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This has been a pretty good week for outrage (and that's not even counting the verdict that set George Zimmerman free) among my fellow Democrats. I have to admit it a bit (well, a lot) of 'outrage fatigue', because frankly absolutely nothing suggested by the GOP either surprises or shocks me anymore.

In the midst of rights being stripped from voters (especially elderly voters, minority voters, and college students), women (in several states simultaneously – my 'favorite' was the motorcycle vagina bill), and  young black men buying Skittles and iced tea, the GOP is on a rant about light bulbs. Again.

Yeah. I know.

Anyhoo. I bet you were hoping I have a point.

I do: The purpose of the GOP propaganda machine for the last several decades (if not longer) has been to convince their base that they are a special subset of Americans (also known as Real Americans ™) who are the only ones who really deserve rights. In other words, they are doubling down on exclusionary politics.

This lies on an assumption that “those people” (do we really have to spell out who they are? See those whose votes are being marginalized, above) are not Real Americans ™ and are “taking advantage of” those poor, underappreciated Real Americans ™ .

An interesting example came to mind when I got drawn into an abortion argument (I know – but its like red meat, sometimes) with someone who I went to high school with, but didn't actually know in high school.  

This woman, while making her many points about why it is important to punish women who get pregnant and don't want children also - and completely irrelevantly - stated that she and her husband paid 40% taxes last year.

I didn't want to get sidetracked from trying to give her good, solid evidence that making abortions illegal does not prevent abortions, so I ignored it at the time. But the statement and the sentiment it demonstrates illustrates well that envy is at the bottom of her political pyramid – envy and a feeling of entitlement.

If I had addressed her claim that she pays 40% of her income in taxes, there would have been two great places to dig in:

First, she must be doing awfully well to be expected to contribute so much to society – congratulations.

Second, if she's paying 40% of her income in (presumably income) taxes, she has an incompetent tax person and should fire him or her.

The point, however, is that she doesn't see herself as part of a larger community. She sees herself as a special, better Real American ™ for whom special rules apply. She doesn't acknowledge any benefit from living in a society, so she doesn't feel she needs to pay into a society.

Remember that I said she and I went to the same high school? Well, that high school was an extraordinary school in a dozen different ways. It was a public high school close to a military base in a rural (ish) area of California that served farmer's kids, military kids, and kids of military contractors (like me). It was ten miles from the ocean and fifty miles from anywhere else, on the central coast.

It had excellent music and arts programs, academically rigorous classes, and an excellent graduation rate. It was unusually economically, racially and culturally diverse, and the student population had a very low drug addiction rate and a very high graduation rate.  

In other words, that school benefited enormously from investment in public education, in military expenditures, in agriculture expenditures, in funding for arts and music education, in excellent infrastructure expenditure for the town, in public health spending, and in dozens of other ways.

And yet, she can't see this. She sees only:
-Women having sex without being punished for it (enough)
-Gay people existing without being punished for it (enough)
-Poor people existing without being punished for it (enough)

She sees all of those people as getting “her” money and not giving her any benefit. She swims in water of privilege so clear she can't even tell she's in the water.

Let me be clear. There is nothing to envy in the situation of having an abortion. There is nothing to envy in being in a racial minority that is (still) subjected to ongoing institutional racism up to and including being killed with impunity for existing in the wrong neighborhood. There is nothing to envy in being gay or lesbian or transgender or bisexual and having one's very existence be challenged and criminalized and otherwise marginalized.

And yet, if one believes, as this woman does, that these folk aren't Real Americans ™, then it's perfectly acceptable (in her mind) to envy that they dare to set foot in her country. And that is the mindset we're struggling against.

I wrote a lengthier and more 'academic' examination of this phenomenon several years ago entitled: All Humans are People: Or, Othering, Justice, and the Monkeysphere.

The 'monkeysphere' (or Dunbar's number) is a fundamental problem with society. As we deal with the concepts of justice and injustice, we always and perpetually run into the inability for many (most?) people to extrapolate their own personal 'monkeysphere' into  the larger society, granting that larger society not only our own strengths, but our own foibles as well.

And don't you smirk at me, Mr. or Ms. Liberal. You (and I) are just as guilty of it. We marginalize those on the other side all the time. I have trouble finding the compassion needed to go into 'teaching' mode and 'communicator' mode on a regular basis, especially when I'm dealing with people who feel they are justified in taking away rights from people within my 'monkeysphere'.

It's a question for a philosopher, perhaps. Certainly Plato attacked it, in The Republic. So long as we see a disparity between the 'justice' accorded to those within our monkeysphere, and those outside of it (and we all do, on a regular basis) we will have value conflicts and envy and the politics of envy. So what can we do about it?

Originally posted to Am I the Only One Dancing on Sun Jul 14, 2013 at 10:18 AM PDT.

Also republished by Community Spotlight.

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Comment Preferences

  •  "Who is my neighbor?" (9+ / 0-)

    It still resonates.

    When you come to find how essential the comfort of a well-kept home is to the bodily strength and good conditions, to a sound mind and spirit, and useful days, you will reverence the good housekeeper as I do above artist or poet, beauty or genius.

    by Alexandra Lynch on Sun Jul 14, 2013 at 10:29:57 AM PDT

    •  Been thinking about this all day (15+ / 0-)

      Our priest preached about this today re the story of the Samaritan and the man by the side of the road. And I've been thinking about it in relation to an outrageous (in my opinion) proposal made by an Ohio state senator this week that takes the idea of disinvesting in public education – and potentially everything you don't feel like paying for — to a destructive extreme.

      He's proposing that home-schooling parents get a refund on the entire portion of their property taxes paid for school levies, so these poor families can buy a few books and pay for museum admissions.

      In Shaker Heights, one of the highest taxed districts in the state with excellent schools, this would mean a lavish check of almost $3000 a year on a $100,000 home.

      While this would undoubtedly hurt some districts, there aren't enough home-schooled kids in Ohio to make a huge difference. The real evil in this proposal is the way it shatters the social contract.

      "I don't use the schools so I should get my money back."

      What else should you get your money back for? "I haven't been to the library in a few years — give me a refund on the library levy." "I've never called the police; I need a rebate on the taxes we pay for safety forces."

      Then you have someone like me, with no children, in the district adjoining Shaker, whose property taxes aren't much lower. Why am I any less entitled to a refund than a home-schooling family? I actually save the schools MORE money because there are public school facilities and services home-schooling families can use. Where's my huge check?

      And this is probably how this asshole wants people to start thinking because once you get seniors and others with no kids looking at the massive amount they pay in property taxes (because our state funds schools primarily this way, which our state Supreme Court has found unconstitutional several times but our legislature is too buy talking about abortion to address) and the refund these special families are getting, the resentment is going to go through the roof.

      It's really about nuking the idea that we pay taxes for shared services.

      By the way, this is the same state legislator whose wife called 911 about two years ago after he went on a drunken rampage and threatened her and pushed her around. The tape of her talking to the sheriff's deputies was too chilling for me to watch more than a few minutes of. She said he did this all the time when he drank but it was getting worse, and the only reason she called 911 was because she usually called his parents to calm him down and they were out of town. Nice.

      A few days later, he forced her to make a public statement with him that it was all nothing, said "she got a little excited — girls do that," and accused the Republican sheriff of trying to ruin his political career.

      A real special asshole.

      Ed FitzGerald for governor Of Ohio. Women's lives depend on it. http://www.edfitzgeraldforohio.com/

      by anastasia p on Sun Jul 14, 2013 at 08:35:44 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Agree with you on the social contract issue (7+ / 0-)

        There has been a concerted attack on the concept for over thirty years, beginning with a certain female Russian Jewish immigrant with a chain-smoking habit, a thing for younger men and serial killers, and delusions of philosophy.

        As for your state legislator, ugh. You'd think people would see through the coerced 'see it's not so bad' stand-by-your-man-ism of the wife but no. Willful blindness is willful.

        Happiness begins when you examine your life, your thoughts, and your actions, and begin to balance all the pieces, lighten all the dark corners, and actively participate in building it.

        by odanu on Mon Jul 15, 2013 at 04:55:45 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  I never had kids. (3+ / 0-)

        Imagine me proposing that all childless people get the same refund on their property taxes.

        How could other people's children being educated possibly benefit ME.

        Those funds earmarked for kids' public education could be used by me, me, me, to provide educational materials and educational travel for ME.

         

      •  Instead you could make museum admission free (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Cassandra Waites

        for kids.... Oh, wait, that would let EVERYONE benefit.

        Fry, don't be a hero! It's not covered by our health plan!

        by elfling on Mon Jul 15, 2013 at 12:15:14 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  Anastasia, I’m going to rant now… (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        odanu

        …just because I have several thoughts I might want to convey and sometimes I can be very wordy. (My girlfriend sometimes thinks I talk too much).

        --

        First, about the Good Samaritan. At the beginning of the parable, a Jewish man is beaten and robbed and left by the side of the road. A Jewish priest/rabbi passes by without stopping, then a Levite (from the tribe that provide most of the upper class’s priests/rabbis) passes by, then a Samaritan stops and helps the guy. Samaritans were sort of second class citizens or heretics -- not very high status. So the story is like a black person helping a white person or an atheist helping a Christian or a poor person helping a rich guy without regard to religion or social status (someone who is from an outsider group helping someone solely for the sake of helping). And the question Jesus asks at the end is “who treated him like a neighbor?”

        (Here’s an idea for translating it to the year 2013: A white Republican who belongs to an evangelical church gets into a car accident. An evangelical preacher drives by and doesn’t stop to help. A popular Republican politician drives by and doesn’t stop either. An undocumented Mexican Catholic stops and takes the guy to the hospital and makes sure he‘s OK. Which one was the better neighbor? That‘s basically the same story that Jesus told.)

        I like that parable a lot. In political terms, it’s a story about helping out a fellow human being who needs help (a Democratic party principle) instead of ignoring people who need assistance because it might take time or money to do it (a Republican party principle).

        --

        I’m very disturbed by the idea that some Republicans (in Ohio?) are saying only people who have children in public schools should pay property taxes to support the local schools. Or that parents of home schooled kids should get a tax break. Excuse me? If I have the money to send my kid to a private school, I should still pay taxes. And if I have the time to home-school my kid, I don’t need a tax break.

        It raises all sorts of questions. What does this mean? Gay people who get married (and likely have two incomes and no children) shouldn’t pay property taxes to schools?  Is this a Republican plan to encourage people to be gay? What about straight people with 10 kids? Should they pay extra property taxes while their kids are in school? What about grandparents with 10 adult kids (no longer in school)  and 100 grandchildren -- should they be exempt from property taxes because their grandchildren are in school, but their children aren’t? What about a woman who’s a single mother and is just barely getting by with a crappy part-time job at McDonalds? Should we tax her more because she has a kid in school? And what about a single woman with a decent job who had an abortion -- should she pay lower taxes because she doesn’t have a kid? This means your taxes wouldn’t go up if you have an abortion (a Republican plan to encourage women to have abortions?). And what about apartment buildings? Does the landlord get lower property taxes if the tenants don’t have kids? Or if they’re home schooling their kids? This whole idea becomes a huge mess if you break it down to individual cases.

        --

        I believe public education is a good thing that every taxpayer should pay for, regardless if they have no kids, kids in public school, kids in private school, or home-schooled kids. If I live in a town that spends higher amounts on education (with highly-paid teachers), I will reap the benefits. Kids in the town grow up educated and get better jobs with bigger salaries. They don’t commit as much crime. Spending money on schools -- and roads and sewer systems and public parks and food safety and every other thing government does -- all of that spending benefits everyone in the town.

        --

        Now I’ll play devil’s advocate.

        On the other hand (there’s always an other hand), maybe farmers should be exempt, to some degree, from gas taxes that pay for highways and roads if they’re using the gas in tractors or combines or other machinery in their fields. I have a brother in law who owns a farm and I think he gets some kind of break on the gas tax because his machines are used mostly in the fields (and not on public roads). I’m pretty sure there’s a special coloring agent added to the farm gas to make sure he doesn’t use it in his car that he drives on normal roads and highways. That seems fair to me. And I suppose that to some degree, I’m arguing that some people shouldn’t pay taxes on certain things. As Walt Whitman wrote, “Do I contradict myself? Very well, then I contradict myself…”

        --

        Over the years, I’ve seen far too many letters to the editor saying things like “Why should I pay taxes to subsidize mass transit? I have a car. I don’t need to take a public bus or light rail.” Or -- “Why should I pay taxes for schools? I don’t have kids.” Or-- “Why should I pay taxes for a new police station? I‘m not a criminal and I live in a safe part of town.” And so on.

        --

        The simple answer is this: you pay taxes as part of the price of living in a civilized society. If you don’t like it, you can move to Somalia or Sudan and hire private security guards with high-powered automatic machine guns to guard your wife and kids (so they won‘t be kidnaped). And maybe buy a helicopter, because the roads aren’t very good. Oh, you’ll probably need private tutors for your kids, too, because the public schools suck when there are no taxes. Whenever you want you can beat your wife, you can kill the neighbor who’s playing music you hate, or you can rape your kids, because there’s no court system there to enforce laws. But you’ll be living in a libertarian paradise with taxes that are VERY VERY low. Of course, you might need some money to bribe the local warlord (protection money) to leave you alone, but that’s not a tax. It’s the free market run amok.

        And that's the end of my rant.

        "Stupid just can't keep its mouth shut." -- SweetAuntFanny's grandmother.

        by Dbug on Mon Jul 15, 2013 at 09:04:29 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  Good diary (4+ / 0-)

    I'll rec it as soon as you change the title. Marriage equality, please. It's marriage no matter who the two people are.

    Columbine, Tucson, Aurora, Sandy Hook, Boston (h/t Charles Pierce) Support Small Business: Shop Kos Katalogue

    by Dave in Northridge on Sun Jul 14, 2013 at 10:30:51 AM PDT

  •  Run for office (17+ / 0-)

    You ask "What can we do?" Get the Republicans out of office.
    People need to be all over the ballots this year, next year, the year after that.  By 2016 we might be in position to really put solid people into higher office.

    Your town has a school board or a town council or a library supervisor or a water commissioner, etc.  Get yourself and your friends into these seats.  It doesn't take a lot of money, but it takes commitment and time, lots of door knocking.

    I live in a town of 55,000 people.  It takes 3000 votes to win a seat on City Council.

    Do it. Make a real difference. Get out there and spread the message.

    Imagine all the people, living life in peace. You may say I'm a dreamer, but I'm not the only one. John Lennon

    by GwenM on Sun Jul 14, 2013 at 11:44:06 AM PDT

  •  "She swims in water of privilege (19+ / 0-)

    so clear she can't even tell she's in the water" Beautiful. Worth saying twice. Thanks!

    "Onward through the fog!" - Oat Willie

    by rocksout on Sun Jul 14, 2013 at 12:49:37 PM PDT

  •  Morans (12+ / 0-)

    By no means are all GOPers swimming in privilege.  Recall all the geniuses protesting better health care?

    Fox & talk radio believers have been told that they ought to be swimming in privilege. Since they aren't, it must be the fault of the "others."

    •  good point... (0+ / 0-)

      there is privilege, and there is privilege. Some are actually financially privileged, while others benefit from institutional racism, religious preference, etc.

      And those who aren't swimming in privilege are often awash in "isms" that make them believe that it was merely an oversight that they weren't in first class on the Titanic.

      Happiness begins when you examine your life, your thoughts, and your actions, and begin to balance all the pieces, lighten all the dark corners, and actively participate in building it.

      by odanu on Sun Jul 14, 2013 at 04:05:42 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  was that supposed to be coherent? (0+ / 0-)

        "And those who aren't swimming in privilege are often awash in "isms" that make them believe that it was merely an oversight that they weren't in first class on the Titanic."

        Or are we converting to daism in the comments?

        If so, giraffe.

        http://whatever.scalzi.com/...

        •  I'm not as coherent as I'd like to be right now... (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          old wobbly, congenitalefty

          Bad pain day, and so meds. Simultaneously thinking Whee! and word salad. I was trying to be profound. I missed the boat. Since the boat was apparently the Titanic, it was perhaps a good thing.

          Happiness begins when you examine your life, your thoughts, and your actions, and begin to balance all the pieces, lighten all the dark corners, and actively participate in building it.

          by odanu on Sun Jul 14, 2013 at 05:01:36 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

  •  Brilliant thank you. The only thing we can do (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    historys mysteries, mommyof3, odanu

    is what Jesus and Saint Francis and the Buddha told us...don't respond to hate with hate, respond to hate with love.  They might kill you but they can't kill your soul.  And maybe just sometimes they might be persuaded to get better.  I truly don't think evil people would be evil if they knew better, or am I the most naive Pollyanna in the universe?

    •  on evil... (7+ / 0-)

      Most evil people are people who have been profoundly damaged in life. A few are actually 'born that way' (a very few). But in my years of working with what most people would consider 'the lowest of the low', I've found that most people who struggle with moral decisions have a lack of faith that doing good will serve their needs (usually supported by a system that has historically not served their needs), or a sense of entitlement that because they belong to (insert name of privileged group here) they are better than everyone else and don't need to follow the rules.

      The ones who believe both simultaneously are the really interesting ones (/wry).

      Happiness begins when you examine your life, your thoughts, and your actions, and begin to balance all the pieces, lighten all the dark corners, and actively participate in building it.

      by odanu on Sun Jul 14, 2013 at 04:09:17 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Are you saying they can't be saved? (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Alexandra Lynch

        That makes me very sad, not about the harm they do to others but the harm they do to their ultimate karmic existence (not to get all mystical, I'm an extreme scientific rationalist but I do think that things in the multiverse persist somehow).  Or maybe they'll learn to do better after a few lives as cockroaches or cows?
        I'm afraid I still think the default setting for all living things is benevolence as long as they have enough to eat ;)

        •  that's not what I'm reading (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          eru

          It's more that there are several knots to untangle here and the more we are sensitive to the motivations the better chance we have to change the conversation.

          Stay-at-home-Moms: Hard working unless they're on welfare, then they're lazy. Just ask any Republican.

          by musicsleuth on Mon Jul 15, 2013 at 07:43:43 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Yes... (0+ / 0-)

            the short answer to nearly everything is "it's complicated". Unless it's not.

            Happiness begins when you examine your life, your thoughts, and your actions, and begin to balance all the pieces, lighten all the dark corners, and actively participate in building it.

            by odanu on Mon Jul 15, 2013 at 08:37:49 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

  •  This says it all ... (8+ / 0-)
    She swims in water of privilege so clear she can't even tell she's in the water.
    This is what we're up against. An absolute, total lack of empathy.

    Thanks for writing.

    "Let us not look back to the past with anger, nor towards the future with fear, but look around with awareness." James Thurber

    by annan on Sun Jul 14, 2013 at 04:00:10 PM PDT

  •  perhaps. (3+ / 0-)

    "And don't you smirk at me, Mr. or Ms. Liberal. You (and I) are just as guilty of it. We marginalize those on the other side all the time. I have trouble finding the compassion needed to go into 'teaching' mode and 'communicator' mode on a regular basis, especially when I'm dealing with people who feel they are justified in taking away rights from people within my 'monkeysphere'."

    it's not "smirking", it's the look of exhaustion, that obtains from having spent countless, fruitless hours, attempting to get through to those "real americans" with facts. at some point, it becomes clear that the "other side" has no interest in even hearing facts that conflict with their ideology, and all of your well meaning efforts to "teach" them are a waste of time, time you'll never recover. at that point, I believe marginalization becomes a legitimate response.

    •  I vacillate on this point (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Alexandra Lynch

      I've seen some people I never thought would change, change, and I've despaired of others. But yes, we're just as liable to hang on to our biases as they are.

      We could make a good argument that our biases are less harmful than theirs, and I'd be willing to do that... but not that we don't have biases with the potential for harm.

      Happiness begins when you examine your life, your thoughts, and your actions, and begin to balance all the pieces, lighten all the dark corners, and actively participate in building it.

      by odanu on Sun Jul 14, 2013 at 07:02:46 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  I have to ask, how do WE do this? (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      eru

      This strikes me as more of that "both sides" crap, and it's the Republicans that have gone suddenly and massively crazy, not us. If anything we are too timid to push our beliefs. We value being nice TOO much.

      I don't think it's my job to "teach" someone who has rigid beliefs for whatever reason, especially when he is clinging to falsehoods to support them and is frantic in his defense of those falsehoods. I have to figure that person has a deep-seated need to cling to these beliefs, and it's not my job to try to blow him away.

      Ed FitzGerald for governor Of Ohio. Women's lives depend on it. http://www.edfitzgeraldforohio.com/

      by anastasia p on Sun Jul 14, 2013 at 08:40:31 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  my belief in teaching goes back to (3+ / 0-)

        the social contract. If people hold and espouse beliefs that can cause harm to me and mine, helping to shift those beliefs is partly my responsibility.

        And... as a therapist, getting people to let go of unhelpful beliefs is what I do every day.

        Happiness begins when you examine your life, your thoughts, and your actions, and begin to balance all the pieces, lighten all the dark corners, and actively participate in building it.

        by odanu on Mon Jul 15, 2013 at 04:57:37 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  Republicans are four year-olds (5+ / 0-)

    who will never, ever grow up.

    They are the spoiled brats at the birthday party for some other child who STILL throw a tantrum because they, themselves, didn't get ALL the presents and get to eat ALL the cake and ice cream. They believe every day is their birthday and the world owes them a seat at the head of the table (you know this is true, it's the accusation they always hurl at other people, and republicans are about nothing if not projection).

    The republicans who bitch most about having to pay for stuff they don't use are also the ones who will complain the loudest if that service they didn't want to pay for isn't there when they DO need it.  A good example is EMS: "Why should I pay for an ambulance, I'm healthy!" they cry. Then they or a family member gets sick and they're the most likely to sue if the ambulance crew "allows" their family member to die. Other examples are roads, fire and police services, etc.

    The reality is that they think they DESERVE to have all the services they demand, when they demand them, like a medieval king, they just don't want to pay for them, like a spoiled child. Someone else should always pay. Someone else should always have the burden of making sure their life is easier than anyone else's and that's why they get enraged at any hardship and are consumed by jealousy: SOMEONE ELSE got the stuff that is rightfully MINE!

    Another core aspect of conservatives is the idea that, "All my successes are because I am awesome. ALL of my failures are because of someone else." All right wingers KNOW they are supposed to be millionaires. The only POSSIBLE reason they are not is because someone else is getting something they shouldn't, that rightfully belongs to the great and glorious ME! And so they pick a group they hate with all their souls (usually more than one group) and ascribe to them all their failures: The only POSSIBLE reason I don't have a Ferrari is because of black people, gays,liberals, commies, immigrants! (I love it when a conservative whines that immigrants are "taking our jobs!" because yeah, it's really likely that they would accept a job as a busboy, gardener, housemaid, or some other sub-minimum-wage job.)

    I wrote a short story about this some time ago...

    "Republicans moan and Republicans bitch,
    Our rich are too poor and our poor are too rich” -- Anonymous
  •  The GOP has doubled down on their hatred. (0+ / 0-)

    Spelling their own doom.

    Makers vs Takers. Food Stamps. G.Zimmerman. Taking away women's right to choose in Texas, NC, Ohio and Wisconsin. Rape Comments. Racist jokes everyday.
    Attacking same-sex marriage. Against Immigration Reform.

    It never ends.

    Can you remember the Whig Party?

    Fighting Liberal at
    “You must be the change you wish to see in the world.” --Gandhi:

    by smokey545 on Mon Jul 15, 2013 at 07:28:47 AM PDT

    •  the voice of fear (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      No one gets out alive

      The level of manipulation by those at the top of the party is astounding. It is ruining our democracy to allow a few people at the top to be so rich they can be in absolute power.

      Stay-at-home-Moms: Hard working unless they're on welfare, then they're lazy. Just ask any Republican.

      by musicsleuth on Mon Jul 15, 2013 at 07:47:59 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  The Whigs were the good guys (0+ / 0-)

      The Whigs were the liberal party when the Tories were the Conservatives.  The Whig party ceased to exist, but the Tories are still around, funny thing that.

      The Whigs have been attacked by later leftists for not being liberal enough.  But to see them as the equivalent of today's Republicans is a mistake.  

  •  Diaries On The Psychology Of Hatred And Envy (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    No one gets out alive

    Psychology Of  Hatred and envy
    http://www.dailykos.com/...

    Psychology Of Hatred Part II: Projection & Projective Identification
    http://www.dailykos.com/...

    What is Codependent Dry Drunk?  (not a warm fuzzy diary)
    http://www.dailykos.com/...

    There’s always free cheddar in a mousetrap, baby

    by bernardpliers on Mon Jul 15, 2013 at 09:35:27 AM PDT

  •  Kudos alone for using the "Dunbar Number" (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Oh Mary Oh

    yeap, once things get de-personalized beyond individual contact greed quickly rushes in.

    There is just one thing about your description of your classsmate, she is an asshole.

    "There are many truths of which the full meaning cannot be realized until personal experience has brought it home." John Stuart Mill

    by kuvasz on Mon Jul 15, 2013 at 12:03:11 PM PDT

  •  I sometimes tell people (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Oh Mary Oh

    That one of the wonderful things about the food stamp program is that anyone - even they - can be eligible if they find it so wonderful. All they have to do is quit their job and divest all their assets, and voila! They too can partake of that amazing gravy train.

    So far, none of them have decided to give it a go.

    Fry, don't be a hero! It's not covered by our health plan!

    by elfling on Mon Jul 15, 2013 at 12:14:17 PM PDT

  •  It's Not Her Money (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    odanu, Oh Mary Oh

    First of all, I think we need to address this unfortunate misconception that people on the other side seem to have. They believe it's "their money". It simply isn't, and as long as they live in that bubble, they will be immune to reason.

    I'm not saying you have no ability to influence your lot in life. (We call it a "lot" because it was handed out randomly.) Yes, you definitely have a say, and if you don't show up, of course you get nothing.

    But the truth is you have one vote and the other seven billion humans each have a vote. Who do you think wins that election?

    I think we have to fight back harder against the silly idea these people have that it's their money. No, it is not their money. It's our money. As a part of society they get to use it. If they don't use it very wisely, it's taken from them, usually with a whistling drop.

    And the attitude that "it's my money" is usually the precursor to that fall.

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