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The New York Times Editorial Board calls for more action to Close Guantánamo Prison:

Thanks to outrageous limits Congress placed on the transfer of Guantánamo prisoners beginning in 2010, the prisoners are still being held, with no end to their incarceration in sight. In September, a member of this stranded group, a Yemeni citizen named Adnan Farhan Abdul Latif, killed himself after a federal judge’s ruling ordering his release was unfairly overturned by an appellate court. It was the kind of price a nation pays when it creates prisons like Guantánamo, beyond the reach of law and decency, a tragic reminder of the stain on American justice. [...]

If Mr. Obama is serious about fulfilling his pledge — and we trust he is — he needs to become more engaged this time around and be willing to spend political capital.

Paul Krugman at The New York Times is so good at needling, as he proves once again in Fighting Fiscal Phantoms:
These are difficult times for the deficit scolds who have dominated policy discussion for almost three years. One could almost feel sorry for them, if it weren’t for their role in diverting attention from the ongoing problem of inadequate recovery, and thereby helping to perpetuate catastrophically high unemployment.

What has changed? For one thing, the crisis they predicted keeps not happening.

Robert Kuttner at the Huffington Post writes The Fiscal Myth:
Neither party wants significant budget cuts in the next year or two, when the recovery is too fragile to stand even a smaller fiscal contraction. So the Republicans, Obama and the Democratic budget hawks like Erskine Bowles and retiring Budget Committee chairman Senator Kent Conrad all want to "back-load" the spending cuts—have them bite late in this decade.

It just happens that Social Security and Medicare cuts fill that bill perfectly. Cut social insurance several years from now, and you delay the political outcry until Obama has left office. You also delay the fiscal impact, and you leave room for a bit of other government spending.

But cutting Social Security and Medicare for the sake of an arbitrary and needless budgetary reduction of $4 trillion and as a "solution" to an entirely contrived fiscal crisis is bad policy. It is bad economic policy and worse social policy

Marc Thiessen at the Washington Post suggests that Democrats face a lot of problems if all the tax cuts expire in Let’s go over the fiscal cliff:
Today, the only ones in Washington who advocate fiscal cliff-diving are liberal Democrats. It’s time for conservatives to join them. Letting the Bush tax cuts expire will strengthen the GOP’s hand in tax negotiations next year, and it may be the only way Republicans can force President Obama and Senate Democrats to agree to fundamental tax reform.
John Vidal at The Guardian writes in Time is running out: the Doha climate talks must put an end to excuses:
So what is the point of the massive UN climate talks which start on today in Doha, one of the most energy-profligate cities on Earth? Negotiators from 194 countries are meeting in an atmosphere of mutual mistrust. They are divided and frustrated, and know their political masters mostly seek only painfully slow progress. We already know rich countries will refuse to commit to any further cuts in emissions or to provide more money, just as we know the poor will try to cling to the few global climate agreements reached between nations years ago. There will be fights, tantrums, and righteous anger from the non-government observers and world media.
Bill Fletcher, Jr. at In These Times writes in Jobs, Justice and the Planet:
In 2008, liberals, progressives and many leftists made a strategic mistake. With the election of Barack Obama, we assumed that we could passively await change. We should have known better, given the experience of eight years of the Clinton administration. Rather than moving quickly to push the new Obama administration in a progressive direction, by the spring of 2009, the Left had ceded initiative on both domestic and foreign policy to the Right. With the 2012 election behind us, progressive forces should act quickly so as not to repeat our costly mistake of the first term.
Jackson Diehl at the Washington Post on the Lessons from Gaza:
As a simple, pragmatic matter, “smashing” or “uprooting” Hamas is no longer an option. Not only does Hamas have the support of the region’s richest and most powerful governments, but it is preferable to the most obvious Gazan alternative, which is jihadist movements even more closely tied to Iran.
Chemi Shalev at Haaretz writes in Gaza requiem: Six remarks on image, perceptions, and four dead Palestinian children:
Israel was not alone, the world was not against us, the media was far from hostile, President Obama was a friend indeed and if anyone had a right to feel isolated, misunderstood and much-maligned in recent days, rightly or wrongly, it was the Palestinians, not us. In the entire US Congress, among 100 senators and 435 representatives, the harshest “anti-Israel” statement, if it can be described as such, was put out by the Muslim congressman from Minnesota Keith Ellison, who bravely called on both sides to “show restraint”.
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. at The Baltimore Sun writes in How Republicans win in 2016 that the GOP must contend with leftist journalists who engage in a double standard when they go after a Richard Mourdock or a Todd Akin but don't attack something a Van Jones or a Debbie Wasserman Schultz. Even with that obstacle, he says:
[W]e should not attempt to emulate liberal Democrats on their core issues. A "Democrat-lite" approach is simply a nonstarter, despite the apparent dawning of a new progressive era in the U.S. Believe me, this too shall pass. Accordingly, any recipe for wholesale redrawing of the party platform should be resisted. In the immortal words of Malcolm X, "A man who stands for nothing will fall for anything."
Republicans quoting Malcolm X approvingly. Will wonders never cease?

Andrew Bacevich at the New York Daily News says the Broadwell affair is not the real failure in Where Petraeus let us down. The general, he writes, redefined victory so that it doesn't require winning, and for this he's gets accolades:

The problem isn’t the troops themselves—they’ve demonstrated remarkable resilience and staying power. The problem lies with leadership. Petraeus may well be the finest general of his generation. But, alas, that’s just not saying much.

Worse, the cult of generalship spawned by the myth of Petraeus-as-Patton-reborn promoted notions that when it comes to war, civilians should butt out and leave things to the pros. Elected and appointed officials, think-tank analysts and opinion makers used this as an excuse to stop thinking critically about war and simply repeat conventional wisdom.

The Los Angeles Times Editorial Board joins the growing chorus saying Senate filibuster in need of reform:
One response would be to eliminate the filibuster altogether. As a Senate rule, it can be changed by the majority party, and Democrats could eliminate it (though, of course, Republicans would almost certainly filibuster such a move). That, however, would also do away with the filibuster's legitimate and historic place. Rather than eliminating the rule, the better approach would be to amend it in such a way as to preserve the ability for minorities to fight against one-party steamrolling while scaling back the filibuster's capacity for obstructing everything.

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Comment Preferences

  •  Buffett calls for A Minimum Tax for the Wealthy (8+ / 0-)

    "We didn't set out to save the world; we set out to wonder how other people are doing and to reflect on how our actions affect other people's hearts." - Pema Chodron

    by teacherken on Mon Nov 26, 2012 at 04:34:53 AM PST

  •  You only have to look at the Double Dip Recession (7+ / 0-)

    in Europe to know how well Austerity is working.  You need a combination of things to "kill the bacteria" of the Deficit.

  •  Romney's now at 47.49%. Mitt's Mr. 47% (10+ / 0-)

    I don't know if it changed yesterday and if this is old news, but it's worth a comment.

    Mitt got what he deserved.

    look for my eSci diary series Thursday evening.

    by FishOutofWater on Mon Nov 26, 2012 at 04:58:23 AM PST

  •  Erhlich.....'But it was the Democratic pre-emptive (5+ / 0-)

    strikes on contraception that caught the GOP by surprise.'.......Say Bob, they're not finished yet. We don't call them whackadoodles for nothing.

  •  The proposition that the TP/GOP will benefit (12+ / 0-)

    if Democrats push hard and let the Bush tax cuts expire is interesting. Of course Thiessen is not exactly a wonder of predicting events and a shill for American Enterprise Institute positions. Somehow Brer Rabbit and the Tar Baby comes to mind. Could be, but I am all for making the effort and them ramming the Obama tax cuts down their throats.

    It is far, far past time that playing nice with these people expire. They have made it crystal clear that they are perfectly willing to risk the country for their narrow views and personal benefit. The greatest mistake now would be to start fearing carrying the fight into their ranks in every way possible. Thiessen, in "Obama’s ‘Moneyball’ campaign" shows he is impressed by how “Narwhal” stuck it into the "Orca" during the campaign.

    That is a tool that needs use in the continuing campaign to carry the fight into the home districts of the TP/GOP obstructionist and servants of the 1%.  

    The only foes that threaten America are the enemies at home, and those are ignorance, superstition, and incompetence. [Elbert Hubbard]

    by pelagicray on Mon Nov 26, 2012 at 04:59:40 AM PST

    •  Other than torture, Thiessen doesn't know much (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      pelagicray, Glinda

      about anything.

      Suppose you were an idiot. And suppose you were a Republican. But I repeat myself. Harry Truman

      by ratcityreprobate on Mon Nov 26, 2012 at 05:09:37 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  that makes him (0+ / 0-)

        extraordinarily qualified to be a pundit; I've always thought that knowing nothing was the highest level of achievement for that crowd.  Look at David Brooks.

        Words can sometimes, in moments of grace, attain the quality of deeds. --Elie Wiesel

        by a gilas girl on Mon Nov 26, 2012 at 08:00:14 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

    •  How do you propose the Democrats (3+ / 0-)

      ram the Obama tax cuts down the Republicans' throats when the Republicans still control the House?  Such a Republican tactic may (or may not) cause them to lose the election in 2014, but that just heaps misery on the middle class for another two years.  And keep in mind there is far more to the fiscal cliff than tax rates, much of which will also hit the middle and lower classes extremely hard.

      It doesn't seem possible that the voters can be convinced that the deficit can be ignored, much less increased, without damage to the country.  No one the public sees on their TV screens every day is telling the truth about this.   We shouldn't be addressing the deficit right now at all.

      Someone besides Paul Krugman and other economists that most people never heard of should be taking on the task.  It's past time to educate voters about the deficit instead of setting their hair on fire about it.

      "In this world of sin and sorrow there is always something to be thankful for; as for me, I rejoice that I am not a Republican." - H. L. Mencken

      by SueDe on Mon Nov 26, 2012 at 05:17:10 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  If it takes pain then so be it. (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        tb mare, DSPS owl

        What we have in the TP/GOP is a reactionary group so dedicated to the benefit of an economic elite that breaking them requires a real push. Threats such as Thiessen's proposition must not begin to counter resolve to correct the budget and political situation.

        First, I do not think the House will long stand against the resolve of Democrats to refuse to put the long term interests of that middle class on the table to get a settlement.

        I do think that Democrats caving again and giving up resolve to not do long term damage to Social Security, Medicare and other programs will have a detrimental effect on the country and the party.

        As for other people taking on the task? Yes, most certainly. Every Democrat's campaign engine, including Obama's need to be turned on to a campaign to actually win some policy victories and not just seats.

        The only foes that threaten America are the enemies at home, and those are ignorance, superstition, and incompetence. [Elbert Hubbard]

        by pelagicray on Mon Nov 26, 2012 at 05:38:34 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Dismissing damage to the middle class (0+ / 0-)

          and poor in this political climate will do more damage to the Democrats to the Republicans.  The public expects the Republicans to defend the moneyed interests of this country, and they depend on the Democrats to defend their interests.  The Republicans will endlessly demonize the Democrats for abandoning the middle class's interests - laughing all the way to the bank - and the Democrats will pay a political price come 2014 too.

          Also it would take a series of major undertakings to undo all the damage the rest of the cuts to the middle class and interests of the poor - still having to work with a Republican House - contained in the "fiscal cliff," many of which simply couldn't be undone.

          "In this world of sin and sorrow there is always something to be thankful for; as for me, I rejoice that I am not a Republican." - H. L. Mencken

          by SueDe on Mon Nov 26, 2012 at 06:48:05 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  So, you counsel surrender on the 1%'s tax cuts? (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Meteor Blades

            That is what I'm hearing from you.

            What next? Oh, they can be driven to put the "entitlements" on the table by our intransigence so lets demand personhood for embryos and all the rest!

            There is a reason police and all other law enforcement counsels against paying blackmail and ransom demands. It is the first step to a lifetime of paying and paying and paying in the first and rarely works out well in the last.

            The answer is to this time not cave, to take the fire into the TP/GOP's house and use every platform the Democrats and like minded people have to make sure the public understands.

            The only foes that threaten America are the enemies at home, and those are ignorance, superstition, and incompetence. [Elbert Hubbard]

            by pelagicray on Mon Nov 26, 2012 at 07:49:39 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  I'm not counseling surrender on the 1% tax cuts. (0+ / 0-)

              I'm hoping for a miracle before the end of the year.

              "In this world of sin and sorrow there is always something to be thankful for; as for me, I rejoice that I am not a Republican." - H. L. Mencken

              by SueDe on Mon Nov 26, 2012 at 03:22:48 PM PST

              [ Parent ]

              •  Hope is not a plan. (0+ / 0-)

                The more probably actual consequence of letting the Bush tax cuts expire will give us the opportunity to examine a wide range of tax issues, including the cap on deductions and those corporations that are very profitable and paying no, nada, nil tax even while shipping jobs overseas. As a number of experts and commentators have noted, the fiscal "cliff" is a slope taking place over plenty of time to do course corrections.

                The middle class and poor will suffer much more over the long term if there is panic in the short term. There is a Bible parable about selling your birthright for a bowl of porridge now. It is the tale of a fool that suffered for a long time as a result.

                Members of my family have already suffered from this mess. None are talking hurry up and make a bad deal, sell us out for the future. It is time for us all to stop that crap and let our politicians know we won't tolerate a sell out.

                The only foes that threaten America are the enemies at home, and those are ignorance, superstition, and incompetence. [Elbert Hubbard]

                by pelagicray on Mon Nov 26, 2012 at 05:39:45 PM PST

                [ Parent ]

      •  The deficit (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Meteor Blades

        doesn't mean a thing to voters: it's a Beltway construct designed to deflect any kind of positive action toward progressive policies that will fuel economic growth.

        It is the greatest red herring in the history of legislative and policy narratives.  Not even Agatha Christie would have written one as glaringly obvious as this.

        Words can sometimes, in moments of grace, attain the quality of deeds. --Elie Wiesel

        by a gilas girl on Mon Nov 26, 2012 at 08:02:48 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

    •  He confused the large scope of Obama's data mining (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      pelagicray, a gilas girl

      .....effort with Mitt's "get out the vote" app.

      A lot of columnists have been comparing those apples and oranges over the past couple weeks, which makes me think they either don't know what they're talking about when it comes to data or they'll stretch the truth to be able to write about a false equivalency, both of which I'd believe.

      Show us your tax returns !!!!!!

      by Bush Bites on Mon Nov 26, 2012 at 05:25:58 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  I'd love to see Gitmo closed. (13+ / 0-)

    I'd also like to see the entire war of terror scaled back dramatically. The Patriot act, Homeland Security, the Fusion centers and the TSA. They're all relics of the hysteria surrounding 9/11.

    Republicans ring hollow when they talk of fiscal cliffs. They're the ones who maxed out the nation's credit card with their unfunded wars and tax cuts. Maybe instead of raising their taxes we should just send  them a bill—payable on demand.

    "The human eye is a wonderful device. With a little effort, it can fail to see even the most glaring injustice." Richard K. Morgan

    by sceptical observer on Mon Nov 26, 2012 at 05:01:47 AM PST

    •  Or to Gitmo? (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      sceptical observer, a gilas girl

      There are times, after hearing session chatter or some really rabid crap out of that bunch, that I drift into a small grinning daydream of "what if" about that. What if the rabid bunch got a touch of the Patriot Act provisions we find so objectionable turned on them?

      Every signer, and I note many are "out of state," of those secession petitions on the no fly list? Computers secretly searched? E-mail tracked? The whole suite! Off to Gitmo until proven innocent?

      There are times I get a bit tired of honorable objection that carries our objections to that sort of un-American stuff even to those I so despise. Dammit!

      The only foes that threaten America are the enemies at home, and those are ignorance, superstition, and incompetence. [Elbert Hubbard]

      by pelagicray on Mon Nov 26, 2012 at 05:09:55 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  A moment on the national psyche... (2+ / 0-)

      ...three lifetimes in the national legacy

      Words can sometimes, in moments of grace, attain the quality of deeds. --Elie Wiesel

      by a gilas girl on Mon Nov 26, 2012 at 08:05:16 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Filibuster reform (11+ / 0-)

    has the Republicans all tied in knots. I for one want to see the filibuster used in the traditional sense - get on the floor and make your case. When this becomes an issue, Rachel Maddow will be the go-to for information - she has spent considerable time explaining how it's been used (abused) and how majority rules no longer exist.
    I love this quote regarding the consequences of Reid going after the filibuster:
    “It will shut down the Senate,” the incoming Senate GOP whip, Texas Sen. John Cornyn, told POLITICO. “It’s such an abuse of power.”
    Haha. Abuse of power. Good one.

    I'm pretty tired of being told what I care about.

    by hulibow on Mon Nov 26, 2012 at 05:03:56 AM PST

  •  The LA Times fails to convince me that half (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Bush Bites, a gilas girl

    measures reforming the filibuster will solve the abuse problems the Senate has been experiencing.  The GOP is dedicated to obstructing any and all parts of the President's agenda and that of the Senate Dems.  There is no reason to think that limiting their opportunity to filibuster will prevent them from continuing to use the remaining opportunity to filibuster from doing so, or to think they can't keep 40 members on the floor or nearby to stifle moves for cloture.

    Jonathan Bernstein made a similar argument to that of the LAT in Salon on Saturday and he also failed to explain how half measures would succeed in the face of GOP obstructionism.  http://www.salon.com/...

    There is no good reason not to kill the filibuster.  The make up of the Senate with 2 seats per state makes the argument that it would become another House ridiculous. Minority views would continue to be over-represented in the Senate.

    Suppose you were an idiot. And suppose you were a Republican. But I repeat myself. Harry Truman

    by ratcityreprobate on Mon Nov 26, 2012 at 05:04:12 AM PST

    •  Republicans filibustered (8+ / 0-)

      even bringing items up for debate, so nobody knew they were filibustering veterans, seniors, children, etc.

      If you actually bring things to the floor & force them to filibuster a jobs bill for veterans, it looks a lot worse politically because almost nobody pays attention to procedural behind-the-scenes stuff.

      "I'm not a member of an organized political party - I'm a Democrat." Will Rogers

      by newjeffct on Mon Nov 26, 2012 at 05:15:38 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Several things counter your argument that the (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      tb mare, DRo, Livvy5

      rules change actually proposed would just be overcome by the TP/GOP.

      The first is history of the thing. Graphs of that history have been shown and are very striking in demonstrating a recent and huge spike in deadlock by a minority.

      Of course, if a dedicated minority feels strongly enough about something, as Southern Senators did about racist positions, we will see long winded actual filibusters. From the Senate web page Filibuster and Cloture:

      Filibusters were particularly useful to Southern senators who sought to block civil rights legislation, including anti-lynching legislation, until cloture was invoked after a 57 day filibuster against the Civil Right Act of 1964. In 1975, the Senate reduced the number of votes required for cloture from two-thirds to three-fifths, or 60 of the current one hundred senators.
      At least that would get the jackass crew willing to burst bladders for the 1% in the spotlight, in the news, rather than "filibustering" hidden in the shadows only the most hard core C-Span watcher would notice. The word "filibuster" is "Dutch word meaning 'pirate'" so lets make those opposing say an Obama tax cut after all the Bush ones expire fly the black flag for all to see. Put them in the spotlight, turn the Obama campaign machine loose in their districts and campaign hard to evict them from seats in 2014.

      The only foes that threaten America are the enemies at home, and those are ignorance, superstition, and incompetence. [Elbert Hubbard]

      by pelagicray on Mon Nov 26, 2012 at 05:29:57 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  If everyone was even close to rational then (0+ / 0-)

        what you say would work.  I don't think the current crop of GOP senators are anywhere close to rational, they have no shame and their overriding priority is to obstruct.  They just don't give a shit about the Country.

        Suppose you were an idiot. And suppose you were a Republican. But I repeat myself. Harry Truman

        by ratcityreprobate on Mon Nov 26, 2012 at 06:01:28 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  I agree. That is why negotiating with their hard (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          ratcityreprobate

          core is no more profitable than negotiating with a hard core jihadist, skinhead or other such fanatic threatening damage.

          It is time for Democrats to carry the fire into their "House" for a change. Use every tool that just won the last election in so many cases into undermining the TP/GOP nutters in their own CDs. Make sure they are tarred with the fact they don't give a shit about the United States and ordinary people.

          I'm tired of repeated crowing, including here, after gains about how the GOP is dead. I'm ready to see our side make that happen. With regard to the TP/GOP the much ridiculed Vietnam era "It is necessary to destroy the village to save it" probably truly applies. Until that party is ravaged and destroyed we will not see a rational and effective loyal opposition that actually helps hammer out effective policy.

          The only foes that threaten America are the enemies at home, and those are ignorance, superstition, and incompetence. [Elbert Hubbard]

          by pelagicray on Mon Nov 26, 2012 at 07:57:51 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

  •  The L.A. Times Editorial Board (5+ / 0-)

    seems to have started reading something other than their own newspaper.  

    Harry Reid and other Democrats have been saying for months now that their intention is to "reform" the filibuster by forcing senators who threaten a filibuster to actually take the floor and talk themselves to death instead of being able to simply threaten a filibuster and thereby stop all senate consideration of a bill.  I don't know anyone in the senate - certainly not Reid - who has suggested doing away with the filibuster completely.

    Nice that the Times could finally catch up with the filibuster reform proposals that have already been suggested.

    "In this world of sin and sorrow there is always something to be thankful for; as for me, I rejoice that I am not a Republican." - H. L. Mencken

    by SueDe on Mon Nov 26, 2012 at 05:06:29 AM PST

  •  hhmmm. does r. kuttner know something we don't? (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    DSPS owl

    'Neither party wants significant budget cuts in the next year or two,'

    has he read ryan's budget lately?

    'Well-behaved women seldom make history” Laurel Thatcher Ulrich

    by dear occupant on Mon Nov 26, 2012 at 05:10:24 AM PST

  •  What did Debbe Wasserman-Schultz say (6+ / 0-)

    that was so controversial?

    and, there is a difference between Van Jones - who resigned under pressure, if I recall - and Mourdock, Akin, Vitter and other Republican scandals.  All the Republicans continued to either run for office, or continue in office.  And, while Mourdock & Akin were initially reprimanded by Republicans, they ended up supporting them in the end, despite their far more controversial remarks.

    "I'm not a member of an organized political party - I'm a Democrat." Will Rogers

    by newjeffct on Mon Nov 26, 2012 at 05:12:48 AM PST

    •  I think they're setting her up.... (4+ / 0-)

      ....to be the next "Pelosi"

      They have to have a villain to scare the rubes with.

      Show us your tax returns !!!!!!

      by Bush Bites on Mon Nov 26, 2012 at 05:31:46 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Dunno, ask Allen West, he might know (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      DSPS owl, One Opinion
      From: Z112 West, Allen
      Sent: Tuesday, July 19, 2011 04:48 PM
      To: Wasserman Schultz, Debbie
      Cc: McCarthy, Kevin; Blyth, Jonathan; Pelosi, Nancy; Cantor, Eric
      Subject: Unprofessional and Inappropriate Sophomoric Behavior from Wasserman-Schultz

      Look, Debbie, I understand that after I departed the House floor you directed your floor speech comments directly towards me. Let me make myself perfectly clear, you want a personal fight, I am happy to oblige. You are the most vile, unprofessional ,and despicable member of the US House of Representatives. If you have something to say to me, stop being a coward and say it to my face, otherwise, shut the heck up. Focus on your own congressional district!

      I am bringing your actions today to our Majority Leader and Majority Whip and from this time forward, understand that I shall defend myself forthright against your heinous characterless behavior……which dates back to the disgusting protest you ordered at my campaign hqs, October 2010 in Deerfield Beach.

      You have proven repeatedly that you are not a Lady, therefore, shall not be afforded due respect from me!

      Steadfast and Loyal

      Congressman Allen B West (R-FL)

      Focus on your own congressional district indeed, Allen!

      "Liberty without virtue would be no blessing to us" - Benjamin Rush, 1777

      by kovie on Mon Nov 26, 2012 at 06:15:34 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Ehrlich knows all about winning elections of cours (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Nina Katarina, Meteor Blades

    Having lost two statewide races himself

    And he only won his one term as Governor predominantly because KKT ran such an awful campaign

  •  The problem I am having (4+ / 0-)

    with all the people writing about the budget, deficit, etc., is that they seem utterly removed from the consequences of any actual policy.  Krugman is a sometimes exception.

    We need representatives from labor writing.  "The economy" is not bloody Wall Street.

    Justice For Will Will spent his brief, courageous life fighting for the rights we all take for granted. Please share his story to support the fight!

    by KibbutzAmiad on Mon Nov 26, 2012 at 05:19:31 AM PST

  •  Graham...'I will violate the pledge FOR THE GOOD (5+ / 0-)

    OF THE COUNTRY only if Democrats put entitlements on the table.'....You might want to rephrase that Lindsey.

    •  Are Dems stupid enough to fall for this setup? (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      skillet

      Or are they willing to pretend to be this stupid, to avoid a fight? It certainly wouldn't be the first time. It almost seems...rehearsed...

      "Liberty without virtue would be no blessing to us" - Benjamin Rush, 1777

      by kovie on Mon Nov 26, 2012 at 06:11:13 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  The long list of what sucks today (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    skillet

    in contrast to the what sucked yesterday clearly demonstrates why people hate government.  It doesn't work.   Congress is by far the most dysfunctional, and the White House is right behind.   When these self-serving crooks quit being the face of government, maybe then someone will have some faith in its potential.  

    If money is speech, then speech must be money.

    by dkmich on Mon Nov 26, 2012 at 05:26:01 AM PST

  •  I'm going over the "cliff"... (3+ / 0-)

    ...and I'm going to handcuff Marc Thiessan to me. In fact, I'm going to push him over first so I land on him.

    Not that a two foot drop is much to be concerned about. Good news for Thiessan: I only weigh around 165 lbs now. 5 years ago when I was pushing 196 might have been harder on him.

    When you are right you cannot be too radical; when you are wrong, you cannot be too conservative. --Martin Luther King Jr.

    by Egalitare on Mon Nov 26, 2012 at 05:30:17 AM PST

  •  are mccain and graham going steady or what? n/t (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    tb mare
  •  The Malcolm X quote was not his (4+ / 0-)

    It was Alexander Hamilton's, to whom Repubs can, in theory at least, claim some ideological simpatico. Of course, if Hamilton were alive today he'd have penned scathing screeds (in the NY Post, of course, which he founded) denoucing the lot of them as infamous and treacherous scoundrels and challenge more than a few to a duel. And this time, he probably wouldn't miss.

    Also, he would denounce all this manufactured "fiscal cliff" hysteria as nonsense:

    A national debt, if it is not excessive, will be to us a national blessing.

    "Liberty without virtue would be no blessing to us" - Benjamin Rush, 1777

    by kovie on Mon Nov 26, 2012 at 06:08:47 AM PST

  •  My suggestion for filibuster reform (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    One Opinion

    Each filibuster must have a "filibuster champion". One spokesperson who must visibly - on the Senate floor - champion the filibuster. In a two-year Congress, no person may champion more than one filibuster.

    How could Republicans cheat on something like that, assuming they regain the majority?

    They could keep bringing up the same thing and attempt to clean out the opposition's ability to filibuster.

    So, should the Senate bring up the same or essentially the same topic again, the same champion may continue their filibuster again for that topic. The Senate may proceed with a bill or appointment if the topic that is being filibustered is stripped from the bill.

    They could also bring up lots of topics that are so heinous that it could force the opposition to filibuster useless things until all of the capability is used up, then the Republicans bring up the real stinker.

    So the Dems could refuse to bite on those. Force the Republicans to vote for real on those and go on record.

    Anyway, something like that is my suggestion.

    I am progressive. I am liberal. I make no apologies. - Kos

    My political compass: - 8.38,-6.97

    by pucklady on Mon Nov 26, 2012 at 06:28:28 AM PST

  •  Two points: (0+ / 0-)

    1)  Thiessen is an absolute effin' idiot! Does he actually get paid for his stupid, baseless opinions?  But I do hope that the GOP listens to his advice.  Then they can explain to us why the "fiscal cliff" was a mirage after all.

    2) Re: Thiessen and Ehrlich: Why is it that all conservatives of a fiscally nutty stripe have very bad haircuts?  Too cheap for a good barber?

    "Republicans have been fleeced and exploited and lied to by a conservative entertainment complex." - David Frum

    by Glinda on Mon Nov 26, 2012 at 06:31:08 AM PST

    •  Yes. He does get paid for his stupid, baseless (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Glinda

      opinions.  He'd probably also get paid for intelligent, evidence-based opinions, if he ever thought to pen any of those.  But that's much more work and the paychecks are the same no matter how flimsy the opinions.  

      Words can sometimes, in moments of grace, attain the quality of deeds. --Elie Wiesel

      by a gilas girl on Mon Nov 26, 2012 at 08:10:16 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Mr. Fletcher is living in fantasy land (0+ / 0-)
    Rather than moving quickly to push the new Obama administration in a progressive direction, by the spring of 2009, the Left had ceded initiative on both domestic and foreign policy to the Right.
    It wasn't the left who ceded the initiative on domestic and foreign policy. It was the administration. They consistently pushed back against the left. Does he not remember us being called "whiners", and the "professional left", as well as numerous other insults? At some point you have to wonder who pays people to spout utter nonsense as wisdom.

    I'm no philosopher, I am no poet, I'm just trying to help you out - Gomez (from the song Hamoa Beach)

    by jhecht on Mon Nov 26, 2012 at 06:31:44 AM PST

  •  Watch for this fragment (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    a gilas girl
    In the entire US Congress, among 100 senators and 435 representatives, the harshest “anti-Israel” statement ... was put out by the Muslim congressman from Minnesota Keith Ellison
    to be used in ads against Ellison, without the rest of the sentence
    who bravely called on both sides to “show restraint”.

    We all understand that freedom isn't free. What Romney and Ryan don't understand is that neither is opportunity. We have to invest in it.
    Julian Castro, DNC 4 Sept 2012

    by pixxer on Mon Nov 26, 2012 at 07:24:37 AM PST

  •  Thanks for roundup. (0+ / 0-)

    I'm posting this, and anything else I post, fom a site that's away from my home.

    I, however, read on a Kindle from home, and every morning a read the roundup.

    Thanks for taking the trouble to post it.

  •  What the hell did Debbie Wasserman Schultz (0+ / 0-)

    say that was any near what Akin/Murdouck said?

    The modern conservative is engaged in one of man's oldest exercises in moral philosophy;the search for a superior moral justification for selfishness

    by CTMET on Mon Nov 26, 2012 at 09:26:20 AM PST

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