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See Who's tuning in when you visit a website.  Below are 25 Websites showing who's there when you show up (see purple boxes for list).  I was curious and wanted to know, so I took screen shots of each website, uploaded to flickr, and presented the 25 Website screen shots here to make it easier to do a comparison.  

TO BETTER READ THE PEEP LIST for each site, double click on the pic which will take you to a larger version at flickr.com.

And before I forget to mention it, Ghostery won't show up as an app.  On my iMac/Safari it shows up as a little black ghost with a red number IN THE UPPER LEFT HAND CORNER of the page.  Just click on the Ghost to see who is tracking, etc.

ENJOY!

OK big quite obvious disclaimer: I know nothing about computers, networks, software, or the internet.  Also, I put this together mostly so I could compare and find out if some of the peeps show up more often than others.  That said, I apologize if this isn't that well-written.  Family requirements leave me with little time these days.

That said, I somehow found a service called Ghostery that shows who is watching your activity on websites.  From Ghostery's website, it states the following features:

At Ghostery, we believe in enabling informed decisions about your control over your online privacy. The more you learn about the companies trading your online behavioral data, the better you can make decisions about how to control your exposure to those companies.

CONTROL:  Ghostery™ allows you to block scripts from companies that you don't trust, delete local shared objects, and even block images and
iframes. Ghostery puts your web privacy back in your hands.''

DETECT:  Ghostery™ sees the invisible web - tags, web bugs, pixels and beacons. Ghostery tracks the trackers and gives you a roll-call of the ad networks, behavioral data providers, web publishers, and other companies interested in your activity.

LEARN:  After showing you who's tracking you, Ghostery™ also gives you a chance to learn more about each company it identifies. How they describe themselves, a link to their privacy policies, and a sampling of pages where we've found them are just a click away.

So with Ghostery installed, the purple boxes show WHO'S WATCHING when you visit a website.  The purple box disappears after less than a minute on a website.

The following are 25 screen shots of popular websites I captured BEFORE I used the Ghostery BLOCK feature.

Is it possible that one or more of these assist NSA in one of those private/public partnerships?  

Looking for similarities and explanations.

Perhaps the DailyKos technical team can help us better understand what these list mean?  Are the items on the purple list invited BY the website owner?  What are these different services?  Who pays for them?  How do they make money?  Do they pay the website owners?

You will see that some sites have a really long list while others have just a few.  Why?

I will leave an evaluation of the information up to the technically-minded.

I am just sharing what seems to be some interesting data.

I'll begin with DailyKos.

DAILYKOS, not logged on

Dailykos

DAILYKOS, after logging on

DailyKos Signed in

COMCAST.NET
Comcast.net

COMCAST.NET EMAIL SIGN ON PAGE
Comcast Email

WHEN YOU DOWNLOAD GHOSTERY, you can opt out ie BLOCK all these peeps, some of which are services like the Twitter Button which is the only one I don't block, but might.  Not that hard to copy/paste to twitter.

WHAT DO YOU THINK?

COMCAST.NET after SIGNING IN EMAIL ACCOUNT

Comcast - Signed In Email

I checked these three steps for Comcast.net to see if there were any differences.

FOX NEWS
Fox News

MSNBC
MSNBC
THE GUARDIAN

MSNBC

REDDIT

Redditt

RED STATE

Red State

THE HILL

The Hill

THE ECONOMIST

The Economist

OCCUPY WALL STREET

Occupy Wall Street

THE DAILY CALLER

Daily Caller

TPM

TPM

BLOOMBERG BUSINESSWEEK

Business Week

LOS ANGELES TIMES

Los Angels Times

THE WALL STREET JOURNAL

Wall Street Journal

DEMOCRATIC UNDERGROUND

Democratic Underground

TWITTER, not logged on

Twitter

ALTERNET

Alternet

WASHINGTON POST

Washington Post

NEW YORK TIMES

New York times

HUFFINGTON POST

Huffington Post

P J MEDIA

PJ Media

LASTLY AND IMPORTANTLY

Oh, after downloading Ghostery and blocking the peeps, the same purple box shows up with the same peeps BUT WITH the names crossed out with dashes.  This way, you can see if a new peep has shown up.

Ghostery makes it possible to block 1,528 peeps.  Here's the breakdown from Ghostery

Ghostery List of Who's Watching Websites

I am off to check out DO NOT TRACK ME

At the bottom of this link, there are lots of PRIVACY SERVICES.  I chose Ghostery because it is FREE.

I'm not sure if these services are real or just psychological decoration but, hey, it is nice to see WHO THE PEEPS ARE.

Poll

I use Ghostery

72%80 votes
7%8 votes
20%23 votes

| 111 votes | Vote | Results

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Comment Preferences

  •  Interesting about TPM (6+ / 0-)

    I wonder if FDL or Wonkette gets that kind of eyeballing, er, ogling...

    The thing is, it's not so much who's looking, it's who's buying that information, and the intent of that need for data. Worst case we become like the Chinese and our dialogue is influenced by key words and censoring topics. Best case we balance out corporate greed with humanity.

    The day is coming when a single carrot, freshly observed, will set off a revolution. Paul Cezanne Heads up! Al Gore 2016

    by MeToo on Thu Jun 13, 2013 at 10:56:19 AM PDT

    •  wonkette has 12 trackers (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      MeToo, War on Error, SadieSue

      and lots of dirty minds.

      •  I'm referring more to the cutting edge (0+ / 0-)

        dialogue and the cultural stuff under the radar- the stuff that really changes progressive culture. Someone(s) thinks TPM has some inside track... like they know where the bodies are, or at least the investigative reporting that comes close to detecting the secrets.

        Oooh... how many watchers on Anonymous' Twitter feed?

        The day is coming when a single carrot, freshly observed, will set off a revolution. Paul Cezanne Heads up! Al Gore 2016

        by MeToo on Thu Jun 13, 2013 at 11:16:46 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  There's a big difference... (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          War on Error, MeToo

          ...between what these services are doing, and what you seem to be writing about in your comment.

          Your comment seems to suggest that you're worried about tracking the content of a webpage—i.e., what articles and comments are on TPM, what Anonymous's twitter people are saying, etc.

          That is ridiculously easy to do, and I'd be shocked if the NSA wasn't already doing it. They wouldn't need a warrant to look at or store the contents of publicly-available webpages, any more than you or I need a warrant to read those pages.

          The same thing goes for Anonymous's Twitter feed; it's a relatively simple task for anyone familiar with web scripting languages to set up a script that will interface with Twitter's API and pull down and store the contents of that feed.

          If you're publishing something to the public Web (like a blog post, a comment on an article, a public tweet, etc.), you don't have anything approaching a reasonable expectation of privacy.

          But that's a totally different thing from what the services highlighted in this piece are doing, which has nothing to do with the content of the pages and everything to do with tracking who is viewing the pages. And as I mention in my comment below, I really don't really think the NSA would use a tracking tool that can be easily blocked by a free browser extension.

          "When I give food to the poor, they call me a saint. When I ask why the poor have no food, they call me a communist." --Dom Helder Camara, archbishop of Recife

          by JamesGG on Thu Jun 13, 2013 at 11:39:38 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

      •  Wonkette Ghostery results (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        marina, MeToo

        Wonkette

        It's difficult to be happy knowing so many suffer. We must unite.

        by War on Error on Thu Jun 13, 2013 at 11:18:48 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  Great diary, WoE (10+ / 0-)

    Thanks for posting all of the screen shots. I used Ghostery for several months, but recently switched to "Do Not Track Me" which is similar.

    How many trackers are there out there? My blocker tells me that I have blocke over 37,000.

    I'm not sure if this affects government snooping, but it sure gets rid of the "marketing" parasites.

  •  Ghostery Owners Sell Your Actions Back to (14+ / 0-)

    the folks that you are blocking.

    Read this review.

    Ghostery is owned by Evidon and the article states:

    But while Ghostery is a valuable tool for the privacy-obsessed, Evidon is savvy enough to know that it can’t make money solely by blocking tracking cookies. So, the company had a smart and somewhat devious idea: Why not take its trove of data and sell it to the very companies Ghostery users are blocking?
    So a little more due diligence may be in order here...

    Let's show our legislators what Citizens United really means.

    by TriangleNC on Thu Jun 13, 2013 at 11:01:04 AM PDT

  •  Installed it and learning (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Mary Mike, War on Error, SadieSue

    Very interesting.

    Thanks.

    Daily Kos an oasis of truth. Truth that leads to action.

    by Shockwave on Thu Jun 13, 2013 at 11:01:19 AM PDT

    •  Note it's searchable feature (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Shockwave

      You can find out about anyone on the list.

      Quantcast raises my eyebrows.

      It's no secret that the CIA has front companies.

      Why wouldn't the NSA?

      It's difficult to be happy knowing so many suffer. We must unite.

      by War on Error on Thu Jun 13, 2013 at 11:27:29 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Because NSA doesn't need them. (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        JamesGG, trumpeter

        It has google, yahoo, microsoft, etc.

        And it has Visa, Mastercard, Bank of America, Chase, Verizon, AT&T, Comcast, Cox, Time Warner, etc.

        Plus, it can get what else it needs from CIA.

        That's my guess.

        © grover


        So if you get hit by a bus tonight, would you be satisfied with how you spent today, your last day on earth? Live like tomorrow is never guaranteed, because it's not. -- Me.

        by grover on Thu Jun 13, 2013 at 11:46:14 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Yes, this. (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          War on Error

          If you're using Comcast cable internet, the NSA doesn't need to have a script on every page tracking whether or not you've been there.

          They can just get a warrant for Comcast's server logs and look at which pages your IP address or MAC address requested.

          It seems like an unnecessary complication for them to set up a company like Quantcast and establish them as a pretty well-known name in web analytics, in order to get data that they could get much more easily, much more reliably, and much more quietly with a few well-placed warrants.

          "When I give food to the poor, they call me a saint. When I ask why the poor have no food, they call me a communist." --Dom Helder Camara, archbishop of Recife

          by JamesGG on Thu Jun 13, 2013 at 11:56:10 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Still, not beyond the imagination. (0+ / 0-)

            Maybe it all funnels into the NSA, which is why the Utah data center is over 1,000,000 square feet (much of which is underground, btw.  I've watched them build this behemoth)

            It's difficult to be happy knowing so many suffer. We must unite.

            by War on Error on Thu Jun 13, 2013 at 12:00:54 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  It's less about "beyond the imagination"... (0+ / 0-)

              ...and more like "why would they do it?"

              You've shown in this piece that Quantcast tracking can easily be blocked by anyone with a freely available browser plugin... and the Quantcast tracking script only works on pages that have installed it.

              If they can get access to ISP server logs with an easily-obtained warrant, why would they bother to set up this whole dummy front corporation that could be easily blocked at the client end or not installed at the content-server end? What would be the benefit from that?

              "When I give food to the poor, they call me a saint. When I ask why the poor have no food, they call me a communist." --Dom Helder Camara, archbishop of Recife

              by JamesGG on Thu Jun 13, 2013 at 12:13:46 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

          •  Or even (0+ / 0-)

            not get a warrant, and still look at which pages your IP address or MAC address requested.

            I am not religious, and did NOT say I enjoyed sects.

            by trumpeter on Thu Jun 13, 2013 at 02:42:32 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

      •  The Evergreen Museum (0+ / 0-)

        has an SR-71

  •  for those wondering... (7+ / 0-)

    ... and using NoScript:

    Conflict with AdBlock Plus
    In May 2009, it was reported that an "extension war" had broken out between NoScript's developer, Giorgio Maone, and the developers of the Firefox ad-blocking extension AdBlock Plus after Maone released a version of NoScript that circumvented a block enabled by an AdBlock Plus filter. The code implementing this workaround was "camouflaged" to avoid detection. Maone stated that he had implemented it in response to a filter that blocked his own website. After mounting criticism, and a declaration by the administrators of the Mozilla Add-ons site that the site would change its guidelines regarding add-on modifications, Maone removed the code and issued a full apology.

    Conflict with Ghostery
    Also in May 2009, shortly after the AdBlock Plus incident, a spat arose between Maone and the developers of the Ghostery add-on after Maone implemented a change on his website that disabled the notification Ghostery used to report web tracking software. This was interpreted as an attempt to "prevent Ghostery from reporting on trackers and ad networks on NoScript's websites". In response, Maone stated that the change was made because Ghostery's notification obscured the donation button on the NoScript site.

    The conflict was resolved when Maone changed his site's CSS to move — rather than disable — the Ghostery notification.

    Footnotes are at link; page updated 9 June 2013.

    @Hugh: There is no Article II power which says the Executive can violate the Constitution. * Addington's perpwalk? TRAILHEAD of accountability for Bush-2 Crimes.

    by greenbird on Thu Jun 13, 2013 at 11:01:52 AM PDT

  •  Ghostery doesn't just show (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    kaliope, Mary Mike, War on Error

    who's watching, you can block them too.

  •  If nothing else, (5+ / 0-)

    this explains why TPM takes such a long time to load.

    Hige sceal þe heardra, heorte þe cenre, mod sceal þe mare, þe ure mægen lytlað

    by milkbone on Thu Jun 13, 2013 at 11:04:51 AM PDT

  •  more like this (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    War on Error, marina, SadieSue

    Also take a look at Do Not Track (mentioned above) and Disconnect.  you can run them together!

  •  I'm a big fan of the "disconnect" snap-in (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    War on Error, marina

    mainly for speed and to block all that frakking invasive Facebook crap...

    http://disconnect.me

    Hey SCOTUS: your government is tracing all your calls too.

    by here4tehbeer on Thu Jun 13, 2013 at 11:08:13 AM PDT

  •  It's all related to social, ads, and analytics. (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    marina, War on Error, MeToo
    Are the items on the purple list invited BY the website owner?
    In one way or another, yes. Site owners put them on their own sites—sometimes to get analytics data about their own audiences or provide features like social media sharing, and sometimes in order to be able to serve up ads. With high-profile sites like those, I strongly doubt that any of those services have been installed on their servers without their server administrators' knowledge and consent.
    What are these different services?  Who pays for them?  How do they make money?  Do they pay the website owners?
    There are a bunch of different services listed there, and they all do different things. Services like Google Analytics and Quantcast tell you about your audience, and Google Analytics can also tie into Google ad services so that you can target ads based on the site's visitors.

    AddThis and other social media widgets are what powers the little AddThis button, Facebook feeds on pages, Facebook/Twitter sign-ins for comments, etc.

    And a lot of those other ones (DoubleClick, etc.) are ad services that enable the page to display targeted advertising—which is, of course, what keeps those sites in business.

    I personally run DoNotTrackMe on my own browser because I trust large corporations even less than the government, but I don't necessarily see the hand of the NSA in any of those services.

    Given how easy it looks to be for them to get a warrant, it seems to me that if they're really interested in finding out where you've gone on the web, they'll just have a warrant issued for your ISP's server logs for your computer.

    Just getting the data right from the source seems like it would be much easier and more reliable for them than to potentially risk discovery by going through a third-party tool that can be easily blocked by a free browser plug-in.

    "When I give food to the poor, they call me a saint. When I ask why the poor have no food, they call me a communist." --Dom Helder Camara, archbishop of Recife

    by JamesGG on Thu Jun 13, 2013 at 11:32:36 AM PDT

    •  Thank you, JamesGG (0+ / 0-)

      I would like to add your explanation to the diary above, with your permission to do so and to mention you as the source.

      RE: NSA front companies, I wouldn't doubt that at all.  The CIA is infamous for this behavior.  Using the front companies, the IP addresses can be found.  Who knows anymore, the world is exceeding Orwell's 1984 imagination.

      It's difficult to be happy knowing so many suffer. We must unite.

      by War on Error on Thu Jun 13, 2013 at 11:42:58 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Be my guest. (0+ / 0-)

        But I find it difficult to believe, given the access the NSA seems to have, that they would use something so clunky as a tracking service installed on a website in order to track people's viewing habits—particularly when those tracking services can be easily blocked with a browser plug-in, and when they're not on anywhere near all websites.

        Why wouldn't they just go right to the source and get a warrant for their target's ISP's server logs, which would not only ensure that they get every site their target is browsing (I very much doubt that terrorist websites are using Quantcast or Facebook Connect), but also do so in a way that couldn't be blocked and that had no potential for alerting the target that he or she is being tracked?

        "When I give food to the poor, they call me a saint. When I ask why the poor have no food, they call me a communist." --Dom Helder Camara, archbishop of Recife

        by JamesGG on Thu Jun 13, 2013 at 11:47:18 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  Interesting. (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Sylv, War on Error

    I installed it just now and I am somewhat surprised how many trackers were making it through NoScript.

    Facebook in particular.

  •  I've been blocking trackers for some time (4+ / 0-)

    not because of NSA paranoia, but because I don't want to be marketed. I don't care about targeted ads. I have ads turned off with ADBlock Plus. I have all kinds of malware blockers.

    This shit slows down your computer. Huffington Post was the worst with all of the trackers they were using.

    I also turned off autoplay video with Chrome because of all the shit videos that start blaring out when you open a site. ABC, I'm looking at you.

    If I want to see a video, I just click on it and it plays.

  •  what good is AVG Do Not Track (0+ / 0-)

    that shows up under a button in chrome?...owned by google?...

    This machine kills Fascists.

    by KenBee on Fri Jun 14, 2013 at 02:37:20 AM PDT

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