Skip to main content

Welcome to bookchat where you can talk about anything...books, plays, essays, and books on tape.  You don’t have to be reading a book to come in, sit down, and chat with us.

...................

UPDATE: pico says the list is a fake...see his link here!

http://www.purplecar.net/...

I still kind of like it, though.

................

A hat tip to chingchongchinaman for this idea.  I do enjoy lists.  I have read about 2/3 of the BBC list and tried some more of them, but I am older so I have had time.  There are some on the list that I have consciously decided NOT to read because of reviews or comments from friends.  Basically, this is a good list, though.

The part that is critical that I don’t really agree with is the MUST READ part.  I just can’t force people to read books that I loved.  We all enjoy different books.

I will try my own list below this one and I hope you will, too.  

Have you read more than 6 of these books? The BBC believes most people will have read only 6 of the 100 books listed here.

http://community.indigo.ca/...

Instructions: Copy list
Bold those books you’ve read in their entirety.
Italicize the ones you started but didn’t finish or read only an excerpt.

1 Pride and Prejudice – Jane Austen
2 The Lord of the Rings – JRR Tolkien
3 Jane Eyre – Charlotte Bronte
4 Harry Potter series – JK Rowling
5 To Kill a Mockingbird – Harper Lee
6 The Bible
7 Wuthering Heights – Emily Bronte
8 Nineteen Eighty Four – George Orwell
9 His Dark Materials – Philip Pullman
10 Great Expectations – Charles Dickens
11 Little Women – Louisa M Alcott
12 Tess of the D’Urbervilles – Thomas Hardy
13 Catch 22 – Joseph Heller
14 Complete Works of Shakespeare
15 Rebecca – Daphne Du Maurier
16 The Hobbit – JRR Tolkien
17 Birdsong – Sebastian Faulk
18 Catcher in the Rye – JD Salinger
19 The Time Traveler’s Wife – Audrey Niffenegger
20 Middlemarch – George Eliot
21 Gone With The Wind – Margaret Mitchell
22 The Great Gatsby – F Scott Fitzgerald
24 War and Peace – Leo Tolstoy
25 The Hitch Hiker’s Guide to the Galaxy – Douglas Adams
27 Crime and Punishment – Fyodor Dostoyevsky
28 Grapes of Wrath – John Steinbeck
29 Alice in Wonderland – Lewis Caroll
30 The Wind in the Willows – Kenneth Grahame
31. Anna Karenina – Leo Tolstoy
32 David Copperfield – Charles Dickens
33 Chronicles of Narnia – CS Lewis
34 Emma -Jane Austen
35 Persuasion – Jane Austen
36 The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe – CS Lewis
37 The Kite Runner – Khaled Hosseini
38 Captain Corelli’s Mandolin – Louis De Bernieres
39 Memoirs of a Geisha – Arthur Golden
40 Winnie the Pooh – A.A. Milne
41 Animal Farm – George Orwell
42 The Da Vinci Code – Dan Brown
43 One Hundred Years of Solitude – Gabriel Garcia Marquez
44 A Prayer for Owen Meany – John Irving
45 The Woman in White – Wilkie Collins
46 Anne of Green Gables – LM Montgomery
47 Far From The Madding Crowd – Thomas Hardy
48 The Handmaid’s Tale – Margaret Atwood
49 Lord of the Flies – William Golding
50 Atonement – Ian McEwan
51 Life of Pi – Yann Martel
52 Dune – Frank Herbert
53 Cold Comfort Farm – Stella Gibbons
54 Sense and Sensibility – Jane Austen
55 A Suitable Boy – Vikram Seth
56 The Shadow of the Wind – Carlos Ruiz Zafon
57 A Tale Of Two Cities – Charles Dickens
58 Brave New World – Aldous Huxley
59 The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time – Mark Haddon
60 Love In The Time Of Cholera – Gabriel Garcia Marquez
61 Of Mice and Men – John Steinbeck
62 Lolita – Vladimir Nabokov
63 The Secret History – Donna Tartt
64 The Lovely Bones – Alice Sebold
65 Count of Monte Cristo – Alexandre Dumas
66 On the Road – Jack Kerouac
67 Jude the Obscure – Thomas Hardy
68 Bridget Jones’s Diary – Helen Fielding
69 Midnight’s Children – Salman Rushdie
70 Moby Dick – Herman Melville
71 Oliver Twist – Charles Dickens
72 Dracula – Bram Stoker
73 The Secret Garden – Frances Hodgson Burnett
74 Notes From A Small Island – Bill Bryson
75 Ulysses – James Joyce
76 The Inferno – Dante
77 Swallows and Amazons – Arthur Ransome
78 Germinal – Emile Zola
79 Vanity Fair – William Makepeace Thackeray
80 Possession – AS Byatt
81 A Christmas Carol – Charles Dickens
82 Cloud Atlas – David Mitchell
83 The Color Purple – Alice Walker
84 The Remains of the Day – Kazuo Ishiguro
85 Madame Bovary – Gustave Flaubert
86 A Fine Balance – Rohinton Mistry
87 Charlotte’s Web – E.B. White
88 The Five People You Meet In Heaven – Mitch Albom
89 Adventures of Sherlock Holmes – Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
90 The Faraway Tree Collection – Enid Blyton
91 Heart of Darkness – Joseph Conrad
92 The Little Prince – Antoine De Saint-Exupery (In French)
93 The Wasp Factory – Iain Banks
94 Watership Down – Richard Adams
95 A Confederacy of Dunces – John Kennedy Toole
96 A Town Like Alice – Nevil Shute
97 The Three Musketeers – Alexandre Dumas
98 Hamlet – William Shakespeare
99 Charlie and the Chocolate Factory – Roald Dahl
100 Les Miserables – Victor Hugo

This is my list of fiction books that I recommend because I loved them or was inspired by them, not because they are great literature because many are not…

These books and authors are not in any order and I had to leave many of my favorites off.  Hopefully, my posters will mention some I did not list.  This list may vary from previous lists I have given.  To squeeze in more books, I resorted to listing all stories by an author as I went along.  

1.  East of Eden by John Steinbeck

2.  Of Mice and Men by Steinbeck

3.  Grapes of Wrath by Steinbeck

4.  The Acts of King Arthur and his Noble Knights by Steinbeck

5.  Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson

6.   Moby Dick by Herman Melville

7.   Chesapeake by James Michener

8.   The Speed of Dark by Elizabeth Moon

9.   The Mists of Avalon by Marion Zimmer Bradley

10.  Jane Austen’s  Pride and Prejudice, Persuasion, Sense and Sensibility

11.  All of James Herriot's series that begins with All Creatures Great and Small

12.  Mrs. Mike by Nancy and Benedict Freedman

13.  Shane by Jack Schaefer

14.  The Guns of Navarone by Alistair McLean

15.  Dorothy Dunnett
         Lymond Chronicles
         House of Niccolo
         King Hereafter

16.  Einstein’s Dreams by Alan Lightman

17.  Girl of the Limberlost by Gene Stratton Porter

18.  All by Patricia McKillip...especially The Riddle Master of Hed series, The Cygnet and the Firebird

19.  All by Ursula Le Guin

20.  The Last Unicorn by Peter Beagle

21.  The Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit by J. R. R. Tolkien

22.  All by C. J. Cherryh

23.  Harry Potter series by J. K. Rowling

24.  Both Amber series by Roger Zelazny

25.  Mildred Taylor’s

   Song of the Trees
   Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry
   Let the Circle Be Unbroken
   The Road to Memphis
   The Land

26.  Winter’s Tale and A Soldier of the Great War by Mark Helprin

27.  Dragondoom by Dennis L. McKiernan

28.  All by P. G. Wodehouse

29.  Charles Dickens…A Christmas Carol, Great Expectations, A Tale of Two Cities

30.  Kenneth Roberts…Northwest Passage, Oliver Wiswell

31.  Exodus by Leon Uris

32.  Lalita Tademy…Cane River and Red River

33.  The Likeness by Tana French

34.  All by Louise Penny

35.  Mary Renault

       The King Must Die
       Bull from the Sea
       Mask of Apollo
       The Charioteer

36.  All by Ellis Peters...Cadfael

37.  Patrick Rothfuss…The Name of the Wind: The Kingkiller Chronicle: Day One and The Wise Man’s Fear: Day Two

38.  All by Guy Gavriel Kay...Tigana, Under Heaven, Fionavar Tapestry series

39.  A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L’Engle

40.  Mary Doria Russell The Sparrow and The Children of God (must be read together)

41.  Fred Saberhagen all the Sword Book series

42.  Gail Tsukiyama…Samurai’s Garden, Street of a Thousand Blossoms

43.   Remembrance Rock by Carl Sandburg

44.   Sir Walter Scott… Ivanhoe, Lady of the Lake  
http://www.online-literature.com/...

45.  The Secret of Santa Vittoria by Robert Crichton

46.  Snow Falling on Cedars by David Guterson

47.  Mary Stewart

    The Crystal Cave
    The Hollow Hills
    The Last Enchantment
    The Wicked Day

48.  To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee

49.  War and Peace by Tolstoy

50.   A Tree Grows in Brooklyn by Betty Smith

51.   A Prayer for Owen Meany by John Irving

52.   The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas

53.   The Iliad and the Odyssey by Homer

54.   Ulysses by James Joyce

55.   Losing Battles by Eudora Welty

56.   James White…Tales of Sector General series

57.   All by Connie Willis

58.   All by Jani Wurts

59.   All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque

60.   All the King's Men by Robert Penn Warren

61.   Cry, the Beloved Country by Alan Paton

62.   Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison

63.   Sophie’s Choice by William Styron

64.  Lian Hearn

   Heaven’s Net Is Wide
   Across the Nightingale Floor
   Grass for His Pillow
   Brilliance of the Moon

65.   Little Women and sequels by Louisa May Alcott

66.   House of Spirits and Of Love and Shadow by Isabel Allende

67.   The Chronicles of Prydain by Lloyd Alexander

68.   Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay by Michael Chabon

69.   Anne of Green Gables and the Emily series by L. M. Montgomery

70.   The Foundation Trilogy by Isaac Asimov

71.   Blind Assassin by Margaret Atwood

72.   Banner in the Sky by James Ramsey Ullman

73.   The Beauty and the Beast by Jeanne-Marie LePrince de Beaumont

74.   Middlemarch by George Eliot

75.   The Elfin Ship by James P. Blaylock

76.   Bard by Morgan Llywelyn

77.   Enemy Mine and sequels by Barry Longyear

78.   Irish RM by Somerville and Ross

79.   David Brin

   Sundiver
   Startide Rising
   Uplift War
   Brightness Reef
   Infinity’s Shore
   Heaven’s Reach

80.  Chaim Potok

   My Name Is Asher Lev
   The Chosen
   The Promise

81.  Outsiders by S. E. Hinton

82.  The Octopus by Frank Norris

83.  The English Patient by Michael Ondaatje

84.   Temeraire series by Naomi Novik

85.   The Eight by Katherine Neville

86.   Neverending Story by Michael Ende

87.   All the short stories by Patrick F. McManus

88.   Robin McKinley
             The Hero and the Crown
                 The Blue Sword

89.   Pern series including the Harper series by Anne McCaffrey

90.   Patricia Kenealy-Morrison

        The Copper Crown
        The Throne of Scone
        The Silver Branch

91.  The Glass Menagerie by Tennessee Williams

92.   Robert Jordan…Wheel of Time series

93.   Diana Gabaldon… Outlander series

94.   Redwall series by Brian Jacques

95.   I Heard the Owl Call My Name by Margaret Craven

96.   All by Andrea Camilleri (except the first one Shape of Water)

97.   All by Lindsey Davis with Falco

98.   The Devil in Music and three sequels by Kate Ross

99.   The Doll Maker by Harriette Arnow

100.  All by Robin Hobb

101.  The Far Pavilions by M. M. Kaye

102.   All by Terry Prachett

103.   All by Kelly McCullough

104.   Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society by Mary Ann Shaffer and Annie Barrows

Some other time I will do my non-fiction favorites.

This list leaves room for the names of lots more great and entertaining books from posters below…hundreds, even.

Diaries of the Week:

Monday Murder Mystery: Scott Turow's Presumed Innocent
by Avila
http://www.dailykos.com/...

Kos Katalogue: Holiday Mood (HOTLIST THIS!)
by Sara R
http://www.dailykos.com/...

What We Know About Elon Musk’s Proposed Mars Colony

http://idealab.talkingpointsmemo.com/...

...Musk envisions sending up much larger rockets and volunteer colonists in batches for the cost of about $500,000 per person. At first, 10 people would be sent to Mars, then larger groups, moving up to 80,000 per year.

The rockets, which would be larger even than SpaceX’s still-in-development Falcon Heavy (two Falcon 9 rockets combined), would also need to carry a massive amount of cargo for the journey to Mars and for getting the colony started — everything from the materials needed to build pressurized domes for growing crops, to water, which would be used not only for drinking and bathing but to shield the astronauts from harmful solar and cosmic radiation during flight.

Musk said in his talk that when calculating the cost-per-ticket to Mars, he looked into two different major types of fuel to get there and back: hydrogen and methane.
“The cheapest fuel is methane,” Musk said. “The nice thing about methane is you can create it on Mars, because Mars has a CO2 atmosphere and there’s a lot of water ice as well.”

NOTE: plf515 has book talk on Wednesday mornings early

Originally posted to Readers and Book Lovers on Wed Nov 28, 2012 at 05:00 PM PST.

Also republished by Progressive Friends of the Library Newsletter.

Poll

Would your list have more?

21%14 votes
0%0 votes
0%0 votes
6%4 votes
21%14 votes
7%5 votes
1%1 votes
16%11 votes
10%7 votes
1%1 votes
1%1 votes
1%1 votes
3%2 votes
3%2 votes
4%3 votes

| 66 votes | Vote | Results

EMAIL TO A FRIEND X
Your Email has been sent.
You must add at least one tag to this diary before publishing it.

Add keywords that describe this diary. Separate multiple keywords with commas.
Tagging tips - Search For Tags - Browse For Tags

?

More Tagging tips:

A tag is a way to search for this diary. If someone is searching for "Barack Obama," is this a diary they'd be trying to find?

Use a person's full name, without any title. Senator Obama may become President Obama, and Michelle Obama might run for office.

If your diary covers an election or elected official, use election tags, which are generally the state abbreviation followed by the office. CA-01 is the first district House seat. CA-Sen covers both senate races. NY-GOV covers the New York governor's race.

Tags do not compound: that is, "education reform" is a completely different tag from "education". A tag like "reform" alone is probably not meaningful.

Consider if one or more of these tags fits your diary: Civil Rights, Community, Congress, Culture, Economy, Education, Elections, Energy, Environment, Health Care, International, Labor, Law, Media, Meta, National Security, Science, Transportation, or White House. If your diary is specific to a state, consider adding the state (California, Texas, etc). Keep in mind, though, that there are many wonderful and important diaries that don't fit in any of these tags. Don't worry if yours doesn't.

You can add a private note to this diary when hotlisting it:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary from your hotlist?
Are you sure you want to remove your recommendation? You can only recommend a diary once, so you will not be able to re-recommend it afterwards.
Rescue this diary, and add a note:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary from Rescue?
Choose where to republish this diary. The diary will be added to the queue for that group. Publish it from the queue to make it appear.

You must be a member of a group to use this feature.

Add a quick update to your diary without changing the diary itself:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary?
(The diary will be removed from the site and returned to your drafts for further editing.)
(The diary will be removed.)
Are you sure you want to save these changes to the published diary?

Comment Preferences

  •  welcome (47+ / 0-)

    How to find the group Readers & Book Lovers:

    http://www.dailykos.com/...

    or click on the heart by our tag and we will come to your page.  Please stop by and visit as you can comment in diaries now for a longer time and there are some really interesting diaries there.

    Susan from 29 has made our schedule so you can click on it and read the diaries...thanks, Susan!

    All Times are EDT, EST

    Readers & Book Lovers Series Schedule


    DAY TIME (EST/EDT) Series Name Editor(s)
    SUN 6:00 PM Young Reader's Pavilion The Book Bear
    Sun 9:30 PM SciFi/Fantasy Book Club quarkstomper
    Bi-Monthly Sun Midnight Reading Ramblings don mikulecky
    MON 8:00 PM Monday Murder Mystery Susan from 29
    Mon 11:00 PM My Favorite Books/Authors edrie, MichiganChet
    alternate Tuesdays 8:00 AM LGBT Literature Texdude50, Dave in Northridge
    Tue 8:00 PM Contemporary Fiction Views Brecht
    WED 7:30 AM WAYR? plf515
    Wed 8:00 PM Bookflurries Bookchat cfk
    THU 8:00 PM Write On! SensibleShoes
    Thu (first each month) 11:00 AM Monthly Bookpost AdmiralNaismith
    Thu (third each month) 11:00 PM Audiobooks Club SoCaliana
    FRI 8:00 AM Books That Changed My Life Diana in NoVa
    SAT (fourth each month) 11:00 AM Windy City Bookworm Chitown Kev
    Sat 4:00 PM Daily Kos Political Book Club Freshly Squeezed Cynic
    Sat 9:00 PM Books So Bad They're Good Ellid

    …………………

    I have finished reading:

    The Betrayal of Trust by Susan Hill

    I am reading:

    David Falkayn: Star Trader by Poul Anderson (pg. 601 of 680)

    Operation Mincemeat by Ben Macintyre (pg. 30 of 337)

    Some Kind of Fairy Tale by Graham Joyce (pg. 128 of 308)

    Crossed Blades by Kelly McCullough (part three of the Fallen Blade series) (pg. 62 of 287)  

    What are you reading or hoping to read?

    Join us at Bookflurries-Bookchat on Wednesday nights 8:00 PM EST

    by cfk on Wed Nov 28, 2012 at 12:25:42 PM PST

  •  Here Is My List (19+ / 0-)

    1 Pride and Prejudice – Jane Austen
    2 The Lord of the Rings – JRR Tolkien
    3 Jane Eyre – Charlotte Bronte
    4 Harry Potter series – JK Rowling
    5 To Kill a Mockingbird – Harper Lee
    6 The Bible
    7 Wuthering Heights – Emily Bronte
    8 Nineteen Eighty Four – George Orwell

    9 His Dark Materials – Philip Pullman
    10 Great Expectations – Charles Dickens
    11 Little Women – Louisa M Alcott
    12 Tess of the D’Urbervilles – Thomas Hardy
    13 Catch 22 – Joseph Heller
    14 Complete Works of Shakespeare
    15 Rebecca – Daphne Du Maurier
    16 The Hobbit – JRR Tolkien
    17 Birdsong – Sebastian Faulk
    18 Catcher in the Rye – JD Salinger
    19 The Time Traveler’s Wife – Audrey Niffenegger
    20 Middlemarch – George Eliot
    21 Gone With The Wind – Margaret Mitchell
    22 The Great Gatsby – F Scott Fitzgerald
    24 War and Peace – Leo Tolstoy
    25 The Hitch Hiker’s Guide to the Galaxy – Douglas Adams
    27 Crime and Punishment – Fyodor Dostoyevsky
    28 Grapes of Wrath – John Steinbeck
    29 Alice in Wonderland – Lewis Caroll
    30 The Wind in the Willows – Kenneth Grahame

    31. Anna Karenina – Leo Tolstoy
    32 David Copperfield – Charles Dickens
    33 Chronicles of Narnia – CS Lewis
    34 Emma -Jane Austen
    35 Persuasion – Jane Austen
    36 The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe – CS Lewis
    37 The Kite Runner – Khaled Hosseini
    38 Captain Corelli’s Mandolin – Louis De Bernieres
    39 Memoirs of a Geisha – Arthur Golden
    40 Winnie the Pooh – A.A. Milne
    41 Animal Farm – George Orwell
    42 The Da Vinci Code – Dan Brown
    43 One Hundred Years of Solitude – Gabriel Garcia Marquez

    44 A Prayer for Owen Meany – John Irving
    45 The Woman in White – Wilkie Collins
    46 Anne of Green Gables – LM Montgomery
    47 Far From The Madding Crowd – Thomas Hardy
    48 The Handmaid’s Tale – Margaret Atwood
    49 Lord of the Flies – William Golding
    50 Atonement – Ian McEwan
    51 Life of Pi – Yann Martel
    52 Dune – Frank Herbert
    53 Cold Comfort Farm – Stella Gibbons
    54 Sense and Sensibility – Jane Austen
    55 A Suitable Boy – Vikram Seth
    56 The Shadow of the Wind – Carlos Ruiz Zafon
    57 A Tale Of Two Cities – Charles Dickens
    58 Brave New World – Aldous Huxley
    59 The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time – Mark Haddon
    60 Love In The Time Of Cholera – Gabriel Garcia Marquez
    61 Of Mice and Men – John Steinbeck
    62 Lolita – Vladimir Nabokov
    63 The Secret History – Donna Tartt
    64 The Lovely Bones – Alice Sebold
    65 Count of Monte Cristo – Alexandre Dumas
    66 On the Road – Jack Kerouac
    67 Jude the Obscure – Thomas Hardy
    68 Bridget Jones’s Diary – Helen Fielding
    69 Midnight’s Children – Salman Rushdie
    70 Moby Dick – Herman Melville
    71 Oliver Twist – Charles Dickens
    72 Dracula – Bram Stoker

    73 The Secret Garden – Frances Hodgson Burnett
    74 Notes From A Small Island – Bill Bryson
    75 Ulysses – James Joyce
    76 The Inferno – Dante
    77 Swallows and Amazons – Arthur Ransome
    78 Germinal – Emile Zola
    79 Vanity Fair – William Makepeace Thackeray
    80 Possession – AS Byatt
    81 A Christmas Carol – Charles Dickens
    82 Cloud Atlas – David Mitchell
    83 The Color Purple – Alice Walker
    84 The Remains of the Day – Kazuo Ishiguro
    85 Madame Bovary – Gustave Flaubert
    86 A Fine Balance – Rohinton Mistry
    87 Charlotte’s Web – E.B. White
    88 The Five People You Meet In Heaven – Mitch Albom
    89 Adventures of Sherlock Holmes – Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
    90 The Faraway Tree Collection – Enid Blyton
    91 Heart of Darkness – Joseph Conrad
    92 The Little Prince – Antoine De Saint-Exupery (In French)
    93 The Wasp Factory – Iain Banks
    94 Watership Down – Richard Adams
    95 A Confederacy of Dunces – John Kennedy Toole
    96 A Town Like Alice – Nevil Shute
    97 The Three Musketeers – Alexandre Dumas
    98 Hamlet – William Shakespeare
    99 Charlie and the Chocolate Factory – Roald Dahl
    100 Les Miserables – Victor Hugo

    When opportunity calls pick up the phone and give it directions to your house.

    by webranding on Wed Nov 28, 2012 at 05:05:29 PM PST

  •  Happy to have these, but, "Dear Beeb"... (15+ / 0-)

    Always enjoy lists like this, if only to stimulate my own reading and remind me of things I need to get to.

    But as for "The BBC believes most people will have read only 6 of the 100 books listed here"...you privileged British twerps can bite me. There's still an awful lot of elitism in that august institution.

    •  It Is Kind Of A Better List Than Most (11+ / 0-)

      there are a number of books listed, which I think most folks that write about books for a living, would find beneath them.

      When opportunity calls pick up the phone and give it directions to your house.

      by webranding on Wed Nov 28, 2012 at 05:08:35 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  I thought that was a pretty small number, too (8+ / 0-)

      considering that many of the titles are very popular ones.

      Join us at Bookflurries-Bookchat on Wednesday nights 8:00 PM EST

      by cfk on Wed Nov 28, 2012 at 05:15:30 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  If it makes you feel better, (15+ / 0-)

      it's not a BBC list.  

      In 2003 the BBC did put together a list it called "The Big Read", which asked viewers to submit "the nation's best-loved novel", which is something else entirely.

      Here's a good history of the "books you must read before you die" list, which is one of those internet-drive memes that keeps getting modified and attached to different institutions in different ways.

      Saint, n. A dead sinner revised and edited. - Ambrose Bierce

      by pico on Wed Nov 28, 2012 at 05:32:19 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  I don't think this is an elitist list (10+ / 0-)

      as there are many entries that book snobs would scoff at.  I DO think it's a very western mind set list, with a few exceptions.

      But let's face it, "the classics" as they are understood to be, are pretty much all from western civilization, just to start with.  This doesn't make them bad or wrong, but simply one side of a world of different points of view.

      Points of view I've enjoyed from outside the western culture bubble, to name just two stellar examples out of many, have come to me via Abraham Verghese's "Cutting for Stones," and Thrity Umrigar's "The Space Between Us," both riveting and glorious reads.  

      "A typical vice of American politics is the avoidance of saying anything real on real issues." Theodore Roosevelt.

      by StellaRay on Wed Nov 28, 2012 at 05:32:22 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Yeah, but these "classics" are like 90% (10+ / 0-)

        English-language literature. Doesn't even represent Western Civilization well.

        •  Several of these books (4+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          cfk, mahakali overdrive, Anak, Limelite

          are translated into English.  But fact is, whether we like it or not, English is the predominant language of Western Civilization, and if an author does not get translated into English, that author will probably not achieve "classic" status.

          Seems to me it's useless to argue about the predominance of any language, or what should be, as it is what it is.

          What I think IS important, is that authors from other cultures DO get translated into English, more of them and more often. That authors whose POV is not western, are translated, discovered and explored more and more.  

          "A typical vice of American politics is the avoidance of saying anything real on real issues." Theodore Roosevelt.

          by StellaRay on Wed Nov 28, 2012 at 08:08:35 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  Right NOW English is the predominant language. (3+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            cfk, pico, Brecht

            But that only started after, I dunno, WWII. Western Civilization is way longer than the dominance of English, or do you disagree?

            Way fewer authors get translated into English than into French or German. We kinda suck when it comes to translations.

            If an author needs to be translated into English to achieve "classic" status, that is a horrible sign of our literary ignorance and arrogance, no? Thank God the Nobel Lit Prize is in the hands of the Swedes.

            •  As I stated below, (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              cfk

              it depends on how you define "classic."  The simple fact is a book will be read much more widely in the western world if it is translated into English---a practical consideration not a sign of literary ignorance or arrogance, imo.

              Of course a book can be a "classic" within its own culture, but if the English speaking world can't read it it will be a lesser known classic. Would Tolstoy's books be considered classics if they were never translated into English or French or all the other languages they've been translated into?  Sure, in Russia.  But no one here would know who he is.  Same is true for English writers.  If they're never translated they are lesser known.

              The issue is accessibility to the widest audience---which means translations all ways.

              "A typical vice of American politics is the avoidance of saying anything real on real issues." Theodore Roosevelt.

              by StellaRay on Thu Nov 29, 2012 at 06:36:39 AM PST

              [ Parent ]

              •  Sorry that is not a simple fact. And, yes, it is a (0+ / 0-)

                sign of literary ignorancee and arrogance.

                What the hell do the French or Germans care if we translate things into English?

                Germans, who are way better-read than us and who still have a great interest in literature, unlike us, all know at least two modern Dutch authors, Cees Nooteboom and Harry Mulisch. They don't care if we don't know them or translate them. And they don't read them in Dutch, they read them in German translation, ie. those authors are not part of their culture.

                And then there is Roberto Bolaño, where the English world was scrambling furiously to get translations out for this modern classic because they were behind. I have a novel in Spanish of his that still hasn't been published in English, cause we are just behind, we don't really care about the rest of the world much; we are insular.

                Or have you never lived in a non-English-speaking country?

            •  May Be More Than a Language Issue (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              Brecht, cfk

              Could, to a degree, also be a matter of printing, freedom of the press, and distributing.  If, in Europe, the English speaking countries produced more writers who wrote more books because there existed greater freedom to do so, with greater assurance of finding a publisher, and a better marketing strategy and financing, then books written in English would out compete books written in other languages, achieving a wider readership, greater renown, and probably higher status among works of merit and longevity, the qualities basic to Western literary canon.

              I don't believe it's simply an issue of original language.

              Readers & Book Lovers Pull up a chair! You're never too old to be a Meta Groupie

              by Limelite on Thu Nov 29, 2012 at 09:56:47 AM PST

              [ Parent ]

              •  I dunno, but copyright laws in Germany (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                cfk

                in the 19th century were much more favorable for publishing than in the UK. Germany published way more books than the UK did in the 19th century.

                There was a recent article in Der Spiegel about this (available in English too, iirc) where they claimed that this led to Germany's excellence in the sciences.

          •  Er... (3+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Anak, cfk, Brecht

            For some spheres, like science or business, that may be true.  But that's not even remotely the case that English is predominant when it comes to art.   Canons tend to be very culture-specific, which is why English speakers list more English books, French speakers more French books, etc.  There are plenty of works considered classics outside the English-speaking world that have never been translated into English.  That's especially the case with languages more distant from English, like Chinese or Vietnamese.  

            Off the top of my head: it's surprising how much Stanislaw Lem has never been translated into English, including some of his best-known, most important work. Still a classic.

            And it works in the reverse, too: outside of English, you'll almost never find names like e.g. Philip Roth on list of classic writers.  But he appears on "our" lists... so is he a classic?  

            Saint, n. A dead sinner revised and edited. - Ambrose Bierce

            by pico on Thu Nov 29, 2012 at 12:14:19 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  Well, I guess it depends on how you (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              cfk

              define "classic."  How many people need to read a book for it to achieve that stature, and who decides?  I did qualify my comment as "western civilization," which population wise is largely English speaking.  Hard for a book to be a classic outside it's own culture if people cannot read it.  If you take say, Shakespeare, you have a classic Western civilization classic---translated into many languages.

              I'm not familiar with Stanislaw Lem, and I would wager that most aren't.  Which doesn't mean he hasn't written "classics," ----again, just depends on how you define "classic."  

              "A typical vice of American politics is the avoidance of saying anything real on real issues." Theodore Roosevelt.

              by StellaRay on Thu Nov 29, 2012 at 06:24:21 AM PST

              [ Parent ]

              •  Not so: (3+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                Brecht, cfk, StellaRay
                I'm not familiar with Stanislaw Lem, and I would wager that most aren't.
                Most English-only speakers.  Until his death Lem was a perennial favorite for the Nobel Prize, and he's the most widely-translated and read science fiction writer in history.  That some of his major works, like Summa Theologica, have never been translated into English, doesn't diminish their stature as classics at all.

                Classics of the Western canon?  Well, depends on who's counting, I guess.

                Where we're disagreeing is that I think you're begging the question of what a classic is by giving it a set of parameters that aren't really in play.  Classics come about through time and influence, and it really doesn't matter if they ever achieve enormous readerships.  This is why people grumble when those "best-of" lists appear, that most readers haven't heard/read the books on the list because they only appeal to a narrow, academic slice of the readership.   e.g. Most readers haven't read Ulysses, but it's the best English-language novel of the last century.  It's a classic even if so few people (relative to the market) are reading it.

                Anyway, starting to ramble.

                Saint, n. A dead sinner revised and edited. - Ambrose Bierce

                by pico on Thu Nov 29, 2012 at 10:39:05 AM PST

                [ Parent ]

                •  correction: (1+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  cfk

                  most widely-read and translated modern science fiction writer.  I'm sure Verne has him beat.

                  Saint, n. A dead sinner revised and edited. - Ambrose Bierce

                  by pico on Thu Nov 29, 2012 at 12:37:51 PM PST

                  [ Parent ]

                •  I don't believe I've set (1+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  cfk

                  up any parameters for a classic, but rather asked the questions that might determine what a classic is.  My point was simply that it seems just common sense that a book will not achieve classic status in a culture, if it is in a language most can't read.  And that goes for English authors as well.

                  We agree that classics come "through time and influence," but part of that equation, the influence part, is somewhat dependent on how many voices are heralding the book as a classic.  You can choose a book like Ulysses and I'll agree most people haven't read it.  Or, you can choose a book like The Great Gatsby, and millions have read it.  

                  We agree the definition is hard to pin to the wall. In any case, it's been a fun and interesting discussion, and I enjoyed it.

                  "A typical vice of American politics is the avoidance of saying anything real on real issues." Theodore Roosevelt.

                  by StellaRay on Thu Nov 29, 2012 at 01:37:06 PM PST

                  [ Parent ]

            •  Fifty years ago the two languages that (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              Brecht, cfk

              dominated scientific journals and books were English and French. I imagine that English is even more dominate to day.

              Might and Right are always fighting, in our youth it seems exciting. Right is always nearly winning, Might can hardly keep from grinning. -- Clarence Day

              by hestal on Thu Nov 29, 2012 at 06:40:03 AM PST

              [ Parent ]

    •  What's wrong with elitism? Especially compared.... (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      cfk, RamblinDave, Brecht

      .....with what makes best-seller status on this side of the pond.  Plus, US mass media would be a heck of a lot better if they were of the overall quality of the BBC (recent scandals aside).  Even with the BBC's recent faults, 1 millisecond of the BBC is worth all of Faux News in its entire benighted years of existence.

      "It's only in books that the officers of the detective force are superior to the weakness of making a mistake." (Wilkie Collins, The Moonstone)

      by chingchongchinaman on Wed Nov 28, 2012 at 08:59:51 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  what a tiny world they live in ... (12+ / 0-)

    over at the BBC.

    It's not a fake orgasm; it's a real yawn.

    by sayitaintso on Wed Nov 28, 2012 at 05:07:09 PM PST

  •  Of the BBC 100 (15+ / 0-)

    1 Pride and Prejudice – Jane Austen
    2 The Lord of the Rings – JRR Tolkien
    3 Jane Eyre – Charlotte Bronte
    4 Harry Potter series – JK Rowling
    5 To Kill a Mockingbird – Harper Lee
    6 The Bible
    7 Wuthering Heights – Emily Bronte
    8 Nineteen Eighty Four – George Orwell
    9 His Dark Materials – Philip Pullman
    10 Great Expectations – Charles Dickens
    11 Little Women – Louisa M Alcott

    12 Tess of the D’Urbervilles – Thomas Hardy
    13 Catch 22 – Joseph Heller
    14 Complete Works of Shakespeare
    15 Rebecca – Daphne Du Maurier
    16 The Hobbit – JRR Tolkien
    17 Birdsong – Sebastian Faulk
    18 Catcher in the Rye – JD Salinger
    19 The Time Traveler’s Wife – Audrey Niffenegger
    20 Middlemarch – George Eliot
    21 Gone With The Wind – Margaret Mitchell
    22 The Great Gatsby – F Scott Fitzgerald
    24 War and Peace – Leo Tolstoy
    25 The Hitch Hiker’s Guide to the Galaxy – Douglas Adams
    27 Crime and Punishment – Fyodor Dostoyevsky
    28 Grapes of Wrath – John Steinbeck
    29 Alice in Wonderland – Lewis Caroll
    30 The Wind in the Willows – Kenneth Grahame

    31. Anna Karenina – Leo Tolstoy
    32 David Copperfield – Charles Dickens
    33 Chronicles of Narnia – CS Lewis

    34 Emma -Jane Austen
    35 Persuasion – Jane Austen
    36 The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe – CS Lewis
    37 The Kite Runner – Khaled Hosseini
    38 Captain Corelli’s Mandolin – Louis De Bernieres
    39 Memoirs of a Geisha – Arthur Golden
    40 Winnie the Pooh – A.A. Milne
    41 Animal Farm – George Orwell

    42 The Da Vinci Code – Dan Brown is this a joke? This book was AWFUL
    43 One Hundred Years of Solitude – Gabriel Garcia Marquez
    44 A Prayer for Owen Meany – John Irving
    45 The Woman in White – Wilkie Collins
    46 Anne of Green Gables – LM Montgomery
    47 Far From The Madding Crowd – Thomas Hardy
    48 The Handmaid’s Tale – Margaret Atwood
    49 Lord of the Flies – William Golding
    50 Atonement – Ian McEwan
    51 Life of Pi – Yann Martel
    52 Dune – Frank Herbert
    53 Cold Comfort Farm – Stella Gibbons
    54 Sense and Sensibility – Jane Austen
    55 A Suitable Boy – Vikram Seth
    56 The Shadow of the Wind – Carlos Ruiz Zafon
    57 A Tale Of Two Cities – Charles Dickens
    58 Brave New World – Aldous Huxley
    59 The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time – Mark Haddon

    60 Love In The Time Of Cholera – Gabriel Garcia Marquez
    61 Of Mice and Men – John Steinbeck
    62 Lolita – Vladimir Nabokov
    63 The Secret History – Donna Tartt
    64 The Lovely Bones – Alice Sebold
    65 Count of Monte Cristo – Alexandre Dumas
    66 On the Road – Jack Kerouac
    67 Jude the Obscure – Thomas Hardy
    68 Bridget Jones’s Diary – Helen Fielding
    69 Midnight’s Children – Salman Rushdie
    70 Moby Dick – Herman Melville
    71 Oliver Twist – Charles Dickens
    72 Dracula – Bram Stoker
    73 The Secret Garden – Frances Hodgson Burnett
    74 Notes From A Small Island – Bill Bryson
    75 Ulysses – James Joyce
    76 The Inferno – Dante
    77 Swallows and Amazons – Arthur Ransome
    78 Germinal – Emile Zola
    79 Vanity Fair – William Makepeace Thackeray
    80 Possession – AS Byatt
    81 A Christmas Carol – Charles Dickens
    82 Cloud Atlas – David Mitchell
    83 The Color Purple – Alice Walker
    84 The Remains of the Day – Kazuo Ishiguro
    85 Madame Bovary – Gustave Flaubert
    86 A Fine Balance – Rohinton Mistry
    87 Charlotte’s Web – E.B. White
    88 The Five People You Meet In Heaven – Mitch Albom
    89 Adventures of Sherlock Holmes – Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
    90 The Faraway Tree Collection – Enid Blyton
    91 Heart of Darkness – Joseph Conrad
    92 The Little Prince – Antoine De Saint-Exupery (In French)
    93 The Wasp Factory – Iain Banks
    94 Watership Down – Richard Adams
    95 A Confederacy of Dunces – John Kennedy Toole
    96 A Town Like Alice – Nevil Shute
    97 The Three Musketeers – Alexandre Dumas
    98 Hamlet – William Shakespeare
    99 Charlie and the Chocolate Factory – Roald Dahl
    100 Les Miserables – Victor Hugo

    But they have both Hamlet and the complete works; and they have Lion Witch and Wardrobe and Chronicles of Narnia.  Who made this list????

  •  What I'm reading (16+ / 0-)

    Just finished
    Louis D. Brandeis: A life by Melvin Urofsky. Supreme Court Justice Brandeis was fundamental in shaping the modern state of the law and of law firms and played a key role in many reform movements as well. A fascinating man and a well written biography.

    Full review to come on Yahoo Voices

    Now reading

    Cooler Smarter: Practical tips for low carbon living by the scientists at Union of Concerned Scientists, a great group. These folk make sense, concentrating on the changes you can make that have the biggest impact with the least effort.

    Thinking, fast and slow by Daniel Kahneman.  Kahneman, most famous for his work with the late Amos Tversky, is one of the leading psychologists of the times. Here, he posits that our brains have two systems: A fast one and a slow one. Neither is better, but they are good at different things. This is a brilliant book: Full of insight and very well written, as well.

    The secret life of pronouns by James W. Pennebaker.  What our choice of pronouns and other "function words" says about our mood, our education, our personality and other things

    What hath God wrought? by Daniel Walker Howe. Subtitled "The transformation of America 1815-1848. I am reading this with the History group at GoodReads.  This is very well written, and does a good job especially with coverage of the treatment of Blacks and Native Americans.

    The hard SF renaissance ed. by David G. Hartwell.  A large anthology of "hard" SF from the 90's and 00's. I think Hartwell takes himself a bit too seriously, but the stories are good.

    Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power by Jon Meachem.  So far I've only read a few pages, but this is an extremely admiring look at Jefferson.

    Just started
    Moranthology by Caitlin Moran.  I am somewhat handicapped in my appreciation of this collection because 1) i am not English and 2) I am not a fan of pop culture. Nevertheless Moran is both funny (e.g. when she is describing how she trained her husband to say "You look so thin in that!" whenever she asks him about clothes) and righteous (e.g. when she is talking about growing up poor, or about abortion (she's pro-choice). Warmly recommended.

  •  I love these lists too (16+ / 0-)

    OK, the ones I've read:

    1 Pride and Prejudice – Jane Austen
    2 The Lord of the Rings – JRR Tolkien
    3 Jane Eyre – Charlotte Bronte
    4 Harry Potter series – JK Rowling
    5 To Kill a Mockingbird – Harper Lee
    6 The Bible
    7 Wuthering Heights – Emily Bronte
    8 Nineteen Eighty Four – George Orwell
    9 His Dark Materials – Philip Pullman - First book only, hated it
    10 Great Expectations – Charles Dickens
    11 Little Women – Louisa M Alcott
    12 Tess of the D’Urbervilles – Thomas Hardy
    13 Catch 22 – Joseph Heller
    14 Complete Works of Shakespeare - Probably about half, I'm getting there
    16 The Hobbit – JRR Tolkien
    20 Middlemarch – George Eliot
    25 The Hitch Hiker’s Guide to the Galaxy – Douglas Adams
    27 Crime and Punishment – Fyodor Dostoyevsky
    28 Grapes of Wrath – John Steinbeck
    29 Alice in Wonderland – Lewis Caroll
    33 Chronicles of Narnia – CS Lewis
    34 Emma -Jane Austen- Saw the movie only
    35 Persuasion – Jane Austen
    36 The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe – CS Lewis - that's cheating, Chronicles of Narnia is already on the list!
    37 The Kite Runner – Khaled Hosseini
    40 Winnie the Pooh – A.A. Milne
    41 Animal Farm – George Orwell
    42 The Da Vinci Code – Dan Brown
    43 One Hundred Years of Solitude – Gabriel Garcia Marquez
    46 Anne of Green Gables – LM Montgomery
    48 The Handmaid’s Tale – Margaret Atwood
    49 Lord of the Flies – William Golding
    53 Cold Comfort Farm – Stella Gibbons
    57 A Tale Of Two Cities – Charles Dickens
    58 Brave New World – Aldous Huxley
    61 Of Mice and Men – John Steinbeck
    64 The Lovely Bones – Alice Sebold
    65 Count of Monte Cristo – Alexandre Dumas
    68 Bridget Jones’s Diary – Helen Fielding
    71 Oliver Twist – Charles Dickens
    72 Dracula – Bram Stoker - Movie only
    76 The Inferno – Dante
    79 Vanity Fair – William Makepeace Thackeray
    81 A Christmas Carol – Charles Dickens
    83 The Color Purple – Alice Walker
    84 The Remains of the Day – Kazuo Ishiguro
    87 Charlotte’s Web – E.B. White - Movie only
    91 Heart of Darkness – Joseph Conrad
    92 The Little Prince – Antoine De Saint-Exupery (In French) - Started it, got bored
    97 The Three Musketeers – Alexandre Dumas
    98 Hamlet – William Shakespeare - Another cheat, the complete Shakespeare is already on the list!
    99 Charlie and the Chocolate Factory – Roald Dahl _ - Movie only
    100 Les Miserables – Victor Hugo - stage production only, looking forward to the film!

    53, not bad!

    I shall die, but that is all that I shall do for Death; I am not on his payroll. - Edna St. Vincent Millay

    by Tara the Antisocial Social Worker on Wed Nov 28, 2012 at 05:10:17 PM PST

  •  My "Bucket List" Book Choice Would Be.... (19+ / 0-)

    Man's Search For Meaning by Viktor Frankl.

    It's probably one of the most thought provoking & haunting books one can read on the subjects of suffering, free will, and what it means to be human.

    The way in which a man accepts his fate and all the suffering it entails, the way in which he takes up his cross, gives him ample opportunity — even under the most difficult circumstances — to add a deeper meaning to his life. It may remain brave, dignified and unselfish. Or in the bitter fight for self-preservation he may forget his human dignity and become no more than an animal. Here lies the chance for a man either to make use of or to forgo the opportunities of attaining the moral values that a difficult situation may afford him. And this decides whether he is worthy of his sufferings or not... We who lived in concentration camps can remember the men who walked through the huts comforting others, giving away their last piece of bread. They may have been few in number, but they offer sufficient proof that everything can be taken from a man but one thing: the last of the human freedoms — to choose one's attitude in any given set of circumstances, to choose one's own way... Some details of a particular man's inner greatness may have come to one's mind, like the story of the young woman whose death I witnessed in a concentration camp. It is a simple story. There is little to tell and it may sound as if I had invented it; but to me it seems like a poem.

    This young woman knew that she would die in the next few days. But when I talked to her she was cheerful in spite of this knowledge. "I am grateful that fate has hit me so hard," she told me. "In my former life I was spoiled and did not take spiritual accomplishments seriously." Pointing through the window of the hut, she said, "This tree here is the only friend I have in my loneliness." Through that window she could see just one branch of a chestnut tree, and on the branch were two blossoms. "I often talk to this tree," she said to me. I was startled and didn't quite know how to take her words. Was she delirious? Did she have occasional hallucinations? Anxiously I asked her if the tree replied. "Yes." What did it say to her? She answered, "It said to me, 'I am here — I am here — I am life, eternal life.'" ...

  •  Great to see THE IRISH R M (14+ / 0-)

    in your list. I loved the TV series, read the book back in the day, and am planning to listen it as an audiobook at some point! Lots of Jane Austen bandied about, but I'm currently listening to Northanger Abbey, which is silly, but fun. Also reading Love, Poverty, and War - a collection of Christopher Hitchens essays. I was prepared to say of them, "Well, the writing is very good, but some are a bit dense." Then, I got to his entry on Los Angeles, which hit five-star territory!

    I did not do a count on the BBC list, but a random spot check of sections indicated I've probably read about 25% - 30% of them.

  •  I've read 20 from the BBC 100, (14+ / 0-)

    not going to list them because i'm still under the weather and not up to it. And another 40 I've read parts of.

    "Let us never forget that doing the impossible is the history of this nation....It's how we are as Americans...It's how this country was built"- Michelle Obama

    by blueoregon on Wed Nov 28, 2012 at 05:17:26 PM PST

  •  The Bible is not a book. (14+ / 0-)

    It's a collection of books, which varies according to different communities.

    Anyway, pedantry aside...

    I doubt I'll get through that list.  What I'm reading now is

    Marcella Althaus-Reid, Indecent Theology: Theological Perversions in Sex, Gender and Politics, which has been on my to-read list for years.  Not finding it quite as exciting/mind-blowing as I expected, but some good stuff there.

    Mary Midgley, Evolution as a Religion: Strange Hopes and Stranger Fears.  Title is perhaps a bit overblown - it's not saying "evolution is a religion," but pointing out where religious modes of thought creep into scientists' writings on evolution - and she dedicates the book to Darwin, "who did not say these things" - that is, she credits him with being a better thinker than some of the subsequent evolutionary theorists she looks at.

    Read a good, critical review of James Robert Brown Who Rules in Science?  An Opinionated Guide to the Wars and Philip Kitcher Science, Truth, and Democracy, both of which deal with the critiques of scientific practice in the 1990s.  The reviewer noted some ways they failed to understand the nature of some of the critiques by Bruno Latour and others.

    Just taught the penultimate chapter of Jorge Pixley, Biblical Israel: A People's History and I started reading Martin Hengel, Judaism and Hellenism as background for it.

    Time is running out for me to read Cortazor's Hopscotch before the year runs out, and I am sure the fate of the WHOLE UNIVERSE rests only on my getting through that book in order for the Mayan prophecy to be averted.  Or something.

    -9.38/-7.69 If religion means a way of life, and life's necessities are food, clothing, and shelter, then we should not separate religion from economics. - Malcolm X

    by dirkster42 on Wed Nov 28, 2012 at 05:19:42 PM PST

  •  I got on a reading kick (15+ / 0-)

    ... about France lately.  Picked up a biography of Alexandre Dumas' (BBC #97) father, though not read it yet.  Father provided raw material for son to spin into novels.  From the cover blurb:

    ... one of history's great forgotten heroes: a man almost unknown today yet with a personal story that is strikingly familiar.  His swashbuckling exploits appear in The Three Musketeers, and his triumphs and trials inspired The Count of Monte Cristo - both books written by his son.
    ...
    Born to a black slave mother and a fugitive white French nobleman in Saint-Dominque (present-day Haiti), Alex Dumas was sold into bondage but made his way to Paris, where was schooled as a sword-fighting member of the French aristocracy.  When the Revolution broke out, he joined the army at the lowest rank - yet quickly rose, through a series of legendary feats, to command more than 50,000 men.
    ....
    ultimately became a threat to Napoleon himself.

    "The most exciting phrase to hear in science, the one that heralds new discoveries, is not "Eureka!", but "That's funny..." (Isaac Asimov)

    by Land of Enchantment on Wed Nov 28, 2012 at 05:22:13 PM PST

  •  Okay, Here's How I Did (11+ / 0-)

    Bold -- are books I have read; italic are books we have in the house but I've never gotten around to reading.

    1 Pride and Prejudice – Jane Austen
    2 The Lord of the Rings – JRR Tolkien
    3 Jane Eyre – Charlotte Bronte
    4 Harry Potter series – JK Rowling
     5 To Kill a Mockingbird – Harper Lee
    6 The Bible
     7 Wuthering Heights – Emily Bronte
     8 Nineteen Eighty Four – George Orwell
     9 His Dark Materials – Philip Pullman
     10 Great Expectations – Charles Dickens
     11 Little Women – Louisa M Alcott
     12 Tess of the D’Urbervilles – Thomas Hardy
     13 Catch 22 – Joseph Heller
    14 Complete Works of Shakespeare --(well, I haven't read all of them, but most of them)
     15 Rebecca – Daphne Du Maurier
    16 The Hobbit– JRR Tolkien
     17 Birdsong – Sebastian Faulk
     18 Catcher in the Rye – JD Salinger
     19 The Time Traveler’s Wife – Audrey Niffenegger
     20 Middlemarch – George Eliot
     21 Gone With The Wind – Margaret Mitchell
    22 The Great Gatsby – F Scott Fitzgerald
     24 War and Peace – Leo Tolstoy
     25 The Hitch Hiker’s Guide to the Galaxy – Douglas Adams
     27 Crime and Punishment – Fyodor Dostoyevsky
     28 Grapes of Wrath – John Steinbeck
    29 Alice in Wonderland – Lewis Caroll
    30 The Wind in the Willows – Kenneth Grahame
     31. Anna Karenina – Leo Tolstoy
     32 David Copperfield – Charles Dickens -- (I've read the Classics Illustrated version; does that count?)
    33 Chronicles of Narnia – CS Lewis
     34 Emma -Jane Austen
     35 Persuasion – Jane Austen
    36 The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe – CS Lewis
     37 The Kite Runner – Khaled Hosseini
     38 Captain Corelli’s Mandolin – Louis De Bernieres
     39 Memoirs of a Geisha – Arthur Golden
    40 Winnie the Pooh – A.A. Milne
    41 Animal Farm – George Orwell
     42 The Da Vinci Code – Dan Brown
     43 One Hundred Years of Solitude – Gabriel Garcia Marquez
     44 A Prayer for Owen Meany – John Irving
     45 The Woman in White – Wilkie Collins
     46 Anne of Green Gables – LM Montgomery
     47 Far From The Madding Crowd – Thomas Hardy
     48 The Handmaid’s Tale – Margaret Atwood
     49 Lord of the Flies – William Golding
     50 Atonement – Ian McEwan
     51 Life of Pi – Yann Martel
    52 Dune – Frank Herbert
     53 Cold Comfort Farm – Stella Gibbons
     54 Sense and Sensibility – Jane Austen
     55 A Suitable Boy – Vikram Seth
     56 The Shadow of the Wind – Carlos Ruiz Zafon
     57 A Tale Of Two Cities – Charles Dickens
     58 Brave New World – Aldous Huxley
     59 The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time – Mark Haddon
     60 Love In The Time Of Cholera – Gabriel Garcia Marquez
    61 Of Mice and Men – John Steinbeck
     62 Lolita – Vladimir Nabokov
     63 The Secret History – Donna Tartt
     64 The Lovely Bones – Alice Sebold
    65 Count of Monte Cristo – Alexandre Dumas
     66 On the Road – Jack Kerouac
     67 Jude the Obscure – Thomas Hardy
     68 Bridget Jones’s Diary – Helen Fielding
     69 Midnight’s Children – Salman Rushdie
    70 Moby Dick – Herman Melville
     71 Oliver Twist – Charles Dickens
    72 Dracula – Bram Stoker
     73 The Secret Garden – Frances Hodgson Burnett
     74 Notes From A Small Island – Bill Bryson
     75 Ulysses – James Joyce
     76 The Inferno – Dante
     77 Swallows and Amazons – Arthur Ransome
     78 Germinal – Emile Zola
     79 Vanity Fair – William Makepeace Thackeray
     80 Possession – AS Byatt
    81 A Christmas Carol – Charles Dickens
     82 Cloud Atlas – David Mitchell
     83 The Color Purple – Alice Walker
     84 The Remains of the Day – Kazuo Ishiguro
     85 Madame Bovary – Gustave Flaubert
     86 A Fine Balance – Rohinton Mistry
    87 Charlotte’s Web – E.B. White
     88 The Five People You Meet In Heaven – Mitch Albom
     89 Adventures of Sherlock Holmes – Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
     90 The Faraway Tree Collection – Enid Blyton
     91 Heart of Darkness – Joseph Conrad
     92 The Little Prince – Antoine De Saint-Exupery (In French)
     93 The Wasp Factory – Iain Banks
    94 Watership Down – Richard Adams
     95 A Confederacy of Dunces – John Kennedy Toole
     96 A Town Like Alice – Nevil Shute
     97 The Three Musketeers – Alexandre Dumas
     98 Hamlet – William Shakespeare
     99 Charlie and the Chocolate Factory – Roald Dahl
     100 Les Miserables – Victor Hugo

    27 out of the BBC's list of 100; better than 25%.  Granted a couple of those were ones I was assigned in school and would not likely re-read, and very few of the unread ones are books I have a keen interest in picking up.  Still, it's interesting to compare my reading with that of others.

    "All the World's a Stage and Everyone's a Critic." -- Mervyn Alquist

    by quarkstomper on Wed Nov 28, 2012 at 05:24:36 PM PST

  •  And from cfk's list (10+ / 0-)

    1.  East of Eden by John Steinbeck
    2.  Of Mice and Men by Steinbeck
    3.  Grapes of Wrath by Steinbeck
    9.   The Mists of Avalon by Marion Zimmer Bradley
    10.  Jane Austen’s  Pride and Prejudice, Persuasion, Sense and Sensibility
    13.  Shane by Jack Schaefer
    19.  All by Ursula Le Guin - Earthsea series, Left Hand of Darkness, some shorts
    21.  The Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit by J. R. R. Tolkien
    23.  Harry Potter series by J. K. Rowling
    29.  Charles Dickens…A Christmas Carol, Great Expectations, A Tale of Two Cities
    44.   Sir Walter Scott… Ivanhoe, Lady of the Lake  
     See below
    46.  Snow Falling on Cedars by David Guterson
    48.  To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
    52.   The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas
    60.   All the King's Men by Robert Penn Warren
    62.   Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison
    65.   Little Women and sequels by Louisa May Alcott
    66.   House of Spirits  by Isabel Allende -
    69.   Anne of Green Gables and the Emily series by L. M. Montgomery
    74.   Middlemarch by George Eliot
    83.  The English Patient by Michael Ondaatje
    86.   Neverending Story by Michael Ende - Movie only
    89.   Pern series including the Harper series by Anne McCaffrey
    102.   All by Terry Prachett - Nowhere close to all yet, but several

    24 total.  

    I'm currently working on Ivanhoe, but getting a little exasperated with the way the word "Jew" or "Jewess" is shoehorned into every freakin' sentence - it's ok for Isaac and Rebecca to have other characteristics!

    I'm currently at the part where Rowena's abducted by a knight who wants to marry her, and Rebecca by a knight who wants to make her his sex slave (since her can't marry a mere "Jewess").  Both men seem quite baffled that the women aren't won over by this, er, courtship.

    I shall die, but that is all that I shall do for Death; I am not on his payroll. - Edna St. Vincent Millay

    by Tara the Antisocial Social Worker on Wed Nov 28, 2012 at 05:24:53 PM PST

  •  Good Evening cfk ... (10+ / 0-)

    I hope all is well with you. Your poll is impossible, as usual.
    Our scores on the BBC list: Her - 30, me - 27.
    We'll come back and do yours after dinner.

    The free market is not the solution, the free market is the problem.

    by Azazello on Wed Nov 28, 2012 at 05:25:14 PM PST

  •  I've read 44 of the books on the BBC list. (16+ / 0-)

    Not bad.  But how on earth can they say you should have read Dan Brown and not mention Georgette Heyer or Agatha Christie or P. G. Wodehouse?

    Hope all is well with y'all.  I just went out for a run and fell on the sidewalk with a loud splat when I was a mile out and am now home covered in bandaids and neosporin with mangled glasses and a fat lip -- but no sprains!

  •  I'd add to any list everything by Faulkner. (14+ / 0-)

    List.

    And here, and more comprehensive list.

    Also, everything by Vonnegut.

    202-224-3121 to Congress in D.C. USE it! You can tell how big a person is by what it takes to discourage them. "We're not perfect, but they're nuts."--Barney Frank 01/02/2012

    by cany on Wed Nov 28, 2012 at 05:28:53 PM PST

  •  From cfk's list (10+ / 0-)

    Deleting what I haven't read
    1.  East of Eden by John Steinbeck
    2.  Of Mice and Men by Steinbeck
    3.  Grapes of Wrath by Steinbeck
    5.  Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson
    7.   Chesapeake by James Michener
    9.   The Mists of Avalon by Marion Zimmer Bradley
    17.  Girl of the Limberlost by Gene Stratton Porter
    19.  All by Ursula Le Guin - not all but a lot
    22.  All by C. J. Cherryh - some
    28.  All by P. G. Wodehouse - some
    29.  Charles Dickens…A Christmas Carol, Great Expectations, A Tale of Two Cities 2 of 3
    39.  A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L’Engle
    40.  Mary Doria Russell The Sparrow and The Children of God (must be read together)
    48.  To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
    50.   A Tree Grows in Brooklyn by Betty Smith
    57.   All by Connie Willis - a lot
    62.   Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison
    63.   Sophie’s Choice by William Styron
    70.   The Foundation Trilogy by Isaac Asimov
    79.   David Brin

       Sundiver
       Startide Rising
       Uplift War
       Brightness Reef
       Infinity’s Shore
       Heaven’s Reach

    84.   Temeraire series by Naomi Novik - some
    89.   Pern series including the Harper series by Anne McCaffrey - most
    102.   All by Terry Prachett - just as soon as they hit the shelves!

  •  here's mine, with my personal addenda below: (9+ / 0-)

    1 Pride and Prejudice – Jane Austen
    2 The Lord of the Rings – JRR Tolkien
    3 Jane Eyre – Charlotte Bronte
    4 Harry Potter series – JK Rowling

    5 To Kill a Mockingbird – Harper Lee
    6 The Bible
    7 Wuthering Heights – Emily Bronte
    8 Nineteen Eighty Four – George Orwell
    9 His Dark Materials – Philip Pullman

    10 Great Expectations – Charles Dickens
    11 Little Women – Louisa M Alcott
    12 Tess of the D’Urbervilles – Thomas Hardy
    13 Catch 22 – Joseph Heller
    14 Complete Works of Shakespeare
    15 Rebecca – Daphne Du Maurier
    16 The Hobbit – JRR Tolkien
    17 Birdsong – Sebastian Faulk
    18 Catcher in the Rye – JD Salinger
    19 The Time Traveler’s Wife – Audrey Niffenegger
    20 Middlemarch – George Eliot
    21 Gone With The Wind – Margaret Mitchell
    22 The Great Gatsby – F Scott Fitzgerald
    24 War and Peace – Leo Tolstoy
    25 The Hitch Hiker’s Guide to the Galaxy – Douglas Adams
    27 Crime and Punishment – Fyodor Dostoyevsky
    28 Grapes of Wrath – John Steinbeck
    29 Alice in Wonderland – Lewis Caroll
    30 The Wind in the Willows – Kenneth Grahame
    31. Anna Karenina – Leo Tolstoy
    32 David Copperfield – Charles Dickens
    33 Chronicles of Narnia – CS Lewis

    34 Emma -Jane Austen
    35 Persuasion – Jane Austen
    36 The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe – CS Lewis
    37 The Kite Runner – Khaled Hosseini
    38 Captain Corelli’s Mandolin – Louis De Bernieres
    39 Memoirs of a Geisha – Arthur Golden
    40 Winnie the Pooh – A.A. Milne
    41 Animal Farm – George Orwell
    42 The Da Vinci Code – Dan Brown

    43 One Hundred Years of Solitude – Gabriel Garcia Marquez
    44 A Prayer for Owen Meany – John Irving
    45 The Woman in White – Wilkie Collins
    46 Anne of Green Gables – LM Montgomery
    47 Far From The Madding Crowd – Thomas Hardy
    48 The Handmaid’s Tale – Margaret Atwood
    49 Lord of the Flies – William Golding

    50 Atonement – Ian McEwan
    51 Life of Pi – Yann Martel
    52 Dune – Frank Herbert
    53 Cold Comfort Farm – Stella Gibbons
    54 Sense and Sensibility – Jane Austen
    55 A Suitable Boy – Vikram Seth
    56 The Shadow of the Wind – Carlos Ruiz Zafon
    57 A Tale Of Two Cities – Charles Dickens
    58 Brave New World – Aldous Huxley
    59 The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time – Mark Haddon
    60 Love In The Time Of Cholera – Gabriel Garcia Marquez
    61 Of Mice and Men – John Steinbeck
    62 Lolita – Vladimir Nabokov
    63 The Secret History – Donna Tartt
    64 The Lovely Bones – Alice Sebold
    65 Count of Monte Cristo – Alexandre Dumas
    66 On the Road – Jack Kerouac
    67 Jude the Obscure – Thomas Hardy
    68 Bridget Jones’s Diary – Helen Fielding
    69 Midnight’s Children – Salman Rushdie
    70 Moby Dick – Herman Melville
    71 Oliver Twist – Charles Dickens
    72 Dracula – Bram Stoker
    73 The Secret Garden – Frances Hodgson Burnett
    74 Notes From A Small Island – Bill Bryson
    75 Ulysses – James Joyce
    76 The Inferno – Dante
    77 Swallows and Amazons – Arthur Ransome
    78 Germinal – Emile Zola
    79 Vanity Fair – William Makepeace Thackeray
    80 Possession – AS Byatt
    81 A Christmas Carol – Charles Dickens
    82 Cloud Atlas – David Mitchell
    83 The Color Purple – Alice Walker
    84 The Remains of the Day – Kazuo Ishiguro
    85 Madame Bovary – Gustave Flaubert
    86 A Fine Balance – Rohinton Mistry
    87 Charlotte’s Web – E.B. White
    88 The Five People You Meet In Heaven – Mitch Albom
    89 Adventures of Sherlock Holmes – Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
    90 The Faraway Tree Collection – Enid Blyton
    91 Heart of Darkness – Joseph Conrad
    92 The Little Prince – Antoine De Saint-Exupery (In French)
    93 The Wasp Factory – Iain Banks
    94 Watership Down – Richard Adams
    95 A Confederacy of Dunces – John Kennedy Toole
    96 A Town Like Alice – Nevil Shute
    97 The Three Musketeers – Alexandre Dumas
    98 Hamlet – William Shakespeare
    99 Charlie and the Chocolate Factory – Roald Dahl

    100 Les Miserables – Victor Hugo

    I'm a reader, and have been since I learnt how. I wish we had more well-written nonfiction; my personal leanings are toward biographies and histories, but I'm a science fiction fanatic.

    If you have yet to read any David Weber you owe it to yourself to remedy that lack, if only so you can meet treecats for yourself; likewise Susan Cooper's "Dark is Rising" series, which I think is a little better than "His Dark Materials" and borders the "Wrinkle in Time" series for appeal to readers of all ages and maturities;  Lois McMaster Bujold's "Vorkosigan Adventures," and the 1632 series by Eric Flint, are just my most recent indulgences (altho I confess I've been a fan of Miles Vorkosigan since the early 1990s).

    There's no such thing as too much either of Mark Twain -- how did the Beeb miss him entirely? -- or Charles Dickens, altho I think the GOP takes the misery their heroes face as a manual for how to build a society, when what was meant was how to overcome a dysfunctional one; I also highly recommend Dorothy L. Sayers and D.R. Meredith.

    I tried five times to get through War and Peace, and failed everytime; in penance I reread "Gone With the Wind," which was far better IMO than "Giant."

    They tell me I'm prejudiced when it comes to Larry McMurtry, but since neither Stephen King nor Tom Clancy made the Beeb's list, I'm relieved to see McMurtry's not on it either.

    LBJ, Lady Bird, Anne Richards, Barbara Jordan, Sully Sullenberger, Ike, Drew Brees, Molly Ivins --Texas is no Bush league! -7.50,-5.59

    by BlackSheep1 on Wed Nov 28, 2012 at 05:34:23 PM PST

  •  OK, I'll play. (9+ / 0-)

    Bold means I've read it
    Underline means I want to read it

    1 Pride and Prejudice – Jane Austen
    3 Jane Eyre – Charlotte Bronte
    4 Harry Potter series – JK Rowling (I could have skipped it and lived)
    5 To Kill a Mockingbird – Harper Lee
    6 The Bible (some corners still left to explore)
    7 Wuthering Heights – Emily Bronte
    8 Nineteen Eighty Four – George Orwell
    14 Complete Works of Shakespeare (Haven't read all of it)
    20 Middlemarch – George Eliot
    25 The Hitch Hiker’s Guide to the Galaxy – Douglas Adams (heard large portions in a radio version)
    27 Crime and Punishment – Fyodor Dostoyevsky
    28 Grapes of Wrath – John Steinbeck
    29 Alice in Wonderland – Lewis Caroll
    30 The Wind in the Willows – Kenneth Grahame
    31. Anna Karenina – Leo Tolstoy
    33 Chronicles of Narnia – CS Lewis
    34 Emma -Jane Austen
    35 Persuasion – Jane Austen
    40 Winnie the Pooh – A.A. Milne
    41 Animal Farm – George Orwell
    43 One Hundred Years of Solitude – Gabriel Garcia Marquez
    44 A Prayer for Owen Meany – John Irving
    45 The Woman in White – Wilkie Collins
    46 Anne of Green Gables – LM Montgomery
    47 Far From The Madding Crowd – Thomas Hardy
    48 The Handmaid’s Tale – Margaret Atwood
    54 Sense and Sensibility – Jane Austen
    80 Possession – AS Byatt
    83 The Color Purple – Alice Walker

    OK, some other titles in there should be on the list of either have or want to read, but got tired of going through the list...

    -9.38/-7.69 If religion means a way of life, and life's necessities are food, clothing, and shelter, then we should not separate religion from economics. - Malcolm X

    by dirkster42 on Wed Nov 28, 2012 at 05:34:50 PM PST

  •  BBC's list (10+ / 0-)

    I've read 51 out of the 100, but remember the details of far, far fewer. Of the remain 49, I counted only a dozen or so that I have any smidgen of desire to read.

    The BBC's list seems Anglo-centric to me. The list sort of cheats since Tolkien's LOTR is 3 books, or 1 book depending on how you slice it. Shakespeare gets two mentions: his complete works and then plus Hamlet. The Bible really isn't a single book either.

    Off the top of my head, I'd have included in that list: Swift's Gulliver's Travels, Stevenson's Treasure Island, Ellison's Invisible Man, Asimov's Foundation trilogy, L'Engle's Wrinkle in Time, Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, Dick's Do Android Dream of Electric Sheep, Faulkner's Light in August, Shelley's Frankenstein, Baldwin's Go Tell it on the Mountain, Heinlein's Moon Is a Harsh Mistress, and Bowles' Sheltering Sky.

  •  I only come in a little under 30 percent (9+ / 0-)

    Interesting list.  I've never managed to get into these, but I'm always fascinated to see what gets compiled.  The closest I come is when someone who hasn't certain things (OK, a lot of literarily oriented skiffy) and is laid up for awhile lets me bring them a lot of stuff to read.  But even then it's tailored to their character and my prejudices.  Kind of like a mix tape :}  And there's no perfect mix tape...

    ...j'ai découvert que tout le malheur des hommes vient d'une seule chose, qui est de ne savoir pas demeurer en repos dans une chambre.

    by jessical on Wed Nov 28, 2012 at 05:37:56 PM PST

  •  I have read or had read to me- 46. (9+ / 0-)

    Quite a few of them were assigned in high school English classes.
    I just returned from the library.  Should have gone later with list in hand.

    •  Great number! (6+ / 0-)

      I worry that some of these books are not available anymore in small libraries.  It is one reason I keep so many books.

      Join us at Bookflurries-Bookchat on Wednesday nights 8:00 PM EST

      by cfk on Wed Nov 28, 2012 at 06:15:29 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  We can put a hold on books (4+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        cfk, Monsieur Georges, MT Spaces, Brecht

        and rarely wait long.  

        They have a section for books they consider classics, and many of these books on the list are in that corner.  I have checked out many on the list, but they don't reach the top of the pile when I can read something by Louise Penny.  

        I finished Sargent's Daughters, which is a long book about a painting, "The Daughters of Edward Boit".  I never would have read anything like this.  I understand how the politics of the time influence art criticism. I had to read it with google image available, as there were references to many other paintings.

        •  lololol (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Monsieur Georges, MT Spaces

          I understand this:

          I have checked out many on the list, but they don't reach the top of the pile when I can read something by Louise Penny.
          I got the latest Susan Hill with Simon Serrailler in the mail, today, and I will start it tonight.  :)  But then there will be a long wait for a new one...sigh.

          Join us at Bookflurries-Bookchat on Wednesday nights 8:00 PM EST

          by cfk on Wed Nov 28, 2012 at 07:11:21 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

  •  Can't come up with 100 (9+ / 0-)

    off the top of my head, but here are some of mine that didn't make the BBC list:

    Abso-freakin'-lutely everything by Mark Twain
    Alice Walker - they had The Color Purple but left off  Possessing the Secret of Joy
    Marge Piercy - Woman on the Edge of Time and He, She and It
    Gerd Brantenberg - Egalia's Daughters

    I'm sure I'll think of more as soon as I hit "post."

    I shall die, but that is all that I shall do for Death; I am not on his payroll. - Edna St. Vincent Millay

    by Tara the Antisocial Social Worker on Wed Nov 28, 2012 at 05:43:59 PM PST

  •  One moment, if you please. (6+ / 0-)

    Is it out of place here (I hope it isn't) to remind you, dear readers, that Christmas/Chanukkah/Kwanzaa/Solstice etc etc is coming, and that if you have gifts to give, one that would make a lovely stocking stuffer or, if you don't stuff stockings, a small gift is a paperback novella.  I have two I can offer that I wrote: The Dream Antilles (2005) and Tulum (2011).  These make handsome, readable gifts, which you will like, and which your guests will like to receive and read.

    And for a limited time only, I will sign and dedicate these howsoever you may wish, if you buy a copy and send it to me with a SASE.  I will then inscribe the book and mail it back to you in your envelope, with an inscription of your choice. Contact via email at my profile.

    Is that a deal or what? Not as useful as the vegamatic, but hopefully more enjoyable.

  •  Beeb completely copped out on Shakespeare (5+ / 0-)

    They allow multiple works for other authors (e.g. Jane Austen) but not William? Bad form BBC.

    "I smoke. If this bothers anyone, I suggest you look around at the world in which we live and shut your fuckin' mouth." --- Bill Hicks

    by voroki on Wed Nov 28, 2012 at 05:47:52 PM PST

  •  I've read about a third of BBC's list ... (11+ / 0-)

    ... and am ashamed that only know the basic plots of another third via movie adaptations, which are not the same things by their very definition.

    BBC wasn't very kind to the S-F genre, unless the novels were by outriders like Huxley, Golding, Orwell, and Atwood.
    They do give FANTASY some proper "honours," though.

    Weathertop in Late Autumn:

    At least in MY mind's eye -- how many others see landscapes from their readings when traveling?

    Millions of us – the majority – must come together to insist that President Obama and the Democrats stand up and fight for the things we sent them there to do ... Michael Moore

    by MT Spaces on Wed Nov 28, 2012 at 05:47:57 PM PST

  •  A note on a classic that should have been... (8+ / 0-)

    "Catcher in the Rye" is pretty much understood to be the ultimate coming of age story of a certain time and place, from a western POV.  I dutifully read it in Jr. High and found it gloomy and depressing, and told my English teacher who had assigned it as much.  

    Yeah, adolescence can be gloomy and depressing, but it's also funny as hell, and bursting with HUGE dreams as well as fears.  

    He said, "I agree."  Then he suggested a book that he said should have all the fame "Catcher in the Rye" has garnered, but doesn't.  I went to the library, checked it out, and to this day, have never forgotten the joy and sorrow that book brought me. I bought my own copy eventually, and when I need a good HONEST cry, I reread the last couple pages of this book.

    Title:  Temple of Gold.  Author:  William Goldman.  Funny, whimsical, sad, poignant, and one of the most beautiful stories of an adolescent friendship I've ever read.

    Also, William Goldman's "Boys and girls together" is a GREAT coming of age read.

    "A typical vice of American politics is the avoidance of saying anything real on real issues." Theodore Roosevelt.

    by StellaRay on Wed Nov 28, 2012 at 05:54:39 PM PST

  •  I have read 23 of them. At least half of them (8+ / 0-)

    were class assignments. I have started many others but couldn't finish.

    I never was interested in fiction, though I tried to be. Nonfiction for me and even then I read with a purpose. I read a lot but I want to learn something when I do. It sounds dreary, I know, but for me it is a lot of fun.

    Might and Right are always fighting, in our youth it seems exciting. Right is always nearly winning, Might can hardly keep from grinning. -- Clarence Day

    by hestal on Wed Nov 28, 2012 at 05:56:11 PM PST

    •  You don't think you learn from fiction? (8+ / 0-)

      You don't think it helps to learn history, for instance, from reading novels?

      •  Two examples: (6+ / 0-)

        What was it like for a Filipino or an Indonesian to live in the final years of Spanish/Dutch colonial rule?

        If you go to the history section of your bookstore, I'll bet you will not find a single history book on either topic. But, there is a good chance they might have the great novels describing this period by José Rizal, Noli Me Tangere, or Pramoedya Ananta Toer, This Earth of Mankind.  

        •  I don't want to start an argument, but this (5+ / 0-)

          kind of thing devolves into tit-for-tat very quickly. I can point to many books of nonfiction that address subjects never addressed by fiction.

          Might and Right are always fighting, in our youth it seems exciting. Right is always nearly winning, Might can hardly keep from grinning. -- Clarence Day

          by hestal on Wed Nov 28, 2012 at 07:22:15 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  Yes, I doubt there are many novels about (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            cfk, MT Spaces

            Newton's Laws of Physics. Not sure what your point is.

            •  My point is that I want to learn from reading and (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              cfk

              the best way to do that is to read nonfiction.

              Might and Right are always fighting, in our youth it seems exciting. Right is always nearly winning, Might can hardly keep from grinning. -- Clarence Day

              by hestal on Thu Nov 29, 2012 at 04:31:59 AM PST

              [ Parent ]

              •  Huh? Just repeating what you said (0+ / 0-)

                doesn't mean you are right. Explain, por favor, why the hell you think one can learn more from non-fiction.

                And, dude, it is not even non-fiction. There is, philosophically speaking, no such thing as truely "non-fictiön."

                Or do you not read philosophy either?

                •  I am very tired of this argument, which as (0+ / 0-)

                  you should recall I said would happen. It was easy to see at the outset that you were looking for a fight. So, I gave you one, and I put you in your place. But instead of accepting your defeat you kept on asking for more blows about the head and shoulders.

                  This comment is just plain pathetic, and instead of having some kernel of fun is annoying. So, go away, kid, you are bothering me.

                  Now, I know that people like you, those with weak arguments, and who lack the courage to accept that weakness, must always have the last word. So, take your best shot. I promise to read it and not respond. That way you might be able to sleep again.

                  Might and Right are always fighting, in our youth it seems exciting. Right is always nearly winning, Might can hardly keep from grinning. -- Clarence Day

                  by hestal on Fri Nov 30, 2012 at 04:24:43 AM PST

                  [ Parent ]

                  •  Wow. You defeated me? (0+ / 0-)

                    I didn't even understand why you said this would be a fight, since I didn't even know why anyone would want to fight over whatever it is you think we are fighting over.

                    Again, you give NO reasons for why one learns more from non-fiction than fiction. I.e., you have not been arguing, just repeating "one learns more from non-fiction." You obviously haven't given much thought as to what that actuallly means, so all you do is keep repeating it.

                    Whatever.

          •  It's possible to learn from either (5+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            cfk, MT Spaces, Anak, Brecht, hestal

            if they're well done.  For instance, it's interesting to me that Holocaust survivors Elie Wiesel and Arnost Lustig wrote both nonfiction and novels about it.  Fiction can communicate emotional truths that can be hard to get at in nonfiction.

            And of course nonfiction can be moving and entertaining  - and unlike fiction, it doesn't have to be "believable" because real life sometimes isn't.

            I shall die, but that is all that I shall do for Death; I am not on his payroll. - Edna St. Vincent Millay

            by Tara the Antisocial Social Worker on Wed Nov 28, 2012 at 07:39:29 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  So, biography does not teach one about emotional (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              cfk

              truth? Or is biography classified as fiction?

              Might and Right are always fighting, in our youth it seems exciting. Right is always nearly winning, Might can hardly keep from grinning. -- Clarence Day

              by hestal on Thu Nov 29, 2012 at 04:50:16 AM PST

              [ Parent ]

      •  Perhaps a little, but not as much as if I (5+ / 0-)

        were to study actual history. For example, fiction glorified the tyranno-South in the book Gone With the Wind, but the history it taught was false. Eric Foner, a real historian, wrote a book on the Reconstruction in which he demonstrated how a false history was written by southern apologists, most notably Jubal Early, and this history was taught in our schools until the mid-1960s. Others have written on this same topic. It is a real shame that many more people, I will wager, will read Gone With the Wind than will ever read Foner's excellent, and accurate, work of non-fiction.

        Might and Right are always fighting, in our youth it seems exciting. Right is always nearly winning, Might can hardly keep from grinning. -- Clarence Day

        by hestal on Wed Nov 28, 2012 at 07:20:18 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Then Gone With the Wind is obviously not a (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          cfk, MT Spaces

          good novel with which to learn about he Civil War. Does that mean there are no other novels that might be good to learn about how people might have felt during the Civil War? How people feel is something fiction can do way better than non-fiction, no?

          •  I liked Jubilee (4+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Anak, MT Spaces, Monsieur Georges, hestal

            by Margaret Walker based on a relative's story.  Very good antidote to Gone with the Wind.

            Even as a child, I suspected some of the parts of GWTW, but that was because I was from the North.  I hadn't thought how it would appear to children in the South until just recently.

            Join us at Bookflurries-Bookchat on Wednesday nights 8:00 PM EST

            by cfk on Wed Nov 28, 2012 at 07:53:44 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

          •  So you concede that reading fiction may or may not (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            cfk

            teach you something useful and true. The key, therefore, is to be careful about the fiction you read, otherwise you may be given false information, just as millions and millions and millions of Americans have been given false information about the tyranno-South through reading Gone With the Wind.

            I am not sure what your point is...

            Might and Right are always fighting, in our youth it seems exciting. Right is always nearly winning, Might can hardly keep from grinning. -- Clarence Day

            by hestal on Thu Nov 29, 2012 at 04:37:25 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  One fiction book that I read (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              hestal

              made me aware that something had happened and made me question who was right and I ended up reading more than 200 books as a result...most of them non-fiction.

              I also check on non-fiction books and like the ones with lists of sources.  

              I have seen biographies that trashed a famous person or were weighted with bad stuff.  I do question nearly everything I read though.

              Join us at Bookflurries-Bookchat on Wednesday nights 8:00 PM EST

              by cfk on Thu Nov 29, 2012 at 01:18:26 PM PST

              [ Parent ]

      •  And about the human experience. :) (4+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        cfk, Monsieur Georges, Brecht, Anak

        Really, what nonfiction written during Shakespeare's time is going to tell you more about that time/place than Shakespeare does in his fiction?

        Or if I read The Golden Ass, an ancient Roman novel, it's going to tell me more about everyday life in that time than reading Tacitus, for example.

        •  But I do like reading nonfiction, too! :)/nt (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          cfk, Monsieur Georges, Anak
        •  I thought Shakespeare teaches about human (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          cfk

          nature, irrespective of the time. There are many nonfiction books, thank goodness, that teach us much more about human nature and how it is formed than the Bard, and, to me, they are easier to read and much more interesting.

          For example, the Framers, throughout the Federalist essays describe and warn us about certain kinds of human beings. They say that the paramount aim of the Constitution is to keep these men under control. They talk about what these men would do if they ever come to power. But far fewer people read the Federalist essays than read the Bard. Pity, because the Framer's dire predictions have all come true, and the only way out of our present political predicament is to dust off the essays and implement changes to our national institutions.

          I'll wager than no one who reads this comment can tell me about the Framers' warnings, but they can tell me a lot about what the Bard said.

          Might and Right are always fighting, in our youth it seems exciting. Right is always nearly winning, Might can hardly keep from grinning. -- Clarence Day

          by hestal on Thu Nov 29, 2012 at 04:47:55 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

    •  It is OK with me :) (6+ / 0-)

      It doesn't sound dreary at all.  There is a lot of really interesting non-fiction out there.  I have a list of 100 for another week and had to cut off hundreds of titles.

      I do think that I have learned a LOT from fiction stories, though.  But to each of us our own.

      Join us at Bookflurries-Bookchat on Wednesday nights 8:00 PM EST

      by cfk on Wed Nov 28, 2012 at 06:28:32 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  I read a lot of science fiction when (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Brecht, Monsieur Georges, cfk

        I was a child, but at the same time, I tried to read science fantasy and thought it was a bunch of crap. What I liked about science fiction was that it proposed ideas about what science could do for humankind. However, I grew up and my childhood ended. I can remember the time that happened very well. It was the summer of 1949, and the childish games, the childish fantasies, began to fail me. I could not enter the imaginary world I had enjoyed for so many years before. My cousin, two years younger, had often entered the imaginary world with me and he still could. But I could not. So I stopped reading science fiction and started reading real science.

        My mother took me to the library and told the librarians that it was okay for me to check out adult books. These were not racy books, but books that were deemed too difficult for children. I loved going into the adult section. I could not get enough of it.

        Just a few years ago, I was at an all-school reunion and had lunch with some schoolmates that I had not seen in a long time. We had a good time, or at least I did. Toward the end of our lunch, I complimented one of my schoolmates about the record he had set for the long jump back in 1955 that still was a district record. He enjoyed talking about that meet and I enjoyed hearing about it as well. But I made a mistake. My friend said that during the warm up for the event he suddenly decided to switch from his right to his left leg for his takeoff leg. He is right-handed. He said it made all the difference and he set a record.

        Another friend at the table, also a jumper, made a few comments. I joined in and blurted out something about the physics of motion and how my father had taught me about high-jumping and his takeoff leg theories. Silence. We broke up in no time and as the record-setting broad jumper walked away I heard him say, dismissively, to his wife, "That's Hestal. He reads encyclopedias." It stung a little, but he was right I do read encyclopedias.

        There is a picture in my high school annual of me trying on my football letter jacket for the first time. I was thrilled to earn it. But the caption under the picture reads, “The Genius.” Nothing about football, or basketball, or golf that I also lettered in and even won district championships in the latter two. And just a few years ago, one of my lifelong friends said that I always was on a “different plane” than the rest of the class. I objected, he insisted. That stung.

        During my working life, I had a similar reputation. I was a computer professional and I read manuals, from front to back. My coworkers learned that they needn’t bother. When they needed to know something about the high order bit in the address register for the load address instruction all they had to do was ask Hestal.

        Yeah, I know, life is hard...

        Might and Right are always fighting, in our youth it seems exciting. Right is always nearly winning, Might can hardly keep from grinning. -- Clarence Day

        by hestal on Thu Nov 29, 2012 at 06:21:11 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  I would add (6+ / 0-)

    The Glass Bead Game by Herman Hesse if I had to make just one addition.

  •  Below are the ones I haven't read in their (6+ / 0-)

    entirety....or I have entirely skipped ;)
    End of year list making and list reading is a pass time of mine as well. Does anyone happen to have a list of Best Books,or just a single title,for a smart,very modern 12y.o. girl?

    6 The Bible
    14 Complete Works of Shakespeare
    19 The Time Traveler’s Wife – Audrey Niffenegger
    40 Winnie the Pooh – A.A. Milne
    42 The Da Vinci Code – Dan Brown
    45 The Woman in White – Wilkie Collins
    46 Anne of Green Gables – LM Montgomery
    52 Dune – Frank Herbert
    55 A Suitable Boy – Vikram Seth
    63 The Secret History – Donna Tartt
    74 Notes From A Small Island – Bill Bryson
    77 Swallows and Amazons – Arthur Ransome
    78 Germinal – Emile Zola
    86 A Fine Balance – Rohinton Mistry
    88 The Five People You Meet In Heaven – Mitch Albom
    100 Les Miserables – Victor Hugo

    "George RR Martin is not your bitch" ~~ Neil Gaiman

    by tardis10 on Wed Nov 28, 2012 at 06:02:06 PM PST

  •  What a fascinating topic you've picked for (8+ / 0-)

    tonight, cfk!  This is really intriguing.

    I've read 44 of the books on the Beeb list, but only 22 on your list.  I'm fascinated that Enid Blyton's "Faraway Tree" collection is included in the Beeb's list--I read everything Enid Blyton ever wrote when I was a child in Singapore.  She's out of fashion now, of course.

    I was also interested in your own list, because you included Mrs. Mike.  That was really good, and different.  Didn't care for the movie version at all, very corny and 1940s-Hollywood style, I thought.

    Thanks for a very entertaining diversion tonight!

    "Religion is what keeps the poor from murdering the rich."--Napoleon

    by Diana in NoVa on Wed Nov 28, 2012 at 06:06:35 PM PST

  •  I sometimes dream great mashups... (8+ / 0-)

    ... of literary classics, High and Low:

    A Poet is at the same time a force for Solidarity and for Solitude -- Pablo Neruda / Netroots Radio podcasts of The After Show with Wink & Justice can be found on Stitcher

    by justiceputnam on Wed Nov 28, 2012 at 06:06:36 PM PST

  •  I read Shane (7+ / 0-)

    We were assigned to read Shane and Call of the Wild over the summer between 7th and 8th grade in the late '60s. I agonized over this assignment and never got it accomplished. Started many times, then went out to play.

    But last week I actually finally got around to reading Shane. Very good. Only took 45 years!

    I tried Call of the Wild a few years ago but couldn't do it. All the stuff being from the dog's point of view, his thoughts, etc., is too much for me (so far).

  •  Ok, just to annoy the BBC and their Brit (8+ / 0-)

    bias, here is my list:

    1. Die Leiden des jungen Werther - Goethe
    2. Les Fleurs du mal - Baudelaire
    3. Pedro Páramo - Juan Rulfo
    4. Der Proceß - Franz Kafka
    5. Faust - Goethe
    6. Don Quijote - Cervantes
    7. 狂人日记 - Lu Xun
    8. Things Fall Apart - Chinua Achebe
    9. De Aanslag - Harry Mulisch
    10. Tanin no kao - Kobo Abe

  •  downloaded the new Harry Dresdan (5+ / 0-)

    from Audible, have listened to 2 chapters, of course I like it. I listened to Android's Dream on the way to & from Dallas, it is really good, I'm definitely putting John Scalzi on my favorite authors list.

    Still contemplating the list, dunno what percentage of them I've read.

  •  How Is This Possible? (8+ / 0-)

    I've read almost all the books on the BBC list.  Probably means it's time for me to kick the bucket.

    Yet, I'm more intrigued by the titles on your list -- many more of which I haven't read.

    Sorry, I'd probably make a 1000 Books You Should Read Before You Die list.  So many favorites, so little self-editing.  For some reason whatever I read last always urges itself onto the list.  Unfortunately, I like obscure books over many of the canon "fodder."  So, I'm not a good person to make such a list in the first place.

    There, I think I wiggled off the hook.

    Readers & Book Lovers Pull up a chair! You're never too old to be a Meta Groupie

    by Limelite on Wed Nov 28, 2012 at 06:22:37 PM PST

  •  Whenever I'm asked for a reading list... (6+ / 0-)

    ... I point to this:

    Beauty, Truth and Bibliomania

    by

    Justice Putnam

    "Why do you have four books by Bukowski?" she seemed disturbed as she closed The Most Beautiful Woman In Town.

    "I'd have more of his opus," I answered, "I'm slowly re-building my library."

    "But I don't understand, you like Bukowski?"

    "Sure," I responded, a little tentative, not quite understanding her question, "I've always been attracted to his writing style. He is very spare."

    "But Bukowski is a misogynist and you have four of his books!" she pointed at my bookcase. South Of No North, Factotum and Women, plus the one she was returning to the shelf indeed totaled four.

    I thought of all the other books I used to have, lost now from bad love affairs and bad finances. I used to have all of Will and Ariel Durant's tomes, even a rare, Mansions Of Philosophy. I had all of Jack London's books and stories. I had all of Cooper's Leather Stocking Tales. I had most of McMurtry's work from the sixties and seventies; All My Friends Are Going To Be Strangers prominent among them.

    I had Edna St. Vincent Millay's poems and stories. I had H.G. Well's Outline Of History. I had everything by Virginia Woolfe and Janet Flanner. I had obscure poems and letters by Gertrude Stein. I had most of Phillip K. Dick, Asimov and Arthur C. Clarke. I had most of Clifford D. Simak. I had a first printing of The Treasure Of The Sierra Madre by B. Traven. I had everything by Hemingway. I had everything by Orwell; including Down And Out In Paris And London.

    I had all the works of De Sade and Thackeray. I had a dozen volumes of Eugene Field. I had Dickens and Marlowe. I had Melville, Chaucer, Defoe, Voltaire, Swift, Virgil, Plutarch and Donne. I had all the English translations of Mishima. I had Kobe Abe's Woman In The Dunes.

    I had volumes of Dryden, Pope, Shakespeare and Spencer. I had Balzac and Fante. I had Baudelaire and Fitzgerald. I had poems by St John Of The Cross and essays by Annie Dillard. I had all of Henry Miller. I had some of John Rechy. I had volumes of Linda Paston and Marge Piercy. I had some of Sharon Olds and all of Jack Kerouac. I had all of Gary Snyder's work and volumes of Eric Hoffer. I had Kahil Gibran and Rilke. I had Ovid and Nietzsche. I had Berkeley, Hume, Kant and Ghandi.

    I had Autobiography Of A Yogi by Yogananda. I had the Kama Sutra and the Upanishads. I had The Analects and The Tibetan Book Of The Dead. I had Byron. I had Percy and Mary Shelley. I had Ten Days That Shook The World by Jack Reed and I had volumes of Emma Goldman. I had Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison and volumes of Faulkner. I had God and Man at Yale by William F. Buckley Jr. and I had The Monkey Wrench Gang by Edward Abbey.

    "I take Bukowski's work," I began, though I feared she was having none of it, "to be stories and characters that show us how not to be. He is taking a snapshot of life as it is, in all of its dirt and grime; in its violence, bigotry and selfishness. But I don't take his life of the gutter milieu to be a blueprint or affirmation of bad behavior."

    "Oh," she said, pulling out a volume of the Alexandria Quartet, "you have Durrell. Now this is beautiful."

    © 2004 by Justice Putnam
    and Mechanisches-Strophe Verlagswessen

    This piece appeared in the Berkeley Daily Planet

    A Poet is at the same time a force for Solidarity and for Solitude -- Pablo Neruda / Netroots Radio podcasts of The After Show with Wink & Justice can be found on Stitcher

    by justiceputnam on Wed Nov 28, 2012 at 06:24:06 PM PST

    •  I am sorry about your lost books!! (5+ / 0-)

      I tried the other day to explain to my son-in-law why I did not want him to sell my books at B&N used books.  He was sincere.  I told him I had parted with all the ones I could bear to part with...and many other reasons for keeping the ones I have.

      Hubby has kindly kept building book shelves.

      I am sure I have The Tibetan Book Of The Dead and I would be glad mail it to you.  I don't need it back.  (If I can find it.  I think I know which room.)

      Join us at Bookflurries-Bookchat on Wednesday nights 8:00 PM EST

      by cfk on Wed Nov 28, 2012 at 06:43:08 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  It is an old story... (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        cfk, MT Spaces

        ... and I have many of those on the list back in my possession; including a fairly good bound copy of the Tibetan Book of the Dead.

        Thanks, though! It is very thoughtful and generous of you!

        A Poet is at the same time a force for Solidarity and for Solitude -- Pablo Neruda / Netroots Radio podcasts of The After Show with Wink & Justice can be found on Stitcher

        by justiceputnam on Wed Nov 28, 2012 at 06:47:57 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  My list (7+ / 0-)

    1 Pride and Prejudice – Jane Austen
    2 The Lord of the Rings – JRR Tolkien
    3 Jane Eyre – Charlotte Bronte
    4 Harry Potter series – JK Rowling

    5 To Kill a Mockingbird – Harper Lee
    6 The Bible
    7 Wuthering Heights – Emily Bronte
    8 Nineteen Eighty Four – George Orwell
    9 His Dark Materials – Philip Pullman
    10 Great Expectations – Charles Dickens
    11 Little Women – Louisa M Alcott
    12 Tess of the D’Urbervilles – Thomas Hardy
    13 Catch 22 – Joseph Heller
    14 Complete Works of Shakespeare
    15 Rebecca – Daphne Du Maurier
    16 The Hobbit – JRR Tolkien
    17 Birdsong – Sebastian Faulk
    18 Catcher in the Rye – JD Salinger
    19 The Time Traveler’s Wife – Audrey Niffenegger
    20 Middlemarch – George Eliot
    21 Gone With The Wind – Margaret Mitchell
    22 The Great Gatsby – F Scott Fitzgerald
    24 War and Peace – Leo Tolstoy
    25 The Hitch Hiker’s Guide to the Galaxy – Douglas Adams
    27 Crime and Punishment – Fyodor Dostoyevsky
    28 Grapes of Wrath – John Steinbeck
    29 Alice in Wonderland – Lewis Caroll
    30 The Wind in the Willows – Kenneth Grahame

    31. Anna Karenina – Leo Tolstoy
    32 David Copperfield – Charles Dickens
    33 Chronicles of Narnia – CS Lewis
    34 Emma -Jane Austen

    35 Persuasion – Jane Austen
    36 The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe – CS Lewis
    37 The Kite Runner – Khaled Hosseini
    38 Captain Corelli’s Mandolin – Louis De Bernieres
    39 Memoirs of a Geisha – Arthur Golden
    40 Winnie the Pooh – A.A. Milne
    41 Animal Farm – George Orwell
    42 The Da Vinci Code – Dan Brown

    43 One Hundred Years of Solitude – Gabriel Garcia Marquez
    44 A Prayer for Owen Meany – John Irving
    45 The Woman in White – Wilkie Collins
    46 Anne of Green Gables – LM Montgomery
    47 Far From The Madding Crowd – Thomas Hardy
    48 The Handmaid’s Tale – Margaret Atwood
    49 Lord of the Flies – William Golding

    50 Atonement – Ian McEwan
    51 Life of Pi – Yann Martel
    52 Dune – Frank Herbert
    53 Cold Comfort Farm – Stella Gibbons
    54 Sense and Sensibility – Jane Austen
    55 A Suitable Boy – Vikram Seth
    56 The Shadow of the Wind – Carlos Ruiz Zafon
    57 A Tale Of Two Cities – Charles Dickens
    58 Brave New World – Aldous Huxley
    59 The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time – Mark Haddon
    60 Love In The Time Of Cholera – Gabriel Garcia Marquez
    61 Of Mice and Men – John Steinbeck
    62 Lolita – Vladimir Nabokov
    63 The Secret History – Donna Tartt
    64 The Lovely Bones – Alice Sebold
    65 Count of Monte Cristo – Alexandre Dumas
    66 On the Road – Jack Kerouac
    67 Jude the Obscure – Thomas Hardy
    68 Bridget Jones’s Diary – Helen Fielding
    69 Midnight’s Children – Salman Rushdie
    70 Moby Dick – Herman Melville
    71 Oliver Twist – Charles Dickens
    72 Dracula – Bram Stoker
    73 The Secret Garden – Frances Hodgson Burnett

    74 Notes From A Small Island – Bill Bryson
    75 Ulysses – James Joyce
    76 The Inferno – Dante
    77 Swallows and Amazons – Arthur Ransome
    78 Germinal – Emile Zola
    79 Vanity Fair – William Makepeace Thackeray
    80 Possession – AS Byatt
    81 A Christmas Carol – Charles Dickens
    82 Cloud Atlas – David Mitchell
    83 The Color Purple – Alice Walker
    84 The Remains of the Day – Kazuo Ishiguro
    85 Madame Bovary – Gustave Flaubert
    86 A Fine Balance – Rohinton Mistry
    87 Charlotte’s Web – E.B. White
    88 The Five People You Meet In Heaven – Mitch Albom
    89 Adventures of Sherlock Holmes – Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
    90 The Faraway Tree Collection – Enid Blyton
    91 Heart of Darkness – Joseph Conrad
    92 The Little Prince – Antoine De Saint-Exupery (In French)
    93 The Wasp Factory – Iain Banks
    94 Watership Down – Richard Adams
    95 A Confederacy of Dunces – John Kennedy Toole
    96 A Town Like Alice – Nevil Shute
    97 The Three Musketeers – Alexandre Dumas
    98 Hamlet – William Shakespeare
    99 Charlie and the Chocolate Factory – Roald Dahl

    100 Les Miserables – Victor Hugo

    Wow, they recommend a lot of bad books on there, from Heart of Darkness to Jane Eyre and Phillip Pullman. They should know better.

    IMO of course. I hate Steinbeck and Herbert (Dune is the most boring book I've ever read). But at least they didn't include Heinlein.

    They also repeated a few titles...Lion, Witch, and Wardrobe is PART of the Chronicles of Narnia series, of course.

  •  I finished Pratchett's Bromeliad trilogy. (5+ / 0-)

    It was a fun read.  Now I'll have to cast around for something new at bed time.

    For the list I'll suggest Richard Farina's Been Down So Long It Looks Like Up to Me.

  •  such interesting lists (6+ / 0-)

    I do have Cloud Atlas on the shelf, and a couple of others. Am reading Le Petit Prince en francais as an exercise in translation.

    M.M. Kaye wrote several mysteries, either shortly before she wrote Far Pavilions or after, set in the Andamans. They're interesting for their portrayal of British colonial society, as well as for information about an island chain few of us are likely ever to visit.

    I tried reading Life of Pi and couldn't get interested in it. Now that it's the latest cause celebre, I may try again. Or not.

    And the comment on complete Shakespeare reminds me to get out my complete volume -- I still haven't read Coriolanus.

    The truth is rarely pure and never simple. -- Oscar Wilde

    by Mnemosyne on Wed Nov 28, 2012 at 06:45:33 PM PST

  •  Interesting lists (4+ / 0-)

    I've read closer to half of the BBC list - maybe even more.  There are books on there that I have no interest in reading, and more than a few that I read and really, really would not recommend.  Your list contains a fair amount of science fiction, I think, and I just can't get into scifi.  

    I didn't see Stieg Larson's trilogy on either list, and I guess if I were recommending books, that would be one of the top picks.   Other than that, I like reading these diaries and hearing about books that others enjoy and then checking them out on-line to see if they might interest me.  Lists seem almost like an assignment from high school English.  

  •  I've read 42 of those... (6+ / 0-)

    Wow.  I'm well-read.  I cheated a little, because I included a few books I started and didn't finish for one reason or another.  There are some books there I wouldn't necessarily have on my MUST-read list, like Lolita (upsetting,gross), Tale of Two Cities (stupid), or Dune (it's okay but must read, really?).

    Poor Stephen King.  Frank Herbert made the list but he didn't.  He didn't blow the right people, I guess.

    My list would also include (not mentioned in the list at the top) most of the works of Herman Hesse, the Illuminati Trilogy, some of Philip K. Dick's novels like Flow My Tears (which I wrote a long diary about), a Kafka collection, The Idiot by Dostoyevsky, Interview with the Vampire by Anne Rice, Hawaii by James Michener, I, Robot, by Asimov, and more if I dwell on it.  

    I tried to focus on this short list  on books that weren't just entertaining but likely to give you a broader perspective.  

    Hey, some generous soul sent me a copy of Patricia McKillip's Wonders of the Invisible World.  Can't wait to read it!

    Brief Dumbo Spam: Tomorrow night we'll have Thursday Night Classical Music.  Subject still to be determined.

  •  and for anyone wondering (6+ / 0-)

    about the value of sticking your nose in a book all the time, the diary just above this one in my queue was HoundDog's on reading and writing and how it stimulates brain function, especially as we get older.

    Read On!

    The truth is rarely pure and never simple. -- Oscar Wilde

    by Mnemosyne on Wed Nov 28, 2012 at 07:00:41 PM PST

  •  From the so-called BBC list: (7+ / 0-)

    6 The Bible -- well, not from cover to cover, just selections
    8 Nineteen Eighty Four – George Orwell
    13 Catch 22 – Joseph Heller
    18 Catcher in the Rye – JD Salinger
    20 Middlemarch – George Eliot
    22 The Great Gatsby – F Scott Fitzgerald
    25 The Hitch Hiker’s Guide to the Galaxy – Douglas Adams
    27 Crime and Punishment – Fyodor Dostoyevsky
    28 Grapes of Wrath – John Steinbeck
    41 Animal Farm – George Orwell
    43 One Hundred Years of Solitude – Gabriel Garcia Marquez
    48 The Handmaid’s Tale – Margaret Atwood
    55 A Suitable Boy – Vikram Seth
    58 Brave New World – Aldous Huxley
    60 Love In The Time Of Cholera – Gabriel Garcia Marquez
    62 Lolita – Vladimir Nabokov
    66 On the Road – Jack Kerouac
    69 Midnight’s Children – Salman Rushdie
    70 Moby Dick – Herman Melville
    75 Ulysses – James Joyce
    85 Madame Bovary – Gustave Flaubert
    91 Heart of Darkness – Joseph Conrad

    Just 22, but I've got a few on the tbr pile.

    I would also add some Faulkner, some Richard Wright, some Patrick Chamoiseau, some Robert Coover, and lots more Salman Rushdie.

  •  I've read 29 of the books on that list - (7+ / 0-)

    several of them repeatedly, some in more than one translation.

    I've also read parts of 16 others - stopping mostly because I thought they were awful, though there were a few that I ran across selections from in other places and just haven't gone looking to finish the whole book.

    Strength and dignity are her clothing, she rejoices at the days to come; She opens her mouth with wisdom, and the law of kindness is on her tongue.

    by loggersbrat on Wed Nov 28, 2012 at 07:21:39 PM PST

    •  That is interesting (3+ / 0-)

      to read them in more than one translation!

      I have tried some and not finished them, too.  

      I often re-read favorite titles, too.  

      Join us at Bookflurries-Bookchat on Wednesday nights 8:00 PM EST

      by cfk on Wed Nov 28, 2012 at 07:28:13 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  I *own* seven different translations (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        cfk, MT Spaces, Sychotic1

        of the Bible.  And have read all of them completely through at least once.

        I've read two different translations (abridged) of War and Peace - one concentrated on the social aspects of the story, the other on the war.  I tried reading an unabridged, but it was a really kludgey translation, so I didn't get very far.

        I've read stuff by Zola, Hugo and Dumas, but only one that's on the list.  The Little Prince is one I started and couldn't stand.

        Strength and dignity are her clothing, she rejoices at the days to come; She opens her mouth with wisdom, and the law of kindness is on her tongue.

        by loggersbrat on Wed Nov 28, 2012 at 07:46:46 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  61 definitely read from the BBC list - (6+ / 0-)

    Haven't gone slowly through yours yet.  I enjoy seeing how many I've read of books that people list.

    Right now I'm cleaning up the impulse purchases on my Kindle, as I'm away from home for a couple of weeks.  These include a trilogy, self-published, by Beverly Barton, A Boy's Life by Robert R. McCammon and The Night Circus, by Erin Morgenstern.  Loved A Boy's Life and The Night Circus, especially Boy's Life, which reminded me of my brother and his two friends and their adventures growing up in the country and in a very small town.

    One more Barton to finish, then some Mercedes Lackey, Justin Cronin (The Twelve), and the newest Lee Child.

    It's good to have time to check in with the readers!

    "We all do better when we all do better." Paul Wellstone

    by jolux on Wed Nov 28, 2012 at 07:21:56 PM PST

  •  uh oh. this is gonna take awhile. get back 2/u (6+ / 0-)

    consider these terms: ocean rise, weather re-patterning, storm pathology, drout famine, acceptance of nature

    by renzo capetti on Wed Nov 28, 2012 at 07:23:41 PM PST

  •  From the CFK list: (6+ / 0-)

    1.  East of Eden by John Steinbeck
    3.  Grapes of Wrath by Steinbeck
    6.   Moby Dick by Herman Melville
    11.  All of James Herriot's series that begins with All Creatures Great and Small
    28.  All by P. G. Wodehouse -- I've only read a few
    54.   Ulysses by James Joyce
    59.   All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque
    74.   Middlemarch by George Eliot

    Boy, almost none!  I have to say, though, I was very strongly affected by All Quiet on the Western Front.  Also loved the Steinbeck, the Herriot, and Middlemarch.

  •  Of course I wouldn't expect it to be on a BBC (6+ / 0-)

    list, but one book every American should read before they die is A People's History of the United States by Howard Zinn.

    As for the list:

    1 Pride and Prejudice – Jane Austen (tried to read Austen, couldn't.  Okay, shoot me.)
    2 The Lord of the Rings – JRR Tolkien (Do I get extra points for having read it 25 times?)
    6 The Bible (meh)
    8 Nineteen Eighty Four – George Orwell (I haven't read it, but this reminds me that I really must!)
    13 Catch 22 – Joseph Heller (same for this one)
    14 Complete Works of Shakespeare (I haven't read them all, but I have read Julius Caesar, Romeo and Juliet and a few sonnets)
    16 The Hobbit – JRR Tolkien (I've probably read this 12 times)
    18 Catcher in the Rye – JD Salinger (started to read it, couldn't make myself care)
    22 The Great Gatsby – F Scott Fitzgerald (read a page or 2, bored me all to hell)
    24 War and Peace – Leo Tolstoy (ditto)
    25 The Hitch Hiker’s Guide to the Galaxy – Douglas Adams (I've read this twice and could read it again any time)
    27 Crime and Punishment – Fyodor Dostoyevsky (I feel I should read this before America finishes turning into a gulag)
    28 Grapes of Wrath – John Steinbeck (started it, didn't finish, intend to someday)
    29 Alice in Wonderland – Lewis Caroll
    33 Chronicles of Narnia – CS Lewis
    36 The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe – CS Lewis
    41 Animal Farm – George Orwell (another "haven't read" that I'm ashamed to admit)
    49 Lord of the Flies – William Golding (had to read it in school; I'm still disturbed by it)
    52 Dune – Frank Herbert
    57 A Tale Of Two Cities – Charles Dickens (tried, couldn't finish it)
    64 The Lovely Bones – Alice Sebold (my best friend keeps trying to get me to read this and I mean to...)
    70 Moby Dick – Herman Melville (tried, couldn't)
    72 Dracula – Bram Stoker
    75 Ulysses – James Joyce (Tried. Tried hard, for I'm Irish on my father's side. Made it to page 38 before wearily giving up.)
    76 The Inferno – Dante (I've read parts)
    92 The Little Prince – Antoine De Saint-Exupery (In French) Thanks to DKos I did read this one - very moving!
    94 Watership Down – Richard Adams

    I look up at my list and see a lot of "Important Books" that I tried to read and gave up.  I fear that people are going to think I'm about as literate as Sarah Palin.

    Does the fact that I read several bios of FDR back in the day, a translation of Don Quixote when I was in the seventh grade, and every Kurt Vonnegut I could find redeem me any?

    I tend to get interested in a given subject and read about it rather than fiction.  My best friend jokes that I read "technical manuals".  Right now I'm devouring what I can find on Morgan horses.  Before that it was gardening.  Before that it was general pet health. Before that it was Irish history and archaeology wrt the Celts. Way back in the day I read all I could on the Native American tribes...

    That reminds me: A book I can't recommend enough is

    The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven by Sherman Alexie

    Okay, I'm rambling and will shut up.  No one will read this comment, probably.

    •  I like the rambling! (4+ / 0-)

      Thanks!  Yes, extra points.  I think you have beat hubby's record for reading Lord of the Rings.

      Join us at Bookflurries-Bookchat on Wednesday nights 8:00 PM EST

      by cfk on Wed Nov 28, 2012 at 07:46:25 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  I haven't read it in a few years now, so maybe he (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        cfk, MT Spaces, melpomene1

        will catch up to me.  I used to read it once or twice a year.  It used to be one of my Christmas traditions to start LOTR - it helped me ignore my SAD for a while.

        I've read The Silmarillion about 5 times, Unfinished Tales twice, The Letters of JRR Tolkien 2 or 3 times. I really recommend that all JRRT lovers read the Letters.  I have even read all but a few pages of the gargantuan twelve- volume History of Middle Earth. My God! That was some of the most difficult reading I've ever done.  I still have them here, most in hardback, but I will probably never crack them again! LOL

        •  I didn't know (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          zett, MT Spaces

          there was a History!  My sister and a friend used to write notes to each other in elven.  I was not that good, but I loved the story.

          On my non-fiction list is the bio of JRR, Tolkien and the Great War by John Garth.  The book said that Tolkien considered himself most like Faramir.  I really like Faramir so that was interesting.

             

          Join us at Bookflurries-Bookchat on Wednesday nights 8:00 PM EST

          by cfk on Wed Nov 28, 2012 at 08:05:48 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

  •  So many good books and so little time.... (5+ / 0-)

    I've read all but 8 of the books on the BBC list plus a whole lot more.  I like a mix of classics, political, science and some philosophy.  I try to keep up with best-sellers.  For example, I just saw the movie "The Life of Pi" and thought I should re-read that.... I know it is somewhere in the 3000+ books in my library but can't find it.  Did I lend that out to someone and they dared to not return it?  I'm such a book hoarder. I like to hold a book in my hands and turn the pages eagerly as I read. Sorry, I really don't like my Kindle.

    Gravitation cannot be held responsible for people falling in love. - Einstein

    by moose67 on Wed Nov 28, 2012 at 07:37:49 PM PST

  •  Here's mine, if folks are still around ... (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    cfk, MT Spaces, Monsieur Georges, Brecht

    Just the ones I've read or partially read:

    1 Pride and Prejudice – Jane Austen
    3 Jane Eyre – Charlotte Bronte
    5 To Kill a Mockingbird – Harper Lee

    6 The Bible
    7 Wuthering Heights – Emily Bronte
    8 Nineteen Eighty Four – George Orwell
    9 His Dark Materials – Philip Pullman
    10 Great Expectations – Charles Dickens
    12 Tess of the D’Urbervilles – Thomas Hardy
    13 Catch 22 – Joseph Heller
    14 Complete Works of Shakespeare
    16 The Hobbit – JRR Tolkien

    18 Catcher in the Rye – JD Salinger
    20 Middlemarch – George Eliot
    21 Gone With The Wind – Margaret Mitchell
    22 The Great Gatsby – F Scott Fitzgerald
    25 The Hitch Hiker’s Guide to the Galaxy – Douglas Adams
    27 Crime and Punishment – Fyodor Dostoyevsky
    28 Grapes of Wrath – John Steinbeck
    34 Emma -Jane Austen
    35 Persuasion – Jane Austen
    41 Animal Farm – George Orwell
    42 The Da Vinci Code – Dan Brown
    47 Far From The Madding Crowd – Thomas Hardy
    49 Lord of the Flies – William Golding
    54 Sense and Sensibility – Jane Austen
    57 A Tale Of Two Cities – Charles Dickens
    58 Brave New World – Aldous Huxley
    61 Of Mice and Men – John Steinbeck

    62 Lolita – Vladimir Nabokov
    67 Jude the Obscure – Thomas Hardy
    68 Bridget Jones’s Diary – Helen Fielding

    70 Moby Dick – Herman Melville
    75 Ulysses – James Joyce

    98 Hamlet – William Shakespeare

  •  37/100 (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    cfk, MT Spaces, Monsieur Georges, Brecht

    1. Jane Eyre
    2. To Kill a Mockingbird
    3. Wuthering Heights
    4. 1984
    5. Tess of the D'Urbervilles
    6. Catch 22
    7. Rebecca
    8. The Hobbit
    9. Catcher in the Rye
    10. Gone With the Wind
    11. The Great Gatsby
    12. Crime and Punishment
    13. Grapes of Wrath
    14. Alice in Wonderland
    15. Anna Karenina
    16. Winnie the Pooh
    17. Animal Farm
    18. The Da Vinci Code
    19. One Hundred Years of Solitude
    20. A Prayer for Owen Meany
    21. The Handmaid's Tale
    22. Lord of the Flies
    23. A Tale of Two Cities
    24. Brave New World
    25. Love in The Time of Cholera
    26. Of Mice and Men
    27. Lolita
    28. The Lovely Bones
    29. On the Road
    30. Jude the Obscure
    31. Moby Dick
    32. Dracula
    33. A Christmas Carol
    34. The Color Purple
    35. Heart of Darkness
    36. A Confederacy of Dunces
    37. Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

  •  A list of my favorites (fiction) (7+ / 0-)

    1 The Master and Margarita  (Mikhail Bulgakov)
    2 Solibo Magnificent  (Patrick Chamoiseau)
    3 The Origin of the Brunists  (Robert Coover)
    4 The Public Burning  (Robert Coover)
    5 Guard of Honor  (James Gould Cozzens)
    6 The Brothers Karamazov  (Dostoyevsky)
    7 Middlemarch  (George Eliot)
    8 The Sound and the Fury  (William Faulkner)
    9 Go Down, Moses  (William Faulkner)
    10 Chronicle of a Death Foretold  (Gabriel Garcia Marquez)
    11 Catch-22  (Joseph Heller)
    12 The World According to Garp  (John Irving)
    13 Lake Wobegon, Summer 1956  (Garrison Keillor)
    14 The Buddha of Suburbia  (Hanif Kureishi)
    15 London Kills Me  (Hanif Kureishi)
    16 The Black Album  (Hanif Kureishi)
    17 The Periodic Table  (Primo Levi)
    18 Palace Walk/Sugar Street/Palace of Desire  (Naguib Mahfouz)
    19 One Hundred Years of Solitude  (Gabriel Garcia Marquez)
    20 In Country  (Bobbie Ann Mason)
    21 Tropic of Capricorn  (Henry Miller)
    22 Song of Solomon  (Toni Morrison)
    23 The Bluest Eye  (Toni Morrison)
    24 At Swim-Two-Birds  (Flann O'Brien)
    25 The Things They Carried  (Tim O'Brien)
    26 The Bell Jar  (Sylvia Plath)
    27 In Search of Lost Time  (Marcel Proust)
    28 The Ground Beneath Her Feet  (Salman Rushdie)
    29 The Satanic Verses  (Salman Rushdie)
    30 Midnight's Children  (Salman Rushdie)
    31 Don Quixote  (Cervantes)
    32 A Suitable Boy  (Vikram Seth)
    33 Anywhere But Here  (Mona Simpson)
    34 Carnivore Diet  (Julia Slavin)
    35 The Grapes of Wrath  (John Steinbeck)
    36 East of Eden  (John Steinbeck)
    37 The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn  (Mark Twain)
    38 Slaughterhouse Five  (Kurt Vonnegut)
    39 The Sirens of Titan  (Kurt Vonnegut)
    40 Cat's Cradle  (Kurt Vonnegut)
    41 God Bless You, Mr. Rosewater  (Kurt Vonnegut)
    42 The Passion  (Jeannette Winterson)
    43 Sexing the Cherry  (Jeannette Winterson)
    44 Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit  (Jeannette Winterson)
    45 Native Son  (Richard Wright)

    •  Excellent list...thank you!! (3+ / 0-)

      This whole diary is a keeper with many thanks to you and those who took the time to list their favorites!

      Join us at Bookflurries-Bookchat on Wednesday nights 8:00 PM EST

      by cfk on Wed Nov 28, 2012 at 08:15:37 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  You have immaculate taste (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      cfk, Brecht

      in Literature. My hat's off to you for your selections. Particularly the mention of Primo Levi. And a few recommendations that I've not read that look tantalizing (Kureishi? Mahfouz? I've not read these authors!)

       

      "Counsel woven into the fabric of real life is wisdom" - Walter Benjamin

      by mahakali overdrive on Wed Nov 28, 2012 at 10:03:35 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Well, Kureishi is big fun, (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        mahakali overdrive, Brecht, cfk

        or at least he was when he was young.  He wrote one novel later on that was all sour and mopey, and surprised the heck out of me.  He also wrote the films My Beautiful Laundrette and Sammy and Rosie Get Laid, if you remember those.

        Those three Mahfouz books, aka the Cairo Trilogy, are just great, and I push them whenever I can.  ;-)

    •  You're a superstar, and you utterly win. (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      cfk, MT Spaces, Monsieur Georges

      I've only read:

      1 The Master and Margarita  (Mikhail Bulgakov) - magic
      6 The Brothers Karamazov  (Dostoyevsky) - best novel ever?
      8 The Sound and the Fury  (William Faulkner)
      11 Catch-22  (Joseph Heller)
      12 The World According to Garp  (John Irving)
      19 One Hundred Years of Solitude  (Gabriel Garcia Marquez)
      24 At Swim-Two-Birds  (Flann O'Brien) - my favorite novel
      26 The Bell Jar  (Sylvia Plath)
      (27 In Search of Lost Time  (Marcel Proust) - Only Swann's Way)
      31 Don Quixote  (Cervantes)
      37 The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn  (Mark Twain)
      38 Slaughterhouse Five  (Kurt Vonnegut)
      39 The Sirens of Titan  (Kurt Vonnegut)
      40 Cat's Cradle  (Kurt Vonnegut)

      But almost half the others are on my TBR list.

      "Every man has a right to utter what he thinks truth" Samuel Johnson

      by Brecht on Wed Nov 28, 2012 at 11:12:25 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  here's mine (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    cfk, Brecht, MT Spaces, Monsieur Georges

    1 Pride and Prejudice – Jane Austen
    2 The Lord of the Rings – JRR Tolkien
    3 Jane Eyre – Charlotte Bronte
    4 Harry Potter series – JK Rowling
    5 To Kill a Mockingbird – Harper Lee
    6 The Bible
    7 Wuthering Heights – Emily Bronte
    8 Nineteen Eighty Four – George Orwell
    9 His Dark Materials – Philip Pullman
    10 Great Expectations – Charles Dickens
    11 Little Women – Louisa M Alcott

    12 Tess of the D’Urbervilles – Thomas Hardy
    13 Catch 22 – Joseph Heller
    14 Complete Works of Shakespeare
    15 Rebecca – Daphne Du Maurier
    16 The Hobbit – JRR Tolkien
    17 Birdsong – Sebastian Faulk
    18 Catcher in the Rye – JD Salinger
    19 The Time Traveler’s Wife – Audrey Niffenegger
    20 Middlemarch – George Eliot
    21 Gone With The Wind – Margaret Mitchell
    22 The Great Gatsby – F Scott Fitzgerald

    24 War and Peace – Leo Tolstoy
    25 The Hitch Hiker’s Guide to the Galaxy – Douglas Adams
    27 Crime and Punishment – Fyodor Dostoyevsky
    28 Grapes of Wrath – John Steinbeck
    29 Alice in Wonderland – Lewis Caroll
    30 The Wind in the Willows – Kenneth Grahame

    31. Anna Karenina – Leo Tolstoy
    32 David Copperfield – Charles Dickens
    33 Chronicles of Narnia – CS Lewis
    34 Emma -Jane Austen
    35 Persuasion – Jane Austen
    36 The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe – CS Lewis
    37 The Kite Runner – Khaled Hosseini
    38 Captain Corelli’s Mandolin – Louis De Bernieres
    39 Memoirs of a Geisha – Arthur Golden
    40 Winnie the Pooh – A.A. Milne
    41 Animal Farm – George Orwell
    42 The Da Vinci Code – Dan Brown
    43 One Hundred Years of Solitude – Gabriel Garcia Marquez
    44 A Prayer for Owen Meany – John Irving
    45 The Woman in White – Wilkie Collins
    46 Anne of Green Gables – LM Montgomery
    47 Far From The Madding Crowd – Thomas Hardy
    48 The Handmaid’s Tale – Margaret Atwood
    49 Lord of the Flies – William Golding
    50 Atonement – Ian McEwan
    51 Life of Pi – Yann Martel
    52 Dune – Frank Herbert
    53 Cold Comfort Farm – Stella Gibbons
    54 Sense and Sensibility – Jane Austen
    55 A Suitable Boy – Vikram Seth
    56 The Shadow of the Wind – Carlos Ruiz Zafon
    57 A Tale Of Two Cities – Charles Dickens
    58 Brave New World – Aldous Huxley
    59 The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time – Mark Haddon
    60 Love In The Time Of Cholera – Gabriel Garcia Marquez
    61 Of Mice and Men – John Steinbeck
    62 Lolita – Vladimir Nabokov
    63 The Secret History – Donna Tartt
    64 The Lovely Bones – Alice Sebold
    65 Count of Monte Cristo – Alexandre Dumas
    66 On the Road – Jack Kerouac
    67 Jude the Obscure – Thomas Hardy
    68 Bridget Jones’s Diary – Helen Fielding
    69 Midnight’s Children – Salman Rushdie
    70 Moby Dick – Herman Melville
    71 Oliver Twist – Charles Dickens
    72 Dracula – Bram Stoker

    73 The Secret Garden – Frances Hodgson Burnett
    74 Notes From A Small Island – Bill Bryson
    75 Ulysses – James Joyce
    76 The Inferno – Dante

    77 Swallows and Amazons – Arthur Ransome
    78 Germinal – Emile Zola
    79 Vanity Fair – William Makepeace Thackeray
    80 Possession – AS Byatt
    81 A Christmas Carol – Charles Dickens
    82 Cloud Atlas – David Mitchell
    83 The Color Purple – Alice Walker
    84 The Remains of the Day – Kazuo Ishiguro
    85 Madame Bovary – Gustave Flaubert
    86 A Fine Balance – Rohinton Mistry
    87 Charlotte’s Web – E.B. White
    88 The Five People You Meet In Heaven – Mitch Albom
    89 Adventures of Sherlock Holmes – Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
    90 The Faraway Tree Collection – Enid Blyton
    91 Heart of Darkness – Joseph Conrad
    92 The Little Prince – Antoine De Saint-Exupery (In French)
    93 The Wasp Factory – Iain Banks
    94 Watership Down – Richard Adams
    95 A Confederacy of Dunces – John Kennedy Toole
    96 A Town Like Alice – Nevil Shute
    97 The Three Musketeers – Alexandre Dumas
    98 Hamlet – William Shakespeare
    99 Charlie and the Chocolate Factory – Roald Dahl
    100 Les Miserables – Victor Hugo

    One series that I don't see that I love, and have read way too many times is the Little House on the Prairie series.  Also, Guardians of Ga'hoole.  YA books count!

  •  have read 36 on this list (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    cfk, Sychotic1

    Granted, it's odd that C.S. Lewis gets 2 dips in the till with both the complete Narnia series as well as just the 1st volume.  Anyway....

    Just finished the Aaron Copland bio.  Now that it's on the to-be-traded pile, not sure what book is next.

    "It's only in books that the officers of the detective force are superior to the weakness of making a mistake." (Wilkie Collins, The Moonstone)

    by chingchongchinaman on Wed Nov 28, 2012 at 09:03:34 PM PST

    •  hi (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      chingchongchinaman

      I hope your next one is very interesting and absorbing.

      36 is a good number!

      Join us at Bookflurries-Bookchat on Wednesday nights 8:00 PM EST

      by cfk on Wed Nov 28, 2012 at 09:05:15 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  well, the next one will be something of..... (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        cfk

        .....some sort :) .  It won't be populist, to be sure.  Obviously no lack of choice, but the usual variables kick in (ease of reading, what I can trade in), besides the random one of what I'm in the mood for.

        BTW, this weekend's SNLC might turn into another SNLC/opera mash-up, which means it goes up super early, potentially.  That depends on me (a) getting to the Met opera-cast this weekend and (b) writing it up in time for the evening.  We'll see.

        "It's only in books that the officers of the detective force are superior to the weakness of making a mistake." (Wilkie Collins, The Moonstone)

        by chingchongchinaman on Wed Nov 28, 2012 at 09:59:08 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  Ahh, thanks for putting me on the list (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    cfk, MT Spaces, Monsieur Georges, Brecht

    Mine (for f&sf at least) is here: http://kellymccullough.com/... I'd do something more thorough, but I'm on my iPad at the moment, which limits my typing. Also, pretty crazy with book launch stuff at the moment.

    Kelly McCullough - author of the WebMage series and the Fallen Blade books (Penguin/ACE)

    by KMc on Wed Nov 28, 2012 at 09:17:20 PM PST

  •  Here's my own list: (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    cfk, Monsieur Georges, Brecht

    I limited this to 19th-21st long-form fiction, only one per author, but it's still pretty obvious where the huge, gaping holes in my reading are.  Here's a list of 50, chronologically:

    Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice
    Mary Shelley, Frankenstein
    Alexander Pushkin, Eugene Onegin
    Mikhail Lermontov, A Hero of Our Time
    Herman Melville, Moby Dick
    Nikolai Gogol, Dead Souls
    Gustave Flaubert, Madame Bovary
    Ivan Turgenev, Fathers and Sons
    Fyodor Dostoevsky, Demons
    Jose Rizal, Noli Me Tangere
    Leo Tolstoy, Hadji Murad
    Anton Chekhov, Three Sisters
    Rudyard Kipling, Kim
    Charles Chesnutt, The Marrow of Tradition
    Fyodor Sologub, The Petty Demon
    Andrei Bely, Petersburg
    Evgeny Zamyatin, We
    Jaroslav Hasek, The Good Soldier Svejk
    Isaak Babel, Red Cavalry
    E. E. Cummings, The Enormous Room
    James Joyce, Ulysses
    Fernando Pessoa, The Book of Disquiet
    Mikhail Bulgakov, The Master and Margarita
    Karel Capek, War with the Newts
    Antoine de Saint-Exupery, Wind, Sand and Stars
    Carson McCullers, The Heart is a Lonely Hunter
    Robert Penn Warren, All the King's Men
    Albert Camus, The Plague
    John Steinbeck, East of Eden
    Vladimir Nabokov, Pale Fire
    Julio Cortazar, Hopscotch
    Vasily Grossman, Life and Fate
    Stanislaw Lem, His Master's Voice
    John Gardner, Grendel
    Kurt Vonnegut, Slaughterhouse-Five
    Venedikt Erofeev, Moscow-Petushki
    Thomas Pynchon, Gravity's Rainbow
    Boris and Arkady Strugatsky, Roadside Picnic
    William Gaddis, J R
    Gabriel Garcia-Marquez, Autumn of the Patriarch
    Georges Perec, Life a User's Manual
    John Kennedy Toole, A Confederacy of Dunces
    Chinua Achebe, Anthills of the Savannah
    Tom Stoppard, Arcadia
    Haruki Murakami, Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World
    Salman Rushdie, The Satanic Verses
    Kazuo Ishiguro, The Remains of the Day
    David Foster Wallace, Infinite Jest
    Roberto Bolano, The Savage Detectives
    Mark Danielewski, House of Leaves

    Saint, n. A dead sinner revised and edited. - Ambrose Bierce

    by pico on Thu Nov 29, 2012 at 01:18:48 AM PST

    •  A wonderful list! (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Monsieur Georges, pico, Brecht

      I have heard about The Enormous Room and I should read it.  

      I will write it down.

      Join us at Bookflurries-Bookchat on Wednesday nights 8:00 PM EST

      by cfk on Thu Nov 29, 2012 at 04:13:28 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  OK, I'll never catch up (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      pico, Brecht, cfk

      with that list!  Even just the Russians.  ;-)

    •  An impressive list. You're rather hip, but also (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      cfk, pico

      have your own taste and choose for yourself. Here's what I've read - but 55% of the rest are on my TBR list.

      Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice
      Mary Shelley, Frankenstein
      (Alexander Pushkin, Eugene Onegin - on my shelf)
      Mikhail Lermontov, A Hero of Our Time
      Herman Melville, Moby Dick
      Nikolai Gogol, Dead Souls
      Gustave Flaubert, Madame Bovary
      (Ivan Turgenev, Fathers and Sons - on my shelf)
      Fyodor Dostoevsky, Demons
      (Leo Tolstoy, Hadji Murad - on my shelf)
      Rudyard Kipling, Kim
      Evgeny Zamyatin, We
      Jaroslav Hasek, The Good Soldier Svejk
      James Joyce, Ulysses
      Mikhail Bulgakov, The Master and Margarita
      Robert Penn Warren, All the King's Men
      Kurt Vonnegut, Slaughterhouse-Five
      John Kennedy Toole, A Confederacy of Dunces
      (Kazuo Ishiguro, The Remains of the Day - on my shelf)
      (David Foster Wallace, Infinite Jest - on my shelf)
      Roberto Bolano, The Savage Detectives

      Your list makes me a tad jealous, and I want to poke holes in it. But if these are your 50 favorite, they're the tip of the iceberg, and imply that you've read very widely indeed. I can find areas that appear under-represented; but perhaps you've read them, and they're just not your favorites. So I'll poke a bit, but it's really more of a tribute than a quibble. I only bother to attack a Canon if it's mostly sound.

      Only 3 women? You've got the two top current Japanese, but I think no other Asian. Middle East? More Latin America and Africa? Okay, those geographical pokes are unfair, when you have a far more international palette than most readers.

      So, really, one substantial poke so far. And my only other poke is, you're slanted very highbrow. Now, these are great choices, I feel. But where are mystery, thriller, SF (OK, We, Frankenstein, Slaughterhouse Five-ish), Fantasy (beyond magical realism). I won't say you're missing Romance, when Austen invented it. Aren't there any middlebrow bestsellers that just grab you?

      Then again, that meme-debunking purplecar post you linked to showed that the "BBC" list was specifically tweaked to be middlebrow. Your personal list is an order of magnitude better than that. Thank you.

      "Every man has a right to utter what he thinks truth" Samuel Johnson

      by Brecht on Thu Nov 29, 2012 at 12:38:21 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  pico used to do literature diaries on DKos (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Brecht, pico

        that were wonderful.  You can find them by clicking on his name.  The one on Edwidge Danticat who is female is a great one.

        A while back he did Ulysses with some of us at a different site and I was just amazed to be able to read it and enjoy it after years of being afraid.  He was a great teacher and very kind about my observations which were low brow.

        I would love to sit in on his classes at the University.

        I do sometimes hope he will read some of my favorites like Helprin's Winter's Tale and he smiles gently.  :)

        I know you are very busy, pico...

        ~waving~

        Join us at Bookflurries-Bookchat on Wednesday nights 8:00 PM EST

        by cfk on Thu Nov 29, 2012 at 01:43:35 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Boy did he. Thanks for pointing me to those, cfk. (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          cfk, pico

          I don't need pico to debate with, I can debate his old diaries, like Debating the Canon!

          Ulysses is mindblowing, beautiful, and intimidating.

          You mention "my observations which were low brow" - well, that's why Ulysses is intimidating. By far the most important thing is whether you read carefully and with an open mind. But having background knowledge and a critical framework can help to clarify your literary ideas and how you articulate them, and pico has plenty of those. You do too, though, with all the reading, paying attention and thinking about books you've put in. He's just mastered the lingo and that expert voice thingy. And me, I have some of that, plus overconfidence.

          I hope to see more of pico in R&BLers. And I'm glad he's already left a big footprint.

          "Every man has a right to utter what he thinks truth" Samuel Johnson

          by Brecht on Thu Nov 29, 2012 at 06:22:15 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

        •  Pshaw. (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          cfk, Brecht

          Hard to say you were too lowbrow for a book with so many fart jokes!

          Saint, n. A dead sinner revised and edited. - Ambrose Bierce

          by pico on Thu Nov 29, 2012 at 07:40:49 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

      •  Spot-on analysis: (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        cfk, Brecht

        1. Definitely haven't read enough women authors.  I've been recently chomping through Zadie Smith and Joan Didion, but in both cases I consider them far superior nonfiction writers (Didion in particular... She's my favorite essayist ever.)  I also like a long list of poets - from Akhmatova to Dickinson - who weren't eligible because of the long-form fiction qualification.  But I do need to read more women fiction authors, and it's a substantial gap I recognize.

        2. Definitely haven't read enough writers from Asia (although add Rizal to that list: he's Filipino.)  I have been through some other classic authors - really disliked both Murasaki and Mishima; I'm pretty fond of Akutagawa, but he's mostly short stories and my list is long-form.  Africa's an even bigger gap, although again some people I'd normally include on my list (Senghor!) were poets.  And nada from the Middle East, which is embarrassing.  My Latin American list would look slightly better if I could include Borges (all short-form) and more than one work by a single author (Cortazar!)

        3. Definitely slanted highbrow.  Somebody's gotta be that guy!  I do enjoy science fiction, but fantasy's never grabbed me much (including Tolkien).  What do you consider Middlebrow?

        All in all, very good observations... Thank you!

        Saint, n. A dead sinner revised and edited. - Ambrose Bierce

        by pico on Thu Nov 29, 2012 at 07:39:53 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  "What do you consider Middlebrow?" (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          cfk, pico

          Two things occurred to me since my critique of your list.

          1) I was poking at things you could use more of; but there aren't any of your 50 I'd want to drop. So the simple answer is that you just need 50 more.

          2) I don't think you're biased against middlebrow, per se.

          Bloom says that what earns you a place in the canon is original vision: inventing a flavor that wasn't in fiction before you. That is something rarely found in middlebrow, and it's the quality that saturates your list.

          I think you find it more often in genre fiction. I'd say Poe (of course - though I think he only managed one novel), Chandler, William Gibson, China Mieville, even Stephen King, each brings a brand new voice to the table.

          You said "Definitely slanted highbrow.  Somebody's gotta be that guy!" I fully agree. The problem with the tweaked BBC list, the reason it's such a popular meme (with its taunt "most people only read 6 of these"), is there are millions of lazy, self-satisfied readers who want to believe in it.

          I looked at some of your old diaries. And I see your list. So I know you have both done the work, and think for yourself.

          I'll answer the rest of your points in another comment.

          "Every man has a right to utter what he thinks truth" Samuel Johnson

          by Brecht on Thu Nov 29, 2012 at 10:55:25 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  Thanks... I definitely need to check out Mievelle, (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Brecht, cfk

            about whom I've heard a lot.  Any recommendations where to start?

            Poe is fine, but his one novel is 3/4 junk and 1/4 brilliance (incidentally, I highly recommend Mat Johnson's Pym, which riffs on Poe's novel considerably.)  This may say a lot about me, but my favorite Poe story is one of his least known, "Silence".

            King is fine, too - he's fun to read, but nothing sticks with me a day or two later.

            Saint, n. A dead sinner revised and edited. - Ambrose Bierce

            by pico on Thu Nov 29, 2012 at 11:21:07 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  Mieville - I've read 7 of them. 3 starting points: (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              pico, cfk

              1) Looking for Jake. Stories. He's almost too ambitious, so it's nice to see him focus on just one or two things at a time. Gives you many flavors (creepy, weird, comic, playful) of his writing.

              2) The City and The City. Unlike his other books - a simpler kind of strangeness? Somewhere between Chandler, Kafka and Borges in style. A mystery set in two overlapping cities, from parallel universes. Perhaps his most fully realized vision.

              3) Perdido Street Station. Strange, disturbing in parts. His second book, and he really lets his imagination rip. But the plot's pretty coherent, for him (incoherence is perhaps his biggest flaw. But he keeps pushing in many directions, and is brilliant).

              Embassytown is perhaps his most ambitious book, so far.

              "Every man has a right to utter what he thinks truth" Samuel Johnson

              by Brecht on Thu Nov 29, 2012 at 11:32:46 PM PST

              [ Parent ]

        •  Well, unless I want to research this comment, (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          pico, cfk

          just to show off, that's about it.

          I keep saying this, but haven't said it to you. I've put in a few months compiling a 1000+ TBR from 7 books on books and 20+ lists. A very fun project. So I'm incredibly good at recognizing names of authors, and have a list to last 20 years.

          1) Good to know about Zadie Smith and Joan Didion.

          2) I agree about Murasaki and Mishima. I have several Asian names on my TBR, but I haven't read them yet. I have enjoyed the two Sosekis I read. Amos Tutuola's Palm-Wine Drinkard is definitely like nothing else I've read, and fun. Africa & Middle East, again, mostly names on my TBR. Latin America: I adore Borges. I keep touting Machado de Assis, because he belongs in the Canon and is clearly under-recognized. Posthumous Memoirs of Bras Cubas, trans. by Rabassa, good place to start.

          You may know these things already. I will, in time, look through your old book diaries. Then I'll have a fuller view of what you've read and love.

          Thanks for such good chat, pico.

          "Every man has a right to utter what he thinks truth" Samuel Johnson

          by Brecht on Thu Nov 29, 2012 at 11:22:02 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

  •  I've read 29 of them (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    cfk, Monsieur Georges, Brecht

    1 Pride and Prejudice – Jane Austen
    2 The Lord of the Rings – JRR Tolkien
    4 Harry Potter series – JK Rowling
    5 To Kill a Mockingbird – Harper Lee
    6 The Bible
    7 Wuthering Heights – Emily Bronte
    10 Great Expectations – Charles Dickens
    11 Little Women – Louisa M Alcott
    16 The Hobbit – JRR Tolkien
    18 Catcher in the Rye – JD Salinger
    20 Middlemarch – George Eliot
    22 The Great Gatsby – F Scott Fitzgerald
    28 Grapes of Wrath – John Steinbeck
    29 Alice in Wonderland – Lewis Caroll
    30 The Wind in the Willows – Kenneth Grahame
    33 Chronicles of Narnia – CS Lewis
    36 The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe – CS Lewis
    40 Winnie the Pooh – A.A. Milne
    41 Animal Farm – George Orwell
    43 One Hundred Years of Solitude – Gabriel Garcia Marquez
    57 A Tale Of Two Cities – Charles Dickens
    58 Brave New World – Aldous Huxley
    65 Count of Monte Cristo – Alexandre Dumas
    66 On the Road – Jack Kerouac
    76 The Inferno – Dante
    85 Madame Bovary – Gustave Flaubert
    87 Charlotte’s Web – E.B. White
    91 Heart of Darkness – Joseph Conrad
    99 Charlie and the Chocolate Factory – Roald Dahl

    There's only one that I've started but not finished, and that's the complete works of Shakespeare. I've read The Tempest and Macbeth, and I was supposed to read Hamlet in high school but I couldn't even make sense of the cliff's notes. I'm not completely sure if I've read the entire Bible, but I think I probably have, just not cover to cover.

    Real or fake, I don't find a lot to quibble with on the list. If I had the patience to make a list of my own, I'm pretty sure Pride and Prejudice, Gatsby, Middlemarch, On the Road and A Tale of Two Cities would be in the top ten. When I was a kid, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, Wind in the Willows and Winnie the Pooh were among my favorites (I think the Paddington Bear series was my favorite then), and in high school Catcher in the Rye and To Kill a Mockingbird were probably tied for my second favorite (#1 was A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, definitely the list's biggest omission).

    Among the ones I haven't read, I do plan to read most of them. I even own a few. The only ones I definitely have no plan to read are The DaVinci Code (I saw the movie and didn't care for it) and Gone With the Wind (I know you're not supposed to pass judgment on a book you haven't read, but what do I want to do with a book in which a woman gets raped and then decides she enjoyed it? No thanks!) I'm tempted to add Bridget Jones' Diary to the no-go list, but the movie is a guilty pleasure.

    Certaines personnes disent qu'il y a une femme à blâmer, Mais je sais que c'est ma faute sacrément.

    by RamblinDave on Thu Nov 29, 2012 at 02:34:58 AM PST

  •  List (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Monsieur Georges, Brecht, cfk

    1 Pride and Prejudice – Jane Austen
    2 The Lord of the Rings – JRR Tolkien
    3 Jane Eyre – Charlotte Bronte

    4 Harry Potter series – JK Rowling
    5 To Kill a Mockingbird – Harper Lee
    6 The Bible

    7 Wuthering Heights – Emily Bronte
    8 Nineteen Eighty Four – George Orwell
    9 His Dark Materials – Philip Pullman
    10 Great Expectations – Charles Dickens
    11 Little Women – Louisa M Alcott
    12 Tess of the D’Urbervilles – Thomas Hardy
    13 Catch 22 – Joseph Heller
    14 Complete Works of Shakespeare

    15 Rebecca – Daphne Du Maurier
    16 The Hobbit – JRR Tolkien
    17 Birdsong – Sebastian Faulk
    18 Catcher in the Rye – JD Salinger
    19 The Time Traveler’s Wife – Audrey Niffenegger
    20 Middlemarch – George Eliot
    21 Gone With The Wind – Margaret Mitchell
    22 The Great Gatsby – F Scott Fitzgerald
    24 War and Peace – Leo Tolstoy
    25 The Hitch Hiker’s Guide to the Galaxy – Douglas Adams
    27 Crime and Punishment – Fyodor Dostoyevsky
    28 Grapes of Wrath – John Steinbeck
    29 Alice in Wonderland – Lewis Caroll
    30 The Wind in the Willows – Kenneth Grahame
    31. Anna Karenina – Leo Tolstoy
    32 David Copperfield – Charles Dickens
    33 Chronicles of Narnia – CS Lewis
    34 Emma -Jane Austen

    35 Persuasion – Jane Austen
    36 The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe – CS Lewis
    37 The Kite Runner – Khaled Hosseini

    38 Captain Corelli’s Mandolin – Louis De Bernieres
    39 Memoirs of a Geisha – Arthur Golden
    40 Winnie the Pooh – A.A. Milne
    41 Animal Farm – George Orwell

    42 The Da Vinci Code – Dan Brown
    43 One Hundred Years of Solitude – Gabriel Garcia Marquez
    44 A Prayer for Owen Meany – John Irving
    45 The Woman in White – Wilkie Collins

    46 Anne of Green Gables – LM Montgomery
    47 Far From The Madding Crowd – Thomas Hardy
    48 The Handmaid’s Tale – Margaret Atwood
    49 Lord of the Flies – William Golding
    50 Atonement – Ian McEwan

    51 Life of Pi – Yann Martel
    52 Dune – Frank Herbert
    53 Cold Comfort Farm – Stella Gibbons
    54 Sense and Sensibility – Jane Austen
    55 A Suitable Boy – Vikram Seth
    56 The Shadow of the Wind – Carlos Ruiz Zafon
    57 A Tale Of Two Cities – Charles Dickens
    58 Brave New World – Aldous Huxley
    59 The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time – Mark Haddon
    60 Love In The Time Of Cholera – Gabriel Garcia Marquez
    61 Of Mice and Men – John Steinbeck
    62 Lolita – Vladimir Nabokov
    63 The Secret History – Donna Tartt

    64 The Lovely Bones – Alice Sebold
    65 Count of Monte Cristo – Alexandre Dumas
    66 On the Road – Jack Kerouac

    67 Jude the Obscure – Thomas Hardy
    68 Bridget Jones’s Diary – Helen Fielding
    69 Midnight’s Children – Salman Rushdie
    70 Moby Dick – Herman Melville
    71 Oliver Twist – Charles Dickens
    72 Dracula – Bram Stoker
    73 The Secret Garden – Frances Hodgson Burnett

    74 Notes From A Small Island – Bill Bryson
    75 Ulysses – James Joyce
    76 The Inferno – Dante

    77 Swallows and Amazons – Arthur Ransome
    78 Germinal – Emile Zola
    79 Vanity Fair – William Makepeace Thackeray
    80 Possession – AS Byatt
    81 A Christmas Carol – Charles Dickens
    82 Cloud Atlas – David Mitchell
    83 The Color Purple – Alice Walker
    84 The Remains of the Day – Kazuo Ishiguro
    85 Madame Bovary – Gustave Flaubert
    86 A Fine Balance – Rohinton Mistry
    87 Charlotte’s Web – E.B. White
    88 The Five People You Meet In Heaven – Mitch Albom
    89 Adventures of Sherlock Holmes – Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
    90 The Faraway Tree Collection – Enid Blyton
    91 Heart of Darkness – Joseph Conrad
    92 The Little Prince – Antoine De Saint-Exupery (In French)
    93 The Wasp Factory – Iain Banks
    94 Watership Down – Richard Adams
    95 A Confederacy of Dunces – John Kennedy Toole

    96 A Town Like Alice – Nevil Shute
    97 The Three Musketeers – Alexandre Dumas
    98 Hamlet – William Shakespeare
    99 Charlie and the Chocolate Factory – Roald Dahl
    100 Les Miserables – Victor Hugo

    Красота спасет мир --F. Dostoevsky

    by Wisper on Thu Nov 29, 2012 at 05:57:35 AM PST

    •  A really good number! (0+ / 0-)

      about the same as me, but some different ones.

      Are there still some on the list that you are interested in?

      Join us at Bookflurries-Bookchat on Wednesday nights 8:00 PM EST

      by cfk on Thu Nov 29, 2012 at 01:49:18 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Few off this particular list (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        cfk

        Not sure how DiVinci Code or Correlli's Mandolin make a list that leaves off Blood Meridian, Frankenstein, The Brothers Karamazov. and everything ever written by William Faulkner, Ernest Hemmingway and Kurt Vonnegut.  Or why Hamlet AND The Complete Works of Shakespeare get separate listings, likewise Narnia and Lion, Witch & the Wardrobe.

        Still...Ive been meaning to read Hundred Years of Solitude but haven't got around to it.

        Not on this list, presumably bumped my Mitch Albom's masterpiece or every major work by Austen, I have Nostromo, Arrowsmith, Adventures of Auggie March, and The Wide Sargasso Sea waiting but as yet unstarted on my e-reader.  ..I was recently distracted by Wool and a few other book club books.

        Oh, and as I approach 40, I suppose I should gear up to read Updike's Rabbit series.  I'd been putting it off as I thought reading it my twenties would leave me incapable of appreciating much of the nuance.    ..like reading Catcher in the Rye or The Bell Jar for the first time at age 45.  One could understand those books at that age, but not understand them.

        As for books to add to the list you created, I would suggest The Sheltering Sky.  An absolute favorite of mine yet often overlooked even by the most widely read lovers of literature.  I recommended it unabashedly to anyone I know.  A powerful story (done grave injustice, as is often the case, by Hollywood).

        Красота спасет мир --F. Dostoevsky

        by Wisper on Thu Nov 29, 2012 at 07:05:58 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Speaking of the desert (0+ / 0-)

          The Race for Timbuktu: In Search of Africa’s City of Gold by Frank Kryza which is on my non-fiction list was very interesting.

          Join us at Bookflurries-Bookchat on Wednesday nights 8:00 PM EST

          by cfk on Thu Nov 29, 2012 at 07:21:22 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

  •  Here's my list (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Monsieur Georges, Brecht, cfk

    I've read a lot of classics, mostly because I studied Lit. in graduate school. But, I need to read more of the recent fiction. It's an interesting list. Not sure I agree with it. Where is John Fowles' The Magus?

    1 Pride and Prejudice – Jane Austen
    2 The Lord of the Rings – JRR Tolkien
    3 Jane Eyre – Charlotte Bronte

    4 Harry Potter series – JK Rowling 0nly read one book
    5 To Kill a Mockingbird – Harper Lee
    6 The Bible
    7 Wuthering Heights – Emily Bronte
    8 Nineteen Eighty Four – George Orwell

    9 His Dark Materials – Philip Pullman
    10 Great Expectations – Charles Dickens
    11 Little Women – Louisa M Alcott
    12 Tess of the D’Urbervilles – Thomas Hardy
    13 Catch 22 – Joseph Heller

    14 Complete Works of Shakespeare
    15 Rebecca – Daphne Du Maurier
    16 The Hobbit – JRR Tolkien
    17 Birdsong – Sebastian Faulk
    18 Catcher in the Rye – JD Salinger
    19 The Time Traveler’s Wife – Audrey Niffenegger
    20 Middlemarch – George Eliot
    21 Gone With The Wind – Margaret Mitchell
    22 The Great Gatsby – F Scott Fitzgerald
    24 War and Peace – Leo Tolstoy

    25 The Hitch Hiker’s Guide to the Galaxy – Douglas Adams
    27 Crime and Punishment – Fyodor Dostoyevsky
    28 Grapes of Wrath – John Steinbeck
    29 Alice in Wonderland – Lewis Caroll

    30 The Wind in the Willows – Kenneth Grahame
    31. Anna Karenina – Leo Tolstoy
    32 David Copperfield – Charles Dickens

    33 Chronicles of Narnia – CS Lewis
    34 Emma -Jane Austen
    35 Persuasion – Jane Austen

    36 The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe – CS Lewis
    37 The Kite Runner – Khaled Hosseini
    38 Captain Corelli’s Mandolin – Louis De Bernieres
    39 Memoirs of a Geisha – Arthur Golden
    40 Winnie the Pooh – A.A. Milne
    41 Animal Farm – George Orwell

    42 The Da Vinci Code – Dan Brown
    43 One Hundred Years of Solitude – Gabriel Garcia Marquez
    44 A Prayer for Owen Meany – John Irving
    45 The Woman in White – Wilkie Collins
    46 Anne of Green Gables – LM Montgomery
    47 Far From The Madding Crowd – Thomas Hardy

    48 The Handmaid’s Tale – Margaret Atwood
    49 Lord of the Flies – William Golding
    50 Atonement – Ian McEwan
    51 Life of Pi – Yann Martel
    52 Dune – Frank Herbert
    53 Cold Comfort Farm – Stella Gibbons
    54 Sense and Sensibility – Jane Austen
    55 A Suitable Boy – Vikram Seth
    56 The Shadow of the Wind – Carlos Ruiz Zafon
    57 A Tale Of Two Cities – Charles Dickens
    58 Brave New World – Aldous Huxley

    59 The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time – Mark Haddon
    60 Love In The Time Of Cholera – Gabriel Garcia Marquez
    61 Of Mice and Men – John Steinbeck
    62 Lolita – Vladimir Nabokov

    63 The Secret History – Donna Tartt
    64 The Lovely Bones – Alice Sebold
    65 Count of Monte Cristo – Alexandre Dumas
    66 On the Road – Jack Kerouac
    67 Jude the Obscure – Thomas Hardy

    68 Bridget Jones’s Diary – Helen Fielding
    69 Midnight’s Children – Salman Rushdie
    70 Moby Dick – Herman Melville
    71 Oliver Twist – Charles Dickens

    72 Dracula – Bram Stoker
    73 The Secret Garden – Frances Hodgson Burnett
    74 Notes From A Small Island – Bill Bryson
    75 Ulysses – James Joyce
    76 The Inferno – Dante

    77 Swallows and Amazons – Arthur Ransome
    78 Germinal – Emile Zola
    79 Vanity Fair – William Makepeace Thackeray
    80 Possession – AS Byatt
    81 A Christmas Carol – Charles Dickens
    82 Cloud Atlas – David Mitchell
    83 The Color Purple – Alice Walker
    84 The Remains of the Day – Kazuo Ishiguro
    85 Madame Bovary – Gustave Flaubert
    86 A Fine Balance – Rohinton Mistry
    87 Charlotte’s Web – E.B. White
    88 The Five People You Meet In Heaven – Mitch Albom
    89 Adventures of Sherlock Holmes – Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
    90 The Faraway Tree Collection – Enid Blyton
    91 Heart of Darkness – Joseph Conrad
    92 The Little Prince – Antoine De Saint-Exupery (In French)
    93 The Wasp Factory – Iain Banks
    94 Watership Down – Richard Adams
    95 A Confederacy of Dunces – John Kennedy Toole
    96 A Town Like Alice – Nevil Shute
    97 The Three Musketeers – Alexandre Dumas
    98 Hamlet – William Shakespeare
    99 Charlie and the Chocolate Factory – Roald Dahl

    100 Les Miserables – Victor Hugo

    "...in a society governed passively by free markets and free elections, organized greed always defeats disorganized democracy." Matt Taibbi

    by Getreal1246 on Thu Nov 29, 2012 at 06:14:52 AM PST

    •  Good ones! (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Getreal1246

      I like classics, too.  :)

      I do sometimes wish I could talk more people into reading them.  

      Join us at Bookflurries-Bookchat on Wednesday nights 8:00 PM EST

      by cfk on Thu Nov 29, 2012 at 01:53:07 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Ah, the Magus (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      cfk, Getreal1246

      If that book could have ended even half as well as it began I would be even more in awe of it then I already am.

      Was disappointed a bit that it couldn't live up to its own intense plot build-up, but still a good story.   I actually have a first edition of that book (in the uncorrected original version) that was a first wedding anniversary gift from my wife.  ...first anniversary is "paper" after all.  :)  

      I would also have included The White Hotel by Thomas , Blindness by Saramago, The Sword and Honour Trilogy by Waugh, Ocean Sea by Baricco, Faucault's Pendulum by Eco or even something newer like Hall's The Raw Shark Texts.

      Красота спасет мир --F. Dostoevsky

      by Wisper on Thu Nov 29, 2012 at 07:14:56 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Harriette Arnow (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Brecht, Monsieur Georges, cfk

    OK, I was going to let you guys go in peace (although I love the lists and I've read 46 on the initial list), but you had to put The Dollmaker on the second, very idiosyncratic list.

    The Dollmaker is probably my favorite novel ever, and I've read it so many times I had to buy a hardcover copy, and I hate hardcovers. Most noteworthy is that this is the only author I ever wrote to, hoping to clarify a point she made - she didn't reply, of course, since I need to do my own thinking - and I've been thinking about it since.

    As to why she didn't reply, for real, I wrote in the 70s and don't know if she was still alive.

    Anyway, great work on the lists and now I'll get back to reading and lurking.          

    •  I am glad you stopped by!!! (0+ / 0-)

      That is neat that you wrote to her.

      That book sticks in my mind like Sophie's Choice.

      It broke my heart, of course, and seemed more real because I live in Michigan.

      Join us at Bookflurries-Bookchat on Wednesday nights 8:00 PM EST

      by cfk on Thu Nov 29, 2012 at 01:55:54 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Arnow (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        cfk

        I am a westerner, but with southern and homestead roots, and the Kentucky beginning sounded like home to me; couldn't fathom their WWII decision to move to Detroit but that was the economic powerhouse at the time. Naturally we all knew it would turn to ashes on their tongues. It probably influenced my move to north Idaho long ago (bad economy here :)

  •  I have read 39 (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    cfk

    from the BBC list.  Now I have to count from your list - oh, wait, I can't.  You have too many "alls."  As in "all by Connie Willis," and while I am certainly a Willis aficionado, I have not read everything by her.  There were a number of other writers in your list that I've read significant works by, but not read all of.

    Fun diary, though, cfk.  Sorry I missed it when it was "live."

    To make the argument that the media has a left- or right-wing, or a liberal or a conservative bias, is like asking if the problem with Al-Qaeda is do they use too much oil in their hummus. Al Franken

    by Youffraita on Thu Nov 29, 2012 at 11:31:37 PM PST

    •  Well, you can count Connie (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Youffraita

      and other authors where I put all.

      I just didn't want to put the whole list up for each one.  For example, my list for Cherryh and McKillip are so long they would take up the whole diary.  It is sort of a generic "all" that I recommend in case someone wants to know if the author is someone to check out.

      I was a bit worried when I didn't see you.  I know some people have been really sick the last few days.

      Thanks for coming by!!

      Join us at Bookflurries-Bookchat on Wednesday nights 8:00 PM EST

      by cfk on Fri Nov 30, 2012 at 12:15:13 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Sorry to worry you! (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        cfk

        I was making spareribs in the oven and watching Hulu or something when your diary went live.

        Definitely a fun diary -- thanks, cfk!  I liked WriteOn tonight, too, but didn't have anything to say.  So I just tipped everyone and came here to read what I'd missed.

        To make the argument that the media has a left- or right-wing, or a liberal or a conservative bias, is like asking if the problem with Al-Qaeda is do they use too much oil in their hummus. Al Franken

        by Youffraita on Fri Nov 30, 2012 at 01:10:02 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  I was brought up reading from these lists (0+ / 0-)

    but I don't see any James Thurber or my personal childhood favorite, The Adventures of Grandfather Frog.  Both very enlightening!

Subscribe or Donate to support Daily Kos.

Click here for the mobile view of the site