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I spoke this about this briefly on Kagro in the Morning last Thursday, climate change skeptics rejoice! We're off the hook! New research indicates it's been the earthworms all this time!

Earthworms probably increase GHG emissions through a combination of mechanisms, as they change the soil environment in many different ways. They mix organic plant residues in the soil, which may increase decomposition and CO2 emissions. Moreover, the earthworm gut also acts as a microbial incubator, boosting the activity of N2O-producing microbes. Finally, by burrowing through the soil, earthworms make it easier for GHGs in the soil to flow to the atmosphere.
So earthworms produce nitrous oxide farts? I expect that might make the little wrigglers even more popular among a certain segment of the population than they might soon be with their new found champions among the usual suspects! Why it seems like only yesterday when a powerful congressman was mocking the idea that humans could affect the climate because it is ordained and controlled by God. But tiny spineless Precambrian annelids? "I knew it was them all along" -- something Inhofe would say!
  • I'm not sure exactly how this works, but apparently a group of researchers were able to use 3-D printing technology to make a human embryonic stem cell or a facsimile thereof. Forget beam me up Scotty, now it's FAX me back, quick!
  • Thanks to the Kepler Mission, NASA/ESA/JPL researchers now estimate there are a bunch of earth-like planets in our galaxy. And by a bunch astronomers literally mean Billions and billions.
  • Find out how smart your dog is right now!
  • Speaking of Kagro in the Morning ... TONS of fun. I recommend everyone whose interested call in. Thanks to my heart stent post heart attack, I have time this month to help Kagro with some programming. I already have some top rated science bloggers lined up, one might be on next week to talk about Comet ISON. What science-y topics and scientists would you like to hear from?
  • Speaking of comets, ISON will be in fair position for viewing from earth beginning in November. But dammit, it will be in a spectacular position for our robotic explorers on Mars! There is no chance of it hitting us, but I made some guesses and played around with some impact simulators to see what would happen if something like ISON did strike earth. Hint: it would be bad.

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Comment Preferences

  •  Gives a whole new meaning to the song (6+ / 0-)

    Nobody likes me,
    everybody hates me,
    I guess I'll eat some worms!

    At first glance it seemed rather negative, go do something gross because you aren't appreciated.

    Oh foolish me. They are using their angst to save the world! Heroic.

    Thank god for all those people nobody likes, everybody hates.

    Spaghetti and meatballs? No thanks. It's worms and worm balls if you care about the planet. Any recipes?

  •  Actually, a correction... (14+ / 0-)

    What the Herriot-Watt group actually did is use living stem cells in a 3D printer, so instead of their normal "colonies" they could be laid out in a specific pattern in a culture dish.  They were then tested to see if they were still a) alive, and b) healthy enough to still change into other types of cells (nerve cells, liver cells, etc.)

    It's a huge advance in the technology because hESCs are extremely delicate.  Tap their culture dish too hard, and they float free of their feeder cells and die...or differentiate on the spot.

    Eventually, you may be able to "print" artificial organs.  Need a new nerve cluster?  New heart?  Even a new liver?  Eventually, you can print the cells into the right size and shape, differentiate them, and voila, organ ready to perfuse and implant.

  •  If Glenn Beck was flying through space, what (8+ / 0-)

    would he be called?

    A dumbassteroid.

    The path of the righteous man is beset on all sides by the inequities of the selfish and the tyranny of evil men.

    by xxdr zombiexx on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 06:13:44 AM PST

  •  I hate the term 3D printer (6+ / 0-)

    Printing creates images of things, not actual things. These should properly be called 3D fabricators, or simply fabricators, or custom fabricators. When I hear 3D printer I imagine a huge geometric glop of toner or ink.

    And worm farts? What's not to like?

    "Liberty without virtue would be no blessing to us" - Benjamin Rush, 1777

    by kovie on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 06:17:57 AM PST

    •  People were talking about this with (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Aunt Pat, justiceputnam, dewtx

      some sort of gun fabrication...and it sounded like one just printed metal into existence.

      Think of the jobs we could kill with this technology.....

      We'd be heroes...... among republicans.

      The path of the righteous man is beset on all sides by the inequities of the selfish and the tyranny of evil men.

      by xxdr zombiexx on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 06:21:13 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  when they become cheap enough for everyone, it (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        MKDAWUSS

        will be the end of patents and copyrights, and will change the entire economy.  Most factories will not be needed and will disappear---you'll be able to simply print, at home, virtually anything you need or want, from a coffee mug to the parts for a jet airplane.

        The only jobs remaining will be to write the programs for the printers--and those will be pirated and copied all over the place.

        •  Control your trekkian fantasies. (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          dewtx

          I rather doubt it will ever be economical to print most common household objects. It's still a lot cheaper to buy the average paperback than it is to print it out at home, and it probably always will be.

          To put the torture behind us is, inevitably, to put it in front of us.

          by UntimelyRippd on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 08:47:28 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

        •  It Will Immortalize Copyright (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          CodeTalker, PeterHug, dewtx

          Manufacturers will own the right to copy by printing all the parts they designed. They will feel free to design even more proprietarty non-interchangeable parts, because people won't be inhibited by the manufacturer running out anymore. All that will let the designers outsource the manufacturing to third parties and consumers, but keep the prices as high as their monopoly allows. While leaving quality control up to the printers, who don't have the designers or other expert technicians in the loop to assure quality.

          Don't get me wrong: I'm excited about the widespread freedom and power of 3D printing in anyone's hands who can buy the relatively cheap printers. I'm excited about the reduction of waste by eliminating shipping and stockpiling. I'm also excited by the prospect of customizing the design myself as it's printed, the possibility of hybridizing designs, of hiring my own technician to change or adapt the design to myself, the implicit mass customizations designers will offer.

          But I'm also realistic about how laser printers, online pages, downloads and mass "prosumer" publishing didn't kill copyright, though it should have. Congress and industry are committed to squeezing the maximum property rights for themselves, like killing the "first sale doctrine" that lets people resell what we bought without restriction. Corporations will own forever anything they once controlled, all property to the ubercapitalists, with restricted licenses to use what's paid for only in ways that don't threaten the controlling corporation.

          I'm part of the open source creators and remixers changing society wherever capitalists aren't chaining consumption to its Industrial Age limits that favor the capitalists. But I'm realistic about the balance of power, and the overwhelming direction the change has been demonstrated to take.

          "When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro." - HST

          by DocGonzo on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 08:52:46 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

    •  Hey, I'm old enough to remember... (4+ / 0-)

      ...when they called it CAM!  (Computer-Aided Manufacturing).

      It was a different concept; you started with a block of material and it was carved out by routers and lasers to shape by computer.  But 3D printers fabricate using the exact reverse of that process, so why not just call it a CAM variant?

      •  It Is CAM (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        CodeTalker, dewtx

        It is a CAM variant. It's the 3D printer CAM variant.

        Also, most 3D printers don't operate in the 6 degrees of freedom ( x, y, z, yaw, pitch, roll) that carving CAM machines did. They're like printers: a stack of 2D layers, each layer deposited by a device extremely close to an injet or laser printer.

        They're 3D printers. Why call them by some vague old acronym like "CAM"? We don't refer to the design as "CAD" anymore, since "design" of these objects is now Computer Aided by default.

        Indeed, with the increased mobility of online documents, we might even find "3D" to be redundant to "printer", as we come to ordinarily print only full objects, and only rarely hardcopy of a 2D page.

        "When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro." - HST

        by DocGonzo on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 08:57:00 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

    •  Too Late (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      dewtx

      It seems the public has adopted "3D printer" as the term for this technology.

      This head movie makes my eyes rain.

      by The Lone Apple on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 06:50:44 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Puh-leeze (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      PeterHug, dewtx

      They're called printers because mechanically, they're pretty much identical to printers.

      In fact, in this case it appears they're actually using ink-jet printing.

      To put the torture behind us is, inevitably, to put it in front of us.

      by UntimelyRippd on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 08:44:18 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Ink for 3D fabrication? (0+ / 0-)

        Puhleeze yourself.

        "Liberty without virtue would be no blessing to us" - Benjamin Rush, 1777

        by kovie on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 08:47:12 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Puhleeze yourself yourself (0+ / 0-)

          From an article in Atlantic awhile back:

          "Instead of using ink in the inkjet cartridge, we use cells," Dr. Anthony Atala from Wake Forest explained to the CBC.
          Here's a quote from an actual scientific paper:
          Using a modified Hewlett Packard (HP) 550C computer printer and an HP 51626a ink cartridge, CHO cells and rat embryonic motoneurons were suspended separately in a concentrated phosphate buffered saline solution (3

          To put the torture behind us is, inevitably, to put it in front of us.

          by UntimelyRippd on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 09:26:04 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

        •  damn something went wrong there. (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          PeterHug, dewtx

          The full quote is:

          Using a modified Hewlett Packard (HP) 550C computer printer and an HP 51626a ink cartridge, CHO cells and rat embryonic motoneurons were suspended separately in a concentrated phosphate buffered saline solution (3). The cells were subsequently printed as a kind of ‘‘ink’’ onto several ‘‘bio- papers’’ made from soy agar and collagen gel.
          from
          Inkjet printing of viable mammalian cells
          Tao Xu, Joyce Jin, Cassie Gregory, James J. Hickman*, Thomas Boland*, Biomaterials 26 (2005) 93–99
          Without reading the Heriot-Watt paper, I can't be sure, but it sounds like they are probably using almost identical technology.

          To put the torture behind us is, inevitably, to put it in front of us.

          by UntimelyRippd on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 09:29:29 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  And what's the structural integrity (0+ / 0-)

            of anything "printed" by such materials and methods? Could it actually be used in a real-world application, or is it only good for mock-ups and display? Does it need to be clear-coated to prevent decomposition? Is this the same as those 3D "printers" used to make functional gun parts?

            And can you make a Howard Wolowitz doll with it?

            "Liberty without virtue would be no blessing to us" - Benjamin Rush, 1777

            by kovie on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 11:52:52 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  No, it isn't the same as the 3d printers used to (0+ / 0-)

              make functional gun parts -- because although those printers have essentially identical technology for controlling the placement of the deposition of whatever material they're depositing, they use cartridges specifically engineered for those materials.

              Some of the newest 3-d printers actually use a complex technology where they are printing a pattern on a substrate, and then the substrate is etched with a solvent, leaving behind the printed pattern. (This is a lot like the lithographic techniques used to create circuits on silicon chips, or for that matter to create circuits on PC boards. That's not "PC" as in Personal Computer, that's "PC" as in "Printed Circuit" Board.) Some of them use still other technologies, to grossly oversimplify, can be thought of as laying down an adhesive that is then washed over with something that adheres to the adhesive.

              The original 3-d printers, by the way, were more like what used to be called "plotters"; instead of drawing on sheets of paper with a pen, they "drew" with a laser, thus cutting a shape out of the paper. Each new shape was then laid down on top of the previous one, with some sort of adhesive applied to hold the whole thing together.

              As for structural integrity, I'm not really sure where these guys are going with the idea of laying down 3-d cell cultures. Do they think that at some point they'll be able to just keep plopping more cells down, and the thing will create its own integrity? Do they think they'll alternate deposition of cells with deposition of connective material? At the moment, we can scarcely keep the cells alive in a 3-d blob grown of its own volition. This is a big, open, current research problem.

              To put the torture behind us is, inevitably, to put it in front of us.

              by UntimelyRippd on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 12:22:01 PM PST

              [ Parent ]

              •  If we restrict the use of the term "3D Printer" (0+ / 0-)

                to devices that can create non-functional 3D mockups of things that could then be fabricated using other methods, be they traditional or an automated 3D fabrication device, then I suppose that I'd be ok with that, even though it's still a misuse of the word "print" IMO. Even 2D "printers" that use lasers to etch patterns aren't really printers. The root word "print" means "to press".

                Plus, I doubt that there would ever be a big market for any such device if it only produced non-functional mockups. Most people would want to be able to build real things they could use. And even if they're ever commercially viable, the government will probably require that they not be able to build certain things, e.g. illegal gun parts and other weapons.

                "Liberty without virtue would be no blessing to us" - Benjamin Rush, 1777

                by kovie on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 12:32:29 PM PST

                [ Parent ]

                •  Um. (0+ / 0-)

                  As far as that goes, you can already buy equipment and put it in your basement that will create real 3-d objects that the government might not want you to have. It's just about the material involved.

                  Anyway, if you want to argue about calling a laser printer a printer, I guess you'd better not permit the phrase, "making a print", since there is no pressing involved in photographic reproduction. I think you're being more than just a tad pedantic here.

                  To put the torture behind us is, inevitably, to put it in front of us.

                  by UntimelyRippd on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 12:54:23 PM PST

                  [ Parent ]

                  •  God forbid one should have a problem (0+ / 0-)

                    with the misuse and abuse of language for commercial purposes because some people are too lazy to come up with a proper term for this process.

                    Printing is a basically 2D process, with at most allowances for some printing processes leaving the final product with some raised texture, just as the word "unique" can't be qualified and a Facebook "friend" isn't a real friend.

                    Whatever this stuff is and whatever one calls it, it's not printing.

                    "Liberty without virtue would be no blessing to us" - Benjamin Rush, 1777

                    by kovie on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 01:07:55 PM PST

                    [ Parent ]

                    •  It is neither misuse nor abuse. (0+ / 0-)

                      It is the natural evolution of language, and in particular technical language.

                      For that matter, the categorical assertion that "unique" can't be qualified is not something that has been demonstrated via some sort of Whitehead & Russell formalized proof, it's just a matter of adamant opinion. I might argue that, given that almost everything in the universe is in fact unique, and that the word is therefore almost meaningless when applied to real phenomena, then if people like you want to be allowed to use the word at all, you'd better let people like me qualify it.

                      To put the torture behind us is, inevitably, to put it in front of us.

                      by UntimelyRippd on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 01:31:13 PM PST

                      [ Parent ]

                      •  You can do whatever you want (0+ / 0-)

                        and I am both unable to prevent you from doing whatever you want to do, and uninterested in trying. It's not my place to tell people what to do or try to keep them from doing what they want to do. I'm just expressing what I believe to be my well-founded opinion that there are certain "evolutions" of language that make no sense, and are thus not so much evolutionary as lazy.

                        Believe it or not, but there is a certain inherent logic to language that may be bendable and extensible, but only so much, and while certain extensions of language make sense, others do not.

                        For example, when people say "the press" these days, they generally mean the media in general, and not just printed media (nearly all of which are not digital as well as printed, and some digital-only). So while it's technically wrong to refer to, say, CNN, as being in the press (notwithstanding the fact that it has a web site with content separate from its TV content), it's generally seen as ok (I tend to use the term media, though, because it's just more accurate).

                        The same can be said of web "broadcasts", or "webcasts", which, again, are technically incorrect, because you're not broadcasting (i.e. casting out, broadly, as in seed, the origin of the term) anything, but rather placing content on a site that people can go to to access. But everyone knows what you mean, so it's here to stay. (Again, not a big fact of such usage, but that ship has sailed.)

                        However, nothing is being "printed" in 3D printers. Printing is about creating or reproducing images, and 3d printers create objects, not images. Objects aren't images, i.e. representations of things. Objects are actual things. (And yes, I realize that people in the visual arts would probably strongly disagree with me on this, but I'm not talking about original art. And I realize that not all images are representational, but, again, we're not debating art theory here, but a physical process.) I suppose that a 3D printer can have the ability to also print images on the objects it produces, but that's not integral to its core purpose.

                        If anything, printers, as in actual, 2D printers, are particular versions of a more general-purpose class of devices that make things, with a 2D printer making 2D images, and a 3D "printer" making 3D objects. They both make things, but different kinds of things, using very different processes. A coffee maker is another example of a particular version of the general class of devices that make things. Should we therefore call it a "coffee printer"? Should we call a bread maker a "bread printer"? See what I'm getting at?

                        And sorry, but the formal definition of unique doesn't allow for qualification, being inherent in the very meaning of the word. To qualify it is to deny its purpose for being. To rob it of its uniqueness, one might say.

                        "Liberty without virtue would be no blessing to us" - Benjamin Rush, 1777

                        by kovie on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 02:30:38 PM PST

                        [ Parent ]

                        •  I see what you're getting at. (0+ / 0-)

                          Unfortunately, you just don't get what I'm getting at. Our language abounds with violations of your principle, many of them created in much the same way that "3d-printing" came into being. Some are less direct, and rely more on analogy, but ultimately the phenomenon is commonplace. I can only guess why this particular one gets your goat.

                          As for "unique", as I observe, there is almost nothing at all in the universe that is not unique, other than perhaps -- and this is only perhaps -- fundamental particles. Thus, anytime you assert that something is unique, you are merely uttering the obvious, and anytime you assert that something is not unique, you are almost certainly wrong. That renders your "formal" definition of unique fairly worthless.

                          To put the torture behind us is, inevitably, to put it in front of us.

                          by UntimelyRippd on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 08:12:07 PM PST

                          [ Parent ]

  •  Cheers to Curiosty - 6 months on Mars (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Aunt Pat, jim in IA, eeff, justiceputnam

    yet to drive a mile...... I'm getting impatient.

    I want PIX of the Gale Crater Canyon

    Here's a great overview of the debate about landing spots that, under Gale Crater, has a good  discussion of the area, with a focus on the canyon.

    More science and some pix/plans

    BTW, Curiosity's generator is generally built with a 12 year life expectancy..... I am hoping for YEARS of MSL data far beyond the 2 scheduled.

    The path of the righteous man is beset on all sides by the inequities of the selfish and the tyranny of evil men.

    by xxdr zombiexx on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 06:34:01 AM PST

  •  Worms, second biggest polluters... (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    justiceputnam

    behind trees.  If we could get them to make nitRIC oxide, then we could get rich. Forget herbal Viagra, now it's vermiform.  Vermiform Viagra, pretty catchy,huh?

  •  I like the video of ISON cruising along. (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    justiceputnam, eeff

    Hoping it will bring spectacular views.

    Comet PANSTARRS is due in March. It could be a good show.
    http://earthsky.org/...


    Predicting is hard...especially the future. ~ Y. Berra

    by jim in IA on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 06:45:37 AM PST

  •  I wish you wouldn't say "bunch..." (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    justiceputnam, DarkSyde

    I just don't get these technical terms.  :)

    "Optimism is better than despair." --Jack Layton, the late Canadian MP, liberal, and Christian.

    by lungfish on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 06:46:25 AM PST

  •  James Hansen (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    justiceputnam

    Going to DC next weekend !
    Can't hardly wait !

  •  We also carry Science programming... (0+ / 0-)

    ... on Monday 3pm to 4pm pacific; SciTech with Yuri & Rick, also Radio Ecoshock and other science pods on thursdays. Check out our schedule at Netroots Radio!

    A Poet is at the same time a force for Solidarity and for Solitude -- Pablo Neruda / Netroots Radio podcasts of The After Show with Wink & Justice can be found on Stitcher

    by justiceputnam on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 06:48:24 AM PST

  •  Billions and billions of earth-like planets? (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    justiceputnam

    MLB is going to have to make room for some more expansion teams.

    Once in a while you get shown the light, in the strangest of places if you look at it right.

    by darthstar on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 06:49:14 AM PST

  •  I would very much like to see the deniers argue (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    justiceputnam, DarkSyde, PeterHug

    that the earth is so big and vast that humans have no effect on its climate---but earthworms do.

  •  I CAN be a good dog, just like you wanted! (0+ / 0-)

    I just had to check out the dog training link -- very cute.  Reminded me about the sweetest dog training post ever, at Hyperbole and a half.

    Do not go gentle into that good night. Blog, blog against the dying of the light. CathiefromCanada

    by CathiefromCanada on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 07:03:17 AM PST

  •  Big issue, another use for fracking, please look (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    eeff, PeterHug

    Horizontal drilling and fracking is coming to geothermal energy. A company has shown you can drill down deep, frack the rocks down there and create your own geothermal pool, using horizontal drilling you can use one well for multiple sources. What do people think about this?

    A Quiet Breakthrough in Geothermal Energy

    AltaRock Energy—which has backing from venture capitalists, as well as Google (GOOG) and Microsoft (MSFT) co-founder Paul Allen’s investment firm—has been working on enhanced (sometimes called engineered) geothermal tech. This technology drills wells deep into the ground, injects them with cold water to fracture the hot rocks, and creates a geothermal source of power where none was naturally occurring. Traditional geothermal systems, in contrast, tap into naturally occurring geothermal reservoirs (you know, the kind you see on the side of the road in Yellowstone National Park).

    Geothermal power has massive potential in many areas of the U.S. but it has long remained a niche technology. A study that came out a few years ago from MIT found that enhanced geothermal system technology could create 100 GW of electricity by 2050 if the technology got reasonable investment in R&D—100 GW is equivalent to the power produced by 100 large coal power plants. But given that traditional geothermal systems are the only ones in use, geothermal power sources have been stuck in isolated areas that have geothermal activity.

    Geothermal power is also the holy grail of clean power because it’s not intermittent like solar or wind power. Geothermal power can produce electricity 24/7—including at night—while wind power drops off when it isn’t windy, and solar power ends when the sun goes down. Constant power like this is called baseload power, and it’s one of the reasons why coal and natural gas are so widely used.

    AltaRock Energy said that it has reached a milestone at its demonstration site in Bend, Ore., which it believes is a good sign that it’ll be able to commercialize its enhanced geothermal tech.

    -1.63/ -1.49 "Speaking truth to power" (with snark of course)!

    by dopper0189 on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 07:13:43 AM PST

    •  My guess is that it will probably be self-limiting (0+ / 0-)

      in that geothermal installations of this sort are likely not to be viable for very long (they will use up the thermal energy they can access faster than it will be replaced from the surrounding rock).  If they deplete quickly, they won't offer a positive ROI, and therefore won't be commercialized.

      The "Do the Math" blog has a good analysis of the thermodynamics of geothermal (although he doesn't consider the possibility of fracking) and concludes that it will may have value as a niche provider of energy, but is unlikely to be able to really solve our problem.

      •  Actually this process by creating several pockets (0+ / 0-)

        allows the life cycle of a single well to last far longer. Also because it creates its own "hot pockets" and can be located closer to where the power is needed and not just where a natural hot spot, greatly reducing the transportation cost.

        -1.63/ -1.49 "Speaking truth to power" (with snark of course)!

        by dopper0189 on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 02:08:03 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  Should I shut down my compost pile? (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    eeff

    It is a hot bed of worm activity - they multiply in there.  This has to end.

    "May the forces of evil become confused on the way to your house." - George Carlin

    by Most Awesome Nana on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 07:17:53 AM PST

  •  3D printing of organs - (0+ / 0-)

    "I'm sculpting now. Landscapes mostly." ~ Yogi Bear

    by eXtina on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 07:28:55 AM PST

  •  Now I understand ... (0+ / 0-)

    ... why worms are always such cheerful little characters.  Even when hooked, they smile.  It's the gas.  

    The wisdom of my forebears ... Two wise people will never agree. Man begins in dust and ends in dust — meanwhile it's good to drink some vodka. A man studies until he's seventy and dies a fool.

    by Not A Bot on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 07:32:51 AM PST

  •  Snowsnowsnowsnowsnow! (0+ / 0-)

    IT just keeps coming down! I had to dig a little pathway in our backyard snowglobe for my dog, so she could have a place to pee.

    Barack Obama for President

    by looty on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 07:38:59 AM PST

  •  3D Printing Embryonic Stemcells (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    NorthCountryNY
    I'm not sure exactly how this works, but apparently a group of researchers were able to use 3-D printing technology to make a human embryonic stem cell or a facsimile thereof. Forget beam me up Scotty, now it's FAX me back, quick!

    They're printing tissue out of whole existing stemcells, not printing the cells from molecules:

    Scientists have recently used a novel 3D printing technique to arrange human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) for the very first time. This could allow the creation of three-dimensional tissues and structures, which could be crucial in the making of artificial organs and tissues.

    "When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro." - HST

    by DocGonzo on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 08:33:45 AM PST

  •  Dog Smartness (0+ / 0-)

    I'm disappointed that KOS would allow an ad in the middle of the column.  

  •  wormgas (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Calamity Jean

    well I've got a big jar of worms hooked up to a balloon, but the little suckers don't build up enough pressure to get the balloon filled - does anyone have any suggestions?

  •  Does this mean I gotta sell my earthworm farm? (0+ / 0-)

    Well I only bought a part interest on one in the desert in Arizona. They told me the could turn a yard of sand into dirt in only two thousand years and they told me it was a green project!!! It is near the London Bridge too.

    Our money system is not what we have been led to believe. The creation of money has been "privatized," or taken over by private money lenders. Thomas Jefferson called them “bold and bankrupt adventurers just pretending to have money.” webofdebt

    by arealniceguy on Sat Feb 09, 2013 at 09:51:08 PM PST

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