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popular vote totals 2012 election

David Wasserman's ongoing popular vote tracker

Lucian Truscott posits that generals live up to, or down to, their wars.

Fastidiousness is never a good sign in a general officer. Though strutting military peacocks go back to Alexander’s time... Gen. David H. Petraeus has set the bar high. Never has so much beribboned finery decorated a general’s uniform since Al Haig passed through the sally ports of West Point on his way to the White House.

...

The genius of General Petraeus was to recognize early on that the war he had been sent to fight in Iraq wasn’t a real war at all. This is what the public and the news media — lamenting the fall of the brilliant hero undone by a tawdry affair — have failed to see. He wasn’t the military magician portrayed in the press; he was a self-constructed hologram, emitting an aura of preening heroism for the ever eager cameras.

Frank Bruni wonders if cyberspace makes it too easy for those with big heads to show off their, er,  little heads.
Like Tiger Woods and so many others before and after him, [Anthony] Weiner met up with what may go down as the greatest contradiction of contemporary life: how safe we feel at our touch pads and keyboards; how exposed and imperiled we really are.

That’s the contradiction that David Petraeus and Paula Broadwell are now coming to terms with, and the oxymoron brought to mind by the imprudent escapades of these two — along with the Tampa socialite with diplomatic "inviolability," the other general with too much time for e-mail and the F.B.I. agent who made a mannequin sandwich of himself — isn’t "military intelligence." It’s "electronic privacy."

Bruni repeats some of the old bromides about how much more thought people put into their missives when it meant stroking Ye Olde goose quill across a freshly-scraped goat hide, but he also scores a few hits.
Be honest: when’s the last time you tossed off a snide aside about a colleague or a secret about a friend in an e-mail whose retrieval would cause you not just embarrassment but actual trouble? A week ago? An hour ago?
Um, do tweets count?

Ross Douthat admits that Democrats won, that he doesn't like it, and that the Republicans are in trouble. Then spends a column saying that Democrats better learn to be more like Republicans.

Maureen Dowd is about two Sundays away from getting the George Will "I'm not ever going to bother to read this crap any more" treatment. Even when she has a kernel of something worth talking about, she insists on dressing it up in terms that wouldn't make a second rate episode of Gossip Girl.  Quite possibly the laziest writing on a major editorial page.

Karen Cox looks at the pitfalls of being a southern liberal–it's not much fun when even your friends are firing at you–and says the maps obscure the reality of the divide between left and right.

Many people have labeled my home state of North Carolina a red state, but it’s much more complicated than that. In the very rural mountain county of Avery, for example, Mr. Romney won with a whopping 74.5 percent of the vote, yet in Mecklenburg County, which includes Charlotte, he lost to Mr. Obama by nearly 23 percentage points. ...

Similarly, in Fulton County, Georgia, whose county seat is Atlanta, Mr. Obama bested Mr. Romney with about 64 percent of the vote but lost in the state’s mostly rural counties. If Charlotte or Atlanta were the size of New York City, then perhaps we wouldn’t tag either North Carolina or Georgia as red states.

Yes, Southern voters (especially white ones) cast their lot with Mr. Romney. So, too, did voters in a large section of Western states. What do they have in common? They are states with largely rural populations that tend to be less diverse racially and ethnically, and they tend to vote more for conservative Republicans — the same trend found in the rural counties of the bluest of states.

Cox insists that even if the south now looks as solid for the Republicans as it once did for pre-Civil Rights Democrats, there are movements behind the scenes. However, just counting on demographic trends to do the trick won't be enough. Democrats need to follow Howard Dean's strategy and continue to build organization in all 50 states.
To my chagrin, liberals living outside the South deny our existence, lump us all together by using rhetoric about the Confederacy and heap pity on us with a little condescension thrown in for good measure. They also seem to be unaware of nuance.

The fact is, liberals everywhere live among people who don’t share their views. Are you listening Wisconsin, Arizona, Indiana and, yes, New York?

David Ignatius provides the answer to the question "who is still in the Petraeus camp?"
In the aftermath of the McCarthy investigations in the 1950s, when Americans wondered how responsible officials could have allowed such a reckless “witch hunt” that ruined reputations on the flimsiest evidence, Arthur Miller wrote a play called “The Crucible” about the Salem witch trials of 1692. The genius of the play was that it explained how sensible early Americans could have been swept up in a process of public shaming and destruction of character.
So resigning for having an affair that at least potentially puts a senior official in an awkward position as regards national security is equivalent to private citizens being blacklisted because someone else says they were secretly "pink." Sure, David. It's just the same.

Jennifer Rubin says Benghazi. Several times. And scandal several more times. Forget what I said about Dowd being the laziest editorial writer.

Jim Hoagland has some advice for President Obama as he negotiates with Republicans in his second term. And a small part of it is advice that's actually worth reading.

For all your talents and discipline, you have not demonstrated in your first term a great gift for negotiating. ...  Name experienced, able negotiators to head the State Department and Treasury and then let them do the essential lifting and hauling of bargaining. Reserve your prestige and power to be applied only at the final deal-making moment.

You should not be wading into details from the outset and making success a matter of all-or-nothing, highly personalized triumph.

You can skip over the rest of Hoagland's advice, which includes appointing Republicans to high positions, and you can certainly skip over the lengthy third-hand characterization of President Obama's foreign policy meetings. But what Hoagland is really asking is that the president give the Republicans a chance to save face rather than just putting a boot to their throats. Which isn't a bad idea. So long as the boot is handy.

Leonard Pitts thinks about what Republicans think about America.

You are a moocher, a zombie, soulless, mouth-breathing, ignorant, greedy, self-indulgent, envious, shallow and lazy.

The foregoing is a summation of “analysis” from conservative pundits and media figures — Cal Thomas, Ted Nugent, Bill O’Reilly and etcetera — seeking to explain Mitt Romney’s emphatic defeat....
Sometimes, they act — the Hannitys, the O’Reillys, the Trumps, the Limbaughs, the whole conservative political infotainment complex — as if this were all a game, as if their nonstop litany of half truths, untruths and fear mongering, their echo chamber of studied outrage, practiced panic, intellectual incoherence and unadulterated equine feculence, had no human consequences. Sometimes, they behave as if it were morally permissible — indeed, morally required — to say whatever asinine, indefensible, coarse or outrageous thing comes to mind in the name of defeating or diminishing the dreaded left.

I long ago thought Republican pundits would eventually hit bottom on their fear mongering, but like that kid in the Matrix pondering a spoon, I eventually learned the truth. There is no bottom. No shame, either.

Want to learn a new language? I mean, brand new language?

Where do new words come from? On Twitter at least, they often begin life in cities with large African American populations before spreading more widely, according to a study of the language used on the social network.

Originally posted to Devil's Tower on Sat Nov 17, 2012 at 09:24 PM PST.

Also republished by Daily Kos.

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Comment Preferences

  •  Black culture=Co-opt. Whitewash. Repackage. Repeat (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    JKTownsend, Egalitare, cactusgal, a2nite
    Where do new words come from? On Twitter at least, they often begin life in cities with large African American populations before spreading more widely, according to a study of the language used on the social network.

    "It strikes me as gruesome and comical that in our culture we have an expectation that a man can always solve his problems" - Kurt Vonnegut

    by jazzence on Sat Nov 17, 2012 at 10:00:01 PM PST

    •  It's not so simple, and I think you don't grant (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      ConfusedSkyes, koNko

      African American communities enough agency in the process.  It's not just one way:  language shapes thought.  African Americans coin words and phrases that are relevant to their lives and cultures.  Yes, the white public adopts them and they eventually become mainstreamed, but it's not like this happens in a hermetically sealed environment.

      First these terms usually pass through "border communities" -- communities in which black and white mix to a degree unusual in the larger culture.  White people have to hear black people talking, before they can steal their words.  In those border communities, the exchange is as often honest as it is exploitive.  Mainstreaming happens when those words are carried out of edge communities and distributed to majority white audiences.  It's true that their meanings change, that they are "whitinized," and that they lose much of the political and aesthetic power they had in their original context.  But it's not true that they're adopted without effect: language changes people just like people change language.

      Thus, the introduction of black vernacular via the civil rights movement and then the black liberation movement, into white progressive movements in the 1960s was not a simple appropriation of words, but of concepts. ("Burn, baby, burn," for example.)  This is why progressives, white and black, were attracted not just to the music, but the language of P-Funk ("Free your mind and your ass will follow"); such language facilitated thinking about revolution, even though many white revolutionaries couldn't let go of their racism.

      I think you don't give near enough credit to the power of black language.  White people don't cherry pick the words they want from some shopping list of black-generated vocabulary.  Instead, African American language has a vitality and persistence, an ability to give voice to concepts and perspectives, that are irresistible, and that influence thought. Because of the creativity of black linguistic culture, these concepts flow from black communities in an unstoppable flow, and they have an effect, even when they're diluted by white mainstream use.

      "If you fake the funk, your nose will grow." -- Bootsy Collins

      by hepshiba on Sun Nov 18, 2012 at 06:41:37 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  And their example is a major fail (0+ / 0-)
      Jacob Eisenstein at the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta and colleagues examined 30 million tweets sent from US locations between December 2009 and May 2011. Several new terms spread during this period, including "bruh", an alternative spelling of "bro" or "brother", which first arose in a few south-east cities before eventually hopping to parts of California. Residents of Cleveland, Ohio, were the first to use "ctfu", an abbreviation of "cracking the fuck up", usage that has since spread into Pennsylvania (arxiv.org/abs/1210.5268).
      To my knowledge, "bruh" and "brah" pre-date Twitter by several years and this is documented in some popular movies.

      What about my Daughter's future?

      by koNko on Sun Nov 18, 2012 at 06:17:01 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  THIS was perfect: (23+ / 0-)
    Democrats need to follow Howard Dean's strategy and continue to build organization in all 50 states.

       

    To my chagrin, liberals living outside the South deny our existence, lump us all together by using rhetoric about the Confederacy and heap pity on us with a little condescension thrown in for good measure. They also seem to be unaware of nuance.

        The fact is, liberals everywhere live among people who don’t share their views.

    PA went for Obama, as expected.  And the small city where I live went for Obama too (also as expected).

    But the county, with a larger overall population, went decisively for that Rethuglican and his innumerate sidekick.

    Howard Dean's 50-state strategy might not have made any difference in PA in this particular election cycle -- but it certainly was making a difference in other places.

    It was madness to abandon a winning strategy just when the winning began.  Utter madness.

    To make the argument that the media has a left- or right-wing, or a liberal or a conservative bias, is like asking if the problem with Al-Qaeda is do they use too much oil in their hummus. Al Franken

    by Youffraita on Sat Nov 17, 2012 at 11:21:20 PM PST

    •  2006 (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      cassandraX, RoIn, Icicle68

      was when we had all the Blue Dogs elected to the House.
      I live in Kansas and would be thrilled to have a blue dog represent me in the House, but it will never happen (R+27 district). They were fiscal conservatives that also turned out to be social conservatives. Worse than moderate Republicans, for that matter.
      Democrats have spent the last 3 cycles trying to get rid of them. So was it a winning strategy?

      “We are not a nation that says ‘don’t ask, don’t tell.’ We are a nation that says ‘out of many, we are one.’” -Barack Obama

      by skohayes on Sun Nov 18, 2012 at 04:58:20 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  great point (9+ / 0-)

        I think a key modification is to GOTprogressiveV in the South. It really is there, just discouraged from voting because "everyone knows" that a Southern state will vote GOP.

        I'm a native Southerner. There are plenty of progressives in those red states. Unfortunately, the conservatives are louder and meaner.... But there is a long tradition of "live and let live" in the rural South, one that could give social liberals common ground with these voters. And honestly, many Southerners resent the sanctimonious rightwingers that they have to deal with on a daily basis. They just cede politics to those bullies because the constant message they hear is that the bullies represent the majority.

        "'Things would be a lot worse without us,' is not a winning campaign slogan." Barney Frank

        by cassandraX on Sun Nov 18, 2012 at 05:27:42 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  MD-01 also had a blue dog. (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        skohayes

        ironically, less effective for the Eastern Shore than the preceding Republican, Wayne Gilchrest.

        And he was so clueless and dithering on health insurance reform ... Which the Eastern Shore desperately needs.

        The current Rep. Is hopeless. An ALECbot.

        Thump! Bang. Whack-boing. It's dub!

        by dadadata on Sun Nov 18, 2012 at 05:33:03 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

    •  Magnolias and Moonshine (4+ / 0-)

      I urge everyone to read the Molly Ivins essay "Magnolias and Moonshine" in her book "Molly Ivins Can't Say That, Can She?"  It is about the south as it pertains to the 1988 presidential race so some of it is obviously dated but the overall message that the south is a much more complicated place than the broad strokes it gets painted with here and in many liberal/progressive circles (note the post here a week or so ago giving discussion to a book advocating for cutting the south lose from the rest of the US) is as relevant today as ever.

      “I believe all Southern liberals come from the same starting point--race. Once you figure out they are lying to you about race, you start to question everything.” ― Molly Ivins

      by RoIn on Sun Nov 18, 2012 at 05:50:27 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  50 State Strategy (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Involuntary Exile
      Many people have labeled my home state of North Carolina a red state, but it’s much more complicated than that. In the very rural mountain county of Avery, for example, Mr. Romney won with a whopping 74.5 percent of the vote, yet in Mecklenburg County, which includes Charlotte, he lost to Mr. Obama by nearly 23 percentage points
      This column goes into a lot about the Confederacy as some sort of blueprint for today's political divide.  But it should be noted that Avery County, NC (mentioned above) where only about 13% of voters are registered as Democrats has been an overwhelmingly Republican stronghold since the Civil War when the people there opposed the Confederacy and sided with the Union.  Much of the continued Republican support there is rooted in ancestral party allegiances although certainly some of the same factors that led rural areas across the country to vote Republican certainly apply there as well.

      Anyway, Avery County (population 17,797 in the 2010 census) was targeted by the Obama campaign in 2008.  Read about the efforts of a 50 state strategy in a very red county here:

      http://online.wsj.com/...

      “I believe all Southern liberals come from the same starting point--race. Once you figure out they are lying to you about race, you start to question everything.” ― Molly Ivins

      by RoIn on Sun Nov 18, 2012 at 06:02:36 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Fifty State Strategy II (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        pelagicray, Eyesbright, Youffraita

        I should add that one of the most glorious aspects of that article I posted a link to is reading about people who were invited to a meeting of Obama supporters running into people they had know for years but had no idea were also Democrats because there had really been no structure for Democrats in the county.  

        This is one of the most important parts of a fifty state strategy, letting Democrats in deeply red areas know YOU ARE NOT ALONE!

        “I believe all Southern liberals come from the same starting point--race. Once you figure out they are lying to you about race, you start to question everything.” ― Molly Ivins

        by RoIn on Sun Nov 18, 2012 at 06:20:06 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  "R" pundits, hit bottom? (11+ / 0-)
    I long ago thought Republican pundits would eventually hit bottom on their fear mongering
    Take away their fear mongering?!!  Deny them their enraged foaming over sketchy details wrapped in bogus accusations inside their frantic attention grabbing exploits?  

    Joking aside, their fear mongering has been, thusfar, their most effective tool in securing their job and I can't see them letting loose of it for a good while to come.  That said, we can dream, can't we?

    As we express our gratitude, we must never forget that the highest appreciation is not to utter words, but to live by them. John F. Kennedy

    by JaxDem on Sun Nov 18, 2012 at 01:33:46 AM PST

    •  There are two bottoms. (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      JaxDem, mdmslle, Eyesbright

      one is the bottom the public can see, and has begun to react to. They can't see it.

      The other is the bottom that isn't there ... Their bottom.

      Thump! Bang. Whack-boing. It's dub!

      by dadadata on Sun Nov 18, 2012 at 04:49:25 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  LOL (8+ / 0-)

      When the Rethugs hit bottom, they don't simply keep digging--they call in for drillers, blasters, and heavy-duty excavation apparatus. They won't stop digging until they look up into the rim of the hole and see Chinese faces looking down at them.

      Al Qeada is a faith-based initiative.

      by drewfromct on Sun Nov 18, 2012 at 04:49:25 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  There will be no bottom for them (4+ / 0-)

        The whole rape legitimization thing is a fine example.

        Instead of condemning the numerous statements of various republicans, the party decided to rally around it. They kept digging then and made a nice crater for themselves.

        This was obviously preferable to them over doing what would have been more acceptable to most people. The outcry against it and the butt-kicking they took at the polls is evidence of this.

        Unless they abandon most of their ideologies and become something they currently aren't, they will repeat the pattern over and over, ruining much of our lives needlessly.

        The path of the righteous man is beset on all sides by the inequities of the selfish and the tyranny of evil men.

        by xxdr zombiexx on Sun Nov 18, 2012 at 05:49:28 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Sadly, this is typical (3+ / 0-)

          of the conservative mindset throughout history. When they feel threatened by something, they automatically reach for "solutions" that are far worse and do far more damage than the "problem" they fear in the first place. I can see how they view abortion as being loathsome, but the death of mothers and forcing them to bear the children of rapists is unarguably worse. Same with pot--it might not be the healthiest thing for you, but what's worse for your health, smoking a joint or going to jail and getting raped and catching AIDS?

          They just. Don't. Get it.

          Al Qeada is a faith-based initiative.

          by drewfromct on Sun Nov 18, 2012 at 05:58:36 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

    •  I often warn people to not think in such terms (4+ / 0-)

      when it comes to republicans and other wingnut varieties.

      Don't use phrases such as "Now I have seen everything".

      It seems to exert an influence on the Larger Wingnutsosphere, causing it to produce even more wild and stupid and venal and breathlessly inappropriate actions and words from these people.

      Fearmongering, lying in service to fearmongering, hoaxes (fiscal cliff) which scaremonger and divisiveness, which is largely what they got punished for in this election.

      Divisiveness may be out, so that leaves hair-on-fire fearmongering and more effort into Benghazi-type smearing.

      People who ar used to gaming and manipulating a system to get what they want are loathe to having to do it the right way.

      The path of the righteous man is beset on all sides by the inequities of the selfish and the tyranny of evil men.

      by xxdr zombiexx on Sun Nov 18, 2012 at 05:41:55 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Truscott won't be getting many invites to (3+ / 0-)

    Washington cocktail parties after that column.  Wow, he eviscerates Petraeus making a strong case that Petraeus is a failed General of no particular accomplishments other than polishing his image and sucking up to the right people.  Truscott has performed a public service and I suspect he is not concerned in the least about the inevitable blow back that will come his way.  David Ignatius will not approve of the Truscott column, too bad David.

    Suppose you were an idiot. And suppose you were a Republican. But I repeat myself. Harry Truman

    by ratcityreprobate on Sun Nov 18, 2012 at 02:56:17 AM PST

    •  wow has Petraeus got some scrambled eggs (7+ / 0-)

      nine rows of medals!! Compare to Eisenhower, Bradley and PAtton who had at most 6

      The man's a resume polisher, no doubt about it

      Happy just to be alive

      by exlrrp on Sun Nov 18, 2012 at 04:25:21 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Wes Clark only has (5+ / 0-)

        5 rows

        What a piker.

        White-collar conservatives flashing down the street, pointing their plastic finger at me..

        by BOHICA on Sun Nov 18, 2012 at 05:01:25 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Audie Murphy only had 3 rows (6+ / 0-)

          And he was a genuine hero
          Photobucket

          Happy just to be alive

          by exlrrp on Sun Nov 18, 2012 at 06:04:28 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  Macarthur didn't like to wear medals (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            BOHICA

            Its surprising---I haven't found an image yet with him wearing a chest full of medals. Its surprising because he got the CMoH, the only one awarded for other than combat. It was a political medal, because his father got one. There was no doubt of his bravery, tho, he established that in WW1
            And Macarthur HAD to be the biggest egotist of American WWII high rank, a bunch not known to be shrinking violets.

            Happy just to be alive

            by exlrrp on Sun Nov 18, 2012 at 06:20:12 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  "Dougout Doug" set the bar for imperial generals (5+ / 0-)

              with the link to Petraeus and some other flag officers today living far too deep in the bubble. See "Petraeus scandal puts four-star general lifestyle under scrutiny" for that. It starts with a comment:

              Then-defense secretary Robert M. Gates stopped bagging his leaves when he moved into a small Washington military enclave in 2007. His next-door neighbor was Mike Mullen, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff at the time, who had a chef, a personal valet and — not lost on Gates — troops to tend his property.
              The most flagrant adherent to that imperial style among those famed in WW II was of course the man that got the nickname "Dougout Doug" from the grunts dying on Bataan while he sat in splendor at Corregidor.

              Dugout Doug MacArthur lies ashakin' on the Rock
              Safe from all the bombers and from any sudden shock
              Dugout Doug is eating of the best food on Bataan
              And his troops go starving on

              He continued that lifestyle no matter what the men under his command faced. He had set a schedule based on his rear echelon reading of maps through some of the most hostile terrain any troops faced, across the mist mountains of New Guinea (Kokoda track and others) and himself "advanced" from Australia to the hardships of servants and splendor in a plantation house on the south coast. The men were starving and disease ridden by the time they reached the objective. Both are eloquently described by James Campbell in The Ghost Mountain Boys.

              Two self promoting and luxury loving generals. As the linked article notes:

              Other veteran commanders concurred with Gates. David Barno, a retired three-star general who commanded U.S. troops in Afghanistan, warned in an interview that the environment in which the top brass lives has the potential “to become corrosive over time upon how they live their life.”

              You can become completely disconnected from the way people live in the regular world — and even from the modest lifestyle of others in the military,” Barno said. “When that happens, it’s not necessarily healthy either for the military or the country.”

              The only foes that threaten America are the enemies at home, and those are ignorance, superstition, and incompetence. [Elbert Hubbard]

              by pelagicray on Sun Nov 18, 2012 at 07:11:56 AM PST

              [ Parent ]

            •  CMoH (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              Eyesbright

              There is no "C". The original and official title is Medal of Honor.

              Just one of my pet nit picks.

              White-collar conservatives flashing down the street, pointing their plastic finger at me..

              by BOHICA on Sun Nov 18, 2012 at 07:13:34 AM PST

              [ Parent ]

          •  Either the standards for awarding medals (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            BOHICA

            has changed considerably since WWII, or there are more types of medals available to be awarded, or Patraeus has done an enormous amount for this country that nobody (or very few of us) is aware of.

            "In this world of sin and sorrow there is always something to be thankful for; as for me, I rejoice that I am not a Republican." - H. L. Mencken

            by SueDe on Sun Nov 18, 2012 at 07:40:32 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

  •  David Wasserman is Cook Report's (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    OLinda, Lawrence, Egalitare

    House specialist and a reliable source. His numbers are as up to date as anyone's.

    "Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies." - Groucho Marx

    by Greg Dworkin on Sun Nov 18, 2012 at 04:30:23 AM PST

  •  My favorite NYTimes letter in today's paper (17+ / 0-)
    The Republicans’ problem is that any move toward the center will make them indistinguishable from the Democrats. In my view, the Democrats are a center-right party, and there is simply no space for any sane positions to the right of them. That is why the Republicans spend most of their time criticizing President Obama for things he hasn’t actually done (raise taxes, move toward socialism, pass job-killing regulations, abandon Israel and so on).

    President Obama is doing almost all the things that the Republicans have always said they wanted. They reject him only because they want power for themselves.

    What America needs is an actual progressive liberal party that is to the left of the Democrats, so there can be a genuine liberal-conservative dialogue. Then the Republicans can go the way of the Whigs and the Know-Nothings.

     TEED ROCKWELL
Berkeley, Calif., Nov. 14, 2012


    Emphasis mine.

    "Everyone is flawed and strange; most people are valiant, too." Andrew Solomon in "Far from the Tree"

    by hester on Sun Nov 18, 2012 at 04:37:43 AM PST

  •  RE: Karen Cox the South is different in 1 way (10+ / 0-)

    the South has had the smallest gender gap of any region. Meaning white Southern woman vote more like their men than in any other region. This is part of the reason issues that help Democrats in the rest of the country with woman (reproductive freedom, childhood education, equal pay laws, etc) have less of an electoral success rate in the South. This is true even though the South has the lowest marriage rate of any region in the country (highest unwed mothers, highest divorce rate, etc). This is what I would love to see a book on. I keep waiting for a researcher to tackle this....

    -1.63/ -1.49 "Speaking truth to power" (with snark of course)!

    by dopper0189 on Sun Nov 18, 2012 at 04:38:21 AM PST

    •  Excellent point. That would be a fantastic topic (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Egalitare, glitterscale, dopper0189

      to explore in depth.

      •  If the gender gap among white females in NC (0+ / 0-)

        had been as wide in NC as it was in say Delaware or Maryland, Obama would have tied the state instead of a 2 point loss.

        I'm not saying that Obama would win NC white females, but that if the difference between them and male NC voters was as wide as in the "Southern" MidAtlantic states.  

        -1.63/ -1.49 "Speaking truth to power" (with snark of course)!

        by dopper0189 on Sun Nov 18, 2012 at 09:15:57 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

    •  Patience with the South (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      diggerspop, Harkov311, dopper0189, dwayne

      Ineffectiveness in maintaining "the natural order of things" will doom the GOP there as surely as it did the former Democratic "Solid South."

      That ACA will "be visited upon" each and every state - either by states agreeing to set up Insurance Exchanges or the Federal Government filling the void in response to a rather tepid contemporary show of "Massive Resistance" - will be one of the earliest manifestations of such "ineffectiveness."

      When you are right you cannot be too radical; when you are wrong, you cannot be too conservative. --Martin Luther King Jr.

      by Egalitare on Sun Nov 18, 2012 at 06:13:54 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Re: Karen Cox (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    skillet, skohayes, glitterscale

    Iowa was blue by 6%. But, NW IA voted Romney 80%+. You know who lurks there. That is Rep. Steve King territory.


    Big Bird Won! Brought to you by the letter 'O'.

    by jim in IA on Sun Nov 18, 2012 at 04:44:25 AM PST

  •  "Unadulterated Equine Feculance" (7+ / 0-)

    LOve it!

    This will be my new Phrase of the Day. As well as being trotted out whenever necessary.

    Thank You Mr. Pitts.

    Al Qeada is a faith-based initiative.

    by drewfromct on Sun Nov 18, 2012 at 04:45:33 AM PST

  •  I don't know about that... (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    BOHICA, PlinytheWelder
    Jennifer Rubin says Benghazi. Several times. And scandal several more times. Forget what I said about Dowd being the laziest editorial writer.
    Take a column by Dowd during this election cycle.  Does the column contain the names Paul Ryan and Janna Little?  Good.  Now, go back to 1992.  Can you use the same column and just replace the names Al and Tipper Gore for Ryan and Little?

    It's about time I changed my signature.

    by Khun David on Sun Nov 18, 2012 at 04:59:47 AM PST

  •  Okay GOP.....you mucked up 2010....now where (0+ / 0-)

    are those freakin JOBS??

  •  Negative advertising works - supressing the vote. (0+ / 0-)

    But there seem to be diminishing returns. Ha.

    Courage is contagious. - Daniel Ellsberg

    by semiot on Sun Nov 18, 2012 at 05:08:05 AM PST

  •  Benghazi Phony Scandal Does Not Resonate (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    skohayes, A Citizen

    beyond the rabid right wing base. The GOP strategy for 2014 is to have their fired up base turn out in great numbers based on foreign policy issues that most of the country is content with Obama's handling of. They know the merely content do not vote in great numbers. A fired up lunatic base will.

  •  So we're almost at a 4 million + vote margin (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    skohayes

    for Obama now.

    Nice.

    It looks like that Rand Corp. "poll, with its new methods and its 3.3 percent victory margin prediction for Obama, may end up being right on the money.

    When's the last time that a President won by that kind of margin while campaigning on tax increases?  This dynamic must be very worrisome to the GOP.

    "A candle loses nothing by lighting another candle" - Mohammed Nabbous, R.I.P.

    by Lawrence on Sun Nov 18, 2012 at 05:13:12 AM PST

  •  the blue vote in red states is suppressed (12+ / 0-)

    As my Democratic-voting cousin in Alabama says, he votes but his vote won't really count. Republicans will win.

    He's committed, but a lot of progressives have to drag themselves to the polls in red states. Some just don't make it. The sense of futility overwhelms them.

    I agree with Karen Cox. Southerners are not uniformly Republican. It would help if progressives outside the South stopped to consider this before making blanket condemnations of Southerners.

    "'Things would be a lot worse without us,' is not a winning campaign slogan." Barney Frank

    by cassandraX on Sun Nov 18, 2012 at 05:20:01 AM PST

  •  cliff (3+ / 0-)

    Better to go over the "cliff" than to make a bad deal.  The DoD budget needs a major reduction, the Bush tax cuts were terrible then--and bad now--the budget cuts could be restored early next year--or not.  Cut farm subsidies--okay--eliminate farm subsidies over $1 million.  The beast is not entitlements--it's the defense department.

    Apres Bush, le deluge.

    by melvynny on Sun Nov 18, 2012 at 05:29:21 AM PST

  •  Maureen Dowd and David Brooks... (0+ / 0-)

     Need to go out and get real jobs. Why the NYT still employs these lazy hacks is beyond me.   There is  room for better op-ed writers on there. The times has had some good ones over the years. Krugman is essential. Even while I didn't agree with him all the time William Safire was worth reading.

    These bums?  Fuggetaboutit!

    "Let Mitt Romney go bankrupt!"

    by PlinytheWelder on Sun Nov 18, 2012 at 05:33:33 AM PST

    •  The Times keeps Maureen Dowd around (0+ / 0-)

      because she's a member of the same social class as many of their readers and because she's a good wordsmith.  She has a sharp tongue, uses big words and literary references,  traits that are very impressive to Times editors and publishers.  She also pens columns that attack people who are in positions of power and/or notoriety, especially Democrats, but carefully avoids supporting Republicans or Republican policies - also very impressive.  The fact that her writing has little or no substance and may even be self-contradictory doesn't bother her Times superiors at all - she's a pet.

      "In this world of sin and sorrow there is always something to be thankful for; as for me, I rejoice that I am not a Republican." - H. L. Mencken

      by SueDe on Sun Nov 18, 2012 at 09:26:45 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Maureen Dowd: (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Buckeye54, ConfusedSkyes
    "No one is good enough for me. You're all stupid and boring and obvious and disappointing and I hate you. Now why am I so lonely and unhappy? Please, somebody love me! I'm dying inside!"

    "Liberty without virtue would be no blessing to us" - Benjamin Rush, 1777

    by kovie on Sun Nov 18, 2012 at 05:36:15 AM PST

  •  Ross Douthat: (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    skohayes, wonmug, a2nite
    "Mitt Romney was wrong to say that Obama won because he gave people gifts. Of course, you can't have a healthy and prosperous society by redistributing wealth, which is what Democrats do. They should be more like Reagan who was for freedom and stuff and the 1950's."

    "Liberty without virtue would be no blessing to us" - Benjamin Rush, 1777

    by kovie on Sun Nov 18, 2012 at 05:39:14 AM PST

    •  There's a great comment (5+ / 0-)

      attached to Douthat's column:

      The Republicans are like an old car -- sure, there are a few classics, but you have to be from another planet to claim they are safer, more efficient, better for the environment, or that their systems have withstood the test of time. Where were the thinking Republicans? Are some people are so blind that they only see what you present to them and take it as truth? Like an old car, Republicans won't be a better option for moving forward until they retool (top to bottom) and come up with an electric car that goes 500 plus miles on a charge. Good luck!

      “We are not a nation that says ‘don’t ask, don’t tell.’ We are a nation that says ‘out of many, we are one.’” -Barack Obama

      by skohayes on Sun Nov 18, 2012 at 05:42:33 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  I posted a comment too (0+ / 0-)

        The problem with the NYT commenting system is that it's moderated, which is ok I guess given the trolls out there, but it takes them forever to review, approve and post one's comments, and when they do, it get a timestamp of the time of posting, not the time of submission, making interaction really difficult. Trusted commenters get to post without review, so they get most of the attention, and it feels like some non-trusted commenters get reviewed and posted faster than others. I'm guessing that they have some low-pay intern or temp worker do the reviewing, and they seem to take long breaks. Annoying.

        "Liberty without virtue would be no blessing to us" - Benjamin Rush, 1777

        by kovie on Sun Nov 18, 2012 at 05:58:05 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  My comment: (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Buckeye54, skohayes, Mark Sumner
        If any political party has contributed to the disintegration of community and a sense of purpose and belonging that conservatives like Douthat like to lament, I'd argue that it's the Republican, not Democratic party, through decades of economic policies that have destroyed local downtowns and the mom and pop and other local businesses that held them together, leading to urban decay and mass flight to the rootless suburbs, where a sense of community is either missing or shallow. Policies that have also made it hard for people to find satisfying, steady, sustaining work that gave them the income and benefits that enabled them to feel a vital part of society. By unleashing a zero-sum, winner takes all economy, the GOP may have made some Americans incredibly wealthy and thus presumably happy, but at the economic, social and emotional expense of most everyone else.

        If asked, most voters who rejected Romney may not put the reason for it quite this way, but clearly he symbolized and encapsulated much of what's wrong with today's GOP in terms of its economic policies and the ideologies that underlie them: I've got mine and you're on your own.

        If that's not a recipe for societal disintegration, I don't know what is.

        "Liberty without virtue would be no blessing to us" - Benjamin Rush, 1777

        by kovie on Sun Nov 18, 2012 at 06:08:02 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  A second comment: (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Buckeye54, skohayes, wonmug
        I also don't understand this:

        "This is a great flaw in the liberal vision, because whatever role government plays in prosperity, transfer payments are not a sufficient foundation for middle-class success. It’s not a coincidence that the economic era that many liberals pine for — the great, egalitarian post-World War II boom — was an era that social conservatives remember fondly as well: a time of leaping church attendance, rising marriage rates and birthrates, and widespread civic renewal and engagement."

        Is Douthat suggesting that Democrats are basing their efforts to rebuild the middle class on "transfer payments", which is code for wealth redistribution, which is another way of saying what Douthat disengenuously tries to distance himself from, the notion that Democrats win elections by offering voters "gifts"? Are we back to that tired old saw again, expressed in so many offensive ways in the past, from "Welfare Queens" to "Tax and spend liberals" to "culture of dependancy"?

        How original. And predictable. Douthat is just saying what Romney and most other Republicans have been saying for years, only, given the forum, doing so somewhat more delicately.

        By the way, who does Douthat think created the allegedly socially cohesive post-WWII economic prosperity that he yearns for? Democrats, along with liberal Republicans. Not conservatives.

        Boy is this getting boring. I think it's time they cooked up some new lies already.

        "Liberty without virtue would be no blessing to us" - Benjamin Rush, 1777

        by kovie on Sun Nov 18, 2012 at 06:09:16 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Love this one (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          kovie

          A lot of the commenters are making very cogent points, made me go back and read what I'd missed when skimming Douthat's piece, like this one:

          Oh, please. Churches are "threatened" by a rule about contraceptives? After two thousand years filled with brutal persecutions and schisms, the church is going to be brought down by birth control pills? Get real.

          And then there's this: " But the typical unchurched American is just as often an underemployed working-class man, whose secularism is less an intellectual choice than a symptom of his disconnection from community in general."

          That is the most breathtakingly condescending misunderstanding of the secular viewpoint I've ever heard. Get out of your bubble, Mr. Douhat, and stop assuming that those evil, godless liberals are destroying America.

          “We are not a nation that says ‘don’t ask, don’t tell.’ We are a nation that says ‘out of many, we are one.’” -Barack Obama

          by skohayes on Sun Nov 18, 2012 at 06:24:16 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  It feels like talking to a conservative (4+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            skohayes, Buckeye54, mayim, a2nite

            is like talking to someone who's had a part of their brain removed. No matter how otherwise intelligent and even decent they might be, something's just not right. Even the more thoughtful-seeming of them seem ultimately driven by an obvious fear of the world and all its complexity, a yearning for safety and simplicity, and a worshipful and reverant view of older white authoritarian males, whom they fear and want to please in a manner I find quite creepy and bizarre. It's like they all belong to this creepy, well-camouflaged cult of older white male worship whose outer, cleaned-up surface is all we get to see, but every now and then a crack in the facade emerges that hints at something far darker and more disturbing inside.

            For people who claim to revere individualism and freedom, they all come across as like-minded followers absolutely terrified of the responsibility and burdens of independant thinking and existance. They are so transparently silly, and sad.

            "Liberty without virtue would be no blessing to us" - Benjamin Rush, 1777

            by kovie on Sun Nov 18, 2012 at 06:49:14 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

  •  Maureen Dowd achieved irrelevance today (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    SueDe, a2nite

    Her column is despicable. Before the election she was hedging, just before the election she went "divine deity on the candidates," and today she went off the cliff and Wile E. Coyote flat faced into the ground.

    Her attacks on Rice are despicable.

    "If you don't use your majorities, you lose your majorities."

    by SteinL on Sun Nov 18, 2012 at 05:39:45 AM PST

  •  small towns (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Lawrence, wintergreen8694, Buckeye54

    I grew up in a very small town - and I mean small, less than 1,000 people. After elections, I like to look at how people in that area voted. It's interesting, you see a rural/urban divide even between the small town and people living out in the country: at least in the region I examined, people living in these small towns were more likely to vote Democratic than people living out in the country. Apparently, just having neighbors made you more likely to vote for Democrats.

    The wolfpack eats venison. The lone wolf eats mice.

    by A Citizen on Sun Nov 18, 2012 at 05:43:56 AM PST

    •  I was amazed to see that (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Over the Edge, Lawrence, Buckeye54

      out of about 1800 votes in our county, Obama got 746 of them! There are more supporters out here than I thought, which gives me hope! This is supposed to be an R+27 district, and we're in the most rural part of the state, so I was surprised he got that many votes.

      “We are not a nation that says ‘don’t ask, don’t tell.’ We are a nation that says ‘out of many, we are one.’” -Barack Obama

      by skohayes on Sun Nov 18, 2012 at 05:54:09 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  The Republican message is comprised of (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      a2nite

      talking points such as "individualism," "independence," "freedom," "I built that," "pull yourself up by your bootstraps," and other such slogans of personal strength  that define the moral worth of individuals.  People who live in rural areas, far away from neighbors and supporting social structures, see such messages as reinforcing their concept of their own personal strengths.

      Democrats' talking points are "society," "community," "neighborhood," "we're all in this together," "we all have a stake in our success," "mutual support," "collectivism," and other such messages of interdependence and a shared vision of progressivism.

      Rural residents live in areas with little proximity to neighbors and by definition must be more self-sufficient; urban dwellers live in tighter proximity to their neighbors and easier access to neighborhood support such as stores, shops, communal entertainment, a sharing atmosphere.

      It's no surprise, then, that rural and urban populations respond to different signals.  It is the consummate statesman who can bring these two perspectives together to appreciate the differences as well as similarities among us.  What we have now are politicians and pundits whose success depends on pointing out and  reinforcing only the differences.

      "In this world of sin and sorrow there is always something to be thankful for; as for me, I rejoice that I am not a Republican." - H. L. Mencken

      by SueDe on Sun Nov 18, 2012 at 10:21:40 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  New words? New language? Kossacks need only go (4+ / 0-)

    to the Saturday hate mail-a-palooza to see new attempts at language.

    God be with you, Occupiers. God IS with you.

    by Hohenzollern on Sun Nov 18, 2012 at 05:44:49 AM PST

  •  One of my favorite writers, (5+ / 0-)

    Michael Tomasky:

    If the entire Republican Party were made up of nothing but David Frums and David Brookses, maybe well-designed and good-faith market-based attempts to address some of these problems could have a chance. But the actually existing Republican Party is more accurately represented by another David—Vitter, the Louisiana senator—who dismissed S-CHIP as “Hillarycare.”

    And it’s Vitter rather than the other Davids who typifies the party because that is how the party’s voting base wants it. The darkly amusing thing about all this distancing from Romney is that in truth, all he was doing was expressing the views of the overwhelming majority of the party’s conservative base, which rose up in a mighty rage in 2009 against these “moochers” and their “gifts.”

    I wish Jindal and the rest of them luck, in spite of it all. If they’re sincere and serious, we’ll have a very different Republican Party five years from now from the one we’ve known. In the meantime, permit me my skepticism. They don’t have good solutions to working people’s problems because the record shows that at bottom, they don’t really want to solve them.

    Running From Romney: the GOP’s Phony New Compassion

    “We are not a nation that says ‘don’t ask, don’t tell.’ We are a nation that says ‘out of many, we are one.’” -Barack Obama

    by skohayes on Sun Nov 18, 2012 at 05:46:59 AM PST

  •  Petraeus - a prissy pedant who (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    a2nite

    never saw combat before he was a Major General.  That explains the ribbons?  Will he get one for being Paula Broadwell's schmuck?

    I tremble for my country when I reflect that God is just; that his justice cannot sleep forever. ~Thomas Jefferson

    by bobdevo on Sun Nov 18, 2012 at 05:50:19 AM PST

  •  Ryan Lizza -- must read for Texas Democrats (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    skillet, wintergreen8694, a2nite

    in The New Yorker

    Demography is not necessarily destiny, however. The Democratic Party in Texas is leaderless and disorganized, ill-equipped to capitalize on the Republicans’ fear of their own extinction. Hispanic turnout is much lower in Texas than in other states with large Hispanic populations, such as California, and nobody seems to be moving aggressively to change the situation. “You don’t have one person trying to unify the collective energies of the Democratic Party with a goal toward putting a Democrat on the map statewide,” said Trey Martinez Fischer, a Democratic state representative who chairs the Mexican American Legislative Caucus.

    “There’s groundwork that needs to be done in Texas that simply hasn’t been done,” Julián Castro, a Democrat and the mayor of San Antonio, told me during an interview on CNN. He noted that whereas in California Hispanics vote at rates that are ten per cent lower than those of the rest of the electorate, in Texas Hispanics are twenty-five per cent less likely to vote. But he insisted that change was coming. “Within the next six to eight years,” he said, “I believe Texas will be at least a purple state, if not a blue state.”

    “I think every case in litigation and every argument in politics is about the fundamental narrative,” he [Ted Cruz] said. “If you can frame the narrative, you win. As Sun Tzu said, every battle is won before it is fought. And it is won by choosing the field of terrain on which the fight will be engaged.” For now, the field belongs to Obama and the Democrats, and the storyline on immigration is theirs to lose.
  •  Jennifer Rubin is a disgrace (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    skohayes

    I read that article yesterday (full blown scandal, hair on fire, etc etc) and had to double check the date to make sure she realized it was POST testimony - which totally invalidates her point.

    It's absolutely shameful that she is allowed to put things in print and get paid.

    "I'm sculpting now. Landscapes mostly." ~ Yogi Bear

    by eXtina on Sun Nov 18, 2012 at 05:58:26 AM PST

  •  I loved the article on new words (4+ / 0-)

    The linguistic creativity of African Americans is well known... certainly by African Americans, and also by African Americanists, who've been talking about the West African linguistic roots of that brilliance for over 60 years now.  Though "the data [from this particular study] cannot say" why the flow is from black invention to white usage, the many reasons why this is so are described by scholars of African American vernacular, and by many virtuosos of African American language and performance. I'm very glad to see quantitative documentation of some these arguments.

    The tendency of the white mainstream is to pretend that African Americans can't speak "proper" English (witness the constant and annoying observation that any black American who speaks in standard English is "well-spoken"), but most African Americans can move from vernacular into standard speech as smoothly as bilingual kids can move between mother tongues.  Black vernaculars are characterized by intense verbal creativity, oral layering that requires a chorus response to virtuoso performance, and put a premium on inventiveness, repurposing, puns, and double meanings.  

    The rhythmic asethetic of black vernaculars also increases the "catchiness" of black vernacular terms, especially since adoption includes not only the word or phrase, but its specific intonations.  (Oh, no he didn't!) A recent study on creativity used freestyle rappers as its subjects, taking brain scans, comparing recited vs. improvised lyrics. The researchers compared those to similar results of earlier studies of jazz musicians who were improvising—the rhythmic complexity of African American speech is quite similar to the rhythmic complexity of the music that African Americans are famous for inventing.

    This underlines the racist nature of most public discussion of "Black English," and the general and simplistic condemnation of attempts to honor it and teach it as a linguistic skill and a legitimate dialect (remember how "Ebonics" was ridiculed).  Like other linguistic sub-communities, speakers of African vernacular keep our language vital and alive.  Lamenting the shifts brought about by popular adoption of black vernacular terms and styles (as the right wing loves to do, in its endless culture wars), is exactly equivalent to lamenting the demographic shift of the American population.  Both are policies doomed to failure, thank goodness.

    "If you fake the funk, your nose will grow." -- Bootsy Collins

    by hepshiba on Sun Nov 18, 2012 at 06:24:30 AM PST

  •  I despise most of the new words (0+ / 0-)
    Where do new words come from? On Twitter at least, they often begin life in cities with large African American populations before spreading more widely, according to a study of the language used on the social network.
    Is that where the loathsome "baby mama" and "baby daddy" came from?  Why not use the words "mother" and "father"?  So much shorter.  So much nicer.

    Some day I'm going to write a Cranky Grammarians diary about all the words I hate.  

    "Religion is what keeps the poor from murdering the rich."--Napoleon

    by Diana in NoVa on Sun Nov 18, 2012 at 06:47:44 AM PST

  •  Odd behavior for sore losers in my town (0+ / 0-)

    We lost hundreds of Obama signs in my semi-rural East TN county before the election, including one I put on a prominent little hill not far from my house. The Sat or Sun before the election someone stole it, so I promptly replaced it and was amazed when it stayed up.

    And it's still there. I haven't taken the time yet to remove it -- and neither have all the WATBs around here who were so hellbent before the election.

    In fact, the entire tone of local GOPpers has been surprisingly subdued (even though they destroyed Dems in state races -- GOP supermajorities in both houses + GOP governor; we're fucked).

    YES WE DID -- AGAIN. FOUR MORE YEARS.

    by raincrow on Sun Nov 18, 2012 at 06:48:48 AM PST

  •  Re Hoagland (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    srfRantz

    Actually, in regards to negotiations with Republicans, it IS absolutely necessary to put your boot to their throats- at least once.  The only thing republicans understand is the boot, and the fear of the boot.  Making the treat isn't enough, and isn't ever going to be enough, unless they KNOW you will follow through on the threat.  You have to follow through on the threat, or they will never respect you, never believe you, and well have another 4 years like the last 4.  That would not be good for anyone, including republicans.

  •  re Cox, red states as red as their AM radio and (0+ / 0-)

    many non 'old south' states are only red because RW radio is the only free source of politics and current events while driving and working. in those sparsely populated areas there's a lot of driving and a lot of RW radio. but the absence of liberal radio is not decided by what they might want to hear- there has never been a chance to choose. the GOP narrative is so ubiquitous and  dominant it is 'conventional wisdom' that is never challenged directly and 'face to face'. even a 25% progressive radio ratio would be disastrous for the GOP in those states- and that's why dems should be trying to destroy that monopoly before the 2014 elections.

    This is a list of 76 universities for Rush Limbaugh that endorse global warming denial, racism, sexism, and partisan lying by broadcasting sports on Limbaugh radio stations.

    by certainot on Sun Nov 18, 2012 at 07:54:18 AM PST

  •  Re Karen Cox's bit above... (0+ / 0-)

    ... SOUTHREN LIBRLS? Yes indeedy! Why even Protestant Evangelical churches
    allegedly harbor liberal minded members so why not liberals in the rural South.
    I agree with the Dean 50 state organizational method & suggest that  the few librals
    there be recruited to
    hand out FREE , ON
    THE TONGUE DISSOLVING, MOUNTAIN DEW FLAVORED BIRTH CONTROL PILLS.
    Control the conservative numbers and there will be no Republican felt need to block any access to the ballot boxes.

  •  If I had a milion dollars (0+ / 0-)

    I'd edit me a phrase..

    ..the whole conservative political dis-infotainment complex

    Maybe one day the Fourth Estate will take their jobs seriously. Or not..

    by Anthony Page aka SecondComing on Sun Nov 18, 2012 at 08:58:28 AM PST

  •  Bravo Karen Rich (0+ / 0-)
    To my chagrin, liberals living outside the South deny our existence, lump us all together by using rhetoric about the Confederacy and heap pity on us with a little condescension thrown in for good measure. They also seem to be unaware of nuance.
    ...because the only thing worse than seeing my Facebook feed full of post-election crap like "...now having 12 guys guarding the country..." and "...get ready to learn a new language..." and seeing crowded church vans unload a Chick-Fil-A on "gay-bashing appreciation day," is seeing non-Southern liberals bash the entire South.  They're assuming the 35-40% of us who voted for Obama in both elections don't exist, or maybe we couldn't read the ballot and intended to vote for Romney.

    “Nice country you got here. Shame if something were to happen to it” --the GOP philosophy to governing as described by Paul Krugman

    by dwayne on Sun Nov 18, 2012 at 09:11:10 AM PST

  •  Lindsay Graham on MTP: making political hay (0+ / 0-)

    over BenghaziGate and reminding us that we're now back to the usual partisan bickering and sour grapes. Apparently Susan Rice will be sacrificed for making John Kerry Secretary of State

    http://gawker.com/...

    yksitoista ulotteinen presidentin shakki. / tappaa kaikki natsit "Nous sommes un groupuscule" (-9.50; -7.03) 政治委员, 政委‽ Warning - some snark above ‽

    by annieli on Sun Nov 18, 2012 at 09:30:11 AM PST

  •  Hoagland's advice falls flat given THIS Congress (0+ / 0-)

    Mr. Hoagland almost sounds sensible until he goes off into begging for Republicans to be given a chance to lead in some of these efforts. It's a forgone conclusion that most conservatives are hell bent on derailing Obama's second term. So why should he appoint any conservatives to give them an opening to screw him?

    The concept of keeping the negotiating at the lower ranks is how government has always worked. The only time the big guns come out is when either someone needs to claim the limelight or someone needs to get hammered for getting in the way. I don't see any reason to blame Obama's first term problems to any lack of following this concept. He appears to be a consummate negotiator, but he is dealing with a Congress that is giving him cards from the bottom of the deck.

    "I think it's the duty of the comedian to find out where the line is drawn and cross it deliberately." -- George Carlin, Satirical Comic,(1937-2008)

    by Wynter on Sun Nov 18, 2012 at 09:59:15 AM PST

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