.  

    I think I need a glass of water after all that...

    As for Johnny Depp, well, he hasn't played anything straight in his entire career, so he'll certainly be playing this for laughs, too.  I expect the movie to be a send up of the entire genre of squeaky clean mid-20th century westerns.

    "There isn't a way things should be. There's just what happens, and what we do." — Terry Pratchett (A Hat Full of Sky)

    by stormicats on Sun Sep 30, 2012 at 06:36:38 PM PDT

  •  Loved that show as a young kid... (3+ / 0-)

    Right and wrong.  Good guys win.  Anyone remember F Troop.  Our history with native Americans is disgusting, but what are you goin to do?  

    No System of Justice Can Rise Above the Ethics of Those Who Administer It. (Wickersham Commission 1929)

    by No Exit on Sun Sep 30, 2012 at 07:35:28 PM PDT

    •  I remember F-Troop (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      No Exit, BlackSheep1

      The great character actor Wilfred Hyde-White, who had appeared in loads of films in the 30s and 40s alongside people like Astaire and Rogers, was in it.

      Check out his filmography HERE. In F-Troop, he played the Indian 'witch doctor'. Kind of a sad, considering his career.

      Lightly Seared On The Reality Grill

      by Retroactive Genius on Mon Oct 01, 2012 at 12:14:17 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  I remember F Troop! (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      No Exit, BlackSheep1

      That was crazy - Ken Berry and um, Larry Storch?  And Forrest Tucker, wasn't it?  

      They were all idiots, if they'd been a real troop on the western plains they wouldn't have lasted through one battle with the Comanches or Sioux or whoever they were supposed to be plopped in the middle of (know it wasn't Cherokee or Seminole) - contrary to what most people thought as kids, all Indians are not the same.  A lot of them were damn good strategists and used their knowledge of the lands they lived on to advantage (i.e., the Seminoles & the Creek in Florida - it was stupid to try to force them to go off to a reservation).  

      We've done some crappy things to First Americans.  

      "Focusing your life solely on making a buck shows a certain poverty of ambition. It asks too little of yourself. Because it's only when you hitch your wagon to something larger than yourself that you realize your true potential." - Barack Obama

      by Ricochet67 on Mon Oct 01, 2012 at 12:11:55 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  I always loved Lyle Lovett's Scenario for Tonto (5+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    luckydog, skwimmer, texasmom, stlsophos, KenBee

    in "If I Had a Boat."

    "Tonto he was smarter, and one day said Kimosabe..Kiss my ass I bought a boat and I'm going out to sea..."

    Thanks for the delightful diary.

    Like all dreamers, I mistook disenchantment for truth. - Jean Paul Sartre

    by ApatheticNoMore1966 on Sun Sep 30, 2012 at 09:22:29 PM PDT

    •  To mix it up, James Arness, who played Marshall (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      KenBee

      Matt Dillon on "Gunsmoke" (which ran from like 1956-197x something) was an avid sailor and raced many regattas from CA to HI. He had a series of yachts named "Seasmoke", heh. Lyle probably mixed 'em up.

      "Double, double, toile and trouble; Fire burne, and Cauldron bubble... By the pricking of my Thumbes, Something wicked this way comes": Republicans Willkommen auf das Vierte Reich! Sie Angelegenheit nicht mehr.

      by Bluefin on Mon Oct 01, 2012 at 10:08:52 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Thank you all for the kind and generous remarks (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    GreenMother, BlackSheep1, KenBee

    I'm sorry a few of you were offended by my use of the words 'libtard' and 'injun'...the terms were used facetiously; we 'libtards' and ____(insert right-wing slur) are kicking ass.

    Thanks for the info on The LR's origins and the silver bullet stuff. The truth is, my memories of The LR are blurred by time and distance.

    I vaguely remember Sky King, whose crime-fighting activities were somewhat curtailed by the need to have everything happen near an airstrip.

    Other very early TV memories are Whirlybirds and Sea Hunt (with Lloyd Bridges). Anyone remember those?

    I also have faint memories of Roger Ramjet but he never made an impression...unlike the various characters on the wonderfully surreal Rocky and Bullwinkle Show: Boris and Natasha ('...Borrris, dollink...'); Mr. Peabody and his pet human Sherman; George of The Jungle and Dudley Doright of The Mounties (who was in love with his horse)...

    Lightly Seared On The Reality Grill

    by Retroactive Genius on Mon Oct 01, 2012 at 12:07:40 AM PDT

    •  I remember most of those ... and Mr. Peabody (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      GreenMother, BlackSheep1

      obviously had a huge impact on the 'tubes:  his WABAC time-travel machine survives:  http://archive.org/...

      We must drive the special interests out of politics.… There can be no effective control of corporations while their political activity remains. To put an end to it will neither be a short not an easy task, but it can be done. -- Teddy Roosevelt

      by NoMoJoe on Mon Oct 01, 2012 at 06:54:43 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  I don't think everyone was offended. (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Calamity Jean, BlackSheep1

      It is going to be difficult for some to accept, but it is okay to discuss such things and mock them. It's one way of dealing with the pain that those RW insults cause.

      I choose to look at it as a Rovian Scheme. Once again, these loosers are projecting all their faults onto us.

      How many of them actually served in the military as opposed to sticking a yellow magnetic sticker to their bumper?

      How many are brave enough to question authority, no matter who it is?

      How many are brave enough to break away from harmful social constructs and take a beating for standing up for something or someone good in this world?

      I am a woman, I wear panties. That doesn't make me weak. But their attempt to use the female-slurs lets me know that they are overcompensating for some lack.

      I am liberal in my thinking--because I am generous and compassionate. That also does not make me weak. Denying people access to opportunity though, shows their need to protect their "success" from people they perceive as more competent and more skilled.

    •  Sea Hunt & Mr. Peabody I remember (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      BlackSheep1

      Watched Sea Hunt a lot.  And Bonanza (my mom's favorite) and Gunsmoke (my dad's favorite).  

      I have a Mr. Peabody here on my desk - my son gave him to me, he was a prize at a veterinary conference :)  Nobody in my office knows who he is - they are all under 40!  

      Dudley Do-Right, I remember him and Nell and Snidely Whiplash - I frequently say "I feel like Snidely Whiplash" when we have our HOA meetings and people are going into foreclosure over their past due HOA fees.  Only one person has not said "who is Snidely Whiplash?"  

      You're making me feel old!  

      "Focusing your life solely on making a buck shows a certain poverty of ambition. It asks too little of yourself. Because it's only when you hitch your wagon to something larger than yourself that you realize your true potential." - Barack Obama

      by Ricochet67 on Mon Oct 01, 2012 at 12:18:23 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  So, Lone Ranger, Ripcord, Sea Hunt, (0+ / 0-)

      Sky King, Rin Tin Tin, Annie Oakley, Lassie ...

      and now we've got "Survivor," "Big Brother," "The Real Housewives of Orange County," and literal boatloads of other amoral sleaze ... but it's all in color and it's all "real."

      NOT all progress IS forward.

      LBJ, Lady Bird, Anne Richards, Barbara Jordan, Sully Sullenberger, Ike, Drew Brees, Molly Ivins --Texas is no Bush league! -7.50,-5.59

      by BlackSheep1 on Mon Oct 01, 2012 at 02:39:12 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Memories (0+ / 0-)

      Thanks for remembering things that might have escaped the minds of young viewers - the hackneyed scripts, the unlikely scenarios, the improbable bright white clothes - and for pointing out the impact of the abiding moral lessons. Maybe it was the simplicity of the scripts and the symbolism of purity that made the morals resonate. This was a very evocative diary.

  •  I wrote (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    GreenMother, BlackSheep1

    a comment a few days ago about how I was planning a diary on the media culture I liked that I believed led me to 'libtardism'. Lone Ranger, Zorro, Gene Autry, Batman (and Im only 29 now, but I loved watching the old stuff as a kid). Always the heroes fighting the establishmen, the damnsel in distress or the lonely rancher who's land was under siege from railroad barons or cattle rustlers.

    It gave me a sense of right and wrong in ways that cartoons could not. Not trying to sound like my grandfather or anything, but we could use more stuff like this.

    Reading Rainbow, mr Rogers and Bob Ross were all favorites as well. Id of prety much done anything in the world do avoid missing Captain Kangaroo or Lamb Chop.

    And even as I got older it was X-Men (fighting for equality), Captain Planet, Spiderman the list goes on and on.

    Ive always found it homorous how 'conservative' Chuck Norris is when his fame is derived from a television show where he is always going after the same oil barons, racists, etcetc.

    •  Also (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      GreenMother, BlackSheep1

      later shows like A-Team and stuff of course where gun heavy but were fun. But i always like McGyver's refusal to use guns.

    •  FWIW: Chuck Norris' conservatism (0+ / 0-)

      is a late-in-life development, mostly. He's famous for it now; but it seems to have followed his mid-90s second marriage.

      One of the principal writers on WTR was one of the Kids From CAPER -- Doc.

      It's the writers / producers who set the tone of a show. We were lucky to have some very non-stereotypical Texans doing WTR -- in fact that's where the creator of Babylon 5 got his start.

      LBJ, Lady Bird, Anne Richards, Barbara Jordan, Sully Sullenberger, Ike, Drew Brees, Molly Ivins --Texas is no Bush league! -7.50,-5.59

      by BlackSheep1 on Mon Oct 01, 2012 at 02:42:09 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  And No Horse Poop! (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    GreenMother, BlackSheep1, KenBee

    Not just the Lone Ranger, ALL the westerns. Never, I mean never did I see a single instance of horse poop.

    And let me tell you, as someone with a wife who has two horses, they generate lots of poop!

    •  My grandma had a horsedrawn iceman stop by (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      BlackSheep1, KenBee

      to deliver blocks of ice in town for her genuine icebox a couple of times a week right on into the 1950's (talk about some buggywhip obsolecence).
      I still remember watching, and feeding some carrots to, that old hoss. And that trusty old steed would usually leave behind some nice road apples to fertilize the garden...

      "Double, double, toile and trouble; Fire burne, and Cauldron bubble... By the pricking of my Thumbes, Something wicked this way comes": Republicans Willkommen auf das Vierte Reich! Sie Angelegenheit nicht mehr.

      by Bluefin on Mon Oct 01, 2012 at 10:23:20 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  I loved the Lone Ranger too, And the old Batman! (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    wildweasels, BlackSheep1

    I watched those, and Gene Autry, and the original Star Trek every chance I got as a kid. They all had those egalitarian themes.

    But then so did Wonderwoman, and Little House on the Prairie, Buck Rogers, Bonanza, MASH, and Gunsmoke.

    The closest I have seen to something satisfying that mindset perpetuated by the 70s Westerns would have been Firefly and Serenity.

    The West wasn't really like that. It was dirty, and full of hard scrabble times. But I think in our attempt to experience the reality, we have lost the better part of story telling. The fantasy of it was better, because it brings out better qualities.

    As far as the stereotype of Tonto, the reason he could hang out in front of a store or saloon and listen in with no one caring was because he was a Native. He was a non person in their world like a child or an old woman. So people don't mind their words in front of such beings, because they have no credibility in the "white" world. So believe it or not that part was plausible.

    What strikes out at me, that Tonto means Fool. I know that in this modern culture, a Fool is seen as a buffoon. But in reality, the word's older meaning hinted at someone far more dangerous and interesting--thinking in terms of the word Jester and it's association with the hellequin. Doubtless this is my own interpretation, but I like it! Johny Depp, I suspect will take it in a similar direction.

    LR was very raw. But it had good qualities that can be used to good effect.  It just needs to be refined for today's audience.

    I remember having my own LR cap guns and the Silver horse with the detachable saddle and tack. LR was one of the few Cowboys I liked from the movies/TV, because he wasn't ignorant and mean.  I remember distinctly not liking most of the spaghetti Westerns at the drive ins at the time because they were so tense, and full of stress and angst and ignorance.

    As a child imagining who I would rather live next to: Tobacco-cud chewing asshole or nice guy that wears a mask and hangs out with his best Native Buddy?

    Hmmmmm. decisions decisions.

    Poor Jay Silverheels did get stuck playing a role that was the embodiment of the Noble Savage stereotype. I have a lot to say about that, but I am not sure I can do it safely without sticking my own boot down my neck.

    LR and other similar fare offered on the television, were really trips into the world of  imagined "Should Be" as in, these shows told us how things should be, as opposed to the realities of the times. They weren't perfect "should bes" because they reflected tons of cultural biases, but still, they weren't all bad either.

    They were weirdly, morality plays of our time. They gave us behaviors to aspire to. Everyone wanted to be the person wearing the White Hat. No one wanted to be the "bad example" that had to be defeated and therefore humiliated by the person in the White Hat.

  •  The Lone Ranger plus (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    GreenMother, JayRaye

    Hop-a-long Cassidy were my big TV shows as as child. I think  Hop-a-long's grandfatherly image had me mesmerized.

    "Sometimes I wonder whether the world is being run by smart people who are putting us on or by imbeciles who really mean it." - Mark Twain

    by phastphil40 on Mon Oct 01, 2012 at 07:02:46 AM PDT

  •  You overlooked a big hoot: every time wily (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    BlackSheep1, KenBee

    old Tonto says "Keemo-Sahbee"; what he was really  saying, in Spanish, was "Quien no sabe", significado "He who does not know (anything)" en el idioma Inglés.

    "Double, double, toile and trouble; Fire burne, and Cauldron bubble... By the pricking of my Thumbes, Something wicked this way comes": Republicans Willkommen auf das Vierte Reich! Sie Angelegenheit nicht mehr.

    by Bluefin on Mon Oct 01, 2012 at 09:34:02 AM PDT

  •  Johnny Depp?!! (0+ / 0-)

    Johnny Depp as Tonto?  Really?!!  They couldn't find one goddamn actual Native American for the role?

    Ultra fucking fail!

    "I'm not scared of anyone or anything, Angie. Isn't that the way life should be?" Jack Hawksmoor

    by skyounkin on Mon Oct 01, 2012 at 09:56:14 AM PDT

  •  The Ranger teaches responsibility to one another (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    BlackSheep1

    All the old superheroes, the people who helped the helpless against the forces of evil, were all doing the right thing: trying to help people.  Not because they wanted to, but because it was their responsibility, as it was everybody's.

    A modern conservative would say, "yah, well, if you want to put on a mask and battle evil, that's a personal choice; me, I'll just invest in Lockheed." But it wasn't just the Ranger's choice; it was his duty; it's everyone's, if we can.

    I actually wrote a Lone Ranger WW-II era knockoff for kids of all ages called "The Adventures of the Clean Plate Ranger." My Ranger is a bit on the husky side; he likes his food.  But fighting evil? It's his business -- and everybody's.  I even included WWII-era gov't posters that promoted shared sacrifice ("When you ride alone, you ride with HITLER! Join a car sharing club today!) Because we don't get a lot of that anymore.

    If you care to read it, it's up on my blog.  Child-tested on children of all ages.  Look for the Clean Plate Ranger box of links in the right-hand column.  It's on Amazon, too, but you can read it for free on my blog.

    Tales from the Coast Blog (Clean Plate Ranger)

    •  It's a bit rougher today & takes a team of 5 (0+ / 0-)

      to manage what TLR & Tonto did as one or two ... but check out Leverage, for a show about making things right and helping people.

      Sometimes in spite of what the lead characters want to do.

      LBJ, Lady Bird, Anne Richards, Barbara Jordan, Sully Sullenberger, Ike, Drew Brees, Molly Ivins --Texas is no Bush league! -7.50,-5.59

      by BlackSheep1 on Mon Oct 01, 2012 at 02:45:21 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  I've seen Leverage; Try Hustle (0+ / 0-)

        Leverage is good -- about former con men (and women) trying to do good.  Hustle -- especially the old episodes, a BBC series --  is better, extremely stylish, though its heroes are mainly out for themselves.  But they do both good and dp well and the same time.  And when they don't, sometimes the tables are turned on them.

        •  tried to get into Hustle cause a friend raves on i (0+ / 0-)

          t but it just didn't work for me (can't hack the street dialect, mainly; "Sherlock" is pretty thick the same way, but the stories kept me coming back).

          LBJ, Lady Bird, Anne Richards, Barbara Jordan, Sully Sullenberger, Ike, Drew Brees, Molly Ivins --Texas is no Bush league! -7.50,-5.59

          by BlackSheep1 on Mon Oct 01, 2012 at 03:38:11 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

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