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Map of fiscal cliff votes
Map of fiscal cliff votes (New York Times)

Tuesday's House vote on the fiscal cliff is one of those rare votes where you don’t get a straight party line vote like most contentious votes, but one where the House shatters into pieces and the winner is the side that reassembles the most fragments. Of course, this time it was Nancy Pelosi who did that, putting together a strange coalition of most of the Dems (minus a few defections on the caucus's left and right flanks), plus the bulk of the establishmentarian and/or moderate Republicans (including the vote of John Boehner himself, no "moderate" but certainly "establishment").

On the Republican side, there were 85 yes and 151 no votes (with 5 non-votes, from Ann Marie Buerkle, Dan Burton, Sam Graves, Jerry Lewis, and Ron Paul). That's too many votes to replicate the entire list, but there was a significant geographic dichotomy here, one that seems to support the larger idea that the GOP is increasingly becoming a regional rump party. The New York Times has a helpful interactive map that puts that into stark relief. (That's the map you see above, though there's more detail at the link.)

Of those 85 yes votes, only 13 were Republicans from the Census-defined "southern" states, and many of those were either ones with ties to leadership (ex-NRCC chairs Tom Cole and Pete Sessions, Appropriations Chair Hal Rogers) or ones with atypical, moderate districts in Florida (Mario Diaz-Balart, Ileana Ros-Lehtinen, Bill Young). Rodney Alexander, Kevin Brady, Howard Coble, Ander Crenshaw, John Sullivan, Mac Thornberry, and Steve Womack, most of whom are also pretty establishment-flavored, round out the list.

And of those 151 no votes, 59 were from non-southern states. That may still seem like a lot, but bear in mind most of the rest of those 59 were from the GOP's other strongholds, the Mountain West and Great Plains. Maybe more striking is the number of GOP no votes that came from the Northeast: a grand total of two, from recently defeated Frank Guinta and from New Jersey's Scott Garrett. (Actually, it adds up to four if you break with the Census Bureau and consider Maryland to be a northeastern state, which would include Andy Harris and the outgoing Roscoe Bartlett.)

More over the fold ...

On the Democratic side, there were 172 yes and 16 no votes (with 3 non-votes, from Pete Stark, Lynn Woolsey, and John Lewis). Within those 16, though, there seem to be two camps: Xavier Becerra, Earl Blumenauer, Peter DeFazio, Rosa DeLauro, Jim McDermott, Brad Miller, Jim Moran, and Bobby Scott (most of whom are Progressive Caucus members) voting against it from the left, and John Barrow, Jim Cooper, Jim Matheson, Mike McIntyre, Colin Peterson, Kurt Schrader, Adam Smith, and Pete Visclosky (most of whom are Blue Dogs) voting against it from the right.

It may not be that simple, though: DeFazio has in recent years been one of the likeliest members of the Progressive Caucus to stray from the party line (for example, he voted against both the Progressive budget and even the leadership budget last year); it's increasingly hard to tell if he's becoming more conservative or if DeFazio, always irascible, has just gotten more willing to dig his heels in on bills that feel like half-measures. Adam Smith, on the other hand, has generally been a New Democrat establishment-type player, but he might be looking to remake himself a bit with his newly configured, much more liberal district, which now contains a slice of Seattle. And Moran and Visclosky, even though Moran (who represents northern Virginia) is significantly more liberal than Visclosky, are probably coming from the same mindset, whatever that might be; they're tight, and are some of the last remaining members of that John Murtha/Norm Dicks appropriations clique that didn’t really fit within any of the Dem caucuses.

(Worth noting: Oregon is the only state where the Dems have the majority of House seats but where the majority of members voted "no." That's Progressive Earl Blumenauer, Blue Dog Kurt Schrader, and who-knows DeFazio, while fellow Progressive Suzanne Bonamici and establishment-flavored GOPer Greg Walden voted "yes.")

One other interesting consideration: The GOP didn't seem as reliant on departing members, which is a turnaround from other high-profile decisions late in the cycle where they needed members who weren't worried any more about their voting records to step up (think back to 2008's TARP vote, for instance).

Fifteen of the GOP "yes" votes were members who, either because of defeat or retirement, won't be coming back (Charlie Bass, Judy Biggert, Brian Bilbray, Mary Bono Mack, Bob Dold, David Dreier, Jo Ann Emerson, Elton Gallegly, Nan Hayworth, Tim Johnson, Steve LaTourette, Dan Lungren, Todd Platts, John Sullivan, and Bob Turner). Twenty end-of-the-liners, however, voted "no" (Sandy Adams, Todd Akin, Steve Austria, Rick Berg, Quico Canseco, Chip Cravaack, Jeff Flake, Frank Guinta, Connie Mack, Sue Myrick, Mike Pence, Ben Quayle, Denny Rehberg, David Rivera, Bobby Schilling, Jean Schmidt, Tim Scott, Cliff Stearns, Joe Walsh, and Allen West), though I suspect some of the more establishment-flavored names on that list would probably have been willing to offer a "yes" if the vote had looked closer than it actually was.

Originally posted to Daily Kos Elections on Wed Jan 02, 2013 at 02:02 PM PST.

Also republished by Daily Kos.

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Comment Preferences

  •  Hold on. Adam Smith? (23+ / 0-)

    Per ThinkProgress, Smith wasn't voting against it from the right.

    Smith said he voted against the “American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012” because the measure locked in low revenue levels that could necessitate dramatic spending cuts in the future.
    And then he proceeded to destroy Steve Doocy and Brian Kilmeade's talking points.

  •  Visclosky is no Blue Dog. (5+ / 0-)

    He's not in the CPC, but he's no Blue Dog.

    "Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity." --M. L. King "You can't fix stupid" --Ron White -6.00, -5.18

    by zenbassoon on Wed Jan 02, 2013 at 02:11:12 PM PST

  •  Brad Miller's reasoning (12+ / 0-)

    Via Facebook:

    Congress has now made permanent a tax structure that doesn't come close to paying for what I regard as core functions of government. The cuts weren't in this bill, but you won't have to wait long to see them. And taxes are still a lot less progressive than they were under Clinton, Bush, Reagan, etc.
    •  Taxes more progressive now not less (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Shockwave, Loge, jj32

      Than during Clinton.  

      The changes in 2013 include the additional 3.8% tax on investment income, so the top marginal tax rate on income is higher than during Clonton.  There is the phase out of deductions for incomes over $300,000.

      Meanwhile, the Bush rates were kept for lower income brackets.

      Only with the most contrived measure could one show Federal taxes on income are less progressive today than in 2000.

      The most important way to protect the environment is not to have more than one child.

      by nextstep on Wed Jan 02, 2013 at 02:34:29 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  But everyone gets taxed at lower rates (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        happymisanthropy, bear83

        on the first $400,000. My brain can't do the math to figure out at what point people really start paying more taxes than they would have before the Bush tax cuts kicked in. (And I've tossed all my pre-2001 tax tables.)

        •  For those with investment income and income (0+ / 0-)

          Greater than $200k single and $250k joint,  there is an additional 3.8% tax on investment income that started on Jan 1.

          In addition, today's deal phases out deduction for those with higher incomes, effectively have a buldge of higher marginal tax rates.

          Keep in mind that the Bush rates were more progressive than the Clinton rates, as the percent tax cut was greater for lower incomes than higher incomes.  

          The cross-over point where people are paying more in taxes depends upon income sources and deductions.

          The most important way to protect the environment is not to have more than one child.

          by nextstep on Wed Jan 02, 2013 at 06:28:50 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

      •  capital gains locked at 20% above $250k... (0+ / 0-)

        Clinton capital gains rates were much much higher. iirc 39.6% and higher.

        •  DDBlevins, Clinton set max Cap Gains Tax 20% (0+ / 0-)

          when he signed the Taxpayer Relief Act of 1997.

          When Clinton did this he lowered the taxes on capital gains to 20%, from the 28% set by Pres Bush Sr.

          Now the max tax rate on Capital Gains is 23.8% because of the higher taxes from the Afordable Care Act,

          The most important way to protect the environment is not to have more than one child.

          by nextstep on Thu Jan 03, 2013 at 06:59:14 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

    •  I hate to see Brad Miller leaving the Congress (0+ / 0-)

      He's a significant loss due solely to gerrymandering.

      I hope he will consider becoming director of the NC Democratic Party. We need a smart, progressive, and recognizable leader for the opposition to the ALEC-inspired legislation to come in NC.

      Filibuster reform now. No more Gentleman's agreements.

      by bear83 on Wed Jan 02, 2013 at 09:23:11 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  That map cannot be correct. (0+ / 0-)

    Illinois has more than 2 Dem districts. ?

  •  Interesting breakdown (0+ / 0-)

    I was wondering what it (the vote) meant about Boehner'schances at remaining speaker but rumor has it that it means he's resigning. We'll see if that is true or an instance of a right wing attempt to create pressure by creating a narrative ahead of the vote.

    But I don't see a Boehner coalition coming out of that base 85... especially after he turned around and pissed off the northeast NY/NJ contingent that voted with him. That's another 12 votes at least right there.

    "Do what you can with what you have where you are." - Teddy Roosevelt

    by Andrew C White on Wed Jan 02, 2013 at 02:23:17 PM PST

  •  I love that first line. (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    itzik shpitzik, tari, No Exit

    "Tuesday's House vote on the fiscal cliff is one of those rare votes where you don’t get a straight party line vote like most contentious votes, but one where the House shatters into pieces and the winner is the side that reassembles the most fragments."

  •  Interesting analysis. Thanks. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    tari
  •  John Barrow (R) (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    KayCeSF

    I said it before the election: he was campaigning as a Republican for more than a year ahead of time. He never voted with his party when it was close, and always voted with the Republicans when it was important.

    The man voted for the censure of Eric Holder! He voted against the ACA, twice! His campaign commercial boasted of cutting funding for ballet "in New York City!"

    Act Blue really needs to get a viable primary opponent for him. He's sure a Democrat can't win. Let's find out.

    People complain about dirt, but I'd like to see them make some.

    by The Geogre on Wed Jan 02, 2013 at 05:35:00 PM PST

    •  ABT or NYCB? (0+ / 0-)

      This is significant.  

      Difficult, difficult, lemon difficult.

      by Loge on Wed Jan 02, 2013 at 06:10:24 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  He didn't say (0+ / 0-)

        His most repeated television ad had him boasting of all the programs he had cut in Washington and appealed to voters to send him back, because there were still wasteful programs that needed attention. He was proud of cutting a program to research the genetics of grapes, a study of the perfect Christmas tree, and ballet in New York City.

        He added that "Every Christmas tree is perfect."

        Anderson argued against him as a big spender and promised to vote for no money for anything, ever, and Barrow attacked him as being a money waster.

        No more Blue Dogs. Saying we have to give them Party money and support them and be sweet to them is to agree to the Southern Strategy and endorse it. It is to sacrifice a quarter of the nation. It is to deny the validity of our own principles. This is especially true because the bulk of them are not conservatives, but corporate.

        People complain about dirt, but I'd like to see them make some.

        by The Geogre on Wed Jan 02, 2013 at 07:13:28 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

    •  He say Barrow voted against the party when it was (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      ban nock

      important. Yet the votes you listed did not need his votes. Additionally Barrow is a great member of Congress and the Democratic Party is lucky to have him. His district will not elect a progressive.

      •  DADT (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        ban nock, The Geogre

        Barrow voted for repeal.  What southern Republican from rural Georgia would do that?

        •  I'm glad you found one vote (0+ / 0-)

          ACA needed votes, and the Holder vote was absurd.

          Barrow has voted with the TEA Party constituency. He may have voted for DADT repeal, but he has been farther and farther and farther to the right. See this very post. He was a "no" vote to the deal. How useful will that be?

          Seriously: in 2014, is this going to be something he'll have to answer for before Republican voters?

          His district may or may not elect a progressive, but that is a question for the primaries. Do Republicans vote for Democrats? Haven't we been reading about polarization? Haven't we been seeing it? Is there any reason to believe that any Georgia Republican is going to vote for Barrow when there is a GOP alternative -- even a fool such as the one that got through the primary this time? If there isn't much evidence of R->D voting, then he doesn't improve his odds by voting for Republicans, and he alienates Democrats.

          And do not tell me about the conservative Democrats in the district, because I'm in the district.

          People complain about dirt, but I'd like to see them make some.

          by The Geogre on Wed Jan 02, 2013 at 07:06:42 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

      •  How is he great? (0+ / 0-)

        Illustrate his greatness for me, as I have missed it.

        I have had enough of the Blue Dog philosophy. Having a district that's 50/50 does not respond to being a 50/50 politician. The GOP voters won't care if Barrow has been with them, as they're purists. Only we are the suckers who say, "Well, it's alright if there's no party discipline, and if a guy takes our money and then votes against us consistently."

        No thanks.

        Billy Tauzin comes to mind. WE did that, with our "better a bad Democrat than losing the seat" philosophy.

        People complain about dirt, but I'd like to see them make some.

        by The Geogre on Wed Jan 02, 2013 at 07:09:11 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  $4 trillion in foregone revenue over 10 years (5+ / 0-)

    The next 10 years, that is what matters to me.

  •  Vermont's delegation voted 100% in favor. (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    RaulVB, ban nock, jj32

    Of course that's just one House member and two Senators.

    "This is NOT what I thought I'd be when I grew up."

    by itzik shpitzik on Wed Jan 02, 2013 at 05:38:29 PM PST

  •  Repub Joe Heck NV-03 voted yes (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    ER Doc

    and man, is he taking a beating from his (former) Tea Party fan club on his Facebook page. He waited until enough votes were in to ensure its passage before jumping on board. Not a profile in courage.
       The Action organized actions at his office, phone calls, faxes, emails and the like to encourage a yes vote.

    ....the only thing we have to fear is fear itself. FDR 1933

    by Tailspinterry on Wed Jan 02, 2013 at 05:39:16 PM PST

    •  The "doc fix" might have been a big part of his (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      ybruti

      decision. He's an emergency physician, & gets a lot of financial support from our professional organizations & individual docs. The doc fix was a big deal for us.
          The support he and other even worse Republican troglodytes have been getting is the reason I quit donating to NEMPAC. That's the big national PAC for emergency physicians, which has traditionally encouraged us all to "give a shift;" i.e., donate the amount of money we earn in one shift of work. I was a faithful donor until I realized who they'd backed in 2010.

      -7.25, -6.26

      We are men of action; lies do not become us.

      by ER Doc on Wed Jan 02, 2013 at 07:36:07 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  My own rep., Scott Garrett [NJ-05], (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    beltane

    was one of the two northeastern GOoPers who voted 'no', i.e. voted to raise taxes on working class and middle-class citizens.  When, when, WHEN will voters in NJ-05 wake up to the frothing right-wing extremism of this douchebag?

    This shirt is dry clean only. Which means... it's dirty. -- Mitch Hedberg

    by Greasy Grant on Wed Jan 02, 2013 at 05:41:22 PM PST

  •  Oklahoma (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    ybruti, NWTerriD

    I noticed Oklahoma was a bit of an outlier - everyone but Lankford voted yes. I suppose that's either Tom Cole's or Tom Coburn's influence.

  •  "recently defeated Frank Guinta" (0+ / 0-)

    As someone who lives in his district, I just love the sound of that. It will be so nice to have Carol Shea-Porter representing me again.

  •  Well if Scott garett voted no then it (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Loge

    Must be a decent bill after all. Maybe not as crappy as I thought but I sure wanted more revenue.  Scott Garrett is a pig.  Absolutely despicable person.

    "The real wealth of a nation consists of the contributions of its people and nature." -- Rianne Eisler

    by noofsh on Wed Jan 02, 2013 at 05:48:01 PM PST

  •  Here's what voteview (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Shockwave, tari, ban nock, llywrch

    says about the vote:

    1. Democrats who voted Nay were widely ideologically dispersed between moderate “Blue Dog” Democrats ... and liberal Democrats.
    2. There is more structure in the split among House Republicans on the vote. More conservative members with lower second dimension scores were more likely to vote Nay than their less conservative counterparts with higher second dimension scores.
    3. But the angle of the cutting line does support a pattern that in important votes in the 112th Congress, the second dimension has represented an establishment vs. anti-establishment divide.
  •  Bye bye Joe Walsh and Allen West (3+ / 0-)

    enjoy your tea parties in your backyard!

  •  So VA has only one dem. rep? eom (0+ / 0-)

    If... the machine of government... is of such a nature that it requires you to be the agent of injustice to another, then, I say, break the law. ~Henry David Thoreau, On the Duty of Civil Disobediance, 1849

    by shigeru on Wed Jan 02, 2013 at 05:58:32 PM PST

    •  3, not 1 (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      shigeru

      Connolly voted in favor; Moran and the Richmond/Norfolk Democratic Rep whose name I can't remember voted against from the left.

      •  Thank you. 3 of 11 right? (0+ / 0-)

        If... the machine of government... is of such a nature that it requires you to be the agent of injustice to another, then, I say, break the law. ~Henry David Thoreau, On the Duty of Civil Disobediance, 1849

        by shigeru on Wed Jan 02, 2013 at 07:04:18 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  Bobby Scott (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        VA Breeze

        is the Democrat from the Richmond/Tidewater area (Newport News, IIRC) who voted no.

        Which means 10 of 11 VA representatives in effect voted for further fiscal cliff-age, at least for a while, which might have been especially harmful for a state which has long benefited from both domestic and military spending.

        37, MD-8 (MD-6 after 2012) resident, NOVA raised, Euro/Anglophile Democrat

        by Mike in MD on Wed Jan 02, 2013 at 07:21:05 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  See the beautiful blue islands below map of U.S. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    llywrch

    I know one person well who moved there to get away from the family who live in the states with the red stripe no votes.

    If you can't join them or convince them, get away from them.

  •  Here in NY Anne Marie Buerkle is... (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    boriscleto

    loudly trumpeting her 'non-vote' as a no vote, insisting that she could not "in good conscience vote to increase the debt we're passing on to our children".

    But of course she has been forcibly retired from the House by Dan Maffei's victory; so it's really just a final "fuck you" to the working class people who voted this rich plutocrat candidate out of office.

    •  She's thinking 2014 (0+ / 0-)

      She's trying to play to the teahadist mouth breathers at syracuse.com while at the same time telling her rich doctor donors that she didn't vote against "Doc Fix".

      In the beginning, the universe was created. This has made a lot of people very angry, and is generally considered to have been a bad move. -- Douglas Adams, The Hitch Hiker's Guide to the Galaxy

      by boriscleto on Wed Jan 02, 2013 at 08:18:09 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  I'm a doctor who trained in Syracuse; (0+ / 0-)

        not that many 'rich doctors' in the area, but plenty of surgeons and procedural sub-specialists who want to keep those low, low tax rates on their hedge fund earnings.

        And I can't get my head around the stupidity of any doctor who would donate to a candidate who has vowed to drop a neutron bomb on Medicare and turn it into a cat food voucher program  

        •  To a working class person (0+ / 0-)

          Any doctor living in a McMansion filled with Stickley in the Fayetteville-Manlius area driving a Lexus is a 'rich doctor'.

          In the beginning, the universe was created. This has made a lot of people very angry, and is generally considered to have been a bad move. -- Douglas Adams, The Hitch Hiker's Guide to the Galaxy

          by boriscleto on Thu Jan 03, 2013 at 04:25:07 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

    •  I'm seeing this too late (0+ / 0-)

      Thanks for exposing AMB for the fraud she is.

  •  hmm. nice map (0+ / 0-)

    maybe just maybe seeing a bit of a trend here

  •  DeFazio (D-OR4) (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    CitizenJoe, llywrch, ybruti
    “While the Senate plan included an extension of unemployment insurance that will save benefits for over 29,000 Oregonians and an essential ‘doc-fix’ that will continue payments to doctors who treat Medicare patients, this ‘deal’ hinders our ability to deal meaningfully with the deficit and burgeoning debt and puts in jeopardy Social Security and Medicare in the coming confrontation over the debt limit.

    "Under the Senate plan, wealthy investors will pay a significantly lower rate of taxes than someone who works for a living like an army captain or a teacher, adding $280 billion over ten years to our nation’s debt. The bill also puts in place a plan that will exempt joint estates worth up to $10 million from estate taxes, adding another $370 billion over ten years to the nation’s debt. And while millionaires and billionaires will see their income above $450,000 taxed at Clinton era rates, the deal permanently extends the Bush tax cuts on all income between $250,000 and $450,000 at a cost of $107 billion over ten years.

    "The Senate plan pushes dumb across-the-board spending cuts back just two months, creating yet another fiscal cliff crisis that coincides with the debt ceiling limit. This sets the stage for a massive attack on Social Security and Medicare under the guise of fiscal responsibility. Republicans are already proposing to increase the Medicare eligibility age to 67 and cut the cost of living adjustment for Social Security and veterans’ benefits.

    "Middle class Americans and seniors who have earned these benefits should not be asked to shoulder the burden of a deficit caused in large part by eleven years of the Bush tax cuts, two years of the Obama tax cuts, a deep economic recession caused by reckless Wall Street gambling, two wars charged to the credit card, and unrestrained federal spending in other areas.

    "We need to address our fiscal issues head on and balance the budget with a balanced approach. This is not a balanced plan and puts in jeopardy Social Security, Medicare and other programs essential to the middle class.”

    Things work out best for those who make the best of the way things work out.

    by winsock on Wed Jan 02, 2013 at 06:06:37 PM PST

    •  Thank you. Peter DeFazio is a solid progressive. (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      winsock, llywrch, ybruti

      He voted against the stimulus bill for similar reasons: too much tax cut, too little infrastructure. I disagreed with him on that vote--but I endorse his objections.
      Ditto in this case.
      I don't always agree with my congressman (DeFazio)--but I always do respect him.
      Joe

      "There is just one way to save yourself, and that's to get together and work and fight for everybody." ---Woody Guthrie (quoted by Jim Hightower in The Progressive Populist April 1, 2012, p3)

      by CitizenJoe on Wed Jan 02, 2013 at 06:35:42 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Peter DeFazio (0+ / 0-)

        can be good at finding uncommonly weighed or abstruse reasons to diverge from other Democrats.  But his reasons are always principled and hard to argue with.  My argument is usually that his reasons should have not been the deciding factors in his final vote.

        In any event, who else?  Art Robinson???  I'll take DeFazio any day without batting an eyelash.

        Things work out best for those who make the best of the way things work out.

        by winsock on Wed Jan 02, 2013 at 07:08:15 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  He reminds me of Wayne Morse (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          winsock

          Another Oregonian who, especially in his later days, voted against all manner of things due to personal principle, especially after he became a Democrat and was most likely to do so from the left.  

          To many, however, Morse then and DeFazio now not unreasonably look like they enjoy just being contrarian for the sake of it.

          37, MD-8 (MD-6 after 2012) resident, NOVA raised, Euro/Anglophile Democrat

          by Mike in MD on Wed Jan 02, 2013 at 07:24:00 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  Interesting comparison (0+ / 0-)

            Of course, DeFazio's district contains large swatches of red so his mavericky approach, seen in this light, makes being a chameleon politically advantageous, as well.

            Things work out best for those who make the best of the way things work out.

            by winsock on Wed Jan 02, 2013 at 07:54:33 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  DeFazio's district (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              winsock

              is an island of blue (Eugene) in a sea of red.  Pretty much the rest of southwestern Oregon is conservative; the one exception (Ashland) is in OR2, not OR4.

              •  True dat (0+ / 0-)

                I live in Eugene.  But even within blue Eugene, while most of my neighbors displayed Obama signs, a block away, the next street down was all Romney.  Weird how even neighborhoods can be politically segregated, but many seem to be.

                Things work out best for those who make the best of the way things work out.

                by winsock on Wed Jan 02, 2013 at 10:44:43 PM PST

                [ Parent ]

        •  Wash your mouth with soap! (0+ / 0-)

          --for saying that name in polite society.

          I think you said it well: "[DeFazio's] reasons should have not been the deciding factors in his final vote." He'll take stands that are too principled by half in the real world of politics. He did vote for Obamacare, though, though it's not yet enough.

          Art "I don't live on a survivalist compound" Robinson is running for chair of the Oregon Republican Party, as you likely know: I wish him success.

          "There is just one way to save yourself, and that's to get together and work and fight for everybody." ---Woody Guthrie (quoted by Jim Hightower in The Progressive Populist April 1, 2012, p3)

          by CitizenJoe on Thu Jan 03, 2013 at 06:49:35 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

  •  I don't follow congressional minutiae (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    ybruti

    But I've been wondering about some specifics, and wanting to see names and read Kossack opinions on them.

    Thanks for this.

    My just unseated smarmy Republican ex-representative Lungren voted yes.

    Poor people have too much money and vote too often. Republican platform plank, 1980 - present

    by Anthony Page aka SecondComing on Wed Jan 02, 2013 at 06:07:28 PM PST

  •  My, my (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    defluxion10

    Just look at all those "no" votes from Republicans along the Gulf coast in the South. Ignorance and ingratitude seem to go hand in hand.

    "I had seen the universe as it begins for all things. It was, in reality, a child's universe, a tiny and laughing universe." Loren Eiseley

    by cadejo4 on Wed Jan 02, 2013 at 06:08:26 PM PST

  •  Northern Texas may as well be Southern Oklahoma (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    ybruti

    Dallas- Fort Worth- whatevah-

    There is a swath of Blue sanity through the San Antonio- Valley- Houston- Austin corridor and then that little, cute blue spot of El Paso out West...

    One county at a time, sanity returns to the Lone Star State.

    Occupy- Your Mind. - No better friend, no worse enemy. -8.75, -6.21<> Bring the Troops Home Yesterday

    by Thousandwatts on Wed Jan 02, 2013 at 06:16:13 PM PST

  •  The most interesting thing about the map, (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    a gilas girl, defluxion10, ybruti

    in my view, is being able to see the shapes of all those gerrymandered districts -- they're everywhere!!
    Then of course, you try to figure out why they are shaped like that, and why those shapes brought about the votes they got, etc.
    It's really a sad reflection of our many-layered political processes at work, and the way little things lead to big (and bad) results.
    Sigh...

    It's really about time i change my sig line...

    by stevenwag on Wed Jan 02, 2013 at 06:21:57 PM PST

  •  So in Michigan it was basically (0+ / 0-)

    Amash, Huizenga and Walberg who were the assholes.

  •  I wonder how this map compares to '12 prez vote by (0+ / 0-)

    CD?  Looks like it lines up reasonably well outside of some parts of Dixie (and also excluding the D 'no' votes from the left).  

    •  Reasonably well (0+ / 0-)

      if you ignore Oklahoma (which, as far as I ever noticed in my years of growing up there, does not consider itself part of Dixie).

      "These are not candidates. These are the empty stand-ins for lobbyists' policies to be legislated later." - Chimpy, 9/24/10

      by NWTerriD on Thu Jan 03, 2013 at 04:25:53 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  The entire Pennsylvania delegation (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    bear83, jj32, bumiputera

    Voted "yea"

    That's a wide range of ideologies on the same side. Curious.

  •  Fucking garrett (0+ / 0-)

    just what are the folks in Sussex county NJ smoking? The guy is a hard right asshole. Rothman should have had the balls to take him on.

  •  Flake to Senate (0+ / 0-)

    While Jeff Flake is leaving the House, he is replacing Kyl as the junior Senator from Arizona, so that may have been a factor in his "no" vote. I don't look forward to seeing how much worse he is than Kyl.

  •  Collin Peterson (0+ / 0-)

    From what I've been hearing on the news here in Peterson's district, his "no" vote was because the Farm Bill fixes included in the bill did not address the actual problems with current farm policy. This district is exceptionally rural and Peterson, for all his Blue Doggedness, has been solid on fighting for family farmers.

    WF

    Walk In Brain - Pure drivel, served with a smile.

    by Wes F on Wed Jan 02, 2013 at 07:44:19 PM PST

  •  Really Tired of This Trope (0+ / 0-)

    I read DailyKos every day, and have voted Dem since my first vote for Jimmy Carter. But I am getting really, really tired of this kind of regional demonizing that seems to be happening on this site more and more. Have you seen the purple map -- the one that shows the very small gradations between states in voting? I'm not certain what you are trying to accomplish -- secession? Exactly what good does it do to constantly attack an entire region of the country? You can't bash the South and at the same time get all oogly-googly about Bill Clinton and Jimmy Carter. Give it a rest -- the differences between regions is minscule, and can tip at any moment.

  •  Huh Pat Meehan Pa-7 (0+ / 0-)

    Voted yes. Haha lookit all those Republican yeses in Pennsylvania.

    I keep confusing Pat Meehan with Pat Toomey. Ugh, that guy.

  •  i have to admit some surprise... (0+ / 0-)

    ...to see shades of blue in Georgia.  Atlanta doesn't surprise me but Southwest GA?  i'll have to look into this a bit more.

    I'm a blue drop in a red bucket.

    by blue drop on Thu Jan 03, 2013 at 08:23:32 AM PST

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