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Ahmed Moaz al-Khatib, the President of the National Coalition for Syrian Revolutionary and Opposition Forces (NCSROF), has resigned.

His resignation follows the resignations of several other top leaders in the NCSROF during the past few days. Mr. al-Khatib had been the president of the NCSROF since it was formed last November in Qatar.

The NCSROF reportedly has refused to accept his resignation.

Additionally, the Free Syrian Army (FSA) has announced that it does not accept the authority of Ghassan Hitto, who was chosen last week by the NCSROF in a meeting in Istanbul to be the provisional prime minister for rebel-held areas in Syria.

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http://www.guardian.co.uk/...

http://www.aljazeera.com/...

http://english.alarabiya.net/...

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Comment Preferences

  •  Tip Jar (19+ / 0-)

    Lamb chop, we can quibble what to call it, but I think we can both agree it's creepy.

    by InAntalya on Sun Mar 24, 2013 at 02:06:27 PM PDT

  •  What does this mean? (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    InAntalya, Odysseus

    That the NCSROF are in meltdown?
    Please give some context for those of us who are not as deeply focused on this conflict.

    If I ran this circus, things would be DIFFERENT!

    by CwV on Sun Mar 24, 2013 at 02:23:26 PM PDT

  •  al-Khatib, Hitto, Tlas . . . (5+ / 0-)

    why don't we just call them all Karzai and be done with it?

    Dogs from the street can have all the desirable qualities that one could want from pet dogs. Most adopted stray dogs are usually humble and exceptionally faithful to their owners as if they are grateful for this kindness. -- H.M. Bhumibol Adulyadej

    by corvo on Sun Mar 24, 2013 at 02:24:35 PM PDT

  •  Honestly, I look for your (9+ / 0-)

    diaries on Syria -- We all know Assad and his thugs are mass murderers, but I don't comprehend the different factions in the opposition.  And neither does the American media.

    thank you for being a solid voice.  I know every history has multiple interpretations but for some reason, I have trust in you.  Don't ask me why because, like me, you are just another person on the interwebz.  I just need a sane, informed human and right now (and for quite awhile) you are that person re: the ME.

    Blessings, InAntalya.  

    " My faith in the Constitution is whole; it is complete; it is total." Barbara Jordan, 1974

    by gchaucer2 on Sun Mar 24, 2013 at 03:06:10 PM PDT

    •  Thanks. (5+ / 0-)

      Now that spring has come I think we will be able to get a good idea of what will happen this year in Syria.

      Right now I still feel that this year will be a status quo stalemate. The food insecurity issue will be a (or the) major factor and I have been hearing that rebel forces are experiencing 'defections' because rebel losses are something like 1 in 5 or more.

      When I have a little more information I will write about it here on DK.

      Lamb chop, we can quibble what to call it, but I think we can both agree it's creepy.

      by InAntalya on Sun Mar 24, 2013 at 03:21:35 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  We only hear one side of the story (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      corvo, mickT, truong son traveler

      The crimes of the islamic rebels are shocking (see as an example last suicide bombing in Damascus few days ago) but the media here have only focused and emphasized on the crimes of the Assad regime.

      •  Not sure what you (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Odysseus, KenBee

        are saying but I listen to BBC and the Damascus bombing was the top story after it happened.

        I've stopped relying on American TM for anything -- domestic or foreign.   For ease of reporting, I understand why our media (lazy) focuses on the Assad regime -- because they are mass murderers.

        It is the subtleties of the opposition which I need to understand and InAtalya has been helpful.

        " My faith in the Constitution is whole; it is complete; it is total." Barbara Jordan, 1974

        by gchaucer2 on Sun Mar 24, 2013 at 03:47:00 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  If you read the Guardian (5+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          mickT, protectspice, Alexandre, KenBee, JesseCW

          then you know how desperately the British media are pushing the jihadi side.

          Dogs from the street can have all the desirable qualities that one could want from pet dogs. Most adopted stray dogs are usually humble and exceptionally faithful to their owners as if they are grateful for this kindness. -- H.M. Bhumibol Adulyadej

          by corvo on Sun Mar 24, 2013 at 05:52:19 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Which jihadi side would that be? (0+ / 0-)

            What a civil war--the radical shiite islamists vs. the radical sunni islamists.  I'm sure there are decent Syrian democrats out there--but it's hard to hear them thru the fog.  I'm tilting toward the Sunni's--anything to deflate Iran and Hezbollah.

  •  Syrian opposition faces tough sledding (3+ / 0-)

    as I note Kerry has warned Iraq against allowing Iran to use their airspace and land space to transport men and supplies to Assad supposedly.

    However the Saudis continue to supply men and supplies to their neighbors who are also facing internal strife without a murmur from the US  

  •  There is no rational Syrian opposition (4+ / 0-)

    The jihadists and extremists drive the war against the Assad regime.  All they achieve is to destroy that country.   The insistence of some european countries like France and England to keep supporting that war to bring the Assad regime down is puzzling.   If that were to happen, the outcome would be an insane islamic fundamentalist regime.   That would be far worse for everyone.

    •  Perhaps that's exactly what they want. (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      protectspice, Alexandre, marsanges

      They have major players in the armaments business too, and they have their eyes on the same prize: Syria's #1 ally, Iran.  Oh, and they seem to derive pleasure and purpose from twitting Russia too.

      Dogs from the street can have all the desirable qualities that one could want from pet dogs. Most adopted stray dogs are usually humble and exceptionally faithful to their owners as if they are grateful for this kindness. -- H.M. Bhumibol Adulyadej

      by corvo on Sun Mar 24, 2013 at 05:53:45 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  certainly not (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        KenBee, InAntalya, sandbox

        our interest (I´m writing from Europe) is in stability along our southern margin. Not turmoil. There is a significant exchange of populations, which means that the more there are "jihadists" of any persuasion there, the more they are here amongst ourselves, since them is now us. We dont want more people attempting to bomb trains in Cologne or London, or shoot people in Toulouse. So, the more the situation on the southern and eastern part of the mediterranean reflects actual people´s wills, the better for us. Graveyard stability also isnt exactly in our interest, as it still drives extremist opposition.  So no ... if we could have Syria in the way as Tunisia is, we would be glad. More important than weapons exports. And, well established legitimate democratic governments also buy weapons from us, so thats not an argument.

    •  They're pretty confident they can install the kind (2+ / 0-)

      regime they've got going in Libya and Egypt.  Hands willing to sign the IMF and World Bank loans.

      That's all it's about for them.  It's not even about the oil anymore, Syria really doesn't have that much.

      One more economy, however weak, paying a cut right off the top to the transnationals.  

      income gains to the top 1% from 2009 to 2011 were 121% of all income increases. How did that happen? Incomes to the bottom 99% fell by 0.4%

      by JesseCW on Mon Mar 25, 2013 at 01:45:42 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  I believe what it's about goes back (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Mokurai, protectspice

        to this from 1996:

        "Israel can shape its strategic environment, in cooperation with Turkey and Jordan, by weakening, containing, and even rolling back Syria.

        This effort can focus on removing Saddam Hussein from power in Iraq — an important Israeli strategic objective in its own right — as a means of foiling Syria’s regional ambitions."

        authored by:
        Former United States Assistant Secretary of Defense Richard Perle ... the "Study Group Leader", but the final report included ideas from James Colbert, Charles Fairbanks, Jr., Robert Loewenberg, Douglas Feith, David Wurmser, and Meyrav Wurmser.
        and then Syria made it's way into the 7 countries in 5 years neocon hit-list.

        The "strategic objective" regarding Iraq has been completed. "Rolling back" Syria is underway.

        Orwell - "Political language ... is designed to make lies sound truthful and murder respectable"

        by truong son traveler on Mon Mar 25, 2013 at 04:03:28 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

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