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You'd think after two hundred years (including some awkward Constitution-patching, here and there) we would finally have this "voting" thing down. Nope:
A Massachusetts Institute of Technology analysis determined that blacks and Hispanics waited nearly twice as long in line to vote on average than whites. Florida had the nation’s longest lines, at 45 minutes, followed by the District of Columbia, Maryland, South Carolina and Virginia, according to Charles Stewart III, the political science professor who conducted the analysis.
So, is that a problem? Obama, to his credit, has actually opined that it is, and opined further that we need to do something about it. Republicans, however, don't want to be all hasty about these things. Let's not (literally) make a federal case about this, right?
[G]etting anything passed without Republican support will be impossible, Democrats acknowledge. And so far, conservatives have complained that Democrats are politicizing an issue that should be handled by the states, not the federal government.

“It’s ridiculous to stand in line a couple of hours to vote,” said Senator Charles E. Grassley of Iowa, the senior Republican on the Senate Judiciary Committee. “But I think it’s also ridiculous to make a political issue out of it when it’s very easily handled.”

Well, here's the problem with that. Let's go below the fold for this one:

The governments of the states in question (and other states with strong rural-urban voting disparities, like effing Ohio, the Florida of the midwest) don't necessarily think it's a problem if certain people have to wait a long, long time to vote and others don't. It may be "very easily handled", as Grassley says, but that only further highlights how very, very invested certain groups are in conspicuously not fixing it. In states like Virginia, in fact, they're still trying their level best to make sure certain people don't have to wait in long lines to vote by making sure certain people aren't allowed to vote at all. Newly passed legislation would:

eliminate the use of a utility bill, pay stub, bank statement, government check and Social Security card as acceptable identification that can be presented at the polls. Voters would still be able to use a voter identification card, concealed handgun permit, driver's license and student ID card.
Well, so long as you're still taking concealed handgun permits.

Since most of those now-banned documents are still perfectly acceptable for obtaining "real" ID's, like drivers licenses, the possibilities for thwarting rampant voting fraud are approximately nil. The only substantive outcome is to make it ever more inconvenient for certain people (i.e. poor, elderly, and those that don't have cars, those city-living bastards) to vote. If that doesn't work to discourage certain people, Virginia has created newly gerrymandered districts; if even that doesn't stop people from unauthorized vote-having, Virginia has contemplated a plan to give more electoral sway to rural areas just because they deserve it. The only thing left is for the state to take out billboard space demanding that minority voters not vote at all, and at this rate we'll be getting there sooner rather than later.

So yes, it would appear that federal action is required in order to solve a problem as apparently simple as states incompetently allocating voting machines. I don't think it'll require sending in the National Guard or anything, but it may require the federal government taking a good, long look at whether certain states are screwing their minority populations accidentally, or deliberately.

Originally posted to Daily Kos on Wed Feb 06, 2013 at 06:30 AM PST.

Also republished by Virginia Kos.

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Comment Preferences

  •  ACCIDENTALLY??????!!!??? (11+ / 0-)

    AHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHHAAHAHAHAHHAHAHAHAAHAHHAAHAHHAAHAHAHAAAAAA
    (deep breath)
    AHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHHAHAHAAAA

    Buy Aldus Shrugged : The Antidote to Ayn Rand, and tear Ayn and the GOP new orifices. ALL ROYALTIES BETWEEN NOW AND MARCH 1, DONATED TO THIS SITE, DAILYKOS!! @floydbluealdus1

    by Floyd Blue on Wed Feb 06, 2013 at 06:39:27 AM PST

  •  republican reaction: twice is not enough (7+ / 0-)

    Howard Fineman needs to have a chat with Chris Cilizza about Grecian Formula and its effects on punditry

    by memofromturner on Wed Feb 06, 2013 at 06:40:48 AM PST

  •  so if their votes only count 3/5 as much, (12+ / 0-)

    it all evens out!

    What we call god is merely a living creature with superior technology & understanding. If their fragile egos demand prayer, they lose that superiority.

    by agnostic on Wed Feb 06, 2013 at 06:41:06 AM PST

  •  Yeah, kind of interesting, but ... (0+ / 0-)

    Aren't most elections run locally?
    Aren't most of those places controlled by Democrats?

    I know Chicago is.
    Pretty sure New York (mayor notwithstanding) in.
    And Los Angeles, etc.

    Wouldn't that mean that the people most instrumental to causing the delays are Democrats, not Republicans?

    LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

    by dinotrac on Wed Feb 06, 2013 at 06:47:04 AM PST

    •  Not there (8+ / 0-)

      There were not systematic and notable delays in Chicago, New York, and Los Angeles.

    •  Actually not true (11+ / 0-)

      Yes, elections are run by the STATES on a statewide basis - not cities and counties, and in those locales where there were delays and long lines, the Republicans controlled the state legislatures and the elections.  You should learn something about the structure of government and the delegation of authority therein before posting here.  This is not Drudge or Breitbart.com

    •  Do try again (9+ / 0-)

      Voting machines are generally allocated by the Secretary of State.

      The drawing of precincts is not local.

      Economics is a social *science*. Can we base future economic decisions on math?

      by blue aardvark on Wed Feb 06, 2013 at 07:04:33 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Thanks for the clarification, but it seems like (0+ / 0-)

        you guys need to learn a thing or two.

        Here in Illinois, at least, county clerks and local officials are heavily involved in running the elections.  That includes getting and dispersing election officials, making sure the polling places open on time with voting booths ready to go, etc.

        Of course, this is a partisan site, so truth is the second priority.

        LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

        by dinotrac on Wed Feb 06, 2013 at 07:21:48 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Do try again (7+ / 0-)

          A systematic difference does not occur in some states, but not in others, without someone doing things differently.

          The states where the systematic differences are most pronounced are those run by Republicans.

          That truth seems to have eluded you, presumably for partisan reasons.

          Economics is a social *science*. Can we base future economic decisions on math?

          by blue aardvark on Wed Feb 06, 2013 at 07:30:10 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  For every season...spin, spin, spin (0+ / 0-)

            Doubly appropriate --

            Exercise your propaganda muscles and send Diogenes a twirlin' in his grave.

            LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

            by dinotrac on Wed Feb 06, 2013 at 07:37:24 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  You sound quite a bit like some of the Fox (3+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              cybersaur, I love OCD, ewmorr

              News fans I know. All contrary data is dismissed as propaganda.

              Economics is a social *science*. Can we base future economic decisions on math?

              by blue aardvark on Wed Feb 06, 2013 at 07:43:48 AM PST

              [ Parent ]

              •  Actually, I was thinking the same of you (0+ / 0-)

                Somebody asks a question?

                HOW DARE THEY!!

                You sure you don't work for Fox?

                ** Disclosure:  I make this statement based on charicaterizations I've read and heard of Fox News.  We don't have cable, so I've never actually seen it.

                LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

                by dinotrac on Wed Feb 06, 2013 at 07:47:50 AM PST

                [ Parent ]

                •  The assertion that the Secretary of State (4+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  Forest Deva, I love OCD, ewmorr, Ahianne

                  has minimal influence over the allocation of resources by precinct is unsupportable.

                  Economics is a social *science*. Can we base future economic decisions on math?

                  by blue aardvark on Wed Feb 06, 2013 at 07:49:49 AM PST

                  [ Parent ]

                  •  I didn't make that assertion, but an assertion (0+ / 0-)

                    that the locals -- the folks actually carrying the election out -- have minimal influence is at least equally unsupportable.

                    LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

                    by dinotrac on Wed Feb 06, 2013 at 09:15:02 AM PST

                    [ Parent ]

                    •  Not quite what you think. (1+ / 0-)
                      Recommended by:
                      Ahianne

                      I'm going to go by how it's been done in the three states I've lived in, plus the one where my mom lives now.

                      The Secretary of State (or the Commonwealth, here in MA) handles the Elections overall, yes.  His office isssues instructions and guidelines that must be followed by the local (county, municipality/township, precinct/ward).  That's where a lot of crazy-ass manipulation comes in.  The early voting regulations in Florida, including acceptable ids, were set by the SoS, not the local officials.  IIRC, that's what one of the court cases in Ohio was about, the statewide restriction on early voting.

                      Local officials can set polling places, including how many polling places can be combined in the same location.  Oftentimes, there are limited public spaces available; other times, local officials deliberately combine "less desirable"  precincts into the same location, producing much longer lines (again, see Florida).  Worse, since usually the locality owns the voting machines/ballot scanners, a less "urban" polling place may have more equipment/voter than the "urban" one does, which means that there's no lines in single-precinct polling place in Podunk and lines around the block at the 5-precincts-in-the-HS-girl's-gym.  Which is where my nominally suburban mom had to vote.

                      My niece, back in my hometown, was able to vote at the local grade school, just as I did; fortunately the local GOP county administrators haven't changed the polling locations significantly.  But my old uni polling places have now been combined, which made for much longer lines (to discourage those pesky student Democrats, you know).  

                      I am lucky; my town (which does own its own equipment) has polling places at the public schools, the police station, and two cultural centers; no more than two precincts meet in a polling place, and they have twice as much equipment (carrels for paper ballots) at the multi-precinct locations.  AFAIK, we had at most 5 minute lines (waiting for carrels to empty).  But Boston, which should know better, had hour-long lines at a few of their polling places, plus several were running out of ballots by early afternoon this past election.

                      Lastly, sometimes the problems are not partisan.  Sheer incompetence can run up and down the lines of this process, so that you get local polling place staff asking for ID's when the law to require them has not actually passed.  

                      •  Non-partisan problems... (0+ / 0-)

                        I know a lot of those happen.

                        The last significant snag we had around here was caused by flooding.  Don't know how either party could manage that!

                        I don't want to underestimate the ability of politicians to screw around with elections, but it does strike me as interesting that Republicans more or less ran the table in 2010. They took the House, but they also made huge gains at the state level.

                        But...when 2012 rolled around, were unable to defeat a President who was stuck with the worst economy since the Great Depression.

                        Makes me wonder just how much all those state offices are really worth when it comes to mucking with federal elections.

                        LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

                        by dinotrac on Wed Feb 06, 2013 at 11:20:35 AM PST

                        [ Parent ]

        •  Truth. (0+ / 0-)

          I do not think that word means what you think it does.  An opinion supported by selected facts is not truth.  It may approximate it, but it remains merely a supported opinion.  More and better facts may get closer to truth but can never capture it.

          •  It means exactly what I think it does. (0+ / 0-)

            And you are correct that the best we can do is often a very well-supported opinion.

            But -- I'm at a loss as to what that has to do with me, especially given that my original post actually posed a couple of questions:

            Aren't most elections run locally?
            Aren't most of those places controlled by Democrats?

            People around here don't seem to like questions.

            Does make the truth harder to find.

            LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

            by dinotrac on Wed Feb 06, 2013 at 09:18:37 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

        •  Ohio - Blackwell and Husted (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          life is making tacos, ewmorr, Ahianne
          That includes getting and dispersing election officials, making sure the polling places open on time with voting booths ready to go, etc.
          The county and local officials did their jobs. Blackwell and Husted sowed the confusion. Fortunately with Husted, the courts slapped down his antics.

          There has never been a protracted war from which a country has benefited. The supreme art of war is to subdue the enemy without fighting. - Sun Tzu

          by OHeyeO on Wed Feb 06, 2013 at 09:07:39 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  I see that Husted did everything he could to (0+ / 0-)

            trash early voting in Ohio.

            That would certainly create more traffic at urban polling places in Cleveland. I imagine in Cincinnati, too.

            How bad were the delays?

            LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

            by dinotrac on Wed Feb 06, 2013 at 09:22:19 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  Heavy Turnout - both early and on election day (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              dinotrac, Ahianne

              I work in a suburban voting location outside Dayton housing three precincts and even with the most early voting I've seen since it was opened up to a wider segment of voters, the lines were still the longest I've seen on election day.

              Here's from the Sunday before election day. Each county in Ohio only has one single early voting center - the Board of Elections.

              Cincinnati Enquirer

              There has never been a protracted war from which a country has benefited. The supreme art of war is to subdue the enemy without fighting. - Sun Tzu

              by OHeyeO on Wed Feb 06, 2013 at 10:13:56 AM PST

              [ Parent ]

              •  I lived in Dayton MANY years ago...so, a question: (0+ / 0-)

                I presume -- and know I could be wrong -- that your location was not majority minority.

                So, I wonder: you had long lines, but were they lines that kept moving?

                I'm thinking statistically now, because the claim in rigging things at the state level to discourage minority voters.

                I can imagine :

                1. Carefully calculating situations that would inconvenience urban centers more than suburban centers, or

                2.  Overall turnout is higher than expected and precincts in densely populated areas get backed up more than in suburban areas.

                Do you know -- or does somebody else know -- if precincts are supposed to be designed to be more or less equal in population or area or what?

                Could somebody in theory cram all of Cleveland into a single precent?

                LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

                by dinotrac on Wed Feb 06, 2013 at 11:28:19 AM PST

                [ Parent ]

                •  ORC - maximum 1,400 in precinct unless waiver (0+ / 0-)

                  In our county, Greene, larger precincts generally around 1,200. Montgomery (Dayton) larger ones 1,200 to 1,400 with many in Dayton. Larger Cuyahoga (Cleveland) precincts around 1,200-1,300. Franklin (Columbus) BOE has a table comparing total voters to number of machines allocated. Hamilton (Cincinnati) looks like larger precincts concentrated within Cincinnati with many over the 1,400 limit. Don't know if someone has pieced this all together, but it would be an interesting study.

                  Search X county ohio board of elections if you want to look at specifics.

                  There has never been a protracted war from which a country has benefited. The supreme art of war is to subdue the enemy without fighting. - Sun Tzu

                  by OHeyeO on Wed Feb 06, 2013 at 08:27:16 PM PST

                  [ Parent ]

    •  No. (5+ / 0-)

      The decisions that affect wait times (distribution of voting machines, etc.) are made at the state level.  State-level executives (including secretaries of state, the relevant actors here) have leaned more Republican since the '90s.

      Grew a mustache and a mullet / Got a job at Chick-Fil-A

      by cardinal on Wed Feb 06, 2013 at 07:16:58 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Lots of decisions affect wait times. One question: (0+ / 0-)

        who decides the actual location of polling places?

        I don't think that's done at a state level, but it might be different in different states.

        At any rate, now I'm curious.
        I'll have to dig a little deeper into that report, but...

        I'm having a serious problem understanding this big difference in voting waits if there was no problem in places like Chicago, New York, and Los Angeles.

        That's a mighty big hunk of people in those places, and a very minority-heavy hunk.  The problems elsewhere would have to be that much bigger if those places were ok.

        Hmmm. That still leaves places like Atlanta, Houston, New Orleans, and St Louis as large cities with major minority populations.

        Kind of an interesting question as I look a little deeper.

        LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

        by dinotrac on Wed Feb 06, 2013 at 07:29:02 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

    •  NYC took forever to count (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      dinotrac

      but I don't think the lines were outrageous like in Florida.

      Filibuster reform, 2013 - woulda, coulda, shoulda.

      by bear83 on Wed Feb 06, 2013 at 08:09:17 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Not sure why it matters. (0+ / 0-)

       The concern is that if this becomes a federal matter it will bump into fed/state jurisdiction issues and dems tend to be pro federal intervention whereas repubs tend to prefer state management.

      The question is whether it can become a federal issue or not. Current causes - be they state or local municipality and whether due to democrats or republicans is immaterial to the question of federal intervention.

      "Jersey_Boy" was taken.

      by New Jersey Boy on Wed Feb 06, 2013 at 08:12:19 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  OH - 2004: Franklin & Knox Counties - 2012 Husted (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Ahianne

      2004 - Long lines in inner-city districts in Columbus were caused by unfair voting machine allocation by a Republican-controlled Board of Elections. Long lines at Kenyon College (last voter left poll at 4am) were caused by unfair voting machine allocation by Republican-controlled Knox County Board of Elections.

      2012 - Ohio Secretary of State broke Board of Election ties in a partisan manner (each Ohio county election board has 2D and 2R per state law, with SOS breaking tie votes) regarding extending early voting hours. Husted broke ties in favor of longer early voting in Republican and rural counties and in favor of shorter hours in urban counties with large Democratic electorates - hardly an act that displays a desire to have consistency across the state.

      Larger counties in Ohio with relatively even inner-city and suburban components have the most trouble when Republicans in power try to disenfranchise urban voters. When Jennifer Brunner (D) was elected SOS in 2006, the mess of long lines was reduced through expanding early voting and consistent rules throughout the state. Everyone benefitted. Then in 2010, Husted was elected and troubles began anew. Not hard to figure it out.

      There has never been a protracted war from which a country has benefited. The supreme art of war is to subdue the enemy without fighting. - Sun Tzu

      by OHeyeO on Wed Feb 06, 2013 at 09:45:46 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Not in defense of VA republicans (5+ / 0-)

    but VA does give every registered voter a voter registration card. It has always been a non-photo ID, always acceptable by itself as proof of eligibility to vote. I believe that utility bills and other items should also be allowed, but there is always the voter ID card.

    Standing in an hours long line in Arlington this past election I heard the republicans (in Arlington?!) in front of me complaining that anyone could use a another person's voter ID card and vote multiple times. They proudly shoved both their voter ID card and driver's licenses at the registrars, who held the licences and looked at the voter IDs.

  •  Money (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    bear83

    I would guess that the money for running the elections is doled out by the state, not the county or city - if you don't have the money to buy the voting machines to have more polling stations then it doesn't matter how good your organizational skills are.

  •  “But I think it’s also ridiculous to.. (0+ / 0-)

    “..make a political issue out of it when it’s very easily handled.” "We'll take that burden from the completely. Problem solved."

  •  Hmmm (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    blue aardvark, bear83, Ahianne

    I suppose a minimum federal standard for federal elections is in order. If states want to go above-and-beyond, that's fine.

    As far as the ID, the difference in that group is the photo requirement.

    I see what you did there.

    by GoGoGoEverton on Wed Feb 06, 2013 at 06:57:06 AM PST

  •  Ok, Senator Grassley. Let's take this (5+ / 0-)

    out of the political arena -- and put it squarely in the Courts, where it belongs.

  •  Can somebody (4+ / 0-)

    Tell me the difference between the current situation and a selective poll tax?

    YES! I'm a bleeding-heart liberal. Ya gotta problem wid dat?

    by mwm341 on Wed Feb 06, 2013 at 07:02:49 AM PST

  •  Four sentence law fixes problem (6+ / 0-)

    In the event of lines longer than 1 hour at any polling place, two remedies shall be enacted:
    1) That polling place shall be held open for an additional 24 hours, and
    2) The number of voting machines and poll workers at the polling place for subsequent elections shall be doubled; said additional resources shall be funded by a statewide levy on real estate which is a flat rate per acre.

    Any state official convicted of non-compliance with this law shall be removed from office and be ineligible to hold any position of trust within any governmental body for life.

    Next problem?

    Economics is a social *science*. Can we base future economic decisions on math?

    by blue aardvark on Wed Feb 06, 2013 at 07:03:39 AM PST

  •  I thought early voting solved the issue of long (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    bear83, exterris

    lines and wait times.

    •  Which is why Republicans have fought so hard (4+ / 0-)

      to reduce early voting in places like Florida and Ohio. Early voting works. Can't have something that works in 'big guvment.'

      Filibuster reform, 2013 - woulda, coulda, shoulda.

      by bear83 on Wed Feb 06, 2013 at 08:15:52 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  An example from Milwaukee (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      exterris, Ahianne

      The only site for early voting is downtown. Many people got rides in the vans provided by groups such as Jobs Now, and the early vote total was heavy. However, that left a lot of people still to vote in their wards. At least at the sites I observed in 2008 and 2012, there was a tendency for very long lines first thing in the morning, and after about 9 am a moderate flow of voters for the rest of the day. The number of desks for voting was quite adequate even in the early part of the day, so that was not the problem. The clerks checked in voters competently, but it does take a certain amount of time to find the voter in the poll books. The procedures mandated by Scott Walker's legislature added signing of the poll book in the last few elections, so that took a little extra time. Overall, I think the only time that waits were excessive was in the morning when people were either trying to vote before work or just wanted to do it as soon as possible for whatever reason.

  •  28 years of voting (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    RadGal70, exterris

    I have never waited more than 3 minutes.  I live in northern NJ.  Bottom line the aHole twits lost, so I would wait an hour to guarantee that outcome.  As would most of us.

  •  Go ahead, wingers. Keep up the dirty tricks, (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    RadGal70, OHeyeO

    just like the bankers, and the pushback will become even stronger.  I am already digging little heelplant holes outside our polling place for the 2014 proxy war.

    Building a better America with activism, cooperation, ingenuity and snacks.

    by judyms9 on Wed Feb 06, 2013 at 07:23:00 AM PST

  •  It IS an issue that should be handled by states (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Ahianne

    Unfortunately, some states are handling it so poorly that the federal government may be justified in trying to do something about it.

    We need constitutional change to make regulation of elections a uniform, federal concern.

    •  It would be OK for states to handle (3+ / 0-)

      if they met a minimum standard for registration and voting access. As it is, they don't, so someone in Minnesota or Oregon has greater access to voting than someone in Florida or Ohio.

      Filibuster reform, 2013 - woulda, coulda, shoulda.

      by bear83 on Wed Feb 06, 2013 at 08:19:27 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  If you had minimum standards (0+ / 0-)

        And some but not all states exceeded those minimum standards, then you would have a situation where some citizens have greater access to voting than others.

      •  Oregon has vote by mail for all elections (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        bear83

        You get your voter's pamphlet, then your ballot.  You have a couple of weeks to read, study and vote.  You can mail it back, drop it at designated sites or turn it in to the county elections office.  On election day they have people standing outside the office to collect ballots until 8:00 pm.

        It works great.  Sometimes I miss hearing, "RadGal70 has voted." at the polling place, but the convenience gives us one of the highest turn out rates in the country.

  •  Voting inequities (4+ / 0-)

    This has been the case my entire voting life and I am 65. When I lived in the city, it always took one plus hours to vote.  The polling places were mobbed, there were two machines for the thousands in my Election district.

    Moving upstate to a rural area, and BTW GOP, there were a few hundred people per ED and two machines.  I never waited more than few minutes.

    Now I live in Nevada.  Plenty of machines and no wait.

    This is done on purpose to decrease urban participation.

    Simple solution:  increase staff/ number of machines.  If a cheap state like Nevada can do it, so can other states.  
    Conclusion:  voter suppression is rife and has been for decades.

  •  I previously posted LOLs at the thought (4+ / 0-)

    of the minority long waits to vote being accidental.  In all seriousness, EEO law requires only disparate impact for proof of violation/discrimination.  INTENT NEED NOT BE PROVEN.  If the impact of a given action results in disparate treatment or effect in the workplace (among protected groups), then that action is illegal.  It is quite simple, and should be applied here as well.  Impact is measurable and objective, while intent is not.

    Thus, rather than have another red-faced lipless wonder in a bad suit, explain why need stronger election laws in certain minority districts, and insist that he is not racist in the least, we can just know that he is, and tell him to just shut the fuck up and sit the fuck down, because his actions have already spoken for him.

    Buy Aldus Shrugged : The Antidote to Ayn Rand, and tear Ayn and the GOP new orifices. ALL ROYALTIES BETWEEN NOW AND MARCH 1, DONATED TO THIS SITE, DAILYKOS!! @floydbluealdus1

    by Floyd Blue on Wed Feb 06, 2013 at 07:31:40 AM PST

  •  Voting is a privilege, not a right. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    OHeyeO

    Gotta make sure that potential voters really really really want to cast their ballots badly enough to wait in line for hours under a blazing sun or a driving rainstorm.  Matter of fact, why not erect military-style obstacle courses at the entrance to every polling place?  Let's see if they want to vote badly enough to crawl on their bellies under razor wire.

    In Democratic-majority districts only. of course.

    •  Don't leave out the machine gun fire overhead (0+ / 0-)

      Gotta make those voters "stand their ground"

      There has never been a protracted war from which a country has benefited. The supreme art of war is to subdue the enemy without fighting. - Sun Tzu

      by OHeyeO on Wed Feb 06, 2013 at 09:47:08 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Great post, I'd suggest one change. (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    DSPS owl, Ahianne

    The headline needs to read: "GOP dancing in undisclosed locations"

    Thanks for the details.  It helps to be reminded that we need to OWN state governments even more than we need Congress and the WH.

    I'm not looking for a love that will lift me up and carry me away. A love that will stroll alongside and make a few amusing comments will suffice.

    by I love OCD on Wed Feb 06, 2013 at 08:32:23 AM PST

  •  The one thing missing from this diary is (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    exterris

    The disparity between White and Black voters in each of the most egregious states.

    Averages are disparate nationally. Lines were long in Florida does not mean voting access was disparate in Florida, which is what matters.

    You can have Racially disparate wait times and find states with a higher percentage of Blacks had long wait times for all voters and get the same data.

    Not saying this isn't so, just that it isn't demonstrated.

    "Jersey_Boy" was taken.

    by New Jersey Boy on Wed Feb 06, 2013 at 08:35:50 AM PST

  •  from the gop's (0+ / 0-)

    point of view thats too short a time in line for minorities, they need to extend that waiting time to have a chance of winning elections in the future since demographics aren't in their favor because of their bigoted agenda, time is getting short gop you had better find other ways to attack democracy and voting rights if you want to continue the fascist agenda you employ.

  •  The hypocrisy, the hatred, the stupid, the (0+ / 0-)

    heartlessness, the greed...

    I'm sorry, but I'd be genuinely surprised if there are GOP folks (up in the higher echelons) who aren't actually ridiculously, cartoonishly insane and cruel.

    ...Sorry. Had to get that out. From Election day it was obvious the numbers would be bad, but it still boggles the mind.

  •  Here's why it seems like no big thang... (0+ / 0-)

    People are confusing and/or conflating the difference between average wait times and worst-case scenario wait times. To say that Florida had "45 minute lines" when it was documented that people waited all f*cking day to vote muddies the issue. While I'd argue that no one in the 21st century should wait more than a few minutes to vote, righties can argue "clearly 45 minutes every 4 years to choose your next leader is the least you can do to further democracy, so quit yer bellyachin'" and perhaps sway some opinions.

  •  National Voter Rights Act. (0+ / 0-)

    We need a National Voter Rights Act that will mandate a structure that all states will have to follow. This will be fair to all the voters no matter what their race, religion, sexuality, or party affiliation. The states will have to implement this standard in a fair and balanced way to their voting population.

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