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Hundreds of pro-choice Texans gathered in Austin Thursday—and into Friday morning—to testify against a bill that would shut down all but five abortion clinics in the state. "Our words are not repetitive," testified one citizen, after a GOP lawmaker cut off testimony. "Our government's attacks on our choice, on our bodies, is repetitive."

Written by Andrea Grimes for RH Reality Check. This diary is cross-posted; commenters wishing to engage directly with the author should do so at the original post.

See all our coverage of the "people's filibuster" against HB 60 here.

It's getting close to 2:00 a.m. in Austin, Texas, and I'm sitting in a room with close to a hundred citizens who have been shut out of testifying against an omnibus abortion bill that would shut down all but five abortion clinics in the state, ban abortion after 20 weeks, and make medical abortion all but impossible to obtain and prescribe.  

Safe, legal, accessible abortion in Texas is under direct threat. That's why many of the people in this room have been here for over 12 hours. The ache in my back reminds me that I've been here right along with them.  

We're here as part of a citizens' filibuster against a bill added to the Texas house's special session calendar at the last minute by Republican Gov. Rick Perry. They spent the day anxiously waiting for their names to be called by House State Affairs Committee chairman Rep. Byron Cook (R-Corsicana). They've been poring over testimony, timing themselves on smartphones, practicing their statements in the hallway with quavering voices.  

Seven hundred people registered to testify today. Tonight. Into the wee hours. They were prepared to wait as long as it took.  

At midnight, Rep. Cook told us that, after nearly seven hours of testimony against HB 60, our words were getting to be "repetitive," and he would allow just one more hour of testimony.  

That's when the yelling started.  

"Let her speak!" chanted women and men who gathered in the room as one woman was escorted away from the podium by a Texas State Trooper.  

Shortly thereafter, citizens took over the hearing room and decided to testify with or without the committee members present.  

That's when #HB60 began trending worldwide on Twitter. That's when people stopped tweeting about getting coffee delivered to the James H. Reagan building here in downtown Austin, and started tweeting about bail money.  

Eventually, Rep. Cook and his colleagues called the hearing back to order and gave the gathered citizens another half-hour to speak against HB 60.  

"Our words are not repetitive," testified Lesli Simms, a first-generation American. "Our government's attacks on our choice, on our bodies, is repetitive."  

There are hundreds of people still waiting to have their voices heard. But it may be their silence, engineered and ensured by Rep. Cook and right-wing lawmakers, that will speak loudest of all.


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