Skip to main content

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV) speaks to the media after a caucus meeting with Senate Democrats on Capitol Hill in Washington August 1, 2011.
Be careful what you wish for.
Amidst all the self congratulation on the Senate floor last night after the body adopted new procedural rules to make the filibuster slightly less convenient, Harry Reid and Mitch McConnell promised one another it would all be better now. Fundamentally, most reports suggest that Reid got precisely what he wanted, not a Senate that would actually be able to pass critical legislation, but a Senate that would move through the process of legislating a little more quickly.
According to conversations with pro-reform Democratic aides, party leadership sources and outside opponents of the filibuster, Reid’s main goal was ultimately not to weaken the 60-vote threshold that reformers desperately wanted to change. Instead his objective was to eliminate mandatory gaps between votes in order to move legislation and nominees that have cleared a filibuster more quickly — which he achieved. [...]

A Democratic leadership aide told TPM that “whether you wanted more or not, Reid got virtually everything he has said he wanted.” The aide pointed to examples of the majority leader saying his goal was to make the Senate operate more efficiently.

Reformers in and out of the Senate believe that Reid tapped into their enthusiasm to advance his goal. “Reid said he wants to make it easier to move on bills,” said a pro-reform aide. “This doesn’t do that. He still has to negotiate with McConnell to get on a bill. It’s a negligible difference to how the Senate operates today.”

Negotiating with McConnell is still necessary, and likely to be as constrained as ever since Reid made a promise to McConnell on the Senate floor after the voting Thursday. He will not, he vowed to McConnell, attempt "any further changes to the filibuster or other rules in the 113th Congress without Republican consent."

Don't expect this new spirit of comity and bipartisanship [cough] to last very long. The renomination of Richard Cordray to direct the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau is at hand. Because of Republican opposition to the simple existence of the CFPB, President Obama was forced to make a recess appointment of Cordray. Republican opposition hasn't abated, and they're vowing to continue the fight.

Originally posted to Joan McCarter on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 07:48 AM PST.

Also republished by Daily Kos.

EMAIL TO A FRIEND X
Your Email has been sent.
You must add at least one tag to this diary before publishing it.

Add keywords that describe this diary. Separate multiple keywords with commas.
Tagging tips - Search For Tags - Browse For Tags

?

More Tagging tips:

A tag is a way to search for this diary. If someone is searching for "Barack Obama," is this a diary they'd be trying to find?

Use a person's full name, without any title. Senator Obama may become President Obama, and Michelle Obama might run for office.

If your diary covers an election or elected official, use election tags, which are generally the state abbreviation followed by the office. CA-01 is the first district House seat. CA-Sen covers both senate races. NY-GOV covers the New York governor's race.

Tags do not compound: that is, "education reform" is a completely different tag from "education". A tag like "reform" alone is probably not meaningful.

Consider if one or more of these tags fits your diary: Civil Rights, Community, Congress, Culture, Economy, Education, Elections, Energy, Environment, Health Care, International, Labor, Law, Media, Meta, National Security, Science, Transportation, or White House. If your diary is specific to a state, consider adding the state (California, Texas, etc). Keep in mind, though, that there are many wonderful and important diaries that don't fit in any of these tags. Don't worry if yours doesn't.

You can add a private note to this diary when hotlisting it:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary from your hotlist?
Are you sure you want to remove your recommendation? You can only recommend a diary once, so you will not be able to re-recommend it afterwards.
Rescue this diary, and add a note:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary from Rescue?
Choose where to republish this diary. The diary will be added to the queue for that group. Publish it from the queue to make it appear.

You must be a member of a group to use this feature.

Add a quick update to your diary without changing the diary itself:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary?
(The diary will be removed from the site and returned to your drafts for further editing.)
(The diary will be removed.)
Are you sure you want to save these changes to the published diary?

Comment Preferences

  •  And the Scorpion said... (44+ / 0-)

    This is reminiscent of the Scorpion who hitched a ride across the river.   "I promise, just get me to the other side"

    Once on the other side, the scorpion laid down the sting, killing it's "friend" that offered the ride.

    "Why did you do it?"

    "it's in my nature"

    I think people see a political upside in saying "they aren't people of their word" but that doesn't hurt Republicans in a single (R) leaning district.   The only people that actually hurts are the entire country who gets legislative standstills and needless bargaining.

    We all just got stung.

    Gandhi's Seven Sins: Wealth without work; Pleasure without conscience; Knowledge without character; Commerce without morality; Science without humanity; Worship without sacrifice; Politics without principle

    by Chris Reeves on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 07:58:51 AM PST

    •  in a nutshell (9+ / 0-)
      "I promise, just get me to the other side"

      "In the depth of winter I finally learned that there was in me an invincible summer."- Albert Camus

      by valadon on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 08:08:57 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  In the version I've heard (10+ / 0-)

      they get to the middle of the water when the scorpion stings the frog. Of course they both drown.

      Here's your horoscope for today: The universe doesn't even know that you exist.--Jbou

      by greycat on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 08:56:45 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  I've heard at least four variations (5+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        greycat, pengiep, lyvwyr101, Tool, Ginny in CO

        Get to the other side and stung
        Stung mid river

        Are the two where the scorpion wins.

        I've also heard the version where, coming to it's senses the turtle submerges mid stream

        And where the scorpion stings the turtle before they start the trek across the river "I couldn't resist"

        In the end, in all versions it never, ever works out for both parties.

        Gandhi's Seven Sins: Wealth without work; Pleasure without conscience; Knowledge without character; Commerce without morality; Science without humanity; Worship without sacrifice; Politics without principle

        by Chris Reeves on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 09:10:31 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  In the middle of the river the frog says (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        greycat

        "now we'll both drown. Why did you sting me?"
        "I'm a scorpion", says the scorpion.
        I always find it easy to use "republican" in the place of "scorpion". They can't help being liars, cheaters and thieves. It's their nature. Only a fool expects anything else of them.

        48forEastAfrica - Donate to Oxfam> "It is better to light a candle than to curse the darkness." Edna St.V. Millay

        by slouching on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 10:16:51 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

    •  All of us just got stung--badly--really badly. (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      joanneleon, gritsngumbo, Glenn45

      "Hey----Hey---NRA---How many kids have you killed today?"

      by lyvwyr101 on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 09:20:51 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Why worry? (9+ / 0-)

      They know that the left grassroots will pledge their undying support in all elections. So why should they change the way they operate?

      We work for them and vote for them and give them our money... no matter what they do.

      Many people here oppose any kind of primary too and treat people who do want primaries as some kind of traitors.  


      "Justice is a commodity"

      by joanneleon on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 09:34:53 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  time to primary Reid n/t (8+ / 0-)

        “It's a terrible thing to look over your shoulder when you are trying to lead - and find no one there” ---Franklin D. Roosevelt

        by vmckimmey on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 09:48:16 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Get ready for a fight (6+ / 0-)

          from your so called allies here at dkos. Get ready to be called a purist, an emoProg, a traitor, and to be blamed for every Democratic loss in elections for the past century.


          "Justice is a commodity"

          by joanneleon on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 09:55:34 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  How can we avoid shooting ourselves in the foot? (0+ / 0-)

            I am not very unhappy with Reid myself but I am not suicidal.
            We have to find a way to make him responsible without
            doing ourselves in as well.

            I am pragmatist and I understand the way negociations work. Both sides have to give up something they want in order to keep what they value the highest. I am not sure what the GOP has given up-their reputation for acting in good faith? Not really.

            Even Sherrod Brown was having a difficult time putting a good face on this tainted deal. I am for waiting to see what really happened behind the scenes instead of forming a circle firing squad.

          •  We've been watching a lot of (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            joanneleon

            losses that could have been won had better primary candidates gotten party support. (Even hidden support where open primary support is not allowed.) Another reason for public campaign funding.

            I also think when we trash and ridicule Dem politicians without grounds, it discourages really good potential candidates from running.

            Having older, powerful incumbents can become a liability rather than an advantage when it comes to getting fresher blood in DC.

            "People, even more than things, have to be restored, renewed, revived, reclaimed and redeemed; never throw out anyone. " Audrey Hepburn "A Beautiful Woman"

            by Ginny in CO on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 01:14:34 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

        •  Time to primary Barbara Boxer and Dianne (6+ / 0-)

          Feinstein.

          48forEastAfrica - Donate to Oxfam> "It is better to light a candle than to curse the darkness." Edna St.V. Millay

          by slouching on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 10:18:24 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  According to Bernie on Hartmann (0+ / 0-)

            Levin got on the floor and spoke against changing the rule. Need to find out who else was not supporting it. Also support the ones who were.

            "People, even more than things, have to be restored, renewed, revived, reclaimed and redeemed; never throw out anyone. " Audrey Hepburn "A Beautiful Woman"

            by Ginny in CO on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 01:03:52 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

          •  Why not? (0+ / 0-)

            They supported this dreck, too.

            The sooner the Democratic base makes it clear that a functional Congress and an end to the kabuki theatre is at the top of the list, the sooner Capitol Hill will get the idea.

      •  This is why age matters in politics. (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        alice kleeman

        I've been bringing this up mostly in regard to Hilary, and especially Joe, running in '16. There are rare exceptions like Bernie Sanders.

        *We have reached a point in time that the world changes faster than anyone can keep up. Our knowledge base doubles faster than I can keep track. It was an amazing less than 18 months last I saw.

        *We are faced with the biggest unnatural threat the human race has ever faced. The GOP is going to fight all climate protection efforts - until it's too late to keep unthinkable numbers of humans and other species from dying.

        Reid, Levin, DiFi, Bowers, and probably some other elderly relics, are the reason we are going to live with a decision based on the worldviews they formed 60 years ago. Sure that was successful for decades. They ignored the changes they needed to change with. What ever good work they've been doing has now been diminished. Joe Paterno comes to mind.

        "People, even more than things, have to be restored, renewed, revived, reclaimed and redeemed; never throw out anyone. " Audrey Hepburn "A Beautiful Woman"

        by Ginny in CO on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 12:59:37 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

    •  "...just got stung..." AGAIN! (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Australian2, claude

      Anyone who really looks at Reid's history versus his public bravado and power hungry  bullshit knows he's always gotten what he and his donors wanted..beginning with control of the all the weak-
      kneed Moderate DLC hacks.
      They're all whores and as such have put this country through hell since Reid's been in control.  His gang essentially dictated how to fuck Americans into submission while cluster bombing/fucking those who question or fight back.

      I know of no one who hasn't been harmed by Reid constantly selling out ..including Barack Obama.

    •  we got stung by the Democratic Party Establishment (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      alice kleeman, joanneleon

      which appears to wish to subvert the will of the People.

      Guess what, folks:  It ain't OUR Party, it's THEIR Party and fuck us.

      Harry Reid can go fuck himself, along with the rest of the Democratic Party Establishment that is determined to continue the present state of single party rule in the US.  There is one  Party and it is the Owner's Party.  The People don't have a Party.

      One begins to understand the Tea Party's frustration with their political establishment.

      don't always believe what you think

      by claude on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 01:11:15 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  So... cosmetic. Not substantive. (28+ / 0-)

    Democrats elected to be majority; majority hands over reins to Republicans. Got it.

    We voted for this then: A democracy where democratic outcomes don't happen.

    Is it time for Democratic Progressive Caucus members to withdraw from the Party and form their own block? Maybe we can actually get some leverage and democratic-type results from that.

    Or do we need a mass de-registration from the Party of the rank-and-file as a way to a) send a message, b) become that all important "independent swing vote" the Dem strategists care so much more about than the Democratic voter.

    I propose these thinking this might actually be the path to electing more and better Democrats. Certainly the Leadership, combined with Schumer's recent safety-net compromise offer, seems to want to trash any electoral advantages against the Republicans as thoroughly as possible.

    Do we change this without putting the moral equivalent of a 2x4 upside their heads?


    Markos! Not only are the Gates Not Crashed, they've fallen on us. Actual Representatives are what we urgently need, because we have almost none.

    by Jim P on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 08:01:12 AM PST

    •  Already changed my party affiliation from Dem to (16+ / 0-)

      Independent. Feels strange, having been a dye-in-the-wool Democrat all of my life (67 years). But, I am too old now to abide by a party that no longer values its own platform or the rank and file.

      No money, no rah-rah-rah, etc. Democrats want my vote now, they will have to buy me like the wealthy buy them. Seems quite democratic to my way of thinking.

      Poverty and Income Inequality isn't Democratic, Justice or American. It is Tyranny.

      by Wendys Wink on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 09:03:03 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Corporatocracy is taking over everything... (10+ / 0-)

        including public schools, DC legislators, State legislators, small town councils! (Chevron buying Richmond council members)   the Democratic Party, ....but as long as we have a two party system I will continue to strive to bring the Democratic Party into line with its constituents.    The CA Demcratic Party elite has been changing its rules & procedures over time to make small d democracy a little more difficult.   Our Progressive Caucus battles them continually and lose.

        We are in a battle for democracy.  We are losing, but most people just hide out and won't discuss it or look at it, much less fight for it.   Given a Corporate Media how do we get more people to wake up, educate themselves and fight for democracy and a future for life on earth?  

        Vultures Out: Voters In

        "I think it is much more interesting to live not knowing than to have answers that might be wrong." Richard Feynman

        by leema on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 09:16:41 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Our gov't is completely owned by lobbyists. (7+ / 0-)

          They've been for sale for years---and we've been sold---as in: sold out by them.

          "Hey----Hey---NRA---How many kids have you killed today?"

          by lyvwyr101 on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 09:24:26 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

        •  "Given a Corporate Media how do we..." (5+ / 0-)

          Take away the Corporate Media.

          Not the near-two-decades long fantasy of replacing it with the Internet. Which a moment's thought should show is a silly idea.

          Break up the de facto monopoly on what is discussed in the public space; on what narratives are offered and suppressed.

          One reason the blogosphere is vastly weaker politically than it should be is that we've failed -- this site included -- in making the end of the most powerful agitation/propaganda machine in history a reality.

          "The internet is just the tail of the Corporate Dog." used to be my signature, and for good reason.

          Until we routinely end up seeing, say, economic panels which have labor representatives and cleaning ladies on them... it doesn't really matter what battles we win. We will continue to lose the war. Guaranteed.

          The top bloggers on the left and mainstream have been grossly irresponsible, imo, by letting this obvious linchpin to the 1%'s rule go on while we just engage in relatively minor sniping, moaning, and mocking.

          And then we're surprised when the Media beats down real change and real discussion again. Which it has done for decades, every day, for years now.


          Markos! Not only are the Gates Not Crashed, they've fallen on us. Actual Representatives are what we urgently need, because we have almost none.

          by Jim P on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 09:28:24 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  Somebody just asked that yesterday (8+ / 0-)

            in Glenn Greenwald's question and answer session with his readers.  He said he gave up on the goal of trying to change the establishment media.  They are the establishment media and they will always serve the establishment.  Instead we have to keep working to use alternative media, alternative outlets.  There's been a lot of progress on that, in fact, during the past decade, almost entirely because of the internet and social media.

            Most kids don't watch TV or listen to the radio, from my experience with three teenagers and their friends.


            "Justice is a commodity"

            by joanneleon on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 09:39:55 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  Well, Glenn shouldn't have given up. (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              tb mare, alice kleeman

              Though I understand and sympathize with any journalist's pressing need to have a steady income in whatever format they can get it. And of course, if you're too sane, you'll not get that on, say, CNN. Still...

              Say you need to get something vitally important into the general public's mind as quickly as possible.

              You have two routes offered to you:
              • You can twitter, youtube, facebook, and blog all day for a week.
              • You can appear on even a local market tv channel for a minute.

              Which would be your fastest way to get the idea out to the widest possible public?

              As to the Internet, the moment it's any kind of threat it disappears. See China, Syria, Iran, Egypt, etc etc etc. This is something we have under sufferance. The fact we still have it is the demonstration it's not regarded as a serious threat.

              (In my more paranoid moments, I remember that every electronic communication is monitored, then I remember Mao's 'let 100 flowers bloom' and what happened next.)

              Again, it's been useful to a degree, we've won a handful of battles because of it, but the War....? We've been losing it all along, since the first day the WWW was opened to the public through this moment.

              For 20 years of internet, the Gates not only remain uncrashed, they're falling on us.

              So how does this possibly change until we break up, or force entry into, the monopoly on narrative-making?


              Markos! Not only are the Gates Not Crashed, they've fallen on us. Actual Representatives are what we urgently need, because we have almost none.

              by Jim P on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 10:02:42 AM PST

              [ Parent ]

              •  I recall seeing a comment (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                tb mare

                during the past few days on emptywheel's web site.  One of her commenters said that her post on, I think it was HSBC, got shared 148,000 times.


                "Justice is a commodity"

                by joanneleon on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 10:05:42 AM PST

                [ Parent ]

                •  And then everyone got together and discussed (2+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  milton333, claude

                  it. Not.

                  That's an impressive number. If some blogger had taken the money to buy tv air-time, if they could, to read off the Emptywheel piece, then we'd have something.

                  The networks reached 300,000,000 people in a day with the "Dean Scream." and the Clinton scandal. Tomorrow morning if they want to broadcast that the President is a Martian, that will be the topic 300 million people will be talking about tomorrow night.

                  On the internet, we in our liberal blog ghetto, the illuminati-ists in their wacko ghetto, and all of us unconnected and in unshared space will be busy rebutting or defending what we all have heard.

                  "The Internet is the tail of the Corporate Dog" as my previous signature said. And for reason.

                  btw, 148,000 is 0.00049% of 300,000,000. Internet/mass-reach media. Entirely different things.


                  Markos! Not only are the Gates Not Crashed, they've fallen on us. Actual Representatives are what we urgently need, because we have almost none.

                  by Jim P on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 10:22:58 AM PST

                  [ Parent ]

      •  I register DEM to participate in the Iowa caucuses (4+ / 0-)

        but I only donate to individual candidates and volunteer only for individual candidates. I give NOTHING to the Democratic party for the reasons you left the party. And I let them know why- though my actions and the actions of other like me have seemingly made no difference.

        "Mit der Dummheit kämpfen Götter selbst vergebens," -Friedrich Schiller "Against Stupidity, the Gods themselves contend in Vain"

        by pengiep on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 09:18:48 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  This is why I make a point of calling myself (4+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        jennylind, MPociask, milton333, COBALT1928

        a "liberal" rather than a "Democrat".

      •  boy, Wendy, I was just having the same thought (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Wendys Wink, joanneleon

        and I'm a life-long Democrat of your age.

        And I for sure am not going to put up with any more bullshit from the Democrat Party hacks here at Daily Kos.

        Where's Howard Dean when we really need him?  Who is left to represent the Democratic wing of the Democratic Party.

        "What I want to know is..."

        don't always believe what you think

        by claude on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 01:19:58 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  You know, I just stopped being insane and will (0+ / 0-)

          let whatever comes, come. Warm down here the last couple of days, claude. Rain tomorrow, I hope!

          Poverty and Income Inequality isn't Democratic, Justice or American. It is Tyranny.

          by Wendys Wink on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 05:28:38 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

    •  Answer (9+ / 0-)
      Is it time for Democratic Progressive Caucus members to withdraw from the Party and form their own block?
      It's our only course of action at this point. We need to start pushing the Progressive Caucus to break off from the Third Way-run party leadership. Because if they don't, nothing will get done. It's the only way we'll have any leverage in anything.

      The Senate is still broken for the People...or in other words, working as intended for the Oligarchs and Plutocrats.

      We don't have a voice anymore. We probably haven't had a voice in years.

      The Grand Bargain must be stopped at all costs to protect the 99%.

      by cybrestrike on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 09:19:34 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  I really like the Norman Goldman show. He has (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        COBALT1928

        been showcasing the Vermont Progressive Party and I'm beginning to think California needs a Progressive Party.

        48forEastAfrica - Donate to Oxfam> "It is better to light a candle than to curse the darkness." Edna St.V. Millay

        by slouching on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 10:21:04 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

    •  If we don't do something different (6+ / 0-)

      nothing will change.

      They have no reason to fear their base.


      "Justice is a commodity"

      by joanneleon on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 09:36:38 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  I wouldn't trust (15+ / 0-)

    Harry's promises.....I thought he made one to us too? If he were truly concerned about the legislative flow or speed in the Senate, then he would have never accepted what he did. I call B.S. on this excuse that that was his intent when the obvious result was that the rest of us got screwed.

    "In the depth of winter I finally learned that there was in me an invincible summer."- Albert Camus

    by valadon on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 08:07:27 AM PST

    •  They are all drinking from the same trough... (8+ / 0-)

      We need to challenge every on of these long-term senators that have the money rolling in.  Otherwise there will be no change.   Harry Reid especially.  He is the sorriest excuse for a Senate leader in my lifetime.  

      Witness that the vote was in the 70-30 range to keep the fillibuster.

      •  if we allow corporations to buy politicians (4+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        importer, Glenn45, COBALT1928, claude

        then they will buy politicians, after all they're a great buy.

        our government is broken and populated solely by a handful of wealthy mavericks (who for all intents and purposes are purely for show) and those willing to suckle at the corporate teat and legislate accordingly.

        as the game is currently rigged, the people cannot win.  the rules must be changed.

        See Kobayashi Maru

        A standing army is like a standing member. It's an excellent assurance of domestic tranquility, but a dangerous temptation to foreign adventure. Elbridge Gerry - Constitutional Convention (1787)

        by No Exit on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 09:33:22 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

    •  Rachel did a good segment on this last night (6+ / 0-)

      Visit NBCNews.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy

    •  Harry Reid wanted this (3+ / 0-)

      Reid is worried that if he "goes nuclear," it'll be open season on Senate rules when Republicans retake the majority.  1/3 of the Senate is up every two years and Republicans are probably going to keep the House until at least January 2023.  There will be two presidential elections by then.  The last time a party won four elections in a row was FDR/Truman.  i.e., there is a grave danger that the Republicans take both houses of Congress and the White House in the near future.

      I think Reid's caution is understandable.  We've got a tough Senate map to defend every two years for the next decade and we can't be certain the Republicans will keep primarying Lugars and nominating Mourdocks.

      It's frustrating when we want to pass gun control or climate change legislation.  But I don't think we'll be so frustrated here if Minority Leader Reid successfully filibusters Medivoucher legislation on President Rubio's watch.

      •  I disagree (7+ / 0-)

        The proposed "talking filibuster" reform would not deny the proper legislative power to the minority - whoever that minority might be.
        It would, however, deny the minority the ability to make almost every issue a super-majority issue.
        And that's the way it should be.

      •  Well, we're certainly not going to win (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        COBALT1928

        elections, when we can't ACCOMPLISH anything.  So, ensuring a pointless waste of time throughout the president's second term doesn't set us up well for future electoral wins, does it?  It's all so short-sighted.

        Thought is only a flash in the middle of a long night, but the flash that means everything - Henri Poincaré

        by milton333 on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 10:36:35 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  The filibuster doesn't matter anymore (0+ / 0-)

          The Republicans in the House are a much bigger roadblock to Obama's second term than the Senate filibuster is.  And I'm very concerned that it's impossible for Democrats to retake the House until after the 2020 redistricting.

          The talking filibuster would shut down the filibuster entirely as a long-term strategy for obstruction.  Sure, in theory, 30 senators can keep taking the podium over a period of weeks or months to read the phone book.  In practice, this would make the senators in question look very silly on C-SPAN.  They'd have to stop sometime.  The talking filibuster would have crushed Republican opposition to Obamacare.  It would also crush a similar crusade against Medivoucher -- poor Bernie Sanders would collapse of exhaustion before Republicans dropped the issue.  I still think the filibuster's potential value in protecting the New Deal outweighs the annoyance of the filibuster obstructing new progressive legislation.

          Also, Obama couldn't accomplish much during the second half of his first term, and he still won re-election.  So we can win elections without accomplishing anything.  Whether there's a point in this, besides holding off the dark forces of Mordor for another cycle, is a different question.

  •  Reid will fight like a badger when he needs (13+ / 0-)

    to be re-elected. Legislating, not so much.

  •  Outcomes not Process (15+ / 0-)

    Heck, when he had 60 votes he might as well have had none.  

    The process is all theater.  Democrats have to be held accountable for outcomes.  I don't care how they get there but if they can't deliver for me, I'm not going to deliver for them.  

    Lincoln was a good reminder that when you need the votes you find out how to get them not how to excuse not getting them.

  •  And what to make of this (11+ / 0-)

    from the TPM article:

    In the end, not even Merkley rebelled against the incremental steps taken in the final deal. He voiced disappointment late Thursday that it did not go further and vowed to “explore stronger remedies” if it does not end Senate paralysis.
    no Progressive fight at all or regrouping? I tend to see this most negatively right now and maybe that's just necessary for my own preservation......do we even have a Progressive movement in Congress or is that all show too?

    "In the depth of winter I finally learned that there was in me an invincible summer."- Albert Camus

    by valadon on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 08:19:10 AM PST

    •  How about a new Senate? (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Laurence Lewis

      We are now in Roman times.

      "You can die for Freedom, you just can't exercise it"

      by shmuelman on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 09:21:52 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Me--too! (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Laurence Lewis

      "Hey----Hey---NRA---How many kids have you killed today?"

      by lyvwyr101 on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 09:27:55 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Agree completely (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      MPociask, COBALT1928, justmy2

      What Harry Reid accomplished was to speed up the Senate from 5 miles per hour to 5.2 miles per hour. I want the Senate to move at 75 miles per hour.

      It's like if someone stole all of your belongings, then after two years they gave you back one t-shirt, and you say, "well, I have made some progress."

      In other words, what Harry Reid and the pussy Democrats accomplished was as close to nothing as possible, without literally being nothing.

      I don't care if the Republicans regain a majority at some point in the future, and they vote for every extreme right wing item on their wish list, and the entire country is destroyed. But until that time, let the Dems, who have the majority now, get things done.

      If I was a freshman Democratic Senator, I would have stood up in the Democratic caucus meeting they had on the topic of filibuster reform, and said "If we acheive anything less than the Constitutional option (51 votes wins for most votes [except treaties, Supreme court noms, etc.]) then for every vote the next two years, I am voting the way Mitch McConnell wants me to. It's my way or the highway--except that you won't be hitting the road, I will."

      And I would have voted with marble mouth for two years, unless we got the "majority votes wins" rule change.

    •  A new majority leader (0+ / 0-)

      wouldn't be any more able to push through reforms than Reid if the new leader's Democratic members, even though enjoying a majority of seats, were unwilling to vote for them.

      "In this world of sin and sorrow there is always something to be thankful for; as for me, I rejoice that I am not a Republican." - H. L. Mencken

      by SueDe on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 09:40:57 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Amen (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Laurence Lewis, COBALT1928

      Time to shitcan Reid. Past time actually.

      Meddle not in the affairs of dragons... for thou art crunchy and good with ketchup.

      by Pariah Dog on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 09:49:21 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Reid's been Senate Majority Leader since Jan 2007 (21+ / 0-)

    ...and has conducted the Senate he wants since then. He didn't want filibuster reform. Majority Leader Reid has always had more power than McConnel and is the person accountable for the machinations of the US Senate from Jan 2007 to the present.

    And Senate Democrats could have changed that designation if they wanted to.

    This is the state of today's Democratic Majority for which "progressives" are a convenient outer boundary worked by "rapid sheep" to be herded, and combed, and sheered, their gentle baying barely heard.

    One more reason to be relentless on every issue. Early, ruthless and relentless.

  •  It all looks and sounds very similar to (13+ / 0-)

    the situation with Cuomo and the New York Senate.

    A Democratic majority run Senate would produce.

    Further, what it would produce would be fairly progressive legislation that members and leaders would have to go on record voting for or against.

    Further, that progressive legislation would then... in New York's case where there is a 2/3's Democratic and very progressive state assembly... land on the Governors desk where he would have to sign that legislation into law and accept it as part of his record to defend when he later attempts to advance his career... or veto and then stand the outrage of the very progressive base in his state... and in the federal case the legislation would then have to voted on in the House where it would in most cases fail. The President would remain insulated but the less progressive Democratic Senators would not.

    In the case of nominees (where the House is not an issue) the President would then not have a defense against not nominating the most progressive possible candidates for his cabinet and for the judiciary.

    And in a Washington environment that likes staying in the "center" having a good excuse for marginalizing the left is perceived as a good thing.

    Let the centrism and dysfunction reign!

    "Do what you can with what you have where you are." - Teddy Roosevelt

    by Andrew C White on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 08:43:11 AM PST

    •  We're all being played (6+ / 0-)

      The Democratic Party pretends to be for the things that their base wants but they never deliever because for some reason they are always stopped by those nasty Republicans which was quite a trick to manage back when they had all 3 branches and a Super Majority in the Senate. On a similar note the Republican Party pretends to be for all of the things that their base wants but somehow they are always thwarted by those dastardly Democrats even when they had complete control of all three branches for years.

      It is all one big game to both parties. Sure there are true believers  but the system makes sure they never get anywhere which was the Democrats end up with Reid in the Senate and the Republicans get Boehner in the House neither of whom represents the Center of what their party stands for. At the end of the day the Corporatist always wins.

  •  Disappointed, (5+ / 0-)

    but not surprised.  I am confident that Senator McConnell would have done the same thing were the Republicans in the majority.  (snark)

    "We have facts on our side. They have propaganda on their side."

    by rlharry on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 09:02:20 AM PST

  •  What would be the effect of filibuster reform (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    lyvwyr101, Bensdad

    on ACA?  On taxes?  On long standing progressive achievements from the past century?

    I've never gotten a satisfactory answer to this question, and while its frustrating to see so much obstructionism in the Senate, I am appalled by what can get passed in the House.

    •  On the ACA (4+ / 0-)

      the effect would have been that there wouldn't have been all those horrendous town hall meetings in the summer on 2009.
      And remember - the Tea Party was a partially birthed through those town halls.
      Obama and Reid could have passed the ACA through a 51 vote procedure but instead they kept trying for the 60 vote goal.
      Plus, the proposed "talking filibuster" would in no way turn the Senate into the House.

      •  And after the fact? (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Bensdad

        ACA was tough to pass, but would filibuster reform make it easier to repeal?

        That's trade off as I see it.  Progressives took a hundred years to build enough consensus to achieve what ultimately became ACA, but it is now (save for the components passed through reconciliation) entrenched.  Do we dare stand down that fire wall?

        •  if the GOP can get 60+ Senators sure (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Capt Crunch, milton333

          Repealing programs is more difficult than instituting them. And they grow more popular over time.

          So while I understand your point about the filibuster protecting important Democratic achievements, I think you overestimate the likelihood of laws being repealed.

          Can you think of a single serious piece of legislation that has been repealed (by either party) in the past three decades?

          •  But that's just isn't it? (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Bensdad

            The GOP won't need 60+ Senators.  They'll only need 51 or 50 and the Vice President.  Of course, they'll need the House and the Senate, but that was exactly what they had for 4 years in the last decade.

            •  nobody was talking about eliminating filibuster (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              alice kleeman

              And making the Senate like the House. Even the Merkley proposal would have enabled a determined minority to block legislation, they just would have had to speak on the floor to do so. And I'm pretty sure it would be a good thing for 41 Democratic Senators to spend months on the floor telling America why they are preserving the ACA. Would have been good to have done the same before they passed it, after all.

              •  Granted. (0+ / 0-)

                The Merkley proposal was very modest and preserves the minority's capacity to block action, just like you say.

                However, if the Senate can change its rules with a simple majority, then what's to stop the GOP from going nuclear and gutting the fish?

        •  ACA wouldn't have been repealed anyway. (3+ / 0-)

          Big Pharma, Big Insurance, and Corporatists loved it and still do. If the Republicans tried to repeal it, lobbyists would descend from the heavens and put a quick stop to that. The House keeps on putting it up for repeal because it gets them votes from their sick and twisted followers.

          As long as it takes 60 votes to get anything done...nothing is going to get done, except legislation that actively and directly hurts the 99%.

          So prepare for more cuts to the programs that keep us at least somewhat afloat. Because the Corporatist wing of the Dems and the Republican sociopaths are going to get together in a quiet room and take that all away from all of us.

          This Filibuster "Reform" is total and utter bullshit and Harry Reid, the Villagers, and the Republicans know it. So fuck all of them.

          The Grand Bargain must be stopped at all costs to protect the 99%.

          by cybrestrike on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 09:52:20 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

        •  would filibuster reform make it easier to repeal? (0+ / 0-)

          Nope.
          Next question.

          •  Care to explain a little more? (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            DaveV
            •  First off there is no real political will (0+ / 0-)

              to repeal the entire ACA. That's reality.
              Secondly, trying to repeal the ACA ala carté would be such a heavy lift it's never going to happen - no matter what Hatch might think.
              Additionally, the entire argument that the 60 vote rule protects good legislation is bogus. The 60 vote rule prevents good legislation. I've already pointed out how it was preventing the good ACA from being passed until they went to a 51 vote procedure.
              That leads to my final point.
              Your first comment was how did the 60 vote rule impact ACA legislation. I answered that.
              Having received an answer to that question you then switched to a NEW question. You never bothered to even acknowledge my answer to your original question. Seems like you're just afraid of change and making it up as you go along.

  •  Mark Twain was right about congress. (5+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    pengiep, tardis10, No Exit, Jim P, vacantlook

    Indeed, it is the only indigenous criminal class in America.

    What is truth? -- Pontius Pilate

    by commonmass on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 09:17:59 AM PST

  •  So he wants this system to move faster (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    pengiep, Nespolo, dewley notid

    before grinding to a halt.

    Lovely.

    The Vichy Dems strike again.

  •  Well, now we know it is all Kabuki (7+ / 0-)

    You think the Senate, "The most exclusive club in the world," is about legislation? Think again. Maybe there are some young bucks (or does) that want to see a progressive agenda, and by that I mean being able to to do something besides naming post offices, but now we know that it is ingrained in the rules that every obstacle will be put in place to keep it from happening.

    "You can die for Freedom, you just can't exercise it"

    by shmuelman on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 09:20:02 AM PST

  •  If this is really all Reid wanted all along, then (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    BlueLeftCoast

    he's an even bigger loser than I first thought.

  •  Much Ado About Nothing, still takes 60, and (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    tardis10, BlueLeftCoast, milton333

    there never was any intention to do otherwise, we were simply played again.

    That, in its essence, is fascism--ownership of government by an individual, by a group, or by any other controlling private power. -- Franklin D. Roosevelt --

    by enhydra lutris on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 09:24:43 AM PST

  •  Why? (6+ / 0-)

    I've never heard a solid argument against filibuster reform other than (paraphrasing) "We're afraid of change... and there might be unintended consequences".

    If that's really it, it's just sad.

    Freedom isn't free. So quit whining and pay your taxes.

    by walk2live on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 09:26:23 AM PST

  •  So we were played - (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Jim P, BlueLeftCoast, milton333

    He never intended to get rid of the 60 vote rule.
    This is something to remember for as long as he is around. And not just around in the Senate.

    Here's my suggestion: take the existing organizational framework for reforming the filibuster and broaden the goal a bit.
    Let's go after the old guard in the Senate.
    Let's go for more than a change to the filibuster.
    Let's go for changes in the seniority system in the Senate. We'll settle for real filibuster reform.
    I know - it can't be done. But it CAN be done.
    The truth is it looks like we came pretty close this time.

  •  Lloyd Blankfein for CFPB chief! (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Jim P

    Wait until we have a GOP president and GOP senate. I'm sure Republicans will gladly let the Democrats filibuster that appointment.

  •  It's time to push aside these worn-out old men. (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Capt Crunch, BlueLeftCoast

    ------
    Ideology is when you have the answers before you know the questions.
    It is what grows into empty spaces where intelligence has died.

    by Alden on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 09:28:32 AM PST

  •  My response to fundraising request this morning... (7+ / 0-)

    in an email from Joe Biden,  subj: "Subject: President Obama is counting on you", soliciting financial support for "the President's plan to reduce gun violence."

    Dear Mr. Vice President,

    Failure to get significant filibuster reform in the Senate, yesterday, means I was disrespected by the Democratic Party since they prefer to maintain personal power than to perform the actions to move this country forward in a democratic manner.

    When the filibuster and secret hold rules are removed from the Senate rules I may again reconsider financially supporting my party.

    Without a return to majority rule in the US Senate, Republican obstructionism is assured for the next 2 years, making gun safety legislation a remote possibility, at best.

    Enough! I've had it with losing battles that could have easily been won and cannot waste my money on supporting exercises in futility.

    *Austerity is the opposite of Prosperity*

    by josmndsn on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 09:29:38 AM PST

    •  Apparently the DNC, DSCC and................ (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      josmndsn

      DCCC have all taken me off their mailing lists.

      When contacted over the last few years I have responded that until the Democratic party agenda starts to remain true to it 's progressive platform; I will only provide financial support DIRECTLY to candidates I decide are worthy of my support.

      I contribute to candidates all over the country; just not through the Democratic party apparatus.

      The mass of men lead lives of quiet desperation--HDT

      by cazcee on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 02:20:10 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  I tend to be a loyalist, at least for public (0+ / 0-)

    consumption.  There's no loyalist angle to this episode.  Hell hath no fury to compare when people constantly stick their necks out to defend these scumbags only to have their heads chopped off.

    "Democracy is a life; and involves continual struggle." ---'Fighting Bob' LaFollette

    by leftreborn on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 09:30:41 AM PST

  •  No one that smart .. is that dumb (0+ / 0-)

    I just made that phrase up but I am tired of this sh*t.   Harry Reid isn't that dumb.  I can't even go on thinking about how idiotic this is.

    FYI - the bluedog thing is about my dog ... I'm a liberal left winger and proud of it.

    by bluedogsd on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 09:34:17 AM PST

    •  That's because it's not a matter of being (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      maryabein, milton333, claude

      weak or dumb.  

      At some point everyone has to open their eyes and see what's going on.  

      He did it because it serves his purpose.  And his purpose is at odds with yours and mine.

      He doesn't work for us. He works for the same guys that Obama works for and McConnell works for.  The 1%.

      The fig leaf is in tatters today.  The theater produced by the Democratic party gets more and more difficult.  


      "Justice is a commodity"

      by joanneleon on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 09:59:26 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Same as the old Senate nt (0+ / 0-)
  •  The Same Old Same Old (0+ / 0-)

    "Republican opposition hasn't abated, and they're vowing to continue the fight."

    Sure, this statement references the nomination of Richard Cordray, but it is also a statement of the overall Republican philosophy in the Senate.

    And Harry Reid wants to live with THIS??  Is he THAT happy to sit on McConnell's lap and lick McConnell's face?

    I'm coming more and more to believe that what we REALLY need in the Senate is a MAJORITY leader, not a Republican lap dog.  We desperately need an LBJ in the Senate.  He knew how to get things done, and he didn't feel that he had to be nicey-nice to the Republicans to do it either.

    It's too bad that Jeff Merkley, Tom Udall, or Sherrod Brown aren't in the Democratic inner circle.  Even without Senate experience none of them could possibly be any worse than Harry Reid is.

    •  What we need (0+ / 0-)

      is a majority leader who is on our side and on the side of the other (very few) progressive senators and on the side of the 99%.  

      Harry Reid is much more allied with McConnell than he is with us or the honest Dems in the caucus.   We are his enemy, except when he needs money and votes.  We're the enemy of the establishment too, which is why the feds and Homeland Security categorize peaceful protesters as low level terrorists and send paramilitarized police forces out there to bash our heads in.


      "Justice is a commodity"

      by joanneleon on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 10:03:43 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Surely you meant to say: (0+ / 0-)
    not a Senate that would actually be able to pass critical legislation, but a Senate that would move through the process of legislating a little more quickly.
    "but a Senate that would NOT move through the process of legislating"

    "I'm totally pro-choice in the matter of abortion. But of course I'm also so radically pro-life that I think every person from birth onward must have full and affordable access to healthcare." - Gail Collins

    by gritsngumbo on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 09:38:43 AM PST

  •  Harry is the guy who got ACA through. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Bensdad

    The guy who got five dozen big pieces of legislation through.

    Without trashing McConnell, who represents business interests and not the Birch Society "tea party" nonsense.

    As a guess, Harry knows what he is doing.

    The big problem is the House, obviously. there the problem is more like having to break up the Republicans to a Business group and a Bircher group.

    Business = 84.

    Bircher = 150.

    And Democrats have 201. So they need about half the Business group to govern.

    Compared to that, Harry's on a picnic.

    "Have you left no sense of decency, sir, at long last?" Army Attorney to Sen. McCarthy, 1954. "We have done nothing to be ashamed of. We have nothing to apologize for." NRA 12/14/2012.

    by bontemps2012 on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 09:40:19 AM PST

    •  Harry did not "get the ACA through" (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      milton333

      Geeze - were you paying attention?
      Remember all those horrible town halls in the summer of 2009? The ones that helped give birth to the tea party.
      They happened because Harry, and Obama, were intent on getting it through using a 60 super majority. Progressives begged and pleaded for them to move it through using a 51 vote procedure - which they finally did months later.  

  •  So nothing new gets done (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    maryabein, joanneleon

    but the Senate gets to go home earlier because it's a little faster?

  •  The Senate (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    TJ, Capt Crunch

    ...where popular legislation goes to die and special interests rule.

    Pretty revealing that Reid chewed out Merkely for violating the trust of Senators by reporting which Dem Senators were opposed to filibuster reform.

    Pretty clubby on our tax dollars.

    50 states, 210 media market, 435 Congressional Districts, 3080 counties, 192,480 precincts

    by TarheelDem on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 09:51:09 AM PST

    •  And I've been busy (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      maryabein, mchestnutjr, joanneleon

      unsubscribing to the myriad of texts/emails especially from Senators/Senate Committees begging for money while telling about the travails of the future.  Inauguration was only 5 days ago and now we are in the "oh woe is us" mode.  Hate to think if we had lost the election! (snark)  I donated to many from outside my state and now am getting hit up for 2014 and beyond from the same and more.
      Think it is time to start worrying about my own/family interests and less about everyone else's.  SAD really

  •  Harry Reid has no honor (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Capt Crunch, milton333

    He just played the activists who worked so hard to try to influence the party they support and help to get elected, time and time again.  

    Senators used the issue in their campaigns to help get elected.   Reid was happy to lie and go along with that.

    What Harry Reid did, and whoever else who was in on it, was destructive to the party, to democracy, to the country.  

    We say that the Republicans are the obstructionists.  But Harry Reid proved that he and other corrupt Senators, and I include the big f'ing phony Barbara Boxer in that number, are obstructionists too.  Let's add the word cowardly to that, since they were so furious that their names were revealed.  

    Corrupt Obstructionist Democratic Senators

    Harry Reid
    Max Baucus (Mont.)
    Patrick Leahy (Vt.)
    Dianne Feinstein (Calif.)
    Barbara Boxer (Calif.)
    Joe Manchin (West. Va.)
    Mark Pryor (Ark.)


    "Justice is a commodity"

    by joanneleon on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 09:52:55 AM PST

  •  Pretend Government For 2 Years (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    milton333

    No policy just posturing for 2 years. Obama gives an ambitous inaugural address when the reality is nothing will come of it.

  •  I think Reid recognized a harsh reality: (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    milton333

    No legislation will get passed in this Congress --none-- because it is DOA in the House of Representatives. Gingrich had it right -- the Liliputians (House republicans) have tied down Gulliver (Obama). Losing the House in 2010 was fatal to our cause. We lost the House because Obama tried to play nice on health care, and the Republicans built up their propaganda machine during the delay (death panels and all).

    Reid knows what the best he can do is get confirmations through. Period.  Changing the rules to a simple majority would do NOTHING to get legislation passed.

    It would die in the House. What am I missing?

    If you hate government, don't run for office in that government.

    by Bensdad on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 10:04:07 AM PST

    •  Maybe, but I think 2014 will be a bad election (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      milton333

      year for Dems because of the cynicism the filibuster fail has engendered.

      48forEastAfrica - Donate to Oxfam> "It is better to light a candle than to curse the darkness." Edna St.V. Millay

      by slouching on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 10:30:11 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  But the reality is simple: (0+ / 0-)

        Changing the rule in the Senate so that the Administration could pass bills through that body more easily would have been an idle exercise.

        All bills will die in the House of Representatives. The President is neutered. All he can do is make appointments. This rule change makes it easier for him to do that.

        If you hate government, don't run for office in that government.

        by Bensdad on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 10:38:09 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  Maybe. I think it more likely that Reid (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Pithy Cherub

    either swapped meaningful filibuster reform for something else or that he really didn't have the votes. The fact that he did not have the support of both of my senators, two Democrats from a very blue state, California, has casused me to revert to my earlier cynicism about very rich Democratic politicians whose interests are not those of the hoi polloi and  Kabuki dance.

    48forEastAfrica - Donate to Oxfam> "It is better to light a candle than to curse the darkness." Edna St.V. Millay

    by slouching on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 10:04:53 AM PST

  •  Put up or shut up time Harry. The appeals court (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    maryabein, KayCeSF

    just gave you the golden opportunity to show us how your new rules make for a better functioning Senate. I fully expect you to have the Presidents appointees to the NLRB and CFPB seated post haste.

    Prove your mettle Harry. Show us the wisdom of your (in)actions.

  •  More N to the (N + 1) Dimensional chess! (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    joanneleon

    Ol' Fightin' Harry Reid knows just when to play the bipartisan comity card to achieve pragmatic compromise.  Now he has the Senate Rubes just where he wants them:  in complete control  of the legislative process.  What more could a Senate Majority Leader from a president's party ask for?

    Ever get the feeling you've been cheated?

    by ActivistGuy on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 10:28:16 AM PST

  •  More Time for Fundraising! (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    maryabein

    With the procedures for failing to pass necessary legislation now streamlined, Reid and his Senate will have more time to spend collecting bribes. For failing to pass necessary legislation.

    All that BS about Republicans replacing Boehner and Reid disarming the filibuster: we should have replaced Reid and gotten Boehner to install the filibuster.

    I note that Reid couldn't even get his own state to elect a fellow Democrat to the Senate for this term, losing by a tiny margin to a Republican jerk.

    We can see that this is how Congressional Democrats like it. Otherwise they'd use the power they have to change what interferes with their power to govern. Instead they insist in the powerlessness that leaves us so badly governed.

    "When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro." - HST

    by DocGonzo on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 10:40:01 AM PST

  •  Reid may have gotten what he wanted, but the (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    joanneleon

    American people still have a crippled Senate that will get nothing done unless the Repubs want it.  Compromise for compromise sake is capitulation.  The Senate Dems remain the Senate Republican squeak toys.  Simply pathetic.

    The trouble with the world is that the stupid are cocksure and the intelligent are full of doubt. Bertrand Russell

    by accumbens on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 11:39:02 AM PST

  •  I thought (0+ / 0-)

    Harry had found his spine. Apparently I was mistaken.

    Being "pro-life" means believing that every child born has a right to food, education, and access to health care.

    by Jilly W on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 11:45:47 AM PST

  •  Reid blocked a punch by McConnell with his face... (0+ / 0-)

    “The object in life is not to be on the side of the majority, but to escape finding oneself in the ranks of the insane.” — Marcus Aurelius

    by LamontCranston on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 12:37:18 PM PST

  •  These reforms might have been better than nothing (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    joanneleon

    but they're simply not good enough!  They are NOT what could have been achieved; are not what we progressives/mainstream Democrats had a right to expect.  These are reforms agreed to by a good old boys and girls club who are all too comfortable with the status quo.  Here's a prediction, one you can take to the bank. It won't be long before  Harry and company are complaining about Republican obstructionism and "not having the votes" to pass progressive legislation.

  •  Harry Reid (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    joanneleon

    puled the wool over the Dem base's eyes. This is now the third consecutive Congress which Reid has passed up the opportunity to reform the filibuster being abused by the GOP.

    Time to oust him and replace him as Senate Majority Leader. Three strikes and you're out, Sen. Reid. And don't bother running for re-election in 2016 - you deserve a primary challenge, and I hope you lose.

  •  BS (0+ / 0-)
    A Democratic leadership aide told TPM that “whether you wanted more or not, Reid got virtually everything he has said he wanted.” The aide pointed to examples of the majority leader saying his goal was to make the Senate operate more efficiently.
    If you read this site, you don't need me to list the ways.

    "Small Businesses Don't Build Levees" - Melissa Harris Perry

    by justmy2 on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 01:16:09 PM PST

  •  Got to keep that powder dry (0+ / 0-)

    "Small Businesses Don't Build Levees" - Melissa Harris Perry

    by justmy2 on Fri Jan 25, 2013 at 01:17:58 PM PST

Subscribe or Donate to support Daily Kos.

Click here for the mobile view of the site