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Well, this is embarrassing!

I read an item recently about a person with medical problems, and thought I'd use this week's JulieCrostic to spotlight something good which people could buy if they wanted to help. So I diagrammed the puzzle, came up with words, wrote out the clues, looked the whole thing over... Looked good! I just needed to paste it into a diary shell, write up this introduction, and the week's puzzle diary would be all set.

And then it occurred to me the puzzle might be better if I included the person's name. So I did a new diagram with that, came up with words, wrote out the clues, looked the whole thing over... Looked good! I just needed to paste it into a diary shell, write up this introduction, and the week's puzzle diary would be all set.

Well, somewhere along the line the gremlins sneaked in again (despite my telling the cats to keep a close eye out and to chase away any gremlins that tried to get in). And not only did they post both versions of the puzzle -- they ran the two versions together without giving any indication where one ends and the other begins. AAARGH!

Unfortunately I'm running very short on time this weekend and won't have time to separate the two puzzles before post time. So I guess you folks will have to do that for yourselves. Sorry about that!

More bad news: science is off doing sciencey things, so will have limited online time tonight and may not be able to take part in tonight's puzzle party.

But good news! Even though science may not be here in online person, he sent along 20 famous movie quotes to brighten our evening. I warned the gremlins not to fiddle with the quotes, and they assured me that on their honor they wouldn't do anything to what science sent. So at least we should be able to enjoy some movie memories while pondering over the JulieCrostic.

Puzzle fun awaits directly below the orange something-or-other!

First up, here are the 20 movie quotes science sent for us to enjoy. I don't recognize them at first glance, but there are a lot of well-known movies I haven't see so that's not surprising. I'm sure the rest of you will recognize these right away...

1.  'Robinson, Problem Solving and research networks?' (1967)
2.. 'The general trends. Hamster mom and dad berries.' (1975)
3.  ‘This is not true. The answer to this question.' (1988)
4.   'I think it's your partner in my jungle.' (1996)
5.   'I'm pretty smart, huh? I love this man.' (1981)
6.   'Access to credit, life and death.' (1994)
7.  'But look, my son was with him.' (1942)
8.  'Perhaps power.' (1977)
9.  'Now can not be denied.' (1972)
10.  'Love is no excuse.' (1970)

11. 'You're a man, I am a man, man.' (1998)
12.  'I want to quit smoking.' (2005)
13.  'Why is this important?' (2008)
14.  'Dare. Less than style.' (1995)
15.  'The fact is that human desires, but more than words, is good.' (1987)
16.  'Way? If you do not have access.' (1985)
17.  'I was very angry, am what?' (1976)
18.  'We are a lack of communication.' (1967)
19.  'Hello, good morning.' (1968)
20.  'Corps to open the door.' (1968)
..................................................................................................................
Puzzle Party / SUNDAY PUZZLE / Puzzle Party / SUNDAY PUZZLE / Puzzle Party /
SUNDAY PUZZLE / Puzzle Party / SUNDAY PUZZLE / Puzzle Party / SUNDAY PUZZLE /

And here's tonight's DoubleJulieCrostic. As I mentioned in the introduction, this week  the gremlins took two different versions I'd done of this week's puzzle and squashed them together into one. (So when you look at the verticals you may think you're seeing double in places...)

As usual the gremlins bunched the clues together in groups of 3 (regardless of how many answers there actually are per row). They also removed the capitalization from the clues. And it's quite possible they fiddled with the punctuation or word spacing...

1. cartoon dog
2. seabird
3. kind of car or cop
4. flashy
5. follower of henry iv
6. kind of deer
7. sandwich
8. first name of plaintiff in famous civil rights case
9. jones' title
10. prime number or mean value
11. confidential law
12. stamp
13. one of eight
14. satisfy
15. takes back
16. you can find this in new york for 55 more days
17. faction
18. manx people
19. wedges
20. tower of london sand
21. french men
22. english chick
23. register up to the time of
24. what a savage does when excited
25. ben or jerry
26. trap
27. next
28. money comes next when this is right
29. oh! oh! oh, oh, oh! oh, oh, oh, oh, OH!
30. abridge
31. weird southern state
32. transaction
33. tall fairy
34. most competent
35. strongly criticized
36. kos follower
37. sarkisian
38. resting place
39. in england this would be blank
40. sanctimonius
41. follower of car and pet
42. biggers
43. kind of job one may be told to get
44. buck is one
45. conversation
46. play scenery
47. hold back
48. agency people
49. sydney suburb and greek gorge
50. pours out
51. female bush (informally)
52. expose
53. first integrated southern college
54. criticize
55. given back
56. liberal involved with chase manhattan
57. pointless tile
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Comment Preferences

  •  SPOILER tips: last months puzzle patterns! (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    pucklady, UnionMade, sny

    Well, the Sunday Puzzle crew managed to solve all of December 2012's puzzles before 2013 arrived. Bravo, team!

    But even though the puzzles were solved, I'm not sure folks ever spotted the two common elements to last month's puzzles.

    One of the patterns people did see, partly: all the JulieCrostics (apart from the first one I contributed to the potluck) were had before-and/or-after verticals, where the items in the verticals go before or after a mystery word you need to guess.

    In order of solution:

    The December 16th verticals read NUTS SHOT VINE: (grape)nuts, (grape)shot, (grape)vine.

    The December 23 verticals were BASIC PITCH LUNG PLAGUE: two befores [basic (black); pitch (black)] and two afters [(black) lung, (black) plague].

    The December 9th verticals read BROC E SEUM C: again, two befores [broc(coli), E. (coli)] and two afters [(coli)seum, (coli)c].

    The December 30 verticals were AL S U PHILLIP PORCU CONE TAR SOL NEEDLE. This time there were five befores [al(pine), s(pine), o(pine), Phillip(pine), porcu(pine)] and four afters [(pine) cone, (pine) tar, (Pine)-Sol, (pine) needle].

    But there's more to the pattern than simply before/after puzzles. There's something else the puzzles have in common -- and it's something the December 2nd puzzle has, too.

    The verticals for the JulieCrostic I contributed to the potluck were ONCILLA PHOTO. That happened to be an alternate version of the puzzle I had posted for Sunday Puzzle Warm-Up the night before (which is why I contributed it to the potluck even though there was already a JulieCrostic).

    All the Sunday Puzzle JulieCrostics this month were built off the JulieCrostic posted the night before in warm-up. Those answers were broccoli, grape fruit, black beans, and pineapples!

    Oops, just a few seconds to beat the automatic tip jar -- in fact, I think I just missed it...

  •  Aha! I think I recognize movie quote # 18! It's... (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    pucklady, UnionMade, sny

    "What we have here is a failure to communicate", from Cool Hand Luke.

  •  ... and I think I also know # 10 ... (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    pucklady, UnionMade, sny
    10.  'Love is no excuse.' (1970)
    even though I never saw the movie, this quote is famous enough even I know it. "Love means never having to say you're sorry", from Love Story.
  •  Quote 1, I think (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    UnionMade, Nova Land, sny

    Mrs. Robinson, are you trying to seduce me?

    The Graduate

    I am progressive. I am liberal. I make no apologies. - Kos

    My political compass: - 8.38,-6.97

    by pucklady on Sun Jan 13, 2013 at 05:37:27 PM PST

    •  oh, of course! (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      pucklady, UnionMade, sny

      I've seen that movie at least once, I think twice, so I have no excuse for not knowing that answer! (Funny thing: after seeing the movie the first time, I liked it enough that some time later I found and read the book. And the book's ending is considerably different than the movie's -- not unusual for Hollywood back then -- but surprisingly to me, the movie's ending is a lot better!)

  •  1-3 (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    pucklady, Nova Land

    1 ren
    2 tern
    3 renta

    This looks like a tough one, and even more so with science out.

  •  36 guess (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Nova Land, sny

    (kos) sack

    I am progressive. I am liberal. I make no apologies. - Kos

    My political compass: - 8.38,-6.97

    by pucklady on Sun Jan 13, 2013 at 05:49:01 PM PST

  •  9-10 (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    pucklady, Nova Land

    9 mother
    10 theorem

    Looks like a 3-4-5-6-7

  •  a possibility for movie quote # 9... (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    UnionMade, pucklady, sny
    9.  'Now can not be denied.' (1972)
    Looking through the wikipedia list of 1972 movies, I see "The Candidate" -- which looks like a good candidate for a science movie quote.

    And looking through the IMDb memorable quotes for that movie, one of them is:

    [last lines]
    Bill McKay: What do we do now?
    I never saw the movie, so don't know when that gets said (and don't know how well-known that quote is). But it sort of fits so it might be the answer.  
  •  Quote 11 (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    pucklady, Nova Land, sny

    Might be from Shakespeare in Love--but which quote?

    "That woman's a woman."

    or p'raps

    "I know something of a woman in a man's profession."

  •  #8 (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Nova Land, pucklady, sny

    Homer works. Don't know the case

    the only thing we have to fear is fear itself--nameless, unreasoning, unjustified terror... FDR first inaugural address

    by blogokvetsch on Sun Jan 13, 2013 at 05:56:41 PM PST

    •  oh, you know the case... (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      pucklady, sny

      you just don't know the person!

      I'm not going to confirm or deny yet that HOMER is the answer you're seeking (since the puzzle is still in progress).

      But consider this an additional puzzle to ponder during the week. Once the puzzle is solved and you know the name --quite possibly Homer! -- can you figure out which reasonably well-known civil rights case had a plaintiff with that first name?

      HINT: I kniht uoy'll ees siht esac derrefer ot erom netfo ni noinipo snmuloc naht ni lagel sfeirb.

  •  11-12,15 (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Nova Land, pucklady

    11 las
    12 seal
    15 repeals

  •  31-34 (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    pucklady, Nova Land

    31 als
    32 sale
    33 tales
    34 ablest

  •  lost! (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    pucklady, Nova Land, UnionMade

    I'm lost on the juliecrostic.

    I've got to go soon too, so this might be the only one we dont get if nobody else shows up!

  •  17,19 (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    pucklady, Nova Land

    I dont think I have enough of the row to be confident on this...but since things are going slow...

    17 bloc
    19 blocks

    •  minor hint on 19 (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      pucklady

      I was surprised to discover that the main definition of the answer word for this is wedges. That's not what I thought it meant!

      There's another definition I could have used which I think is a better-known meaning of this word, but I thought that would be too easy.

      The clue I really wanted to use was name of a teacher from [a certain comic book]. That's how I remembered the spelling of the name -- and a number of other sources had the name spelled that way as well. But -- and fortunately I discovered this in time! -- that's not the correct spelling. (I suspect the spelling may have gotten changed a to the correct spelling of the answer word in an adaptation of the comic to another medium. But since the answer word's spelling is not the same as the correct spelling of the name, I decided better not to use that clue -- and went with wedges instead.)

      I'll be curious to see when this puzzle has been solved how many of you knew that wedges was the main definition of the answer word -- and how many of you, like me, had an entirely different idea of what it meant!

  •  28 (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    pucklady, Nova Land

    28 is probably price. But I cant figure out anything that makes sense for anything else in that row.

  •  Meanwhile, dawdling in movie quotes, can #12 be (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Nova Land, pucklady

    "I wish I knew how to quit you."  from Brokeback Mountain?

    (for  'I want to quit smoking.' )

  •  25? (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    pucklady, Nova Land

    25 could be springer.

    But that would mean we screwed up somewhere else since we already have a 3-4-5-6-7 for row 31-35, and there are no 8 letter words (like springer) in the first puzzle.

    •  hint on 25 (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      pucklady
      25 could be springer.
      Oh! I'm familiar with the name Jerry Springer, but didn't even know there was a Ben Springer. (A famous one, that is.) But I see now that there's one listed in Wikipedia...
      Benedictus (Ben) Springer (Amsterdam, 19 June 1897 - Paris, 29 August 1960) was a Dutch draughts player with a national Grand master title. He became world champion in 1928. One of the standard combinations in draughts, the Coup Springer, is named after him.
      So I guess Springer is possible.

      But a draughts player from 8 decades ago strikes me as a little obscure. Not that I'm completely against obscure clues, of course. But I try -- or at least like to think I try -- to lean more toward this-is-obscure-but-I-think-this-deserves-to-be-better-known when I use obscure bits.

      But you know, I'm not really sure how well-known the people referred to in this clue are, so let me check...

      Okay. "Ben  Springer" gets 21 thousand, but many of those do not appear to refer to the draughts player and are just random people with that name. In contrast, "Ben [name deleted]" gets close to 15 million hits, "Jerry [name deleted]" gets close to 1 million.

  •  After #29, I think I need a cigarette. (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Nova Land, UnionMade

    I am progressive. I am liberal. I make no apologies. - Kos

    My political compass: - 8.38,-6.97

    by pucklady on Sun Jan 13, 2013 at 06:38:05 PM PST

  •  I miss science. (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Nova Land, UnionMade

    We are stuck stuck stuck

    I am progressive. I am liberal. I make no apologies. - Kos

    My political compass: - 8.38,-6.97

    by pucklady on Sun Jan 13, 2013 at 06:49:27 PM PST

  •  I'm stuck on the movie quotes, so will ponder more (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    UnionMade, pucklady

    tomorrow. (Had an inspiration that the one from 1968 which refers to corp might be "The Green Berets", but a look through the memorable quotes list doesn't turn up any likely candidates for the line.) (That's another movie I never saw, so don't really know what the famous quotes would be without referring to things such as the IMDb quote pages.)

    Almost time for Smallville, so I'm going to turn off the computer in a couple of minutes. But I'll check back later (and tomorrow) to see how progress is coming on the JulieCrostic.

    Good night, all!

    (And don't get discouraged -- you're making more progress on the JulieCrostic than I am on the movie quotes!)

  •  Did anybody guess at movie quote #8? (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    pucklady, Nova Land

    "Perhaps power" might be

    May the Force be with you.

  •  46, 47, 48 (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    pucklady, Nova Land

    set, stem, temps

    the only thing we have to fear is fear itself--nameless, unreasoning, unjustified terror... FDR first inaugural address

    by blogokvetsch on Sun Jan 13, 2013 at 07:54:29 PM PST

  •  Back in hotel room. (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    pucklady, Nova Land

    I'll get a pen and paper and start.

  •  Movie quote #17? (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    pucklady, Nova Land

    "I'm mad as hell, and I'm not going to take it any more."

    perhaps?

    (from Network)

  •  51, 52, 54, 55 (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    pucklady, Nova Land

    Bar, bare,???,berate, rebated

    the only thing we have to fear is fear itself--nameless, unreasoning, unjustified terror... FDR first inaugural address

    by blogokvetsch on Sun Jan 13, 2013 at 08:21:51 PM PST

      •  quick DKU note on 53 (0+ / 0-)

        Yes, the answer is Berea:

        Berea college  is a liberal arts work college in Berea (south of Lexington), in the U.S. state of Kentucky, founded in 1855. Current full-time enrollment is 1,514 students.

         Berea College is distinctive among post-secondary institutions for providing low-cost education to students and for having been the first college in the Southern United States to be coeducational and racially integrated.

         Berea College charges no tuition; every admitted student is provided the equivalent of a four-year, full-tuition scholarship (currently worth $102,000; $25,500 per year).

  •  15 (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    pucklady, Nova Land

    repeals

    the only thing we have to fear is fear itself--nameless, unreasoning, unjustified terror... FDR first inaugural address

    by blogokvetsch on Sun Jan 13, 2013 at 09:02:07 PM PST

  •  49 (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    pucklady, Nova Land

    Tempes

    the only thing we have to fear is fear itself--nameless, unreasoning, unjustified terror... FDR first inaugural address

    by blogokvetsch on Sun Jan 13, 2013 at 09:09:55 PM PST

  •  50 (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    pucklady, Nova Land

    empties

    the only thing we have to fear is fear itself--nameless, unreasoning, unjustified terror... FDR first inaugural address

    by blogokvetsch on Sun Jan 13, 2013 at 09:12:32 PM PST

  •  Summary (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    pucklady, Nova Land, sny

    Here is a summary.  I don't see where it divides up, so I suspect both are the same structure,but the verticals break up.


    Ren T tern A renta O ornate X xxxxxxx
    Roe H hero M homer T mother E theorem
    Las E seal E seale P please R repeals
    Xxx X xxxx X xxxxx X xxxxxx X xxxxxxx
    Xxx X xxxx X xxxxx X xxxxxx X xxxxxxx
    Xxx X xxxx X xxxxx X xxxxxx X xxxxxxx
    Als E sale T tales B ablest D blasted
    Xxx X xxxx X xxxxx X xxxxxx X xxxxxxx
    Xxx X xxxx X xxxxx X xxxxxx X xxxxxxx
    Set M stem P temps E tempes I empties
    Bar E bare E berea T berate D rebated
  •  Pattern! (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    sny, Nova Land, pucklady

    They divide after the fourth row.   The first vertical is

    TheX XXeXmeX

    And the second begins AME

    So the second juliecrostic is a copy of the first with the name David added.

    First vertical set: THExAMExOTPxxERx

    Second set:  xxExxMExxTxxPExxBxxETxxDAVID

    Comparing, the first is THExAMExOTPxPERx

    second is. THExAMExOTPxPERxBYPETERDAVID

    Now,to go to wiki and see if there is a book by him that fits.

    Yep, the Camelot Papers.

    So the verticals are

    Thecamelotpapersthecamelotpapersbypeterdavid

  •  16-20 (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    sny, Nova Land, pucklady

    20 is CASTLES

    The letters are CLAS, so 19 anagrams CASTLE, 18 anagrams CLEST, 17 CETS, 16 ETS

    17 is sect
    18 is celts
    19 is cleats

    And 16 is E.S.T

    •  wrong on 19! (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      science

      Try again at anagramming -- there's another word which fits wedges better than CASTLE does (although that's not something I would have known without Dictionary.Com insisting that's the definition).

      [The easy clue for this answer would be type of shoes; the clue I wanted to do for this was one of Archie's teachers and that may technically work since it appears that's how the teacher's name is spelled in a movie but the comic spells it with a K rather than a C.]

      •  oops, I'm the one who's wrong -- misread your (0+ / 0-)

        comment, thought you were saying 19 was CASTLE rather than an anagram of CASTLE. Somehow I missed seeing (until now, as I'm going through the comments to edit all the Bad Translation guesses into the new Sunday Puzzle diary) that farther down in the comment you correctly anagrammed those letters out to CLEATS.

        Drat -- that's one error I can't blame on the gremlins. (Oh, well. I'll still blame them for any other errors that occur.)

  •  Colleagues arrived in breakfast room (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Nova Land, pucklady

    Gotta go

  •  26-30 (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Nova Land, pucklady, science

    26 net
    27 then
    28 onThe
    29 tenOhs
    30 shorten

    I was obsessing about the punctuation on 29 last night, even though I had thought of shorten.

  •  36-40 (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Nova Land, pucklady, science

    36 her
    37 cher
    38 perch
    39 cypher
    40 preachy

    I never would have gotten this without science's verticals. I had thought of preachy last night, but the first few pages of google hits on sarkisian were all steves.

  •  41-45 (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Nova Land, pucklady, science

    41 rel
    42 earl
    43 aReal

    And Science already got
    44 aPearl
    45 palaver

  •  22,24,25 (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Nova Land, pucklady, science

    22 lits
    24 trills
    25 stiller

    No clue on 21 or 23, which I think are the only ones left. I've got to go, but will check back later tonight.

    •  22-24 (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Nova Land, pucklady

      22 is ils (the French word for his)

      24 is tills.    A register is a till and up to the time of is also till

    •  quick DKU notes on 24, 25 (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      pucklady

      Clue 24:

      what a savage does when excited
      This is a pulp fiction reference. Famed pulp hero Doc Savage used to emit a trilling sound when he was excited or intrigued:
      As a result of the training he received, Doc Savage attempts to remain as emotionless as possible. However, in times of mental stress or excitement he may emit a trilling sound. This sound is very difficult to describe and seems to come from every direction so that it is very difficult to locate its source. This is very helpful in that most of the time Doc is not aware that he is making this sound.
      Clue 25:
      ben or jerry
      These are, as y'all figured out, comedian/actor Ben Stiller, who has appeared in numerous movies in the last decade, and comedian/actor Jerry Stiller, who played Frank Costanza on Seinfeld (and is Ben's father).
  •  Peter David's site is safe again (0+ / 0-)

    From his wife Kathleen an update about the site...

    Yeah, we got hit pretty badly with some malicious code that really screwed up the system but Glenn and his team have been working on the sites and getting things back up.
    ... as well as an update on Peter's condition:
    Yesterday he walked 25 feet with a crutch but no other assistance. This is yet another big step in his recovery. They have also upped the number of hours that he is in rehab therapy, which is a good thing indeed. He also finished a script for a project I can talk about shortly. So he is working on getting back to us and is just working on various projects. Dragon Dictate is working for him and what he needs to do at this time.
    And for those who would like to help out Peter's family (and enjoy some good reading at the same time)
    To recap: Peter had a stroke while vacationing with his family in Florida. He’s currently recuperating in a facility in Jacksonville until he’s well enough to travel home. Even though Peter has health insurance, there are co-pays and the like, and since this stroke fell at the end of the year, there are all new co-pays to deal with, and there are things that the insurance company just won’t cover. So we are at the beginning of what is going to be a very expensive year.

    Many people have asked how you can help. First: THANK YOU. Here’s how.

    The most direct way is to buy his e-books from Crazy 8 Press (via ComicMix) or from Amazon or Barnes and Noble websites. These are books that he gets the money from directly and the most per book. The quickest and most money is buying the EPub versions from ComicMix, by the way. The more we sell of these books, the easier it will be for us to pay the bills as they start to pour in.

    ... If you buy via Amazon, please use this link, which will bring in even more funds.

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