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Rep. Kevin Brady (R-TX)
Rep. Kevin Brady, nihilist
Here's just what we needed, another wingnut elevated to a position of power in the House of Representatives. The new chair of the influential Health Subcommittee for the Ways and Means Committee, Rep. Kevin Brady (R-TX, of course), is guaranteeing that the fights for Medicare vouchers and killing Obamacare will continue.
[...] Brady says he’ll return to some ideas Democrats have outright rejected — including the premium support model Rep. Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) has famously advocated for. [...]

Earnestly leaning forward over a table in his Capitol Hill office, Brady ticked through his to-do list for the coming year.

First, he wants to ditch parts of the health care law. A handful of Democrats have already signed on to some of his suggestions, such as repealing the Independent Payment Advisory Board and the medical device tax. [...]

He also plans to spend time highlighting the law’s new regulations and how they’ll affect health providers, patients and employers.

And while he acknowledges the law won’t be repealed anytime soon, it’s clear he hasn’t let go of that hope for sometime down the road.

A truly earnest representative in his position might be focused on how to make the new law work as effectively as possible since it is, you know, the law of the land. The Supreme Court said so. But Brady, a former Chamber of Commerce executive, isn't likely to pursue an agenda that actually makes our health care system function better and more affordably for the consumer.

No, that would be socialism. Brady and his colleagues instead will insist on pursuing the agendas rejected by the nation in the 2012 election. Why? Because they can.

Originally posted to Joan McCarter on Thu Jan 31, 2013 at 07:52 AM PST.

Also republished by Daily Kos.

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Comment Preferences

  •  Tip Jar (21+ / 0-)

    "There’s class warfare, all right, but it’s my class, the rich class, that’s making war, and we’re winning." —Warren Buffett

    by Joan McCarter on Thu Jan 31, 2013 at 07:52:00 AM PST

  •  These guys just have no clue. (16+ / 0-)

    They have the best healthcare in the world as a member of congress.

    Their healthcare is affordable.

    They get their government paycheck whether they desrve it or not.

    Then, the small businesses who fight for their life to make ends meet during this Republican caused economic shit storm, can't get affordable healthcare to save their life (literally).  

    Now, we finally have ACA and they want to dismantle it.  To say they are ignorant is generous.

    "If the misery of the poor be caused not by the laws of nature, but by our institutions, great is our sin." Charles Darwin

    by Rockydog on Thu Jan 31, 2013 at 08:23:08 AM PST

    •  I agree. I would like to see the ACA subsidies (0+ / 0-)

      made a bit more substantial, though.

      $44,680 annual income is not a great deal of money if one has the sole responsibility for 'keeping up a household.'  Especially in urban and other high cost areas of the country.

      I believe that most of this talk from conservatives is bluster.  Kabuki Theater 'for their base.'   :-)

      Mollie

      "Only he who can see the invisible, can do the impossible." --Frank L. Gaines

      "If a dog won’t come to you after having looked you in the face, you should go home and examine your conscience.” -- Woodrow Wilson

      by musiccitymollie on Thu Jan 31, 2013 at 11:10:42 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  It depends on the size of your family. (0+ / 0-)

        The last I heard, subsidies are going to be available to those with income less than 400% of poverty. Poverty figures change according to household size.

        •  That is true, Happy. I will link to the chart for (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          DSPS owl, HappyinNM

          the 2012-2013 (thru June 30, 2013) Federal Poverty Level [FPL] table.

          Problem is, for 1 person or an individual, the 400% annual income cut off is just $44,680.

          So presumably, if one make $44,681 annual income--which isn't exactly a fortune, especially if you're the sole person responsible for all your household expenses and have a car payment--you will not be eligible for any federal subsidy.

          Obviously, the degree of any hardship depends partly on what part of the country one lives in.

          Here's the link to the FPL Table.

          Mollie

          "Only he who can see the invisible, can do the impossible." --Frank L. Gaines

          "If a dog won’t come to you after having looked you in the face, you should go home and examine your conscience.” -- Woodrow Wilson

          by musiccitymollie on Thu Jan 31, 2013 at 02:07:38 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

      •  just got word the grandkids are losing (4+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        pelagicray, HeyMikey, orlbucfan, DSPS owl

        their Medicaid.  State is going after deadbeat dads but the logic is that DSS sends a form to the dad for him to fill out so he can begin making restitution to DSS for the kids' healthcare.

        Problem: guy is deadbeat because he will not pay anything for the kids so why would he fill out the form?  If he ignores the form, then the kids lose healthcare but nothing happens to him.
        Take him to court and he disappears.  Once before he quit a well paying job to avoid payments and another time he moved out of state to avoid being served court papers.  So the state determines to solve this problem by cutting off the kids.  I hope ACA also addresses the problem of deadbeat dads in a substantive way

    •  They have a clue; they all have a clue (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      HappyinNM, HeyMikey

      Just watched Grassley trying to claim the spate of gun related incidents in the past month are tied to black on black violence.  Yep, the major problem with guns in America is that so many African Americans have them.  I guess if you limit that particular group, then incidents such as we have recently seen will not happen.

      Absurd? Of course but these guys rule by division and they make sure they keep theirs by making sure others don't get theirs.  The economy in their heads is a finite resource and if one person gets a piece of the pie, then there is less for others.

      Whether it is guns or healthcare, these guys all have a clue otherwise their legislation would not be so spot on for denying citizens their due and just desserts

    •  They're not ignorant. (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      HeyMikey, Mr MadAsHell

      They know exactly what they're doing, why and for whom.

      "In this world of sin and sorrow there is always something to be thankful for; as for me, I rejoice that I am not a Republican." - H. L. Mencken

      by SueDe on Thu Jan 31, 2013 at 01:27:02 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  They have no idea what it's like (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        DSPS owl

        to not have health insurance or not be able to afford health insurance.  They've always had it and/or always had the money to afford it.  They just don't know.  

        They've never had to worry about affording medical care.

        They don't know what they don't know.  That's what ignorance is.  

        "If the misery of the poor be caused not by the laws of nature, but by our institutions, great is our sin." Charles Darwin

        by Rockydog on Thu Jan 31, 2013 at 01:47:05 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  Thanks for this diary, Joan. While I certainly (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    denise b, cocinero, Krush, HeyMikey

    'have no use for' Rep Brady, it should be said that there are at least two "progressive Dems" who are in agreement with Brady, regarding the medical device surtax.

    They include Elizabeth Warren (MA) and Al Franken (MN).  Most of the other 14-15 Dem Senators (I've seen conflicting numbers) are corporatist or corporatist-leaning Dems, including Dem Leaders like Durbin and Schumer.

    Here's a link to the Washington Examiner piece entitled "Democrats Urge Delay For ‘Job-Killing’ Obamacare Tax."

    Here's an excerpt:

    Several of the senators, many of whom have medical device manufacturers in their states, have opposed the tax for a long time.  During the Obamacare debate, for example, Franken and Klobuchar were among a group of senators who successfully pushed to reduce the tax. (The device giant Medtronic is headquartered in Minnesota.)

    On Monday, Franken again expressed his opposition to the tax he voted for.  “I want to repeal the medical device tax altogether,” the senator and former comedian said in a statement.  “But I am concerned that we are running out of time before this job-killing tax goes into effect. So, for now, the best thing to do to ensure that this important industry continues to create jobs and producing life-saving devices is to delay this unwise tax.”  Franken and other want Reid to include a provision to delay the tax in the ongoing fiscal cliff negotiations.

    And here a link to the Forbes article on the same topic entitled "Repeal of the Medical-Device Tax Is Life-Saving Legislation."

    I'm going to try to find the link to a piece that I just received on Twitter days ago.  Apparently, one of the first of the medical device makers has sent out letters to their clients (heathcare providers) proclaiming that they will "pass on" the medical device surcharge tax (which in turn, traditionally has been passed on to the healthcare consumer by hospitals and other providers).

     

    Mollie

    "Only he who can see the invisible, can do the impossible." --Frank L. Gaines

    "If a dog won’t come to you after having looked you in the face, you should go home and examine your conscience.” -- Woodrow Wilson

    by musiccitymollie on Thu Jan 31, 2013 at 09:11:01 AM PST

  •  wy doesn't he just tell me the truth (4+ / 0-)

    I am old and busted up and of no more economic use, so I need to go ahead and die to make sure I don't consume those resources I helped to create

  •  Oh, I so wish Molly Ivins was still alive (4+ / 0-)

    she'd never let putzes like this get by with their shit.  

    I'd be shocked to see this on anything outside MSNBC, and then surprised to see it there.  Calling out these folks seems to scare the shit out of all the "access journalists".  The fact that this guy was a Chamber of Commerce executive ought to scare everyone, even those in his district who voted for him...he'll turn on them for his corporate masters faster than a dollar bill can drop to the floor.  

    A celibate clergy is an especially good idea, because it tends to suppress any hereditary propensity toward fanaticism. -Carl Sagan

    by jo fish on Thu Jan 31, 2013 at 01:14:13 PM PST

  •  obviously... (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    HeyMikey

    Obviously, he's auditioning to fill the spot Ms. Palin vacated on FOX.  

  •  Chamber of Commerce (0+ / 0-)

    sooo figures. They take donations from Multinational Corporations not Mom and Poppa Joe Sixpack with the corner market. It's just sickening who they keep running up the flagpole at us.

  •  I think the Repukes ought to start pushing (0+ / 0-)

    for vouchers right before the 2014 election. Yeah, that would be good.

  •  What is our strategy? action n/t (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    HeyMikey, musiccitymollie
  •  Once again we're discussing a tea party (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Erik the Red, HeyMikey, orlbucfan

    favorite from East Texas; his district is just north of Houston.  Things that crawl out of East Texas are always slimy and usually poisonous.  And just in case you might harbor hope that that his plans for health care are the extent of his bad plans, this from his website:

    Kevin is the chairman of the influential Health Subcommittee for the House Ways and Means Committee. As chairman, he will focus on ensuring a strong, free market in the nation's health care industry and look for ways to increase the quality of health care, while keeping costs low.

    As the second highest Republican on the Social Security Subcommittee, Kevin is fighting to preserve this important program for future generations once and for all.

    And as chairman of the Joint Economic Committee, he has been a GOP leader on economic issues – opposing the President’s stimulus and fighting White House efforts to raise taxes on families, small businesses and American energy producers.

    I'm really, really tired of apologizing for the awful politicians Texans send to D.C.

    "In this world of sin and sorrow there is always something to be thankful for; as for me, I rejoice that I am not a Republican." - H. L. Mencken

    by SueDe on Thu Jan 31, 2013 at 01:25:43 PM PST

  •  Ryan-Care is a dead issue (0+ / 0-)

    But Brady wishes to bring it back to life.

    Tea Party is like the Zombies, they just keep coming back.

  •  Not Exactly a Mystery (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    orlbucfan

    Mr. Brady's Healthcare is First Rate.

    Mr. Brady has Absolutely NO Reason to Worry about
    Anyone ELSE.

    Unless they Happen to Be a Corporate Lobbyist with
    a Fat Checkbook to Pay Mr. Brady a BRIBE.

    On Giving Advice: Smart People Don't Need It and Stupid People Don't Listen

    by Brian76239 on Thu Jan 31, 2013 at 01:38:19 PM PST

  •  this asshole has government run healthcare (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    DSPS owl

    if its good enough for him, its good enough for every American!

  •  The thing that I tend to forget about when I read (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    HeyMikey

    these ridiculous stories about ridiculous things Republicans are doing to thwart Obamacare is:

    OBAMACARE WAS THEIR IDEA!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    And that fact just makes them all the more ridiculous.

  •  Health of Health Care (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    HeyMikey, musiccitymollie

    The Republicans will chip away at the Affordable Health Care Act until it dies. What I can not understand is that they do not see how critical the condition of  the fee for service system is now. If the present rate of increase continues, the system will collapse. The only rational why to provide health care is a national single payer model. This will be paid by a tax that would be fair to all. The control on costs would be wage and price controls. The for profit system has failed.

  •  IPAB: only decent cost control on the horizon. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    skepticalcitizen
    First, he wants to ditch parts of the health care law. A handful of Democrats have already signed on to some of his suggestions, such as repealing the Independent Payment Advisory Board and the medical device tax.
    IPAB is the body that decides whether more expensive treatments are really more effective than cheaper treatments. If not, then IPAB recommends Medicare/Obamacare pay only for the cheaper treatment.

    Th IPAB approach is the only hope of reasonable healthcare cost control. The main problem with IPAB in Obamacare is that it doesn't get enough authority, fast enough. So, predictably, the GOP wants to kill it. I'm dismayed that any Dems would go along.

    And of course, as Krugman and others point out, Medicare spending growth is our main long-term budget problem, and it's mainly due to general growth in healthcare spending.

    And of course healthcare spending is a major driver of the drop in disposable income for most people. (Wages flat, healthcare costs up = less leftover to spend.)

    IPAB is one of the key good things about Obamacare. It's something we need to fight for.

    "The true strength of our nation comes not from the might of our arms or the scale of our wealth, but from the enduring power of our ideals." - Barack Obama

    by HeyMikey on Thu Jan 31, 2013 at 02:09:23 PM PST

    •  HeyMikey, I agree that rationing is necessary--it (0+ / 0-)

      is a part of almost all of the European health care models that are the envy of the world (France comes to mind).

      But I'm just a little bit circumpect about the IPAB, until I know just what procedures, tests, etc., that they do consider "best practices."

      I'm hoping for the best, and agree that (in principle) it is a necessity.

      The only reason I feel a "tad of reserve," is for the reason that I worry that HHS will be sufficiently vigilant in overseeing this Board (or maybe it's totally independent?--the ACA is not my forte, LOL!).  There may not be an agency that has oversight power over this new entity.  Not sure.

      My point being--I hope that the IPAB doesn't go overboard restricting tests, as a cost-saving measure.

      And I'm concerned that they may be able to get away with placing a lot of restrictions on medical procedures, since these decisions basically won't effect the PtB (I include in that category, our lawmakers, who for beans every month have access to military medical care, in addition to their medical insurance, and the wealthiest and most affluent Americans.)  

      These folks are, after all, the ones for whom most lobbyist groups work.

      For now, I just hope for the best.  But I'm following Kaiser Health News, hoping to ferret out a bit more info on the IPAB.

      [Got a little redundant and garbled.  Sorry.]

      Mollie

      "Only he who can see the invisible, can do the impossible." --Frank L. Gaines

      "If a dog won’t come to you after having looked you in the face, you should go home and examine your conscience.” -- Woodrow Wilson

      by musiccitymollie on Thu Jan 31, 2013 at 02:27:24 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  We already ration, BADLY. Rationing better a must. (0+ / 0-)

        Every time you hear somebody say we "can't afford" more healthcare, remember that's largely because a lot of the money we now spend on healthcare is wasted.

        Research now shows there many expensive tests, drugs, and procedures that, on average, do not result in better outcomes than cheaper alternatives.

        And there are many other cheap-vs.-expensive choices for which there is simply no research.

        If we're going to deny care to some people, isn't it a moral imperative to make damn sure that every dollar we spend on other people's care is at least well spent?

        ESSENTIAL reading:

        http://discovermagazine.com/...

        http://www.nytimes.com/...

        "The true strength of our nation comes not from the might of our arms or the scale of our wealth, but from the enduring power of our ideals." - Barack Obama

        by HeyMikey on Thu Jan 31, 2013 at 02:40:13 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Maybe you misunderstood my comment? I'm in (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          HeyMikey

          total agreement, in  principle, that we must ration.  And yes, we do so now, in the sense that some folks are "rationed out of the system." And that's absolutely unacceptable.

          Heck, I've spent my entire professional career fighting for these folks.

          Now, I will continue to read all available material regarding "best practices," as they apply to the ACA.  I guess you could call my approach (I truly hate quoting Reagan, of all people) "Trust, but verify."  Hopefully, the handful of healthcare advocacy organizations that exist, will be vigilant in doing so, also.  If they are, there will be nothing to worry about, IMO.

          And thanks for the links.  I'll add them to my library of links.  Please share anymore that you discover.

          I follow a couple of health economists, a couple of medical websites, and the Kaiser Health News website, as best my limited time allows.

          And thank you for bringing up this topic.  Folks need to 'get over their fear' of rationing healthcare.  It's here to stay.

          Mollie

          "Only he who can see the invisible, can do the impossible." --Frank L. Gaines

          "If a dog won’t come to you after having looked you in the face, you should go home and examine your conscience.” -- Woodrow Wilson

          by musiccitymollie on Thu Jan 31, 2013 at 02:59:03 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

    •  GOP-speak: IPAB=rationing=death panels (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      musiccitymollie, HeyMikey

      IPAB would appear to be a means to introduce evidence-based medicine as a scientific form of rationing.

      •  Exactly! (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        HeyMikey

        You nailed it.  "Evidence-based medicine is a "scientific form of rationing." (May I borrow that venacular?  Well put.)

        Now, this must be explained to the American people, so that "rationing" (and I mean just the basic standalone word) isn't a 'scary word.'

        Personally, I'm not afraid of it, since I've participated in a single-payer system.  

        By the same token, it doesn't mean that I won't follow up with my own research regarding the system of "Best Practices."

        Doing so is important, because in time, if and when a physician is suspected of "medical malpractice," if he/she has followed the sanctioned federal "best practices" guidelines, he/she will be 'held harmless' regardless of an adverse outcome for a patient.  And the patient will have no recourse to pursue monetary compensation.

        Thank you, skepticalcitizen.

        Mollie

        "Only he who can see the invisible, can do the impossible." --Frank L. Gaines

        "If a dog won’t come to you after having looked you in the face, you should go home and examine your conscience.” -- Woodrow Wilson

        by musiccitymollie on Thu Jan 31, 2013 at 04:28:29 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Nor should the patient. (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          musiccitymollie

          If the doctor follows best practices, there's no reason the patient should get monetary compensation, at least from the doctor.

          The patient may be eligible for disability. But that's a different story.

          "The true strength of our nation comes not from the might of our arms or the scale of our wealth, but from the enduring power of our ideals." - Barack Obama

          by HeyMikey on Thu Jan 31, 2013 at 07:34:07 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  I concur. But this ol' girl is still going (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            HeyMikey

            to watch the process--referring to the establishment of the 'evidence-based' Best Practices guidelines, LOL!

            Seriously, we all have a vested interest in seeing that the appropriate guidelines are set.  All the more, if we have either no (or it might just be limited, after I thought about it) recourse in the case of suspected medical malpractice.

            After all, if carried out competently, the process should be able to bear up to scrutiny.  :-)

            Mollie

            "Only he who can see the invisible, can do the impossible." --Frank L. Gaines

            "If a dog won’t come to you after having looked you in the face, you should go home and examine your conscience.” -- Woodrow Wilson

            by musiccitymollie on Thu Jan 31, 2013 at 08:05:03 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

  •  "We'll make our own reality" was what one (0+ / 0-)

    Bush staffer supposedly said. It appears to have infected all Republicans.

    "I smoke. If this bothers anyone, I suggest you look around at the world in which we live and shut your fuckin' mouth." --- Bill Hicks

    by voroki on Thu Jan 31, 2013 at 02:16:46 PM PST

  •  Fox ... henhouse. (0+ / 0-)

    Republicans are so incredibly shameless!

    Private health insurance: a protection racket without the protection.

    by rustypatina on Thu Jan 31, 2013 at 02:50:51 PM PST

  •  goes both ways. (0+ / 0-)

    "to make the new law work as effectively as possible since it is, you know, the law of the land."

    I don't have the space nor time to list all the laws pertaining to gun control that, ya know, no one seems to want to enforce.

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