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At Alternet, Les Leopold writes Why Is Socialism Doing So Darn Well in Deep-Red North Dakota?

North Dakota's thriving state bank makes a mockery of Wall Street's casino banking system—and that's why financial elites want to crush it:

In 1919, the Non-Partisan League, a vibrant populist organization, won a majority in the legislature and voted the bank into existence. The goal was to free North Dakota farmers from impoverishing debt dependence on the big banks in the Twin Cities, Chicago and New York. More than 90 years later, this state-owned bank is thriving as it helps the state's community banks, businesses, consumers and students obtain loans at reasonable rates. It also delivers a handsome profit to its owners -- the 700,000 residents of North Dakota. In 2011, the BND provided more than $70 million to the state's coffers. Extrapolate that profit-per-person to a big state like California and you're looking at an extra $3.8 billion a year in state revenues that could be used to fund education and infrastructure.

One of America's Best Kept Secrets

Les Leopold, labor writer and director of both The Labor Institute and the Public Health Institute.
Les Leopold
Each time we pay our state and local taxes -- and all manner of fees -- the state deposits those revenues in a bank. If you're in any state but North Dakota, nearly all of these deposits end up in Wall Street's too-big to-fail banks, because those banks are the only entities large enough to handle the load. The vast majority of the nation's 7,000 community banks are too small to provide the array of cash management services that state and local governments require. We're talking big bucks; at least $1 trillion of our local tax dollars find their way to Wall Street banks, according to Marc Armstrong, executive director of the Public Banking Institute. [...]

Banks are supposed to serve as intermediaries that turn our savings and checking deposits into productive loans to businesses and consumers. That's how jobs are supported and created. But the BND, a state agency, goes one step further. Through its Partnership in Assisting Community Expansion, for example, it provides loans at below-market interest rates to businesses if and only if those businesses create at least one job for every $100,000 loaned. If the $1 trillion that now flows to Wall Street instead were deposited in public state banks in all 50 states using this same approach, up to 10 million new jobs could be created. That would effectively end our destructive unemployment crisis. [...]

As state government employees, BND executives have no incentive to gamble their way toward enormous pay packages. As you can see, the top six BND officers earn a good living [...]

Eric Hardmeyer, President and CEO: $232,500
Bob Humann, Chief Lending Officer: $135,133
Tim Porter, Chief Administrative Officer: $122,533
Joe Herslip, Chief Business Officer: $105,000
Lori Leingang, Chief Administrative Officer: $105,000
Wally Erhardt, Director of Student Loans of North Dakota: $91,725

The very existence of a successful BND undermines Wall Street's claim that in order to attract the best talent big banks need to offer enormous pay packages. Yet somehow, North Dakota is able to find the talent to run one of the soundest banks in the country? The BND is living proof that Wall Street's rationale for sky-high executive pay is a self-serving fabrication.


Blast from the Past. At Daily Kos on this date in 2010Insurers Say They Don't Have to Cover Sick Kids Yet:

The NYT's Robert Pear continues coverage of the key story coming out of last week's passage and signing of health insurance reform: the contention by insurers that a key part of the law that is supposed to take effect immediately will not. That is, they are asserting that the provision that prevents them from denying coverage to children with pre-existing conditions--intended to begin with policies that begin on or after Sept. 23, 2010--doesn't do that at all. [...]

Tweet of the Day:

Jesus died for your sins, so make 'em fun.
@TheTweetOfGod via Twitter for iPad
(BTW, on Twitter, God has 569,686 Followers, but He only Follows one: Justin Bieber.)



On today's Kagro in the Morning show: Greg Dworkin on CT's progress toward new gun measures, and new polling saying fervor for reform hasn't dimmed. "Moms Demand Action" draws a counter-protest: guys with AR-15s. Just one of the weird meta issues arising from protesting about guns by showing up with guns. City council declares all future gun restrictions unconstitutional, because they love the Constitution except for supremacy and also the separation of powers. Despite her CPAC railing against consultants, most of Sarah Palin's PAC money went to... consultants. WalMart now wants you to pay them to work there.


High Impact Posts. Top Comments. Overnight News Digest.

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Comment Preferences

    •  Well, here's what Ginsburg said (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      third Party please

      ..... Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg had, before joining the Court, criticized the decision for terminating a nascent movement to liberalize abortion law through legislation.[54]

      Jeffrey Rosen[62] and Michael Kinsley[63] echo Ginsburg, arguing that a legislative approach movement would have been the correct way to build a more durable consensus in support of abortion rights.

      http://en.wikipedia.org/...

      •  One can certainly argue legal points... (7+ / 0-)

        ...regarding the basis on which Roe was founded.

        But today's situation proves just how hollow Rosen's echoing of Ginsburg a decade ago was. Here he is in The New Republic in 2003:

        But the alarmism about abortion rights is wrong. Rather than hanging by a five-to-four thread, the core principle of Roe is supported by six justices. And, even in the unlikely event that Roe were overturned, the core right it protects--the right to choose abortion early in pregnancy--isn't likely to be threatened on a broad scale. For the past 30 years, national polls have revealed a consistent and moderate consensus on abortion: Majorities strongly oppose bans on early-term abortions and strongly support restrictions on late-term abortions. If Roe were overturned, the relative political weakness of the extreme pro-life position would be exposed, and the Republican Party would be torn apart at the seams because many Republicans oppose early-term bans and would desert the party in droves. "The last thing in the world the White House would want is that Roe v. Wade is overturned," says a prominent Republican congressional aide. "The reason being is that it would energize the nation's pro-choice constituency, ... and it would cause a huge fissure in the Republican Party, which has been generally harmonious over the issue because of the belief that the pro-life position will never truly be tested." At the same time, if Roe were overturned, the expanded and moderate Democratic majority would be free to distance itself from extremists in the pro-choice movement who persist in fighting restrictions on late-term abortions, which most Americans embrace. In short, 30 years later, it seems increasingly clear that this pro-choice magazine was correct in 1973 when it criticized Roe on constitutional grounds. Its overturning would be the best thing that could happen to the federal judiciary, the pro-choice movement, and the moderate majority of the American people.

        I suspect you appreciate his turn-of-phrase in the final five words of that excerpt. But I wonder if you or Rosen have looked at what's actually happened. Most states have worked to restrict abortion and women's access to almost since the minute Roe was decided. Abortion is now more difficult to obtain, few physicians are being trained in it, two states will soon have zero abortion clinics, with two more quite likely to follow suit. More than 135 new restrictions on abortion were passed in 2011-2012 in two dozen states

        The Gallup Poll found in 1995 that 51% of the population wanted abortion to be legal only in a few or no circumstances; by 2012, that figure had risen to 56%. The numbers have sporadically been worse, to be sure, but the current trend is not encouraging.

        If Roe were overturned, nothing to be alarmed about? The Center for Reproductive Rights puts the number of states that would ban abortion within a year at 30. Nine already have laws on the books that ban abortion immediately if Roe is overturned. In 1982, there were 2,900 abortion providers across the U.S. By 2008, there were 1,793.

        87% of counties have no abortion provider. Exclude metropolitan areas and that figure rises to 97%.

        Don't tell me what you believe, show me what you do and I will tell you what you believe.

        by Meteor Blades on Fri Mar 29, 2013 at 11:42:05 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  I don't neccesarily agree (0+ / 0-)

          with Ginsburg or Rosen, but I think that point merited a discussion as I have heard it before. And yes I appreciate the term "moderate majority" as used by Rosen.

          But to continue the discussion since no one else has chimed in I am sure what Ginsburg/Rosen would argue is that a democratic movement in legalizing abortion would have created a more formidable and durable consensus around abortion rights than what you have right now. I hope you're not implying that that Ginsburg/Rosen are bad faith actors since both are pro-choice.

          I don't buy the idea that 30 states would ban abortion if given the opportunity. Even in MS , the human life amendment could not pass when there was a very conservative electorate during the 2012 primaries. Plus I think the idea of state regulations wouldn't be as important because I think we would have ended up with a federal abortion law that set guidelines.

          Neither Ginsburg,Rosen , or I are advocating for the repeal of Roe since Roe/Casey have set a framework for abortion, but in a counter-factual world you could see how a better consensus could have been set up with less acrimony.

          Very few Americans are absolutists on abortion rights although the media does sometimes imply so. I don't think there's a contradiction between being pro-choice and supporting a ban on partial birth abortion bans and supporting parental notification laws for example. I believe Biden and Obama have supported both in principle.

          Throughout my entire public career I have followed the personal philosophy that I am a free man, an American, a public servant, and a member of my party, in that order always and only." -- LBJ

          by moderatemajority on Sat Mar 30, 2013 at 12:01:21 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  For the record, I have been involved... (3+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Urban Owl, tardis10, YucatanMan

            ...in the battle over abortion for more than four decades and helped with 14 other men and women to set up one of the first non-profit abortion clinics in the United States in 1973. It is still in existence (although it was also one of the first to be firebombed; they missed and hit our garage instead).

            I don't agree, at all, that liberal legislation would have spread across the country in the absence of Roe or that federal legislation would have passed Congress. And I have 40 years of legislation across the country of states doing everything they can short of banning abortion to back me up. States are right now working on making it impossible for clinics to operate.

            None of this means I think Roe was perfectly decided. But Ginsburg (with respect) and Rosen and McKinsey are completely off-base if they stick to the views they expressed in the past on the situation. The forced-birthers are winning.

            Don't tell me what you believe, show me what you do and I will tell you what you believe.

            by Meteor Blades on Sat Mar 30, 2013 at 12:23:03 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  I think the premise of your argument (0+ / 0-)

              re: abortion restricted passed post-Roe does not necessarily support your claim. What they and maybe I would argue is that you see this type of hostile reaction because Roe short-circuited the democratic deliberations on abortion rights that were percolating in the early 1970's and engendered hostility. And it of course contributed to political polarization as both parties were heterdox on abortion :The Kennedys were-pro-life , but the Bushes and Goldwaters were pro-choice, but such factions have disappeared post-Roe.

              And you can specifically argue that the circumstances surrounding Roe and Casey created hyberbolic and coarsened discourse. Although in the case of Mississippi it is obvious they want to regulate abortion out of existence there are many-common sense restrictions on abortion such as partial-birth abortion and parental notification laws that are perfectly reasonable with the proper safeguards. However, when such matters come up reasonable discourse is rarely found. Any restriction on abortion becomes the end of Roe v. Wade as we know it and extreme Republicans make loathsome comments about abortion/rape and push ridiculous things like the human life amendment as a tool to pander to their base.

              Throughout my entire public career I have followed the personal philosophy that I am a free man, an American, a public servant, and a member of my party, in that order always and only." -- LBJ

              by moderatemajority on Sat Mar 30, 2013 at 12:38:05 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  I am an extremist on abortion and I do not... (6+ / 0-)

                ...apologize for it. The woman always comes first. The fetus is secondary until it draws breath. Period.

                We know that late-term abortions are rare and undertaken in circumstances of great anguish, not casually. Nobody wants one. But banning them? Another example of lawmakers saying they know better than women and their physicians. (And please, I can have a civil conversation about differences in this matter, but not when I have to cringe through right-wing tropes like "partial-birth.")

                Parental notification laws are fraught with problems and ought only to exist if easily granted, well-known exceptions are possible without the minor child exposing herself to potential abuse. Parental consent laws, on the other hand, should not exist for abortion (with requirements for consent from both parents being the first target for repeal).

                The state should cover the cost of all abortions, elective or medically necessary, in the cases of anyone not able to pay, which means getting Congress to stop renewing the Hyde Amendment every year so that Medicaid will be freed from its forced-birther shackles.

                Don't tell me what you believe, show me what you do and I will tell you what you believe.

                by Meteor Blades on Sat Mar 30, 2013 at 12:57:46 AM PDT

                [ Parent ]

              •  That you support a law does not make it reasonable (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                Urban Owl

                or mean that it's got anything to do with "common sense".

                The false middle isn't the high ground.  It's the home of the Free Soiler and the "Separate but equal" and "Civil Unions but not Marriage" crowd.

                income gains to the top 1% from 2009 to 2011 were 121% of all income increases. How did that happen? Incomes to the bottom 99% fell by 0.4%

                by JesseCW on Sat Mar 30, 2013 at 01:32:20 AM PDT

                [ Parent ]

                •  It's also (0+ / 0-)

                  the home of the Bipartisan Containment Policy that beat back Communism, the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Welfare Reform of 1996, the Americans with Disabilities Act, the Clean Air Act, and I think you get the point :)

                  Throughout my entire public career I have followed the personal philosophy that I am a free man, an American, a public servant, and a member of my party, in that order always and only." -- LBJ

                  by moderatemajority on Sat Mar 30, 2013 at 01:44:39 AM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

                  •  You are proud of No Gun Ri and Operation Condor (0+ / 0-)

                    and the Phoenix Program?

                    You're proud of having supported the Taliban?

                    That's "the Bipartisan Containment Policy".

                    income gains to the top 1% from 2009 to 2011 were 121% of all income increases. How did that happen? Incomes to the bottom 99% fell by 0.4%

                    by JesseCW on Sat Mar 30, 2013 at 02:03:03 AM PDT

                    [ Parent ]

                    •  i am going to decline responding to your posts (0+ / 0-)

                      for a while.  I enjoy spirited debates, but don't see the point in pissing matches. I think you crossed that rubicon when in earlier post you said

                      "You already know what you can do with your (0+ / 0-)
                      "condolences"."

                      Enjoy the rest of your night or the rest of your day depending on your sleeping patterns, sir.

                      Throughout my entire public career I have followed the personal philosophy that I am a free man, an American, a public servant, and a member of my party, in that order always and only." -- LBJ

                      by moderatemajority on Sat Mar 30, 2013 at 02:09:49 AM PDT

                      [ Parent ]

          •  I don't agree that Roe hurt abortion rights (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            JeffW

            The idea that all the anti-choice fanaticism would have dissolved in reasonable discussion over decades of local incrementalism ignores a lot.

            The alternative argument, by Scott Lemieux:
            LGM post

            You can comfortably contemplate all those forced births (or illegal abortions) that would have happened in your more incrementalism world. I am glad Roe opened the door to legal and safe abortions for millions of Americans.

            The ongoing assault on women's rights should not be blamed on Roe instead of on the assaulters.

            We can safely abandon the doctrine of the eighties, namely that the rich were not working because they had too little money, the poor because they had too much. JK Galbraith, 1991

            by Urban Owl on Sat Mar 30, 2013 at 08:13:02 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

  •  742,756 registered users on dKos now. (19+ / 0-)

    Here are the 10 newest registered users on dKos.  Hope to see their comments and diaries here soon!  (If they're not spammers.)

    doubtmath85
    redcheese36
    crook82edward
    slip2washer
    canunit72
    planet7crown
    kale1kidney
    tax87space
    candiceswilson
    thomassleet68


    And since our society is obsessed with numbers that end in a lot of zeros as milestones, here's a special shoutout to users:
    #741,300: quart04sponge
    #741,400: fiberbotany54
    #741,500: eastgreek2
    #741,600: banana3europe
    #741,700: gram7shoe
    #741,800: knotface3
    #741,900: cross0debtor
    #742,000: cattle6sphynx
    #742,100: drink9advice
    #742,200: plierclass3
    #742,300: syriashrimp49
    #742,400: edwardmexico91
    #742,500: pinttarget38
    #742,600: bubble54freeze
    #742,700: beam39carbon

    We've added a whopping 1,505 more users in the last 24 hours.  This is a continuation going back to May where we've been absolutely flooded with new users.  I'm pretty sure almost all of these new users are spammers or bots.  While the rate had been getting faster, it seems they suddenly started slowing down right when Hurricane Sandy hit.  It slowed down to under 1,000 new users in a 24-hour period, and we were back down to somewhat over 100 new users every 24 hours or so, until about January 30th, when it exploded again.  What are they planning?


    And for your Diary Rescue music pleasure, here's Everclear's "AM Radio".

  •  Now that's a tweet of the day... (6+ / 0-)

    I can believe in. ;)




    Somebody has to do something, and it's just incredibly pathetic that it has to be us.
    ~ Jerry Garcia

    by DeadHead on Fri Mar 29, 2013 at 08:32:24 PM PDT

  •  He ain't kiddin', bub. (7+ / 0-)
    "...our actions as a team over the past couple of months have made a difference for all Americans,” Boehner wrote.

    The Great Awakening Is Afire! Think outside the box.

    by franklyn on Fri Mar 29, 2013 at 08:34:42 PM PDT

    •  If Harry Reid doesn't blow up the filibuster soon (6+ / 0-)

      I think we should start looking for someone to primary him with the next time he's up for re-election.

      There are still four openings on the DC Circuit Court of Appeals, and Republicans have repeatedly filibustered every single Obama nominee now - going on five years.

      I don't know what Harry Reid thinks he's getting from his bullshit handshake deal with McConnell. If Republicans get control of the Senate in 2014 the first thing they'll do is nuke the filibuster.

      Republicans don't give a damn about Senate tradition, if they didn't they wouldn't have set a record for filibuster abuse.

      "Load up on guns, bring your friends. It's fun to lose and to pretend."::::::::::: ~Kurt Cobain

      by Jeff Y on Fri Mar 29, 2013 at 08:51:43 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Re: BND. We have Pluto-Dems here who (11+ / 0-)

    will argue that there is no way you could attract the talent necessary to those sr. level bank jobs with compensation packages like that.

    So I guess that's why the bank is doing so poorly.

    What's the point of letting neoliberals into the tent when neoliberalism is burning down the campground?

    by Words In Action on Fri Mar 29, 2013 at 08:35:00 PM PDT

    •  Maybe they just don't have (6+ / 0-)

      big ticket MBAs...

      I think that's the one thing top MBA programs teach their graduates: don't work for anything less than a 7 figure compensation package.

      Words can sometimes, in moments of grace, attain the quality of deeds. --Elie Wiesel

      by a gilas girl on Fri Mar 29, 2013 at 08:48:11 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Where else can state banks work? (4+ / 0-)

      Where else are they being considered?

      There is at least a latent movement in Vermont.

      How do we whip this into passage?

      -7.75 -4.67

      "Freedom's just another word for nothing left to lose."

      There are no Christians in foxholes.

      by Odysseus on Fri Mar 29, 2013 at 11:00:11 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  They can, of course, can work EVERYWHERE (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Odysseus

        There are in each and every state talent, astute Financial Professionals who would be willing to faithfully perform mundane, unexciting banking functions and services for a fraction of Wall Street compensation and without annual bonuses. Simply because it's enough for them and right for their communities and states.

        Hence the problem of attempting to enable these entities in 49 other states: it undermines the FIRE sector rationale for obscene compensation in the FIRE sector. I hope Vermont can make that 48.

        When you are right you cannot be too radical; when you are wrong, you cannot be too conservative. --Martin Luther King Jr.

        by Egalitare on Sat Mar 30, 2013 at 05:53:57 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  There is also a "latent" effort in North Carolina, (0+ / 0-)

      spearheaded by one of our few Senate "greats", Sen. Ellie Kinnaird.

      Her effort was written up in the Charlotte Observer on March 19:

      Eleanor Kinnaird, a Chapel Hill Democrat who says she has “very little love for this industry,” is the primary – and so far only – sponsor for Senate Bill 150, which calls for the creation of a commission to study the impact of a state-owned bank that would receive deposits of state funds.

      If Kinnaird is successful, North Carolina would become the second state to have a state-owned bank. The only state with one is North Dakota.

      snip

      “A lot of people say, ‘Why should we be captive to the banks who are not acting in the best interest of our people?’ ” she said. “I think the banking industry has not served the common good.”

      snip

      But that doesn’t mean North Carolina’s banking industry isn’t paying attention to the bill.

      Nathan Batts, senior vice president and counsel for the bankers association, said a state-run bank would compete against privately run banks. A state-run bank would also create “an expansion of state government when we are trying to create efficiencies in North Carolina,” he said.

      Kinnaird, who represents Senate District 23, which is composed of Chatham and Orange counties, said she wants to emulate the success of Bank of North Dakota. That bank, she said, has stabilized that state’s economy “and led to a flourishing, thriving citizenry.”

      The North Dakota legislature created the Bank of North Dakota in 1919 to help the state’s agriculture industry as farmers faced rising interest rates, according to the bank’s website.

      Rick Clayburgh, president and CEO of the North Dakota Bankers Association, said the Bank of North Dakota “has a great reputation, and it’s well respected by the private-sector banks in North Dakota.”

      Sen. Kinnaird's bill doesn't even attempt to create a "state" bank, just authorizes a study...but wanna bet our teabag-dominated legislature has no interest in even letting it out of committee? Even though they say they're all for "the middle class" and so forth?

      Sen. Kinnaird is a rarity: one of the few actual liberals in the North Carolina legislature. She is a giant among men - and women.

      The "big lie" going around in North Carolina right now is that "all our state's problems are the result of 100 years of liberal Democrat rule", which is what the newly-minted teabag majorities in both chambers - and in the Governor's mansion, too, with the election appointment by corporate interests of Gov. Scott Walker Rat McCrory - use as the excuse for every piece of outrageous legislation they've rammed through in the first two months of the legislative session.

      But lost in the fog of rightwing lies is that the "liberal Democratic rule" was really 100 years of Blue-Doggism, and many of the most prominent Democrats still in office are aligned with the worst of the Republican majority.

      I wish we could be privileged to have a state-run bank such as North Dakota's, but even Sen. Kinnaird believes the effort is futile:

      But Kinnaird, who introduced similar legislation last year, has already acknowledged the long odds. She said a state-run bank is simply “not a possibility here” in North Carolina

      "Bernie Madoff's mistake was stealing from the rich. If he'd stolen from the poor he'd have a cabinet position." -OPOL

      by blue in NC on Sat Mar 30, 2013 at 06:14:52 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  On this day, March 29 (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    JML9999, Aunt Pat, Larsstephens, Jeff Y

    a very good film won best Film and best score on the composers birthday.     I write about that

    "We didn't set out to save the world; we set out to wonder how other people are doing and to reflect on how our actions affect other people's hearts." - Pema Chodron

    by teacherken on Fri Mar 29, 2013 at 08:37:08 PM PDT

  •  Could paying a living wage help retail make better (5+ / 0-)

    profits?

    an examination of an Atlantic Magazine article that suggests yes in this post

    "We didn't set out to save the world; we set out to wonder how other people are doing and to reflect on how our actions affect other people's hearts." - Pema Chodron

    by teacherken on Fri Mar 29, 2013 at 08:38:31 PM PDT

  •  Republican Minority Outreach (8+ / 0-)

    North Carolina edition:

    Visit NBCNews.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy

    North Carolina GOPers Push Bills To Limit Early Voting, Same-Day Registration

    http://livewire.talkingpointsmemo.com/...

    "Load up on guns, bring your friends. It's fun to lose and to pretend."::::::::::: ~Kurt Cobain

    by Jeff Y on Fri Mar 29, 2013 at 08:39:55 PM PDT

    •  Isn't that nice. The GOP wants to welcome (7+ / 0-)

      into their party all non-white voters they fail to prevent from voting.




      Somebody has to do something, and it's just incredibly pathetic that it has to be us.
      ~ Jerry Garcia

      by DeadHead on Fri Mar 29, 2013 at 08:44:41 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Oh, that's not all: NC Gov. Rat McCrory is (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      JeffW, Jeff Y

      working hard on his "outreach" to North Carolina's 800,000 Latino residents. According to The Charlotte Observer,

      North Carolina’s Latino advocates are voicing alarm following the governor’s decision to eliminate the state’s office for Latino affairs.

      The closing of the Office of Hispanic/Latino affairs was sudden and caught many by surprise. The move appears to have exacerbated the already tense relationship between Republican Gov. Pat McCrory and the Latino community, including criticism over a driver’s license plan for young immigrants.

      snip

      But advocates such as Jess George, executive director of Latin American Coalition in Charlotte, sees the move as a contradiction to national efforts by the Republican Party to appear more welcoming to Latinos. Those efforts include officially supporting calls to legalize the nation’s 11 million illegal immigrants.

      “The message from Raleigh is that Latinos in North Carolina don’t matter,” she said. “To close the office of Hispanic affairs only goes to confirm what many people suspect in our state, which is that, despite movement with the Republican Party at the national level towards more bipartisan solutions around comprehensive immigration reform, North Carolina conservatives don’t seem to have gotten the same memo.”

      The concerns are just the latest clash that McCrory has had with the Latino community since his election last fall.

      One of his first orders of business after taking office this year was signing off on the “pink licenses” for young immigrants who had been living in the country illegally but were granted federal protections from being deported. The licenses, which included a large pink stripe, were scrapped amid the uproar led by advocates who described them as a modern-day scarlet letter.

      Guess we've got to thank Gov. Rat McCrory...he's doing his best to alienate as many Democratic-leaning constituencies as possible in a valiant effort to turn the state blue again by 2016.

      I hope his (and his party's) efforts take effect even sooner, so that we can retain Sen. Kay Hagan in her reelection bid.

      "Bernie Madoff's mistake was stealing from the rich. If he'd stolen from the poor he'd have a cabinet position." -OPOL

      by blue in NC on Sat Mar 30, 2013 at 06:24:58 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Patrick J. Buchanan again appears on the scene (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Aunt Pat, Larsstephens, Jeff Y

    in a post at American Conservative to which I provide the link if you care, but in this post I offer what I posted there in response

    "We didn't set out to save the world; we set out to wonder how other people are doing and to reflect on how our actions affect other people's hearts." - Pema Chodron

    by teacherken on Fri Mar 29, 2013 at 08:40:02 PM PDT

  •  God follows Justin Bieber? (7+ / 0-)

    That is so wrong.

    Confession time: When I'm not ranting about politics, I write romance novels

    by teresahill on Fri Mar 29, 2013 at 08:41:19 PM PDT

  •  Paul Krugman: "Cheating Our Chidren" (5+ / 0-)

    is the title of this post from this morning.  I explore his column today, follow a link he gives, and link to a relevant piece in 2009.

    "We didn't set out to save the world; we set out to wonder how other people are doing and to reflect on how our actions affect other people's hearts." - Pema Chodron

    by teacherken on Fri Mar 29, 2013 at 08:42:57 PM PDT

  •  Friday Night Tweetapallooza... (8+ / 0-)

    A Poet is at the same time a force for Solidarity and for Solitude -- Pablo Neruda / Listen to The After Show and The Justice Department on Netroots Radio

    by justiceputnam on Fri Mar 29, 2013 at 08:45:42 PM PDT

  •  NK has re-declared war on SK. (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Larsstephens, Jeff Y, JeffW, Eric Nelson

    Journalists flock to Austin to observe NK first strike capabilities.
    Kim chi futures soar.

    http://ca.news.yahoo.com/...

    "Go well through life"-Me (As far as I know)

    by MTmofo on Fri Mar 29, 2013 at 08:52:37 PM PDT

  •  No, no, no. ND State Bank is not pragmatic. (8+ / 0-)

    Everyone knows that for a political/economic thing to be called "pragamatic" it can't possibly actually work.

    Everything which can work in the real world to solve a problem is, by very definition!, "not pragmatic."

    Therefore, North Dakota is a unicorn/pony combo. Now, everyone stop thinking about this.

    Now!


    If Republicans said every 3rd person named "Smith" should hang, we'd bargain them to every 7th. Then we'll see apologia written praising this most pragmatic compromise. There's our losing formula.

    by Jim P on Fri Mar 29, 2013 at 08:53:34 PM PDT

  •  The Bank of North Dakota counts jobs created (9+ / 0-)

    They require someone to create jobs instead of destroying them in order to be treated as a "job creator".

    Freedom isn't free. Patriots pay taxes.

    by Dogs are fuzzy on Fri Mar 29, 2013 at 08:54:54 PM PDT

  •  Have a great weekend everyone! (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    DeadHead, lineatus, Aunt Pat, AirSpencer

    "Load up on guns, bring your friends. It's fun to lose and to pretend."::::::::::: ~Kurt Cobain

    by Jeff Y on Fri Mar 29, 2013 at 09:02:30 PM PDT

  •  I suggest that when the big banks are (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Aunt Pat, JeffW, FiredUpInCA, Eric Nelson

    discussing talent and success, they do not mean the same talents nor metrics for success as you or I might mean.

    To put the torture behind us is, inevitably, to put it in front of us.

    by UntimelyRippd on Fri Mar 29, 2013 at 09:07:24 PM PDT

  •  I've had a rough week, so omg I needed this: (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Aunt Pat, Eric Nelson, navajo
    (BTW, on Twitter, God has 569,686 Followers, but He only Follows one: Justin Bieber.)
    MB, I fucking love you and don't you forget it.
  •  Rachel Maddow referenced this tonight (5+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    lineatus, Jeff Y, Eric Nelson, Aunt Pat, OLinda

    at the end of her show. I had forgotten all about it.

    You younger Kossacks might not remember Ronald Reagan. Let me tell you, he was nuts.

  •  Climate denial at Forbes (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Aunt Pat, Eric Nelson, JeffW

    "Senators are a never-ending source of amusement, amazement, and discouragement" ~ Will Rogers

    by Lefty Coaster on Fri Mar 29, 2013 at 09:32:07 PM PDT

    •  Is this snark? (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      JeffW, Lefty Coaster
      If, and please note the if is very important here, climate sensitivity is two degrees, this gives us perhaps another 40 to 50 years before we really must, must, be reducing our carbon emissions. It means that we really don’t have to be gutting industrial civilisation right now in order to meet our targets. And there’s a joy in that: gutting industrial civilisation would make us all a great deal poorer, now and on into the future. But even more importantly than that a 40 to 50 year timescale gives us the opportunity to deal with climate change pretty much without doing anything at all.
      So just wait until Solar is cheaper than fossil fuels?
      Wow - more "market based" denial sounds like to me
  •  Okiciyap Quilt Auction Diaries Series (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Ninepatch, Eric Nelson

    Okiciyap logo

    These diaries are to promote the Okiciyap Quilt Auction which will directly benefit Okiciyap Food Pantry and Childrens Center.  Please visit, read & recommend them.  The Auction Has Begun.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Okiciyap: Feeding The Hungry ~ glorificus

    Okiciyap Quilt Auction: Thanking DK Quilters Who Share Their Quilt Story~ Patriot Daily News Clearinghouse

    Two-Spirit and Okiciyap ~ Horace Boothroyd III

    This quilt is not invisible- Okiciyap is Lakota for 'we help' and we can help auction it ~ Denise Oliver Velez

    Okiciyap Quilt Guild Auction. We Help. That's What It's All About. ~ radical simplicity

    Okiciyap Quilt Auction: Let the Bidding Begin ~ GreyHawk

    Okiciyap Quilt Auction benefit begins Wednesday. Help the people of Cheyenne River ~ Meteor Blades

    Okiciyap - We Help ~ OPOL

    DK Quilt Guild & Okiciyap Quilt Auction: Why this Quilt ~ leu2500

    Okiciyap Dkos Auction Quilt ~ BeadLady

    Of Quilts and History: The Okiciyap Quilt Auction ~ winifred3

    DK Quilt Guild: Okiciyap Quilt Auction~We Quilt For Others ~ Pam from Calif

    Feeding the Body, Feeding the Spirit: Okiciyap (We Help) ~ Aji

    Twelve is a community number ~ GreyHawk

    Helping the Helpers Who Helped the Helpers ~ Glen The Plumber

    DK Quilt Guild: The Okiciyap Quilt ~ BeadLady

    TIME FOR THE BIG SHOW!!!! ~ glorificus

    DK Quilt Guild: Quilting for a Good Cause ~ weck
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Okiciyap 2013 Quilt~ DK Quilt Guild

    Okiciyap 2013 Quilt~ DK Quilt Guild

    If you cannot afford to bid on the quilt, or if you were outbid, you can contribute here:

    Okiciyap Food Pantry

    P.O. Box 172

    Isabel, S.D. 57633

    online donation page

    It is a terrible thing to see and have no vision. ~ Helen Keller

    by Pam from Calif on Fri Mar 29, 2013 at 09:43:19 PM PDT

  •  North Dakota looked across northern border? (6+ / 0-)
    Not a single Canadian bank failed during the Great Depression, and not a single one failed during the recent U.S. crisis now dubbed the Great Recession. Fewer than 1 percent of all Canadian mortgages are in arrears.

    Defenders of the popular U.S. mortgage-interest deduction call it a big driver of U.S. home ownership, which peaked in 2005 at 69.1 percent. (It fell to 66.9 percent late last year.)

    But even without a mortgage-interest deduction, Canada's percentage of home ownership_ at 68.4 percent, according to the most recent Canadian census in 2006 and now thought to be higher — is comparable to U.S. home ownership rates.

    http://www.mcclatchydc.com/...
    •  MID does not drive home ownership. (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Paul1a
      Defenders of the popular U.S. mortgage-interest deduction call it a big driver of U.S. home ownership, which peaked in 2005 at 69.1 percent. (It fell to 66.9 percent late last year.)
      Wow, that's deeply wrong.  The MID is a subsidy to the high priced coasts.  There are entire MSAs where the median home price does not rise to a level which even qualifies for the MID.

      -7.75 -4.67

      "Freedom's just another word for nothing left to lose."

      There are no Christians in foxholes.

      by Odysseus on Fri Mar 29, 2013 at 10:43:02 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Speaking of Bankers... (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    JeffW, Eric Nelson

    From Jonathan Turley's Blog

    Too Big To Jail? Obama Administration Agrees To Large Penalty In Exchange For Letting Billionaire Escape Insider Training Charge While His Subordinates Plead Guilty
    He ends the piece:
    I recommend Cassidy’s article to you below but I suggest not driving or operating heavy equipment after reading the piece.

    Source: New Yorker [the link gets this, below:]

    Is Steven A. Cohen Buying Off the U.S. Government?

    Unless the judge, Victor Marrero, rejects the settlement between the Securities and Exchange Commission and SAC, which was announced a couple of weeks ago, Cohen will be free to go about his business, which has long been clouded by suspicions of insider trading, once he writes a check of six hundred and sixteen million dollars to the Securities and Exchange Commission. There will be no further sanctions and no admission of wrongdoing. And in fact, Cohen already appears to be celebrating. According to a report in the Times, he has just purchased a Picasso painting, “Le Rêve,” for a hundred and fifty-five million dollars, and an ocean-front mansion in East Hampton, for sixty million dollars.

    I'm sick of attempts to steer this nation from principles evolved in The Age of Reason to hallucinations derived from illiterate herdsmen. ~ Crashing Vor

    by NonnyO on Fri Mar 29, 2013 at 09:53:22 PM PDT

  •  Now if the GOP base would just connect the dots.. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    JeffW

    ..about Social security - 'keep your DFH socialist govt. hands off my Medicare',
    Or The NFL:

    To big to fail Bail outs? - another dot connected -  could lead to Wall street reform considered a good thing.

    On to Campaign finance reform:

    MSNBC’s Martin Bashir: If Socialism Works for the NFL, Why Not Use It in Campaigns?
    And many other sinfully sinful sins we'd already be forgiven for - even by the right  :)
  •  Ultimately, the success (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Odysseus, FiredUpInCA, Paul1a

    of any bank will be tied to the success of the economy in which it invests in. The reason the Bank of N.D. is doing well is  because ND is booming because of oil shale. I am sure if they had heavily invested , in say, Michigan, they wouldn't be doing as well.

  •  Remember uncle Vernon Dursley... (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    FiredUpInCA

    .... from the Harry Potter films?  The actor's name was Richard Griffiths.  He had quite a varied career as listed in the Wikipedia page.

    Richard Griffiths, Uncle Vernon in ‘Harry Potter’ Movies, Dies at 65
    Cause of death was complications after heart surgery.  There's a short video of the TV news announcement at the end of the article.

    I'm sick of attempts to steer this nation from principles evolved in The Age of Reason to hallucinations derived from illiterate herdsmen. ~ Crashing Vor

    by NonnyO on Fri Mar 29, 2013 at 10:41:52 PM PDT

  •  Read jpmassar's diary- Stop-and-frisk on trial (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Eric Nelson

    http://www.dailykos.com/...

    Great new diary by jpmassar

  •  Wall street has its problems and I (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    JeffW

    and I am very glad BND is doing very well.

    But I am going to go out on a limb and say that executive team is motivated by something other than pay.

    Those individuals probably for whatever reason really really want to live in ND and that is their best option living in that state.

    But "wall street" is right that their personnel will leave if they are not paid the "sky high" rates.

    Many people do what they want for a living, follow their dreams and do not care about their pay rate.

    Which is fine.

    Many follow the money...and lets face it many of the wallstreet'ers are essentially intellectual mercenaries.

    This people for the most part are not dumb..someone will pay they well for their minds...if its not wall street than they will find another employer.

    But that is where we as society need to come in an make a decision which professions and industries deserve better pay. Our quality professionals  will follow the money.

    The situation right now is derived from a lack of direction set by a central government....

    Long story short many thousands of very smart people have collectively figured out that it is a lot easier of make millions by essentially skimming the hard  dollars of other industries than to make products of value themselves.

    Untill we change that via stronger government controls over the market..this will be the reality.

  •  Who is Awake? (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    DeadHead, JeffW

    Anyone here at this hour ?

    :=)

  •  funny how deep red states use socialism (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    eeff, JeffW, Eric Nelson

    North Dakota has a state bank. Alaska a red state and home to Sarah Palin has the Permanent Dividend Fund which taxes oil extraction and gives that tax directly to the citizens of Alaska as a yearly check. Palin would freak if any other state would try that.  

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