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Today on Meet the Press, Rand Paul aligned Syria’s Assad government with the protection of Christians. If there is one thing that can make this already bad situation exponentially worse, it is linking action vs no action regarding the use of chemical weapons on civilians to religion.

“I think the Islamic rebels winning is a bad idea for the Christians. All of a sudden we’ll have another Islamic state where Christians are persecuted.”
Not everything he said was so incredibly inflammatory (Russia could help with the peaceful removal of Assad blah, blah, blah) but, honestly, with the 'Save the Christians!" bomb thrown in, nothing else he said matters.

Way to go, Paul. You really are a stunning piece of work.

http://www.mediaite.com/...

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Comment Preferences

  •  Chip off the old block. (11+ / 0-)

    And just as worthless.

    If I ran this circus, things would be DIFFERENT!

    by CwV on Sun Sep 01, 2013 at 10:08:56 AM PDT

    •  It will play well in Kentucky however, so this may (7+ / 0-)

      have been a ploy to bolster his ratings back home.

      And it feels like I'm livin'in the wasteland of the free ~ Iris DeMent, 1996

      by MrJersey on Sun Sep 01, 2013 at 10:14:08 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  True, that. (4+ / 0-)

        But it is a short-sighted ploy completely against US interests.

        •  What are US interests in Syria? (4+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Cedwyn, GAS, schumann, FloridaSNMOM

          Shouldn't US interests be for a stable Syria?

          If so, we should ask ourselves, is a stable Syria (a) more likely or (b) less likely to result from US military intervention.

          Learn about Centrist Economics, learn about Robert Rubin's Hamilton Project. www.hamiltonproject.org

          by PatriciaVa on Sun Sep 01, 2013 at 10:49:46 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Yes. That is the question that should be asked. (4+ / 0-)

            NOT whether we are making sure Christians, as a specific group that makes up less than 10% of the population, are being protected.

            •  Protection of Christians is an important question (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              BRog, cville townie

              Just as the protection of women, lgbt people and other vulnerable/minority groups are important in any country. It's not the only consideration, but it's an important one.

              Are you saying we should ignore the persecution of gays in Russia because it "doesn't serve U.S. interests?"

              "Poor man wanna be rich, Rich man wanna be King, and the King ain't satisfied till he rules everything." Bruce Springsteen.

              by Johnnythebandit on Sun Sep 01, 2013 at 11:45:49 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  I beg to differ (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                FloridaSNMOM

                It is not the job of the United States to protect every interest group in the world - as much as I support the rights of those groups.

                We do have a role in making sure that chemical weapons don't get used without repercussions. This is a matter that goes to our own security.  

                Who loves who? A human rights issue. Not a security issue.  

            •  Exactly Syria is no Bosnia (sarcasm) (0+ / 0-)

              I agree with you killing Christians is irrelevant. However, as you point out, Christians are 10% of the population. Why do we want to put into power a group that will kill 10% of the population? I dont think Assad is that bad.

              Try and see past the chemical weapon nonsense. The only reason we have any 'security interests' in Syria is because we have been funding a not so covert war against Assad for the last couple years.
              A US Senator, John McCain went IN to Syria to hand out weapons to people at war in Syria. I guarantee he only did it because President Obama has 100s of people doing the same.

          •  Why isn't (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            ExpatGirl

            making sure a dictator isn't gassing his own people, including children, considered to be a US interest?  Or a global one, for that matter?

      •  It plays well w/ me, a Stanford-educated Catholic (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        phillies, Duckmg, barkworsethanbite

        whose last time in Kentucky was passing through the state as a child during our annual summer trip to Mexico.

        If Assad falls, how many of you are prepared to have a US military presence in that country to ensure the safety of Christians.

        Or are we prepared to sacrifice them.

        Learn about Centrist Economics, learn about Robert Rubin's Hamilton Project. www.hamiltonproject.org

        by PatriciaVa on Sun Sep 01, 2013 at 10:46:40 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  I might be - (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          highacidity

          or do you think that risking X (an unspecified but possibly high number of) US and other troops and harming Y (an unspecified and probably high number of) Syrians of any or no religion is better?

          can we look at saving lives, please?

        •  So you're rooting for Assad? (4+ / 0-)

          "Sure, he's a monstrous dictator who has likely used chemical weapons against his own people and who has definitely slaughtered them, by the thousands, with conventional weapons... but he doesn't particularly seek out Christians to attack, so he's cool with us."

          I'm not entirely supportive of military action in Syria, but those who suggest that we shouldn't help the rebels because the current regime doesn't persecute Christians are, essentially, arguing for the perpetuation of a murderous bastard's rule.

          "When I give food to the poor, they call me a saint. When I ask why the poor have no food, they call me a communist." --Dom Helder Camara, archbishop of Recife

          by JamesGG on Sun Sep 01, 2013 at 11:06:49 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  That's exactly why the problem in Syria is (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          ExpatGirl, FloridaSNMOM

          complicated, not simple. The admin. has already taken that into account. That's why they're proceeding as they are.
          John McCain and Linsey-poo can demand robust regime change, and Paul can blather about the Christians, but they can't offer any substance on helping the admin. with a very complicated and dangerous way forward.
          Maybe Putin was watching MTP today and will decide to undo everything he's been doing on Syria because Paul suggested it.
          The gop is just blowing it out their ass and that probably is one reason the Pres. pinned them down by making them vote.

          You can't make this stuff up.

          by David54 on Sun Sep 01, 2013 at 12:02:41 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  So PatriciaVa would be equally concerned about (0+ / 0-)

          the treatment of Christians in Saudi Arabia which is listed at the #2 country in the world as far as difficulty to be a practicing Christian.  Perhaps an effort toward regime change there would get a better deal for the Saudi Christians?

          And it feels like I'm livin'in the wasteland of the free ~ Iris DeMent, 1996

          by MrJersey on Sun Sep 01, 2013 at 01:48:42 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  And what of the Kurds, (0+ / 0-)

          and the various other minority groups in that country that Assad is oppressing?

          What about the civilians, including children, that his regime used chemical weapons on?

          Or are Christians the only ones who matter?

  •  Regardless of his B.S. reason, (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    phillies, radmul, Duckmg

    a call for no military involvement by the USA is good news.

    -4.75, -5.33 Cheney 10/05/04: "I have not suggested there is a connection between Iraq and 9/11."

    by sunbro on Sun Sep 01, 2013 at 10:17:07 AM PDT

    •  To say that we aren't acting because (5+ / 0-)

      we only value Christians would be a disaster that would bite us in the ass for years to come.

      •  That's a statement by a faction in the U.S. (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        highacidity

        who think that way. This reason will not get support as an official U.S. position.

        -4.75, -5.33 Cheney 10/05/04: "I have not suggested there is a connection between Iraq and 9/11."

        by sunbro on Sun Sep 01, 2013 at 10:23:43 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  To many civilians in other countries... (5+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          ExpatGirl, BPARTR, GAS, sunbro, TheLizardKing

          ...whether or not it's the "official U.S. position" won't make a damn bit of difference.

          Propagandists will seize on his words, point out that he is a U.S. Senator and likely presidential candidate in 2016, and make their people believe that it is the real position of the U.S. no matter what the "official" one might be.

          "When I give food to the poor, they call me a saint. When I ask why the poor have no food, they call me a communist." --Dom Helder Camara, archbishop of Recife

          by JamesGG on Sun Sep 01, 2013 at 11:08:42 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Amen! (3+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            GAS, sunbro, TheLizardKing

            That is exactly the point.

          •  We have our own Taliban here. (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            ExpatGirl

            Sarah Palin, and people that speak well of her, are good examples of this.

            I do expect that they are going to say things that are damaging to the reputation of the United States among the religious fanatics in other countries.

            George W. Bush once called our activities in the Middle East "a crusade", which was an unfortunate choice of words obviously.

            We have simply too many uneducated religious zealots here. They have no concept of what is likely to hurt our country, and Rand Paul is simply exploiting their stupidity for his supposed political gain.

            -4.75, -5.33 Cheney 10/05/04: "I have not suggested there is a connection between Iraq and 9/11."

            by sunbro on Sun Sep 01, 2013 at 01:44:39 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

        •  A loudmouthed wingnut congressman made a (0+ / 0-)

          speech that said that Hillary, as SoS, was making deals to side the US with terrorirists, and that idiotic speech got HEAVY play in Egypt, where Egyptians idiotically said it was proof that the Obama administration sided with terrorists against the Egyptian people.

          The first manifestation of that nonsense wasEgyptians throwing tomatoes at Hillary's motorcade on a visit to Egypt.  They even taunted her with chants of "Monica! Monica!" She had no idea what they were pissed about, it turned out that they had bought the wingnut's bull.  The next manifestation was a few months ago, during the uprising/coup/whatever, where Egyptians were carrying signs bashing the US for siding with terrorists.

          Just recently, one of the msnbc shows did a segment on the wingnut congressman's speech and how it's been used as anti-US propaganda in Egypt.  I'd link the video, but for the life of me I can't remember which show did it, can't remember the name of the congressman, so I'm having a hard time tracking the video down because I can't come up with a decent search query. :(

          So yes, idiocy from the wingnuts can indeed get play elsewhere.

    •  It's meaningless. If he wants to get the gop (0+ / 0-)

      nomination he'll be kissing up to the neocons in the final analysis.

      You can't make this stuff up.

      by David54 on Sun Sep 01, 2013 at 12:04:16 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Some opponents of intervention... (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    ExpatGirl, Mike S

    Will seemingly go to any length to not only argue against the idea that the U.S. can or should do anything, but against the glaringly apparent facts that the Syrian government is a cabal of bloodthirsty thugs that just gassed a civilian neighborhood and now expect to get away with it scot-free.

    You can vote "no" on the AUMF, Senator, but defending the vicious and brutal Assad regime, with tens of thousands of lives on its hands, is just beyond the pale. We didn't defend the Hutu militias to justify not intervening in Rwanda, or Omar al-Bashir to justify not doing anything about Darfur. Argue on the facts; debate the merits.

    Pragmatic progressive. Oregonian, Cascadian, and American. Keeper of the DKE glossary.

    by SaoMagnifico on Sun Sep 01, 2013 at 10:19:17 AM PDT

  •  Onward christian soldiers........n/t (5+ / 0-)
  •  Oh hell, let him talk! (7+ / 0-)

    The more crap that comes out of his mouth, the easier it will be to assail him when he is running for president in 2016.

    And if he somehow wins the GOP nomination, all his idiot words will be golden arrows to use, again and again, against him.

    I'm not sixty-two—I'm fifty-twelve!

    by Pragmatus on Sun Sep 01, 2013 at 10:24:36 AM PDT

  •  He said much more than that... (3+ / 0-)

    and this was an accurate statement he made, in passing, because the truth is that Christians would be persecuted, as elsewhere.

    Why do so may people hate Christians?

    This diary does not paint an accurate picture.

    I am no Paul supporter either.

    He said the situation was too murky and was against intervention, and wanted the Russians and Chinese to do more.

    But I suppose he is just a bad man because he speaks out on behalf of Christians to be safe and live in some form of dignity.

    •  This diary is perfectly accurate (9+ / 0-)

      He had no business introducing the concept of America acting based on favoring one religion over another.

      I'm sorry you feel so persecuted.

      •  No it isn't. (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        coffeetalk, barkworsethanbite

        I just watched the segment. It's why I responded.

        I am not surprised that many here would see it as accurate. That is the predisposition here.

        I am NOT Christian, by the way.

        And if I was, your last statement is just another indicator that, in truth, you could care about such persecution.

        Which was the point I was trying to make. Why are Christians so hated by so many here?

        •  I made it quite clear that not everything (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Sue B, highacidity, GAS

          he said was incendiary. Introducing protecting Christians, however, has the potential to be.

          I don't hate Christians. I don't actually give a damn about them anymore or any less than any other religion - except when they try to shove their faith down my throat and up my birth canal.

          The situation in Syria is NOT a Christian conflict and a representative of the United States has NO business trying to turn it into one.

          •  He made the statement in passing... (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            coffeetalk

            and I did not say you hated Christians, but surely read the comments, and you will see the hateful tone in many.

            That is a problem here. That it's so easy to bring out hatred for one cause or another.

            I don't think he tried to turn it into a Christian conflict, either. Was he wrong that the rebel element, if in control, would persecute Christians? It just adds to the murkiness that he was trying to convey.

            •  It sure sounds to me like you did. (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              ExpatGirl

              Expatgirl:

              I'm sorry you feel so persecuted.
              ERichards:
              I am NOT Christian, by the way.
              And if I was, your last statement is just another indicator that, in truth, you could care about such persecution.

              Which was the point I was trying to make. Why are Christians so hated by so many here?

              ERichards26
              I did not say you hated Christians
              Um, it sure sounds like you said she hated Xtians...

              As my father used to say,"We have the best government money can buy."

              by BPARTR on Sun Sep 01, 2013 at 11:54:34 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

        •  He did say more. (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          ExpatGirl

          But he also said:

           

          "I don't see American interests invloved on either side of the Syrian war. I see Assad, who has protected Christians for a number of decades, and then I see the Islamic rebels on the other side who have been attacking Christians...I don't see either party that is victorious, if either party is victorious, being an American ally"
          So the fact that he has protected Christians for decades is far more important than him gassing Islamic children.

          The part about neither side being an ally of the US is valid. Mentioning the protection of christians while ignoring the vicious mass murder of innocent men, women and children is not. Is a Christian child more important than a Muslim one?

          Most of the people taking a hard line against us are firmly convinced that they are the last defenders of civilization... The last stronghold of mother, God, home and apple pie and they're full of shit! David Crosby, Journey Thru the Past.

          by Mike S on Sun Sep 01, 2013 at 11:02:47 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Is a hate crime worse than a regular murder? (0+ / 0-)

            It is clearly worse to kill a muslim because he is muslim than it is to kill a muslim over money or other reasons.

            The latter is still a tragedy, but the former forces all muslim people to live in fear and terror.

            The same is true with any religious, ethnic, or other minority in any state.

            "Poor man wanna be rich, Rich man wanna be King, and the King ain't satisfied till he rules everything." Bruce Springsteen.

            by Johnnythebandit on Sun Sep 01, 2013 at 12:14:26 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

        •  The religious right is hated, for good reason. (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          ExpatGirl

          In this case this guy is pandering to the religious right. There is a set of people here that like to bash Christianity but that's really not what the substance of this matter is about.

          You can't make this stuff up.

          by David54 on Sun Sep 01, 2013 at 12:14:55 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

    •  Poor Christians! (7+ / 0-)

      If only Christians comprised an absolute majority of members of Congress, every president to date was Christian, and all but a handful of state constitutions made reference to the Christian construction of God as a supreme deity with a hand in human actions and events, maybe Christians wouldn't feel so, so persecuted.

      Pragmatic progressive. Oregonian, Cascadian, and American. Keeper of the DKE glossary.

      by SaoMagnifico on Sun Sep 01, 2013 at 10:34:50 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Christians in some places may have it good... (0+ / 0-)

        but those that do get persecuted, like in Egypt, barely get a concern.

        Anyway, it's so typical to see the way people here respond.

        In this instance, however, the diary sensationalizes something that was minor.

      •  Christians in Mid-East are worse off than Muslims (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Radiowalla

        in America. While there is some profiling and harassment that goes on, Muslims are allowed to practice their faith openly and are protected by the 1st amendment. The same is not true in many Middle Eastern countries such as Saudi Arabia, where Christians cannot become citizens and are banned from practicing openly.

        If it's so easy being Christian, why don't you walk around Iran with a cross around your neck?

        "Poor man wanna be rich, Rich man wanna be King, and the King ain't satisfied till he rules everything." Bruce Springsteen.

        by Johnnythebandit on Sun Sep 01, 2013 at 12:20:50 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Or if you happen to be Jewish (0+ / 0-)

          you won't last long in any of the Muslim countries. Over 900,000 Jews were chased out of Arab lands in the years following the establishment of Israel.  No "right of return" has ever been granted to any of them.

          Middle Eastern Christians are persecuted in these countries, just as were the Jews.  It ain't pretty.  These middle eastern countries are intolerant and undemocratic.  

          It's the Supreme Court, stupid!

          by Radiowalla on Sun Sep 01, 2013 at 01:10:17 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  I wouldn't say "any of the Muslim countries." (0+ / 0-)

            Albania is a Muslim majority country yet they have always been welcoming to Jews and people of all faiths. During the Holocaust, Albania took in hundreds of Jewish refugees.

            Really it's the Muslim countries in the Middle East where we face the biggest problems in terms of religious freedom.  

            "Poor man wanna be rich, Rich man wanna be King, and the King ain't satisfied till he rules everything." Bruce Springsteen.

            by Johnnythebandit on Sun Sep 01, 2013 at 01:26:31 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

          •  Could safely be Jewish in Syria (0+ / 0-)

            under Assad.  Rand Paul mentions the fact that Christians have lived peacefully in Syria, but Jews and different sects of Muslims have also lived peacefully together for decades under Assad's leadership.

            •  Not according to Wikipedia (0+ / 0-)

              and their entry on the movement of Syrian Jews ....

              In the nineteenth century, following the completion of the Suez Canal in Egypt in 1869, trade shifted to that route from the overland route through Syria, and the commercial importance of Aleppo and Damascus underwent a marked decline. Many families left Syria for Egypt (and a few for Lebanon) in the following decades, and with increasing frequency until the First World War, Jews left the near East for western countries, mainly Great Britain, the United States, Mexico and Argentina. Further emigration, particularly following the establishment of the state of Israel in 1948, was largely caused by repetitive Muslim aggression towards the Jewish communities in Syria.

              Beginning on the Passover Holiday of 1992, the 4,000 remaining members of the Damascus Jewish community (Arabic Yehud ash-Sham) as well as the Aleppo community and the Jews of Qamishli, were permitted under the regime of Hafez al-Assad to leave Syria provided they did not emigrate to Israel. Within a few months, thousands of Syrian Jews made their way to Brooklyn, with a few families choosing to go to France and Turkey. The majority settled in Brooklyn with the help of their kin in the Syrian Jewish community.
              The few remaining Jews in Syria live in Damascus.,[6]

              Under Assad Jews were allowed to leave Syria provided they didn't go to Israel.  There are only a few Jews left.  In other words, they are living peacefully elsewhere.  

              It's the Supreme Court, stupid!

              by Radiowalla on Sun Sep 01, 2013 at 04:07:51 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

        •  I may be wrong, (0+ / 0-)

          but isn't Saudi Arabia still the only Middle Eastern country that legally bans Christianity?

          I remember reading a few years ago about an incident where the Iranians tried to prosecute someone for being a practicing Christian, and their court smacked them down because it's not illegal there.

    •  ... (0+ / 0-)

      Why do so may people hate Christians Jews Muslims etc etc etc ?
      Hate breeds hate and my group is the best and so on .

      "please love deeply...openly and genuinely." A. H.

      by indycam on Sun Sep 01, 2013 at 10:43:05 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  However, hate of Christians... (0+ / 0-)

        is openly tolerated here, so that a simple statement of fact, not a statement that my group is best, is turned into a bash Paul and Christians party.

        •  Enough. Stop hijacking this thread (4+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          mahakali overdrive, BPARTR, GAS, madmojo

          This isn't about how the DKos community feels about Christianity.

        •  Poooooooor Christians! (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          radmul, BPARTR, GAS

          So oppressed!

          Here's a hint for you: the left gets irritated with Christians because of your goddamn persecution complex. Me, most of my extended family is Christian, and I was raised Christian too. I know prayers and hymns by heart; I attended a Catholic school for a time; I have nothing in particular against Christians even though I'm not religious anymore. But what pisses me off is when Christians moan about being oppressed and persecuted and mistreated when they have utterly dominated the Western world (and most of the Southern Hemisphere as well) for centuries and continue to do so.

          Pragmatic progressive. Oregonian, Cascadian, and American. Keeper of the DKE glossary.

          by SaoMagnifico on Sun Sep 01, 2013 at 10:59:01 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Once more, I am NOT Christian... (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Radiowalla

            but believe they are no less entitled to dignity than anyone else.

            So because they dominate the Western world, then they deserve persecution anywhere. That seems what you are saying.

            As the Middle East is being ethnically cleansed of Christians, except in Israel.

            Islam dominates the Middle East and has oppressed other minorities. Does that mean Mulsims cannot complain when they are persecuted in Europe?

            I do not follow your logic, but this will be my last comment because I am accused of threadjacking, even as I try and engage in dialogue.

            Later!

            •  That is not what I am saying (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              ExpatGirl, GAS

              What I am saying is that creatures like the junior senator from Kentucky seem to think the U.S. should identify more with and make a particular effort to do right by Christians around the world based on our "shared faith", while saying, as Sarah Palin did recently, "Let Allah sort it out" between the Muslims.

              Assad is a Bad Dude. Al Qaeda is also bad. Ideally, the U.S. would not choose between Assad and al Qaeda -- although Paul suggests we should favor Assad because he won't kill the Christians, even though he's been killing Christians along with everyone else targeted by his snipers, artillery, jet bombers, and missile launchers since early 2011 -- and would instead support a secular coalition.

              Paul is arguing Assad is the lesser of two evils because he's somehow better for Christians. That's such a wrongheaded approach, I can't even seriously believe you're defending him.

              Pragmatic progressive. Oregonian, Cascadian, and American. Keeper of the DKE glossary.

              by SaoMagnifico on Sun Sep 01, 2013 at 11:16:10 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

            •  Christianity is not an ethnicity. (0+ / 0-)

              And every religion has oppressed other minorities.  You think Christians haven't?

        •  No one here is saying (0+ / 0-)

          they hate Christians, and Christians should be persecuted.

          What we're saying is that there's nothing special about Christians that makes them more important than the innocent civilians that have been killed by Assad, and thus, their protection should not be considered any more important than the protection of EVERY civilian in Syria.

    •  He is just pandering. (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      GAS, rexxnyc

      Obviously the admin. is concerned about an al Qaeda faction coming to power in Syria. Not just on behalf of the Christians, but all the minorities there.
      That's already baked in.
      That is the reason we haven't backed the opposition more robustly and they haven't been able to break the stalemate.

      That is why the admin. and everyone else on our side is trying to construct the very difficult and complicated set of circumstances that force a political settlement there.

      You can't make this stuff up.

      by David54 on Sun Sep 01, 2013 at 12:12:39 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  I saw a panel at Brookings Institution on CSPAN (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        ExpatGirl

        last night about Russia and Putin, specifically. It was held last Monday.
        It seems pretty obvious Paul saw that, judging from his comments. He was just borrowing the experts' observations.

        You can't make this stuff up.

        by David54 on Mon Sep 02, 2013 at 07:19:37 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  Oh, bullshit. (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      ExpatGirl

      The real question is, why does the risk of Christians being persecuted outweigh the fact that Assad is persecuting people in his own country right now?  And killing them, for that matter?

      The argument being made here is that it's ok to let Assad continue doing what he's been doing, but God forbid the Christians be put at risk.  The implication is that Christian lives are somehow worth more.

  •  This already does have religious undertones. (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Mother Shipper, radmul, GAS

    At some point, people outside the region need to understand the long sanding conflict between Sunni and Shiites. Religion is already in this mix just as it was in Iraq.

    The politicians may be bought, and the system corrupt, but it is our duty to fix these things.

    by sebastianguy99 on Sun Sep 01, 2013 at 10:32:59 AM PDT

  •  Christians are being harassed and their churches (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Mother Shipper, Radiowalla

    systematically destroyed right now in Egypt and there's a secular military coup/noncoup/junta/nonjunta in power there now who isn't doing anything about it.

  •  Lunatic, it really is a four-letter word... (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    GAS, ExpatGirl

    just like "Paul."

    Click the ♥ to join us on the Black Kos front porch to review news & views written from a black pov - everyone is welcome.

    by mahakali overdrive on Sun Sep 01, 2013 at 11:02:36 AM PDT

  •  I hope that Paul and the rest of the Christians (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    ExpatGirl, GAS

    will send millions to help the million or so refugees that have come from Syria so far.  These folks have been uprooted and persecuted by this conflict and should be given more care and more protection.  Paul and the rest of the frauds always tend to ignore war's ugly little secret about the poor and the oppressed and can only think of creating more of the same.  Kentucky is a beautiful state and it needs to rid itself of these two skin tags that blight it.

  •  Do you really think they listen to us? (0+ / 0-)

    I think that those of us here have an exaggerated opinion of our influence in the region.   I'm pretty sure that Syrians have already formed their opinions about Assad with respect to Christians (and other sectarian issues) by now.  

    It is too easy to slip into the old colonial and paternalistic views.   The average seventh-grader could give us or any CNN talking head lessons on the complexities of the region, and the adults probably have a better understanding of US politics than we do.   (Those at the receiving end of empire know more about what it is up to than the empire's citizens.)

    They can probably locate Syria on a map, as well.

  •  it isnt Just Senator Paul, yesterday one of (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    ExpatGirl

    the invited talking heads on MSNBC who was pushing for intervention cited his reasons including the persecution of Christians in Syria if the Rebels won.  

  •  He's trying to thread the needle between the (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    ExpatGirl, GAS, rexxnyc, SaoMagnifico

    admin. and John McCain.
    He's dog-whistling to the religious right while criticizing the admin. but deflecting from a blunt critique of McCain.
    So he lands on the great idea of getting Russia to help us forge a political solution. He's right. It would be great if Russia would stop being Russia and help us.
    But it's just craven posturing.

    You can't make this stuff up.

    by David54 on Sun Sep 01, 2013 at 11:56:20 AM PDT

  •  So here's the conundrum. If the Paulite (0+ / 0-)

    preachers start a panic in their congregations will those voters switch to supporting Obama's position?

    Will the far far right support such a switch from opposing to supporting the POTUS they loath, on t his issue?

    Could such a switch in support change the statistics nationally to be nearer enough to a 50/50 tie in the polls to allow Obama to claim that Americans support an illegal act of war that will inevitably cause negative repercussions to us somewhere and will leave Assad in power?

    It would be a fun thing to watch, just like watching the Republican party change from supporting the War POTUS Bush to opposing the War POTUS Black Guy.

    But all this is really serious.  The more outside nations roil the chronically unstable Mideast the longer it will take for anything like peace to predominate in that part of the world.

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