Skip to main content

The New York Times dreams of a living wage.

On Thursday, the day after the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington, thousands of fast-food workers in 60 cities walked off their jobs, the latest in an escalating series of walkouts by low-wage workers demanding higher pay and the right to organize without retaliation.

The parallels, though inexact, are compelling. A half-century ago, the marchers called on Congress to increase the minimum wage from $1.15 an hour to $2 “so that men may live in dignity,” in the words of Bayard Rustin, one of the chief organizers of the march. Today, the fast-food workers also seek a raise, from the $9 an hour that most of them make to $15.00 an hour. That’s not much different from what the marchers wanted in 1963; adjusted for inflation, $2 then is $13.39 an hour today.

...

President Obama has noted, correctly, that increases in labor productivity have long failed to translate into higher wages for most Americans, even while income for the richest households has skyrocketed. His proposed remedies, however, leave much to be desired — a pathetic increase in the minimum wage, to $9 an hour by 2016, plus hopeful assertions that revolutions in energy, technology, manufacturing and health care will create good-paying jobs.

It can't be said enough. Corporations are pulling in record profits. CEOs are continuing to increase their already ludicrous pay. It's way, way, WAY past time that workers got to partake in the bounty they are creating.

And hey, let's hope that you at least have enough time off this morning to come inside and read the rest.

Ross Douthat has the honor of being the only columnist at the NYT who actually addressed the question of war with Syria in his column this week (yeah, yeah, I know, that column on squirrels was too important to delay.)  On the other hand, we are talking Douthat, so his article takes the sophomoric form of a fake speech from the president.

So let’s be frank: Striking Syria isn’t going to put an end to the killing there or plant democracy in Damascus, so it’s hard to make the case that our values are really on the line.
Well, and so on. It's not even that Douthat's rationalizing for war is all that awful. It's the amateur hour form that makes it hard to take.

David Leonhardt anticipates turnover at the Fed.

Since Alan Greenspan became the chairman of the Federal Reserve in 1987, no Democrat has held the job, despite the election and re-election of two Democratic presidents in that time. The Republican hold on the office of chief justice of the United States has lasted even longer, all the way back to the 1950s.

Now President Obama seems poised to end one of those streaks — at the Fed. His selection process so far has been dominated by debate over whether he should choose Lawrence H. Summers, a lightning rod for both criticism and admiration, or Janet Yellen, the Fed’s current vice chairwoman.

Whatever their differences, though, both are clearly Democrats (as are several longer-shot candidates). Mr. Summers and Ms. Yellen have each spoken about the ills of inequality and the economic role for government.

Summers' party affiliation isn't my concern. His miserable fiscal policy is.

Dana Milbank suggests that before the president starts a war, he take a stroll across the river.

As President Obama weighs a strike on Syria, he will meet with military advisers, consult with allies and seek congressional approval.

But before he sends Americans into another war, I suggest one more activity: Return to Section 60 at Arlington National Cemetery.

This is where those killed in Iraq and Afghanistan lie. These fallen warriors, buried alongside those who served in earlier conflicts, have filled 25 rows since they first arrived in early 2002.

Kathleen Parker joins Douthat in imagining the thoughts of the president.
The president is up early, already showered and preparing to shave. Wiping steam from the mirror, he grimaces slightly at his image.

Obama: Good grief, I look old. So much gray.

Mirror: Aw, lighten up, Bo. It makes you look distinguished. You can’t wage war without a few streaks of worry showing in your face and hair.

OK. This is even sillier than Douthat's fantasy speech, and includes a section on which fantasy Obama is made to sigh over the "noble intentions" of the Iraq invasion. Apparently, commenting on actual statements or actions of the president are far too difficult for a conservative columnist. It's so much easier when you just make stuff up.  Hey! Why don't I try that?
Kathleen Parker is up late, realizing that she hasn't written a single word of her column.

Parker: Damn. Where did I put the crayons?

Why yes, it is much easier that way.

Steven Cook earlier wrote pieces suggesting that the United States should become involved in the Syrian civil war... he's changed his mind.

There was a moment early in the Syrian crisis when one could imagine that foreign intervention would have had salutary effects. In January 2012, I wrote that it was “time to think seriously about intervening in Syria” and laid out moral and strategic arguments in a piece for the Atlantic’s Web site.

...

That was then, about 95,000 deaths ago and before about 10 percent of the Syrian population fled the country. It was also before the present pathologies took hold. The Syrian civil war was formerly an uprising against the brutality of a despot. It has become a battle among sects and ethnicities over which group of Syrians should control the country; part of a fight for regional leadership involving Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Turkey and Iran; and an extension of the battlefield on which al-Qaeda affiliates carry out their messianic violence.

Leonard Pitts looks back one week at those looking back 50 years.
Fifty is a turning point year in historical commemoration. It marks the moment — invisible, unspoken, but no less real — when a thing begins to depart living memory and to become the exclusive property of history. The man who was an adult when Martin Luther King spoke to 250,000 demonstrators from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial is at least in his seventies now or very near. The clock of life expectancy begins more loudly ticking.

After 50, a thing begins to dwindle in public consciousness. So the 60th anniversary commemoration will be smaller than this, the 70th smaller still, the 80th almost non-existent. If you doubt this, try a thought experiment. Consider the huge national commemoration that did not happen when the attack on Pearl Harbor passed its 70th anniversary two years ago. Consider how April 15th — the date Lincoln died — goes by each year with barely a whisper of acknowledgment.

So this is likely the last time we will do this, the last time we will gather en masse, devote so many front pages, web pages and television hours, to considering the March and the four incandescent words Martin Luther King spoke that day, the words that sealed him in history.

“I have a dream.”

Damn, but that's a sad thought.

Jon Healey is counting down to shut down.

Lawmakers face two deadlines with enormous fiscal consequences, and they aren't prepared to meet either one.

The new federal fiscal year starts Oct. 1, and lawmakers haven't passed any of the annual appropriations bills needed to keep federal departments and agencies running. Not only that, the House and Senate are miles apart on how many dollars to provide those departments and agencies. The GOP-controlled House wants to abide by the reduced total set by the 2011 Budget Control Act, while ignoring the way the law evenly split spending reductions between defense and non-defense programs. The Democrats who run the Senate want to assume that Congress will revoke the "sequester" cuts in the 2011 law, and they don't want to starve domestic programs for the sake of defense spending.

House Speaker John A. Boehner (R-Ohio) has floated the idea of a temporary spending bill that would keep the government operating for a few weeks past the Sept. 30 deadline. The purpose, though, would be simply to focus the fight with the White House and Senate Democrats on the bill to raise the debt ceiling, which must pass by mid-October. If it doesn't, the federal government will begin withholding payments to creditors, beneficiaries and, eventually, bondholders.

Remember, no price is too high as long as it helps depress the Obama economy.

David Berreby has what may be the most intriguing article on diet and weight in a long time.

...we appear to have a public consensus that excess body weight (defined as a Body Mass Index of 25 or above) and obesity (BMI of 30 or above) are consequences of individual choice.

...many researchers believe that personal gluttony and laziness cannot be the entire explanation for humanity’s global weight gain. Which means, of course, that they think at least some of the official focus on personal conduct is a waste of time and money. As Richard L Atkinson, Emeritus Professor of Medicine and Nutritional Sciences at the University of Wisconsin and editor of the International Journal of Obesity, put it in 2005: ‘The previous belief of many lay people and health professionals that obesity is simply the result of a lack of willpower and an inability to discipline eating habits is no longer defensible.’

The idea that fat=undisciplined is so ingrained that it's hard to think of what evidence would dent that public perception. Except maybe this...
... this troublesome fact, reported in 2010 by the biostatistician David B Allison and his co-authors at the University of Alabama in Birmingham: over the past 20 years or more, as the American people were getting fatter, so were America’s marmosets. As were laboratory macaques, chimpanzees, vervet monkeys and mice, as well as domestic dogs, domestic cats, and domestic and feral rats from both rural and urban areas. In fact, the researchers examined records on those eight species and found that average weight for every one had increased. The marmosets gained an average of nine per cent per decade. Lab mice gained about 11 per cent per decade. Chimps, for some reason, are doing especially badly: their average body weight had risen 35 per cent per decade. Allison, who had been hearing about an unexplained rise in the average weight of lab animals, was nonetheless surprised by the consistency across so many species. ‘Virtually in every population of animals we looked at, that met our criteria, there was the same upward trend,’ he told me.
This increase in weight occurred even among lab animals that were being fed a metered diet equal to that eaten in a slimmer age. Unless you think the issue is that those macaques just spend too much time playing XBox, something strange is going on here.

Originally posted to Devil's Tower on Sat Aug 31, 2013 at 10:30 PM PDT.

Also republished by Daily Kos.

EMAIL TO A FRIEND X
Your Email has been sent.
You must add at least one tag to this diary before publishing it.

Add keywords that describe this diary. Separate multiple keywords with commas.
Tagging tips - Search For Tags - Browse For Tags

?

More Tagging tips:

A tag is a way to search for this diary. If someone is searching for "Barack Obama," is this a diary they'd be trying to find?

Use a person's full name, without any title. Senator Obama may become President Obama, and Michelle Obama might run for office.

If your diary covers an election or elected official, use election tags, which are generally the state abbreviation followed by the office. CA-01 is the first district House seat. CA-Sen covers both senate races. NY-GOV covers the New York governor's race.

Tags do not compound: that is, "education reform" is a completely different tag from "education". A tag like "reform" alone is probably not meaningful.

Consider if one or more of these tags fits your diary: Civil Rights, Community, Congress, Culture, Economy, Education, Elections, Energy, Environment, Health Care, International, Labor, Law, Media, Meta, National Security, Science, Transportation, or White House. If your diary is specific to a state, consider adding the state (California, Texas, etc). Keep in mind, though, that there are many wonderful and important diaries that don't fit in any of these tags. Don't worry if yours doesn't.

You can add a private note to this diary when hotlisting it:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary from your hotlist?
Are you sure you want to remove your recommendation? You can only recommend a diary once, so you will not be able to re-recommend it afterwards.
Rescue this diary, and add a note:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary from Rescue?
Choose where to republish this diary. The diary will be added to the queue for that group. Publish it from the queue to make it appear.

You must be a member of a group to use this feature.

Add a quick update to your diary without changing the diary itself:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary?
(The diary will be removed from the site and returned to your drafts for further editing.)
(The diary will be removed.)
Are you sure you want to save these changes to the published diary?

Comment Preferences

  •  What's making our chimpanzee's fat? (69+ / 0-)

    They're not likely scarfing down double whoppers, and no one ever asks them if they'd like fries with that. We might excuse the weight gain in domestic animals as heavy owners providing fido with an extra course of kibble, but that kind of excuse doesn't fly for animals used in research.

    There are a lot of suspects discussed in Berreby's article, but my completely off the cuff idea: gut bacteria. When ranchers want a calf to pack on weight in the feedlot, they give it a huge dose of antibiotics. Not to protect it from disease, but to kill off the bacteria that in normal circumstances would convert some of the growing cow's food for their own purposes (and in some cases help the cow metabolize material for itself).

    I'm not suggesting that pervasive antibiotics are the culprit. We've certainly thrown them around by the metric ton, but the pattern of obesity's spread looks more like an infectious disease than contamination. I'm putting my (completely imaginary) money on the idea that there's been a turnover in the micro-fauna that operates in the guts of many mammals, with some new organism ascendant that displaces the bugs that used to help us all keep our belts buckled.  Heck, we might even be in the midst of some micro-extinction event for a helpful bacteria.

    None of which excuses the fact that my entire supper consisted of blackberry cobbler.

    •  You too can be a scientist (8+ / 0-)

      Ive seen (lots) worse hypotheses in grant applications.
      Unfortunately gut bacteria are a poorly understood jungle, and exploring that idea would be as hard as proving the existence of dark energy. Maybe harder.
      On the other side of the coin, its pretty well established that the human obesity epidemic has spread across the globe with the adoption of western life styles. Its our way of life thats spread (or IS) the 'infection'.
      Any culture that can come up with the KFC Double Down, then look at it and say "I'll have 2. And an apple tart." has a lot to answer for

      •  Actually, I kind of am... (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        RiveroftheWest

        or at least was. I spent a decade as a geologist and managed to land a few papers in journals (mostly speleology and carbonate deposition), I also worked several seasons on paleontology digs and got one (1) paper published associated with my largely unused aquatic biology degree.  And then I have a degree in information theory...

        It's just the kind of mishmash that often deludes me into thinking I know what I'm talking about.

    •  Have to disagree, Mark (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      JesseCW, VClib, enhydra lutris, psnyder

      Having worked with beef cattle for several years, I can tell you a "whopping dose of antibiotics" is not the route to take, since that would kill off all the gut bacteria, which is essential for a ruminant.
      Do they use low level therapeutic antibiotics in the feed on newly arrived calves? Yes, calves can and do get sick after being weaned and shipped, and a low dose of antibiotics for the first week can prevent a lot of problems down the road.

      Your beliefs don't make you a better person. Your behavior does.

      by skohayes on Sun Sep 01, 2013 at 04:50:31 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Then why do so many (reliable) sources say (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        petral, Bernie68, psnyder

        1. More than half the antibiotics manufactured in this country go to agriculture.
        2. Cattle are fed antibiotics in the belief it helps them grow faster.
        No way are all those drugs used just to treat sick calves for a few days.

        •  1.)Because there are a lot more (0+ / 0-)

          animals than people in this country. There are billions of chickens raised every year for eggs and meat, for example.

          2). Low level (non-therapeutic) antibiotics have been shown to improve growth rate in cattle (average daily gain) and some improve feed efficiency (which is a ratio determined how many pounds of feed adds one pound of gain).

          Individual producers do different things, swine producers don't use antibiotics in the same way as cattlemen and poultry people are a whole different story. And it also depends on if the calves have been backgrounded before arriving at the feedlot (which means already weaned off the cow, started on hay or grass and up to date on vaccinations).

          Your beliefs don't make you a better person. Your behavior does.

          by skohayes on Sun Sep 01, 2013 at 03:55:47 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  From the Union of Concerned Scientists (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            RiveroftheWest

            Using Atibiotics to. fatten Livvestock

            Although reducing or eliminating nontherapeutic uses of antibiotics is a straightforward solution to the problem of resistance, it will be difficult to implement. Eliminating this use of antibiotics challenges the standard operating procedures of a large and powerful industry.
            The nontherapeutic use of antibiotics is ingrained in livestock and poultry operations because producers believe that chickens, cows, and pigs—particularly those that are not healthy to begin with—gain weight faster when these drugs are added to their feed.

            In addition, livestock producers have bought into the myth that bacteria that cause illness in humans develop resistance only in medical settings. While no one denies that unwise use of antibiotics in human medicine is a source of serious resistance problems, this view has prevented recognition of one of the best opportunities to cut back on these drugs—in nontherapeutic agricultural applications.

            •  I cannot speak for the cattle industry (0+ / 0-)

              since I work almost exclusively with pigs these days, but I can tell you that producers are working towards less and less antibiotics, and there are almost none of the drug "cocktails" we used to use less than 30 years ago.
              But it is certainly NOT a "myth" that resistant strains of bacteria have risen in hospital and nursing home settings, not as a result of overuse of antibiotics in livestock, but because of poor cleanliness and quality assurance practices and over-prescription of prophylactic antibiotics in human medicine.

              U.S. doctors are prescribing enough antibiotics to give them to 4 out of 5 Americans every year, an alarming pace that suggests they are being overused, a new government study finds.
              Overuse is one reason antibiotics are losing their punch, making infections harder to treat. The report released Wednesday gives the first detailed look at usage of these medicines in every state and finds it highest in the South and Appalachia.
              And the CDC study found the most frequently prescribed antibiotic was azithromycin, which is commonly used for bronchitis symptoms. But that's a problem. Bronchitis is usually caused by a virus, and antibiotics like azithromycin don't work against viruses.

              Read more: http://www.ctvnews.ca/...

              Your beliefs don't make you a better person. Your behavior does.

              by skohayes on Mon Sep 02, 2013 at 04:28:46 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

    •  Gut bugs... (19+ / 0-)

      Good article on them here: As a new book says processed food killing off 'friendly' bacteria in our gut...Can eating home-made pickles fight off infections-and obesity?

      So might changing the composition of our gut bacteria in turn change our weight?

      Possibly: the researchers have found that when they transferred bacteria from the guts of fat mice into mice with no gut bacteria, they gained nearly twice as much weight as those that received gut bacteria from skinny mice.

      But under the pressures of broad-spectrum antibiotics, food pasteurisation and a modern diet, the human microbe community has probably changed more in the past 100 years than in the previous 10,000, when the shift to agriculture altered our diet and lifestyle.

      Children are exposed to fewer bacteria and the theory is that their immune system isn't then 'trained' to accurately distinguish between good and bad microbes, which may explain the escalating rates of allergy, asthma and autoimmune disease in the developed world.

      The average child in the developed world has also received between ten and 20 courses of antibiotics before their 18th birthday, an assault on the gut bugs the implications of which researchers are just beginning  to calculate.

      But we've worked hard to eliminate bacteria from the diet, by sterilising our food, and by processing it we've removed much of the fibre - precisely the component of greatest value to the microbes.

      With the exception of yoghurt, foods that contain live bacteria have all but vanished from our plates (the bacteria in sauerkraut, ketchup, pickled vegetables etc are killed off by pasteurisation).

      The Western diet, with its refined carbohydrates, highly processed foods, and dearth of fresh vegetables, preserves foods by killing bacteria and then deprives our gut bacteria of much that is good for them to ferment and grow.

      As we express our gratitude, we must never forget that the highest appreciation is not to utter words, but to live by them. John F. Kennedy

      by JaxDem on Sun Sep 01, 2013 at 04:58:14 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Eating fermented foods has changed (7+ / 0-)

        my daughter's life.

        We always ate a healthy diet in our house (a lot of fruit and veggies which were mostly home grown) yet my daughter was one of those kids with no immune system.  She would get sick frequently.  She is now almost 30 and has adopted a diet of mostly organic fruit and veggies and locally sourced meat/eggs.  She makes it a point to eat fermented foods daily and has been making kimchi and water kefir.  When visiting her, I tried her lemon/mint kefir and it was delicious--sort of like drinking a light soda as it had a little fizz.  The added benefit is that she rarely gets sick.  If she does, the illness is short lived and typically treated naturally.  This is a good thing given that she has no health insurance!

        “It is the job of the artist to think outside the boundaries of permissible thought and dare say things that no one else will say."—Howard Zinn

        by musiclady on Sun Sep 01, 2013 at 07:46:17 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Wonderful validation of the findings (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          davehouck, psnyder

          in that article, musiclady.  Thank you for taking the time to share this personal experience.  I'm glad your daughter is doing so well now.

          As we express our gratitude, we must never forget that the highest appreciation is not to utter words, but to live by them. John F. Kennedy

          by JaxDem on Sun Sep 01, 2013 at 08:18:41 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

    •  Penalty for extra apostrophe (5+ / 0-)

      :P

      Your beliefs don't make you a better person. Your behavior does.

      by skohayes on Sun Sep 01, 2013 at 05:06:29 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  I have to say (8+ / 0-)

      though I'm no organic food junkie, I do believe that the addition of processed foods to our diet, with all the associated chemicals and preservatives, has not done us any good.
      I've never had a problem with my weight, but I pretty much cook all my own food from scratch, and avoid things like deli meats, fast food, and the like, plus I exercise (2 mile walk with the dog every morning, plus work) on a regular basis.

      Your beliefs don't make you a better person. Your behavior does.

      by skohayes on Sun Sep 01, 2013 at 05:11:01 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Too simple (10+ / 0-)

        As with you

        I pretty much cook all my own food from scratch, and avoid things like deli meats, fast food, and the like, plus I exercise (2 mile walk with[out] the dog every morning, plus work) on a regular basis.
        and I've struggled with my weight for my whole adult life.  My husband, who has shared the meals I make, and mostly eats more of them, is still skinny after all these years.

        "It ain't right, Atticus," said Jem. "No, son, it ain't right." --Harper Lee, To Kill a Mockingbird

        by SottoVoce on Sun Sep 01, 2013 at 05:41:13 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  I don't want to assume, because I (4+ / 0-)

          don't know your gender and  having a husband doesn't mean you're female, but men generally have about 10% faster metabolisms pound for pound.

          I get to eat 2450 calories a day to maintain 180.  A woman my size and activity level and age could only eat 2220.

          If she ate my intake for a year, she'd be about 20lbs heavier at the end of it.

          Secondly, bigger people get to eat a lot more.  Each pound of weight you carry takes 9 to 12 calories a day to maintain even if you're sedentary.  If your husband is a good deal taller and therefore has a lot higher desired weight, he could eat considerably more and still be thin.

          Lastly, bigger people use more calories to accomplish the same tasks. I burn about 106 calories walking a mile, my wife burns about 75.

          1) Bomb Syria 2)???????????? 3) Lives saved!!!!!!

          by JesseCW on Sun Sep 01, 2013 at 06:12:08 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Fallacious (0+ / 0-)

            Your "A calorie is a calorie is a calorie" assumption has been thoroughly debunked.

            Read Good Calories, Bad Calories by award-winning science reporter Gary Taubes. Shorter version: Dr. Atkins was right all along.

            What is valued is practiced. What is not valued is not practiced. -- Plato

            by RobLewis on Sun Sep 01, 2013 at 10:10:43 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  That a few fringe kooks desperate to sell (0+ / 0-)

              books and promise easy fixes where there are none is nothing unusual.

              It started with Kellogg, 120 years ago, insisting that evil protein was the cause of all that ails us.

              Extremely excessive consumption of sugars and simple carbs can lead to diabetes or a pre-diabetic state that can slow a persons metabolism.  

              That doesn't change the basic math, that eating more than you burn is what causes weight gain.  Rather, it changes the rate at which you burn.

              All gurus of the moment, and their devotees, notwithstanding.

              1) Bomb Syria 2)???????????? 3) Lives saved!!!!!!

              by JesseCW on Sun Sep 01, 2013 at 03:07:20 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

        •  Your metabolism can change with age. (4+ / 0-)

          Many people who never had to watch their weight find that as they reach about 50 years old, it becomes a problem, even if they don't change their diet or reduce their activity level.

          •  Oh, yeah (3+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            enhydra lutris, SottoVoce, psnyder

            Especially when your doctor puts you on birth control for peri-menopausal symptoms at the age of 53, I think I gained 20 lbs overnight.
            Trying to get rid of that extra weight was a definite struggle!

            Your beliefs don't make you a better person. Your behavior does.

            by skohayes on Sun Sep 01, 2013 at 06:52:41 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  I had cancer and a hysterectomy at age 50 (5+ / 0-)

              I'm glad that I came through easily and have remained cancer-free afterwards, but weight has clung to me ever since.

              I think my point is that people who have active metabolisms and come from families who are thin shouldn't be smug about their own virtue, when it's not necessarily virtue that has made them stay trim.

              "It ain't right, Atticus," said Jem. "No, son, it ain't right." --Harper Lee, To Kill a Mockingbird

              by SottoVoce on Sun Sep 01, 2013 at 08:33:51 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  My sister was overweight her (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                SottoVoce

                entire life, and my brother is overweight now, as is my mom.
                Trust me, I have a pretty normal metabolism, but I also have a young black lab that needs to be walked and played with every day, and I work with large animals, so my job is physically taxing as well. I eat one meal a day, because that's all I usually have time for. But trust me, I'm not skinny!
                I know that people who exercise and diet still struggle with their weight, I work with a 27 year old who plays softball all summer and fall and has twin boys to chase after, and still fights to lose weight. I do agree that genetics plays a huge part for some people.
                I'm glad to hear the cancer has not come back!

                Your beliefs don't make you a better person. Your behavior does.

                by skohayes on Sun Sep 01, 2013 at 03:43:01 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

          •  Yup (3+ / 0-)

            I never watched my weight.  I just ate when I was hungry and stopped when I was full.  I never gorged.  My weight stayed constant all of my adult life.  When I turned 50 extra pounds just started added up.  I'm now 25 - 30 pounds heavier.  Fortunately, by keeping my weight down during my adult life, this means I went from a size 6 to an 8, so it's not that bad.  I'd feel better if I could get rid of 15 of these pounds though.

            “It is the job of the artist to think outside the boundaries of permissible thought and dare say things that no one else will say."—Howard Zinn

            by musiclady on Sun Sep 01, 2013 at 07:50:31 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

      •  I gave up meat and processed foods (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        davehouck, aufklaerer

        40 years ago, dairy about 20. I stopped using pharmaceuticals after my last Lyme infection - antibiotics make it worse. Aspirin is as far into chemical medicine as I will go. I use Homeopathics. Acid-alkaline balance is critical. I eat only whole, fresh, natural food, locally produced food whenever possible. I refuse to contribute to the unsustainable and planet-wrecking global anything-anytime shipped-from-anywhere food production and distribution cartels. They don't give a %*@! about you or your health. Only your $ interest them.

        I'm 6', 67 yr old male, 170 lbs. My weight has fluctuated about +- 5 lbs (except for a period 15 yrs ago when I did bodybuilding (195!)) and is now about the same as it was 40 yrs ago. My cholesterol is 135. My resting pulse 48 - I'm no athlete.

        My primary complaint is that I work too much and don't get enough exercise and yoga. I could use a good fast and detox too.

        Diet is a choice. Tastes are acquired (unfortunately much like religion!). Reengineering taste is essential to restore health.

        •  All of that sounds great except (0+ / 0-)

          Homeopathics aren't medicine. They aren't anything at all.

          So you are contributing to the completely fraudalent fake medicine anti-science cartel. Kinda balances all your other good work, you know?

    •  chemicals, hormones, GMO food, all together (8+ / 0-)

      Lab animals and domestic cats and dogs are fed the same kind of engineered food most people eat, full of GMO soy & corn, chemicals, etc. and they drink water contaminated with the same chemicals and pharmaceutical residues that we do. The one that interests me is the feral rats -- but I suspect they too feast on people-food (in dumpsters etc.) and drink contaminated water.

      We have been imbibing chemical soup, plastics, and all manner of toxins since at least 1945, from in utero development onward. The industries have assured us that they're completely safe, and government regulators buy into that. But our bodies know.

      The gut bacteria theory is also interesting, and they're interrelated -- what you eat/drink (and what your mother ate/drank when she was pregnant with you) undoubtedly affects your gut bacteria. Some theorize that's why changing to a vegan diet is so helpful.

      But there is also ideology. Blaming personal choices for obesity makes it an individual moral issue -- "personal responsibility." (It also supports an entire sector of diet foods and programs.) Recognizing the environmental factors would make it a political one, with powerful and well-funded industries that have a stake in not having this research done.

      •  Since you mentioned it (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        enhydra lutris, TerryDarc, davehouck

        I've been a vegan for over 20 years. At 58 I feel great. Daily long walks are key here too. (no daily drugs, either.)

        it's interesting that before  became a vegan, I often (weekly) experienced intestinal discomfort, you know gas and other stuff I would rather not mention at breakfast time. Anyway, that kin of unpleasantness is very much history with me. Once or twice a year at most.

        I would recommend this lifestyle to all.

        Is President Obama the last moderate Republican?

        by al23 on Sun Sep 01, 2013 at 06:16:28 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  Dogs, and moreso cats, are fed vastly more (4+ / 0-)

        carbs than their system can handle.

        Diabetes, rampant among domestic cats, is virtually absent from zoo and sanctuary populations where cats are fed diets of supplemented meats.

        Their metabolisms are completely whacked.  Feeding our pets most pet foods, particularly dry, is like feeding kids a diet of twinkies.

        1) Bomb Syria 2)???????????? 3) Lives saved!!!!!!

        by JesseCW on Sun Sep 01, 2013 at 06:22:44 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Yes, we put carnivores (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          JesseCW, enhydra lutris

          on a diet of dried meat and corn products.  Not good for them.

          "YOPP!" --Horton Hears a Who

          by Reepicheep on Sun Sep 01, 2013 at 07:07:07 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  I had a diabetic cat (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          JesseCW

          who was able to reduce the amount of insulin he needed by giving him a grain free diet. I've known some diabetic cats who go off of insulin entirely by being given an appropriate diet.  Cats in the wild eat small rodents, birds and some grass.  They don't eat corn, soy and wheat gluten which are so prevalent in grocery store brands of food (Fancy Feast has some grain free varieties).  It costs more to give my kitties a good grain free diet, but they are healthier.  The additional money I spend on their food is saved by having lower vet bills.

          “It is the job of the artist to think outside the boundaries of permissible thought and dare say things that no one else will say."—Howard Zinn

          by musiclady on Sun Sep 01, 2013 at 07:53:30 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Remember, too, that the grass they eat gives (0+ / 0-)

            them absolutely no calories.  They can't digest it anymore than we can.

            They eat it to help pass hairballs (lions get them too) and sometimes help with an upset stomach.  

            A home-made grain free diet can be as cheap as canned Friskies, but it's important to use a diet created by a licensed vet and to discuss it with your own veterinarian.

            Wild cats (as I'm sure you know, but sometimes I state things 'for the home audience') eat whole prey bones and organs and all, plus the occasional insect loaded in B vitamins, so they need proper supplements to thrive on a homemade diet.

            1) Bomb Syria 2)???????????? 3) Lives saved!!!!!!

            by JesseCW on Sun Sep 01, 2013 at 08:39:04 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  Yup. We try to keep kitty grass in the house (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              JesseCW

              so they can have it when they need it.  There are so many high quality grain free foods available these days.  We have a local pet store that carries a large variety--brands that cannot be found in the grocery store.  They also carry raw but my cats didn't seem to like that.

              I had a cat who had major intestinal problems.  Turned out that he had IBD which we think was caused by food sensitivities.  Apparently fish, beef and lamb are common food sensitivities in cats and I had been giving them a diet high in fish.  I switched to poultry and rabbit formulas because I thought those would be closer to what they would eat in the wild.  Sure enough, his intestinal problems cleared right up!

              “It is the job of the artist to think outside the boundaries of permissible thought and dare say things that no one else will say."—Howard Zinn

              by musiclady on Sun Sep 01, 2013 at 09:04:23 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

    •  So vegetarian animals (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Johnny Nucleo, enhydra lutris

      are loosing gut bacteria because of cattle feed?

      Sedentary life, certainty of round the clock feeding and lack of survival stress are more in my mind

    •  global warming? (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      enhydra lutris

      If temperatures are warmer then everyone needs less energy to get by.  

      Of course if lab animals are in a completely controlled environment this might not apply.

      www.tapestryofbronze.com

      by chloris creator on Sun Sep 01, 2013 at 06:55:48 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  A very interesting hypothesis, Mark, and one (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Bernie68, petral

      that I find attractive. Gut bacteria, total, diversity, good, bad, and even specific species and sub-species are turning up more and more as suspects, culprits, solutions and cures.

      That, in its essence, is fascism--ownership of government by an individual, by a group, or by any other controlling private power. -- Franklin D. Roosevelt --

      by enhydra lutris on Sun Sep 01, 2013 at 07:50:32 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  a lot of new data supports this hypothesis (0+ / 0-)

      and was just published in Nature. summarized here

      "None of us got where we are solely by pulling ourselves up by our bootstraps" Thurgood Marshall

      by UTvoter on Sun Sep 01, 2013 at 08:33:02 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  MAKE MONEY FROM GOOGLE............MAKE MONEY FROM (0+ / 0-)

      uptil I saw the draft which said $9039, I didn't believe that...my... mother in law woz like they say really making money parttime at their laptop.. there mums best friend had bean doing this 4 less than 10 months and just now cleard the mortgage on their cottage and got a brand new Lotus Carlton. navigate to these guys.....

      Make Money From Google

  •  I heard twas blueberries had da/cure. (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    bastrop, Naniboujou, enhydra lutris

    Don Benedetto was murdered.-IgnazioSilone(BreadAndWine)

    by renzo capetti on Sat Aug 31, 2013 at 10:43:06 PM PDT

  •  those pathologies were always there (8+ / 0-)
    That was then, about 95,000 deaths ago and before about 10 percent of the Syrian population fled the country. It was also before the present pathologies took hold. The Syrian civil war was formerly an uprising against the brutality of a despot. It has become a battle among sects and ethnicities over which group of Syrians should control the country; part of a fight for regional leadership involving Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Turkey and Iran; and an extension of the battlefield on which al-Qaeda affiliates carry out their messianic violence.

    Warning - some snark may be above‽ (-9.50; -7.03)‽ eState4Column5©2013 "I’m not the strapping young Muslim socialist that I used to be" - Barack Obama 04/27/2013

    by annieli on Sat Aug 31, 2013 at 11:24:14 PM PDT

  •  Buddy of mine in SC messaged me a link (18+ / 0-)

    to post an article to my FB wall about the strikes.

    Can you post this to your wall? If I do it, I could get fired. SC is a Right-to-Work state.
    And he is a freaking Republican.

    The place was utterly dark—the oubliette, as I suppose, of their accursed convent.

    by bastrop on Sat Aug 31, 2013 at 11:30:31 PM PDT

  •  Every Day For Like 15 Years I Drove (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    bastrop

    by Arlington. You take 110 to 66 and that is a daily thing. It always amazed me there was a cemetery on my route to work. Oh and you drive by the Pentagon.

  •  Word: (17+ / 0-)
    Summers' party affiliation isn't my concern. His miserable fiscal policy is.

    Irony takes a worse beating from Republicans than Wile E. Coyote does from Acme. --Tara the Antisocial Social Worker

    by Youffraita on Sun Sep 01, 2013 at 12:20:33 AM PDT

  •  Leonhardt's buried lede (11+ / 0-)
    [Summers] does seem to be somewhat to her right, on monetary policy and regulation...

    The area where politics matters most is probably regulation, Mr. Blinder noted. The next leader of the Fed will have a large role in implementing the Dodd-Frank financial regulation law. The Fed will face multiple decisions about when markets should function without interference and when regulators should try to protect consumers or deflate nascent bubbles.

  •  Who will tell the children? (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    bastrop, Brian B

    some thoughts early on a Sunday morning

    in this piece which I invite you to read

    "We didn't set out to save the world; we set out to wonder how other people are doing and to reflect on how our actions affect other people's hearts." - Pema Chodron

    by teacherken on Sun Sep 01, 2013 at 04:31:15 AM PDT

  •  How much does Kathleen Parker get paid? (12+ / 0-)

    It's way too much, whatever it is.

    "So, am I right or what?"

    by itzik shpitzik on Sun Sep 01, 2013 at 04:54:32 AM PDT

  •  Yesterday I posted a review of an interesting book (5+ / 0-)

    on education, written by two advocates of "making" in the classroom.

    You might find it worthwhile to look at Invent to Learn: Making, Tinkering, and Engineering in the Classroom.

    "We didn't set out to save the world; we set out to wonder how other people are doing and to reflect on how our actions affect other people's hearts." - Pema Chodron

    by teacherken on Sun Sep 01, 2013 at 04:59:34 AM PDT

    •  But, school.... (0+ / 0-)

      "That ain't no good as no talent 'cause it don't involve handlin' no ball!"

      "It's not sports, it's not spelling, it's not grammar, it's not normal, and it's not a real talent that we encourage here"...

      I hated school....

      "If this Studebaker had anymore Atomic Space-Age Style, you'd have to be an astronaut with a geiger counter!"

      by Stude Dude on Sun Sep 01, 2013 at 05:20:17 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Douthat makes me want to scream (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    rantsposition, Mark Sumner
    I still believe in the “stable” and “rule-based” part. But what the view from this office has taught me is that real stability still depends almost exclusively on the United States military’s monopoly on global force. Multilateralism is a nice idea, but right now it’s the Pax Americana or nothing. There’s nobody else prepared to act to limit the ambitions of bad actors and keep them successfully boxed in.

    And that’s really all this intervention is about. There is an acknowledged line around the use of chemical weapons, Assad’s government flagrantly crossed it, and we’re the only ones who can make him pay a price.

    Of course there’s something arbitrary about telling a dictator he can kill his subjects with bullets but not gas. But there’s something arbitrary about any constraint we impose on lesser powers. The point is to sustain an environment of constraint, period — in which troublemakers are constantly aware they can only push so far before American military power pushes back.

    I don't think Douthat can tell between his fantasies and Obama's. I can though.

    Your beliefs don't make you a better person. Your behavior does.

    by skohayes on Sun Sep 01, 2013 at 05:05:24 AM PDT

  •  Getting what you (don't) pay for (9+ / 0-)

    The money boys at ALEC have conspired for three decades to move "middle class" workers out of good pay/benefit jobs into lower paying jobs. They not only moved the better jobs overseas and created "right to work for less" zones, but cut off unemployment to make those who have to support a family move into the fast food industry.

    And now that those folks are working fast food as their main job, the money boys are surprised that these hard workers expect a living wage at it.

    If working 40 hours a week for 50 weeks a year doesn't get you a wage that is above the poverty level with health care, then shame on us.

    But I've said it three times; we need a way to support these folks, a fund to contribute to that helps them organize and unionize. Where?

    Of course, a small monetary tip and a reminder to that worker that he/she needs to vote wouldn't hurt either.

  •  David Frost (13+ / 0-)

    has passed away at age 74.

    Sir David Frost, the journalist and broadcaster whose lengthy career covered everything from cutting-edge 60s satire to heavyweight interviews and celebrity gameshows, has died of a heart attack on a cruise ship, his family said.

    "Differences in political opinion are as unavoidable as, to a certain point, they may perhaps be necessary." George Washington

    by civil wingnut on Sun Sep 01, 2013 at 05:18:52 AM PDT

  •  History repeats itself and never in a good way. (5+ / 0-)

    Whenever I think that there might be an answer to the problems in Syria all I have to do is look back at the history that is Israel and the Palestinians.

    Okay... that won't work either.

    "I think it's the duty of the comedian to find out where the line is drawn and cross it deliberately." -- George Carlin, Satirical Comic,(1937-2008)

    by Wynter on Sun Sep 01, 2013 at 05:29:03 AM PDT

  •  Why Obama's Going to Congress on Syria (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    hulibow, skohayes



    Because congress writes letters instead of, if they were really serious about the demands, the leadership of both houses calling the peoples representatives back in session!

    Because most of the press and especially talking heads are praising the letter writing and not questioning why the leadership, especially in the House, has yet to call the representatives back into session!

    Because the some 80% of the people, as reported, 70%plus were in full support of the bush administration quickly abandoning the missions we sent our military into that region after 9/11, occupation continues but winding down, and cheering on invading Iraq, are against any Syria actions while not demanding the congressional leadership call their representatives back into session while those letters from were written and sent to the White House!


    "If military action is worth our troops' blood, it should be worth our treasure, too; not just in the abstract, but in the form of a specific ante by every American." -Andrew Rosenthal 10 Feb. 2013

    by jimstaro on Sun Sep 01, 2013 at 05:34:18 AM PDT

    •  Catch-22 (11+ / 0-)

      If he went ahead without asking Congress, there'd be calls to impeach him for overstepping his authority. If he asks Congress, there are calls to impeach him for being a wuss and not taking action unilaterally.

      In other words, there is a determination to impeach him for something, anything. Wearing the wrong color tie, taking his wife out for their anniversary, vacationing in Massachusetts again, sending his daughters to a too-liberal school, something.

      •  Impeach First.....ask questions later. (6+ / 0-)
      •  There WERE calls to impeach him (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        jimstaro, Stude Dude, celdd

        if he went ahead without Congressional approval all over the right wing commentariot last week.
        The talking points need some clarification.
        A PERFECT example of "If Obama wants it, we're against it."

        Your beliefs don't make you a better person. Your behavior does.

        by skohayes on Sun Sep 01, 2013 at 05:55:51 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  And made, (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          skohayes

          As usual, by the oh so many who weren't questioning their reps on why the leaderships of both houses hadn't already called the representatives back into session, media same, instead of writing letters about!!!

          Dems as well, while not impeachment, doing exactly same and Now some decide it's time to contact their reps to vote against Syrian strikes!!!

          DeJa-Vu all over again as the wheel goes round and round!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

          "If military action is worth our troops' blood, it should be worth our treasure, too; not just in the abstract, but in the form of a specific ante by every American." -Andrew Rosenthal 10 Feb. 2013

          by jimstaro on Sun Sep 01, 2013 at 06:20:18 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Not an emergency. There is no defibrillator. (0+ / 0-)

            This is all bullshit, part a continuation of our decades of meddling and part the knee jerk "respek ma authority!!" syndrome that is 55% of US foreign policy.

            That, in its essence, is fascism--ownership of government by an individual, by a group, or by any other controlling private power. -- Franklin D. Roosevelt --

            by enhydra lutris on Sun Sep 01, 2013 at 08:01:14 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

        •  Meanwhile (0+ / 0-)

          Things were getting done throughout the Executive branch and it's cabinet led agencies, like they have, but you wouldn't know it from visiting this site or sites like it established to help get Democrats and Progressives elected!!

          Same ole same ole!!!

          "If military action is worth our troops' blood, it should be worth our treasure, too; not just in the abstract, but in the form of a specific ante by every American." -Andrew Rosenthal 10 Feb. 2013

          by jimstaro on Sun Sep 01, 2013 at 06:23:58 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

  •  Syria.....Guessing Boehner and McTurtle will use (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Superpole, Naniboujou, Reepicheep

    the debate to run out the clock on all the other things congress has to do in the 9(?) days they have left.

  •  Productivity Increases (11+ / 0-)

    Thanks to the Economic Law of Greed, all these increases have translated into higher dividends for stockholders, higher pay for CEOs and their minions, but little in the way higher wages for the workers. It's really quite disgusting.

    The creatures outside looked from pig to man, and from man to pig, and from pig to man again; but already it was impossible to say which was which.

    by The Lone Apple on Sun Sep 01, 2013 at 05:49:09 AM PDT

  •  President Obama was campaigning in 2007 (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    tardis10, Stude Dude, Chi, BusyinCA

    proposing a minimum wage of 9.50 an hour, to be passed ASAP once he took office, and implimented with two increases, one in 2010 and one in 2011.

    Now, 9.00 is supposed to be enough, phased in by 2016?

    There's no chance of passing it.  Push for 12 and give Representatives something they can sell the public during the midterms FFS.

    This isn't just a callous lack of concern for the poor, it's stupid politics.

    If there has to be some bullshit compromise after the election to get a bill passed, phasing in 11 by 2016 or something, at least we won't have fucking started from "Far too little, far too fucking late" as a place to open negotiations!!

    1) Bomb Syria 2)???????????? 3) Lives saved!!!!!!

    by JesseCW on Sun Sep 01, 2013 at 05:54:39 AM PDT

  •  Sir David Frost is dead at age 74 (6+ / 0-)

    Yes, the David Frost who did the famous interview of Nixon.  He apparently died of a suspected heart attack while on a cruise where he was giving a speech.

    I got this on a BBC news bulletin:
    Sir David Frost, broadcaster and writer, dies at 74

    There are a couple of tribute videos on the BBC web site already.

    I'm sick of attempts to steer this nation from principles evolved in The Age of Reason to hallucinations derived from illiterate herdsmen. ~ Crashing Vor

    by NonnyO on Sun Sep 01, 2013 at 05:58:55 AM PDT

  •  With RepubliKlans Controlling the House a $9 (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    BusyinCA

    minimum wage is a pipe dream. Hell, if the Repubs tke the Senate in 2014 and the Presidency in 2016 they'll lower the minimum wage in order to "spur hiring". Also.

    BTW Dana, did you sleep thru American involvement in Libya? How bout Kosovo? Not every use of American military force results in the needless deaths of thousands of American soldiers - just because LBJ lied our country into an aggressive foreign jungle war doesn't mean that all Democratic presidents are disposed to do the same.

    However I'm relieved that Obama has insisted that Congress perform it's Constitutional duty as the only branch of government that can declare war - even though that didn't turn out so well in regards to Vietnam and Iraq.

    I am not now, nor have I ever been, a member of the Republican Party.

    by OnlyWords on Sun Sep 01, 2013 at 06:00:08 AM PDT

  •  Another Embarrasing Labor Day (7+ / 0-)

    Millions of people who want to work still UNemployed... fast food workers striking in numerous cities for higher wages, because many people working in fast food are older adults unable to find any other work and they have families to support.

    The childhood poverty rate in the U.S. is wayyyyy up. of the two dozen or so nations in the study, only Romania has a higher childhood poverty rate (23%) than we do.

    In spite of this pathetic state of affairs, Congress and our president still have no bold plan to get people back to work at decent paying jobs with decent benefits.

    http://thinkprogress.org/...

    "The 1% don't want SOLUTIONS; they've worked very hard the last four decades to get conditions the way they are now".

    by Superpole on Sun Sep 01, 2013 at 06:12:06 AM PDT

  •  I am thrilled at the fast food workers' success... (6+ / 0-)

    in organizing these strikes across the nation.
    Onward and upward...

  •  I can't wait... (0+ / 0-)

    ...until the 50th anniversary of Reagan's visit to Bitburg.

    Progressive LIBERAL-right, yet "disloyal" since January 20, 2001

    by howie14 on Sun Sep 01, 2013 at 06:31:49 AM PDT

  •  Daddy must spank. Never mind that it will (0+ / 0-)

    accomplish nada, damn it, somebody did something we don't (officially) like, so we must punish.

    A wee look at a bit of Syrian/US history
    US _ Syria

    A brief look at some of our history of aggression and warfare, not counting petty shit like covert campaigns, proxy wars, shooting down Iranian commercial airliners and such US v ROW

    That, in its essence, is fascism--ownership of government by an individual, by a group, or by any other controlling private power. -- Franklin D. Roosevelt --

    by enhydra lutris on Sun Sep 01, 2013 at 08:14:54 AM PDT

  •  It worked sooo well for Clint! (0+ / 0-)

    "commenting on actual statements or actions of the president are far too difficult for a conservative columnist. It's so much easier when you just make stuff up."  This is how Obama derangement syndrome rolls.

  •  Republican and right wing antiwar blather-- (0+ / 0-)

    --Actually offends me on a deep, deep level. These fucking pigs would be painting themselves in blood and chanting in tongues rain down fire upon the "mudslimes" if a Repuglican were President.

    It's just unbelievable not only how they have absolutely zero principal or consistency, but in a way it shows how more than anything they never gave a shit about the troops after all.

    My style is impetuous.
    My defense is impregnable.
    YOU'RE NOT ALEXANDER!

    by samfish on Sun Sep 01, 2013 at 06:03:29 PM PDT

Subscribe or Donate to support Daily Kos.

Click here for the mobile view of the site