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"Not even a gun range had enough good guys with a gun to stop one bad guy with a gun", who before that trigger was pulled for that first shot was considered a 'good guy', but troubled by his war experiences as it's reported his mom sought out help for him, as another brother veteran and from these two conflicts!

After the Country ignored for some forty years, as well as that before and since, until these two present wars of choice and it took a number of years into both to start recognizing the obvious, abandoning the main missions for even sending troops into that region with cheers as the drums beat pointing at Iraq making the missions no more about 9/11, it finally can't be.

Thing is the country, especially the so called journalism profession and those that think they are in same, still tries real hard to do so, including that which exists in the civilian populations, though drama's and even movies have started using in the story lines, as PTS is not only a war theater american soldier/sailor issue, extreme traumatic experiences grab civilians as well who are and have been wrongly diagnosed, as have been the war PTS, forever.


Why ignored? Because the country loves cheering on wars and flag waving that patriotism but really can't stand paying for the results of!

These two present conflicts, one officially over one winding down as those sent try and accomplish at least a tiny fraction of the original missions and promises from this country, proved that out even more then the decades and wars of before as no one has Sacrificed not only to pay for both but especially the long term results of, but those serving and sent their families and those joining our military veterans ranks, but at least it's now extremely hard to ignore, no matter how hard the population tries, including that in the civilian populations!

Former Navy SEAL Chris Kyle' Killing Puts Spotlight on PTSD
Feb. 3, 2013 - The shooting death of former Navy SEAL Chris Kyle, an advocate for veterans' mental health, has pushed the problem of post-traumatic stress disorder among American troops to the fore.

Kyle, who was known as America's deadliest sniper, was killed Saturday at a gun range in Erath County, Texas. The suspect, identified by police as 25-year-old Eddie Ray Routh, is a veteran who served in Iraq and Haiti and who police say may have been suffering from some type of mental illness from being in the military.

A second man, identified by police as 35-year-old Chad Littlefield, was also shot at point-blank range and killed. Kyle and Littlefield had taken Routh to the shooting range to aid his recovery, police said.

"My heart is breaking," Travis Cox, director of FITCO Cares, the non-profit foundation Kyle co-founded to help ease veterans back into civilian life, said in a statement. "Chris died doing what he filled his heart with passion -- serving soldiers struggling with the fight to overcome PTSD. His service, life and premature death will never be in vain."

Routh will be charged with two counts of capital murder, police said today. read more>>>

This younger brother veteran Kyle was NOT helping those veterans with, Not on a firing range, self medicating and most legal prescription drugs givin don't work neither they make it worse, and certainly not with the modern weapons one step away from military combat weapons, and that's a very small step that some are converted to illegally in the private sector. He had joined his own nightmares, like a mercenary does, and was extending that in the guise of therapy for others in his self promoting ideology of the best of the best war theater military sniper Ever, snipers don't meet their targets directly even in war, proved out by dying by the gun and shot by another young war veteran he made worse by that so called 'therapy', Kyles own individual coping with!!

Originally posted to DKos Military Veterans on Mon Feb 04, 2013 at 04:51 AM PST.

Also republished by Shut Down the NRA.

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Comment Preferences

  •  Tip Jar (17+ / 0-)

    Vets On FLOTUS and SLOTUS, "Best - Ever": "We haven't had this kind of visibility from the White House—ever." Joyce Raezer - Dec. 30, 2011

    by jimstaro on Mon Feb 04, 2013 at 04:51:00 AM PST

  •  Good diary (10+ / 0-)

    You've got a couple of massively tangled sentences right out of the chute here that really tripped me up, but I pressed on because I think the kernel of your idea is an important one. It's an approach to the story from an angle that isn't getting a lot of attention (yet).

    It would interest me to know more about what you think should be done wrt to the treatment of PTSD. What therapies are proving worthwhile?

    By the way, this

    He had joined his own nightmares, like a mercenary does, and was extending that in the guise of therapy for others in his self promoting ideology of the best of the best war theater military sniper Ever
    is a very evocative sentence. Good job.

    .

    God bless our tinfoil hearts.

    by aitchdee on Mon Feb 04, 2013 at 05:31:34 AM PST

  •  A Lot Of These Men Who Go Into The Army (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    hnichols

    have some kind of mental disorder already.  The Army takes just about anyone.  When these men get into the Army they don't get any help at all.  If they did the Army would label them as nuts and throw them out, so they never get medication for their disorders.  By the time they get out they are so bad off that these men end up going to the ER and getting drugs for pain which ends up getting them addicted and becoming drug addicts.  The Army, Navy and AF need to start helping these men when they are in the military and not just throw them away.

    "Don't Let Them Catch You With Your Eyes Closed"

    by rssrai on Mon Feb 04, 2013 at 05:31:43 AM PST

  •  Why isn't the VA helping with PTSD? (9+ / 0-)


    That was a question on FB from one of my friends after posting the article, followed by this:

    Isn't that their job?
    So before another asks a similar let me post my responses to my friend:
    Why isn't the Country Sacrificing, a decade plus now added to the previous decades and wars of, Should Be Your Question as it's their responsibility to pay for wars and the results of and they ignored us for over forty years as to what always has been!!! Don't blame the VA, they actually are and have been while being grossly under funded, that's the easy way out for the Citizens in the Society!!
    Off to an appointment at the VA, finally updated my VA card gotten years ago at another I used for substance abuse counseling after a DWI, actually had a couple but stopped drinking years back now. Also getting tests, coming back positive for pretty good health surprisingly at 64 and a long time smoker among other not so healthy lifestyles like food, on the record for anything that might relate to 'Agent Orange', another issue long ignored. Plus a few other reasons to place myself back in the system at my age now.

    So be back later.

    Vets On FLOTUS and SLOTUS, "Best - Ever": "We haven't had this kind of visibility from the White House—ever." Joyce Raezer - Dec. 30, 2011

    by jimstaro on Mon Feb 04, 2013 at 06:16:44 AM PST

  •  The kidnapper/murderer in Alabama is (6+ / 0-)

    being labeled as a decorated PTSD Vietnam vet by the media...

    Government records and interviews with neighbors indicate that Dykes grew up in the Dothan area and joined the Navy in Midland City, serving on active duty from 1964 to 1969. His record shows several awards, including the Vietnam Service Medal and the Good Conduct Medal. During his service, Dykes was trained in aviation maintenance. Fox News
    His awards are basic ribbons for being there and do not indicate combat.

    There are some who exaggerate their experience in Vietnam and blame their mental condition on war experiences when in fact, they are just fucked up individuals.

    The media should not report this based on "interviews with neighbors".

    We all stand submissively before the global ATM machine network like trained chickens pecking the correct colored buttons to release our grains of corn. Joe Bageant

    by Zwoof on Mon Feb 04, 2013 at 06:34:23 AM PST

    •  Respectfully, there are some folks... (6+ / 0-)

      who don't have their combat service properly notated on their awards.

      Not saying that he definitely IS, but I'm not going to assume he's lying about combat experience until it's definitively proven.  There's too many folks who have had their service disrespected, IMHO.

      I don't blame Christians. I blame Stupid. Which sadly is a much more popular religion these days.

      by detroitmechworks on Mon Feb 04, 2013 at 06:45:06 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  If those were his most notable decorations (6+ / 0-)

        he did no combat time. Thats not to say rear area time can't be dangerous..
        I'm going to assumehe wasn't in combat untill I see some thing different.
        I don't give people the "benefit of the doubt" (???) bout being in combat with such a meager showing. If a Marine doesn't have a Combat Action ribbon, you can assume he was not in combat.
        If its found out he's an exception to back, I'll change my mind

        Happy just to be alive

        by exlrrp on Mon Feb 04, 2013 at 06:55:53 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Its no disrespect to to assume (4+ / 0-)

          Someone didn't serve in combat if he has nothing to prove it in his record.
          Its a logical conclusion

          Happy just to be alive

          by exlrrp on Mon Feb 04, 2013 at 06:58:17 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  I hear you... respectfully disagree... (8+ / 0-)

            Of course this is coming from somebody who fought in the current wars and has my highest decoration as an Army Commendation Medal.

            I didn't get my Purple Heart because I was "Breaking Regulations" at the time I got hit.  (Wasn't wearing my DAPS)  I was told to essentially choose between a CAB plus Purple Heart, or No Article 15.

            I do understand Vietnam was a different war.  (My father served as a Teletype Yeoman for the Navy and spent almost his whole time in an apartment in the Philippines.)

            I don't blame Christians. I blame Stupid. Which sadly is a much more popular religion these days.

            by detroitmechworks on Mon Feb 04, 2013 at 07:07:22 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  Rear echelon troops saw action in Vietnam (7+ / 0-)

              and it is possible to have witnessed an event that led to a PTSD rating. I am just saying that the media should not imply that being a Vietnam vet and suffering from PTSD are related. He  could be a vet, but he could be lying "to neighbors" about PTSD since this is not public information. Or, he could suffer from PTSD from a civilian event such as an accident.

              We all stand submissively before the global ATM machine network like trained chickens pecking the correct colored buttons to release our grains of corn. Joe Bageant

              by Zwoof on Mon Feb 04, 2013 at 07:17:31 AM PST

              [ Parent ]

            •  Everybody has their anecdotes (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              Over the Edge, detroitmechworks

              And I'm not disagreeing with what you say, Because it doesn't contradict what I say.
              If someone does not have a CMB, a CIB, a CAR, or equivalent, ALL the combat veterans I know would conclude you were not in combat. If you provide stories they may change that.
              thats what they give CARS and CIBs for--to designate those who served in combat from those who didn't. And thats why they keep records---to determine later who did and didn't do what. I'm the first to say records aren't awayd reliable but veterans memories aren't always reliable either.
              thats what the VA uses as the first cut to determine if you were in combat. if you don't have that but have  a convincing story they'll probably accept that. (or not)
              Plenty of people saw  combat with no CIB, etc. but you don't even need combat experience to get paid for PTSD, I know someone who got a 50% rating from watching a barracks fight.
              My lrrp platoon leader was hit by M60 bullet at a firing range in Vietnam and he didn't get a purple heart. And i know a cook who got a purple heart when his stove blew up.
              The awards and decorations were and probably are a corrupt system, heavily weighted towards officers. John Kerry wouldn't have gotten bupkes for what he did if he was in the 101st. Like blowing away that one guy. that was just business in the 101st, if you didn't do that you would have gotten talked to

              here's something else i can tell you from 4+ decades of dealing with vets: EVRYBODY thinks he didn't get the awards he earned, so just consider you donated all  those unaknowledged good moves

              Happy just to be alive

              by exlrrp on Mon Feb 04, 2013 at 05:48:13 PM PST

              [ Parent ]

        •  That's a bit of tricky subject, ex- (8+ / 0-)

          regarding the CAR. First, as I read the quoted article he "was trained in aviation maintenance." i.e., he wasnt a grunt. Nevertheless, if he was on an airbase in RVN he certainly experienced no small amount of mortar and rocket fire. Perhaps even served as perimeter security and personally faced the periodic intruders.

          The relevant criterion

          (2) The principal eligibility criterion is that the individual must have participated in a bona fide ground or surface combat fire-fight or action during which he/she was under enemy fire and his/her performance while under fire was satisfactory. Service in a combat area does not automatically entitle a service member to the CAR. The following amplifying remarks are furnished as guidance.
          Finally, it depends on when he served in country. The CAR wasn't authorized until February '69. My first tour was over in early '66, the second in early '67. To be retroactively awarded the CAR I'd have to present the evidence that I drew combat pay in the earliest days when we had to be actually "exposed to enemy fire" on five days each month to get that $65.

          “Perhaps the most 'spiritual' thing any of us can do is simply to look through our own eyes, see with eyes of wholeness, and act with integrity and kindness.” Jon Kabat-Zinn

          by DaNang65 on Mon Feb 04, 2013 at 07:13:03 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  Is the CAR the same as the Army CIB? (3+ / 0-)

            In the Army you had to have an 11Bravo MOS to qualify. For example, if a company clerk fought in a ground attack and saved the day, he was not eligible for the CIB.

            We all stand submissively before the global ATM machine network like trained chickens pecking the correct colored buttons to release our grains of corn. Joe Bageant

            by Zwoof on Mon Feb 04, 2013 at 07:20:50 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

          •  Thats an assumption (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            DaNang65
            Nevertheless, if he was on an airbase in RVN he certainly experienced no small amount of mortar and rocket fire.
            Lotss of airbases and every other kind of bases took little or no mortaring. No, just being on an airbase was  not enough to prove combat, not even mortaring or rocketing. if not, Martha Raye would have had 95 CIBs.

            Anyone with a helicopter maintenance MOS would have a hard time proving he deserved a combat award. not just to me and evry other vet with a CIB but to the Army also.

            And besides---I don't consider my CIB for the ttimes I got shot at as much as for all the nights I dug and slept in a muddy hole with diarheea, all the day I ate C rations in the rain, all the nights I stood guard after humping 8-10 hrs
            .
            you got no record like that, you didn't see much infantry combat in Vietnam, don't tell me your hard luck combat stories, I probably won't appreciate tham

            Happy just to be alive

            by exlrrp on Mon Feb 04, 2013 at 06:23:32 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  A bit of assumption, a bit of personal knowledge. (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              exlrrp

              Elsewhere in the thread his unit, VQ 1, a Navy Electronics Countermeasures Squadron, was cited. I checked into VQ 1's history and they were aboard Da Nang Airfield from December '65 until November '67.

              From personal knowledge the Da Nang airfield took at least a few mortar rounds practically every night during the Winter of '65-'66, and took at least one serious 122 mm rocket attack in the Spring of '67 when I passed through there on my way home.

              Those guys were getting blown up pretty regularly.

              Which is not exactly the same thing as having been in the kind of 'combat' where you actually see an enemy, or even get to shoot back at them. But it is combat.

              “Perhaps the most 'spiritual' thing any of us can do is simply to look through our own eyes, see with eyes of wholeness, and act with integrity and kindness.” Jon Kabat-Zinn

              by DaNang65 on Mon Feb 04, 2013 at 10:21:51 PM PST

              [ Parent ]

              •  Is it combat? (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                DaNang65

                Is it combat when you aren't engaged or equipped to do something about it and don't?  More like a tornado hitting.

                You can say its worthy of a PTSD rating and may be right but not many combat vets actually call that combat.

                Its not at all like sticking your muzzle out front and going in to kill someone, hoping God woke up on your side that morning.

                Happy just to be alive

                by exlrrp on Tue Feb 05, 2013 at 07:00:02 AM PST

                [ Parent ]

        •  exlrrp: might depend on *where* he was (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          jimstaro, exlrrp

          I've got a buddy whose service was in places we were officially NOT, during the 'Nam. His "good conduct" ribbons are from Utapao.

          LBJ, Lady Bird, Anne Richards, Barbara Jordan, Sully Sullenberger, Ike, Drew Brees, Molly Ivins --Texas is no Bush league! -7.50,-5.59

          by BlackSheep1 on Mon Feb 04, 2013 at 09:41:03 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  Also depends on his MOS (0+ / 0-)

            You can be all over, fighting America's enemies on every front but if you don't have a combat MOS youre not going to get a combat badge like a CIB, CMB, or CAR.
            And if you don't have a CIB, CAR or euivalent youre going to have a hard time convincing he people who do that you saw combat. Not impossible but you better have agood story with some good backup.

            remember: EVERYBODY remembers things in their own favor, its human nature.  and NOBODY thinks he got all the medals he deserved.

            the awards to look for are, from bottom to top, are: Army Commendation and Bronze Star with V, Silver Star, Distinguished Service Cross/Navy Cross/ Air Force Cross, and Congressional Medal of Honor
            the V stands for Valor---you can get an Arcom, Bronze Star or Silver Star for meritorious: this may be anything from being Soldier of th Month to running an efficent mess hall. If you got a meritorious medal it meant someone liked you and the person had juice.

            You may get any of those medals for bravery for any individual action in any MOS.

            Good Conduct medals don't mean that much, its an administrative award. We used to call them Secret Decoder Rings For Assholes but we weren't career.
            If a person doesn't have a medal for bravery, its not impresive but that may be sour grapes from someone who didn't get any either (got the CIB)
            Most veterans are like me: I wasn't all that brave but I was all that deperate. the times I was brave not enough people saw me do it, and the ones that did had bertter things to do than get me a medal, so Sin Loy, motherfjucker, as the saying went

            Happy just to be alive

            by exlrrp on Mon Feb 04, 2013 at 06:14:26 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

    •  A fuller picture of the Alabama vet's service (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Catte Nappe, jimstaro, BlackSheep1, Zwoof
      The following is biographical data on Jimmy Lee Dykes provided by the U. S. Navy:

      Name: Jimmy Lee Dykes

      Age: 65

      Home of Record: Midland City, AL

      Date Enlisted: October 8, 1964

      Date Discharged: January 10, 1969

      Rank/Rating: Aviation Maintenance Administrationman Third Class – AZ3

      Date of Rank: October 16, 1967

      Duty Station:

      Naval Station Treasure Island, CA  10Jan69
      Fleet Reconnaissance Squadron (VQ) 1, Atsugi, Japan

      Awards and Decorations

      Navy Unit Commendation
      Meritorious Unit Commendation
      Good Conduct Medal
      National Defense Service Medal
      Vietnam Service Medal

      WFSA

      Thought I'd drop the info here for folks to consider, if so inclined.
      •  Thanks for that. (4+ / 0-)

        Between his rate, AZ3, and a quick reading of VQ 1 (his unit)'s history, he most likely served as a clerk at the Da Nang airfield sometime between December of '65 and November '67.

        Things often got pretty hairy around there then, but mostly from "incoming." As a Navy Aviation Maintenance Adminstrationman it's highly unlikely he ever saw a VC after dark, or a PAVN in uniform.

        “Perhaps the most 'spiritual' thing any of us can do is simply to look through our own eyes, see with eyes of wholeness, and act with integrity and kindness.” Jon Kabat-Zinn

        by DaNang65 on Mon Feb 04, 2013 at 07:40:46 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

    •  I went over the linked article a couple of times. (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      jimstaro

      I didn't see PTSD mentioned anywhere. Are my eyes lying to me again?

      “Perhaps the most 'spiritual' thing any of us can do is simply to look through our own eyes, see with eyes of wholeness, and act with integrity and kindness.” Jon Kabat-Zinn

      by DaNang65 on Mon Feb 04, 2013 at 07:26:24 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  What is sad about this is that the very people who (9+ / 0-)

    ... are now claiming that Kyle's murder was some sort of nefarious, left-wing, anti-gun plot are part of the same party/conservative mentality that relentlessly cut VA programs and services to returning vets.

    All of this faux patriotism and rah-rahing of the military by conservatives was for show. The reality was that the Bush administration and even the current Republican-controlled House does not want to fund the VA to the extent the agency needs funding.

    Oh, they love funding the military. Because, after all, that money goes to their pals in the defense industry. But the VA? After the fact for conservatives. And they can't make money off it. So who gives a shit?

    On top of that, the VA is stuck in the 1950s in terms of technology. Their record keeping is atrocious. The backlog in PTSD cases is inexcusable. They are short staff and their organization is a mess.

    Change is not happening near fast enough at the VA. It is a slow-moving, lumbering bureaucracy that is in desperate need of a major overhaul.

    •  Funding mental health (6+ / 0-)

      Let's be honest.  Conservatives don't believe in mental health services. That's why they defund it at every level of government for every type of person.
      They "believe" that praying solves these problem because the devil caused it.  Many modern problems are caused by this.
      Homelessness, drug abuse, PTSD, and yes mass murder by guns.  Time to face up to the problem. This has been going on for over fifty years. The GOP ran the government for years and did nothing.

      One must ask: why do conservatives hate military people.  They love the military because of huge profits.  They hate the people because they cost money and are expendable.

    •  VA is stuck in the 1950s in terms of technology (8+ / 0-)

      They have one of the best Electronic Health Record systems, VistA.

      The Veterans Health Information Systems and Technology Architecture (VistA) is an enterprise-wide information system built around an Electronic Health Record (EHR), used throughout the United States Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) medical system, known as the Veterans Health Administration (VHA).[1] It consists of nearly 160 integrated software modules for clinical care, financial functions, and infrastructure.

      The VHA manages the largest medical system in the United States,[2] providing care to over 8 million veterans, employing 180,000 medical personnel and operating 163 hospitals, over 800 clinics, and 135 nursing homes throughoughout the continental U.S., Alaska, and Hawaii on a single electronic healthcare information network.[3] Nearly 25% of the nation's population is potentially eligible for VA benefits and services because they are veterans, family members, or survivors of veterans.[4]

      Over 60% of all physicians trained in the U.S. rotate through the VHA on clinical electives, making VistA the most familiar and widely used EHR in the U.S. Nearly half of all U.S. hospitals that have a complete (inpatient/outpatient) enterprise-wide implementation of an EHR are VA hospitals using VistA

      ~

      For its development of VistA, the United States Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) / Veterans Health Administration (VHA) was named the recipient of the prestigious Innovations in American Government Award presented by the Ash Institute of the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University in July, 2006. The VistA electronic medical records system is estimated to improve efficiency by 6% per year, and the monthly cost of the EHR is offset by eliminating the cost of even a few unnecessary tests or admissions.

      And it is Open Source.
      The VistA system is public domain software, available through the Freedom Of Information Act directly from the VA website[15] or through a growing network of distributors.

      Help me to be the best Wavy Gravy I can muster

      by BOHICA on Mon Feb 04, 2013 at 07:33:30 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Does it work? (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        BOHICA, aitchdee, jimstaro

        From what I hear from people working on it, it not at all that functional, though they are currently working hard to improve it.

        •  Every time I've been in (8+ / 0-)

          They have all my stuff up to date and it interfaces with MyHealtyVet, where I can log in and download all my records.

          Help me to be the best Wavy Gravy I can muster

          by BOHICA on Mon Feb 04, 2013 at 07:39:47 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  That's a big step up from where they were just (4+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            BOHICA, Ginny in CO, aitchdee, jimstaro

            ... a couple of years ago.

            There are many great people at the VA, but even a few years ago, they still kept some records on index cards!

            •  You might want to check out one of Secretary (9+ / 0-)

              Shinseki's best hires, Tracy Gaudet, M.D. as an example of where today's VA actually is. Consider her job title and its implications. I've met her, she's all that and more.

              The VistA system BOHICA discusses above is the open source standard for large scale health care, developed by and for the VA and presented as a gift to any who want it.

              “Perhaps the most 'spiritual' thing any of us can do is simply to look through our own eyes, see with eyes of wholeness, and act with integrity and kindness.” Jon Kabat-Zinn

              by DaNang65 on Mon Feb 04, 2013 at 07:48:42 AM PST

              [ Parent ]

              •  Thanks. (4+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                DaNang65, BOHICA, aitchdee, jimstaro

                I know Shinseki is making big changes for the better. Has the backlog for PTSD treatment eased?

                •  I suppose that mostly depends on what VAMC (6+ / 0-)

                  one goes to. Here in Tucson, for example, we have several outstanding PTSD programs (I've personally done most of them), including an inpatient unit and an extensive network of PTSD therapies that have modest waiting lists, a month or two at most. The VA sponsors an on site peer support group. They just built an addition onto the Mental Health building (it's just about to open any day) that about doubles the existing Mental Health building, itself only a few years old, after the programs outgrowing their space in the main hospital.

                  From my understanding Bay Pines VAMC in Florida is another bright in the VA PTSD and MST (Military Sexual Trauma) galaxy. There's lots more.

                  I work with a not-for-profit that offers what I believe is the most effective PTSD treatment available, Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) to veterans at no charge. We get many referrals from VA practitioners, and there is a VA counterpart program here as well.

                  “Perhaps the most 'spiritual' thing any of us can do is simply to look through our own eyes, see with eyes of wholeness, and act with integrity and kindness.” Jon Kabat-Zinn

                  by DaNang65 on Mon Feb 04, 2013 at 08:07:45 AM PST

                  [ Parent ]

            •   New health record program roll outs (3+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              Bob Johnson, jimstaro, DaNang65

              are notorious for dragging on. I've been in 4. One I had to stop the agency using the scheduling section and go back to paper because we were missing home care visits for all disciplines. (This would be like not assigning a nurse to an inpatient for 24 hours, and worse.) Health care has had some of the worst programming for decades because the for profit system would not invest the money.

              The VA system development was unique because of the number of people who were health care professionals who also had programming experience. From what I've heard, most people who are used to for profit systems are impressed with the VA program.

              There are some things that are very convenient and are more cumbersome to do on a computer. Hence the trouble getting the index cards transitioned.

              "People, even more than things, have to be restored, renewed, revived, reclaimed and redeemed; never throw out anyone. " Audrey Hepburn "A Beautiful Woman"

              by Ginny in CO on Mon Feb 04, 2013 at 09:04:02 AM PST

              [ Parent ]

          •  That's been my experience too, but then the VAMC (3+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            DaNang65, BOHICA, jimstaro

            down in Big Spring was pretty good back when I lived there.

            Good enough, in fact, I gave up the $180-every-two-weeks company health insurance, and started going to what is now the West Texas VAMC exclusively. $2-per-Rx co-pays (including all the Mylanta I could drink) were nothing to sneeze at, for a single parent of two kids working for a newspaper.

            LBJ, Lady Bird, Anne Richards, Barbara Jordan, Sully Sullenberger, Ike, Drew Brees, Molly Ivins --Texas is no Bush league! -7.50,-5.59

            by BlackSheep1 on Mon Feb 04, 2013 at 09:49:09 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

      •  Became (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        DaNang65, Over the Edge

        A cause advocate and activist as soon as getting out and my last year in 'Nam after realizing a couple of years previous that for photo ops on Vietnam issues, those paid attention to thus to few, they were taking what had been given to the Korean vets to pay for us.

        And deficits mean that programs are under funded, especially the VA as we continue having wars of choice as well as other actions involving the military like the long running Colombian drug interdiction actions and now people are surprised about the new reports that the military are getting more involved in the Mexican etc. same drug issues, folks been goin on for decades. With these two wars there were two tax cuts, huge for the wealthy, the rest went out the exhaust pipes quickly as gas rose rapidly, all along with the beginning of both.

        Nobody in this Country is Sacrificing A Thing except those serving, their families and the veterans from, but will add another 'except', those who've started or volunteer etc. for the many organizations dedicated to filling a need, and not to feed off the donations, and are successful in what they do but they have to fight constantly for donations with very few getting grants and even fewer absorbed into collaboration with the agency to aid the vets.

        Vets On FLOTUS and SLOTUS, "Best - Ever": "We haven't had this kind of visibility from the White House—ever." Joyce Raezer - Dec. 30, 2011

        by jimstaro on Mon Feb 04, 2013 at 09:36:35 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

    •  AMENS!!!! n/t (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      DaNang65

      Vets On FLOTUS and SLOTUS, "Best - Ever": "We haven't had this kind of visibility from the White House—ever." Joyce Raezer - Dec. 30, 2011

      by jimstaro on Mon Feb 04, 2013 at 09:25:40 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  It's a potentially damaging spotlight (0+ / 0-)

    It reinforces the stereotype that everyone with PTSD is a bomb waiting to go off, as opposed to being emotionally numb and disabled. It might even discourage people to seek treatment if they knew they were going to be treated as if they were going to commit a double murder at any instant.

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