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It was making the front page headlines. A little boy needed a transplant to stay alive. He was 5 years old and poor. That was not a good place for him to be in. I felt calm because my mother worked for the State and would give me the "inside" scoop. Sitting quietly at her break drinking coffee with me,she says"your quiet." I ask about the little boy. She says their is nothing to say. The budget is used up and their is no money to pay for a surgery where the boy could die anyway.
I am trying to stay calm. THIS IS MY MOTHER! "Mom I ask, why not take the money from some other place in the budget,build one less road, something like that?" "Michael I don"t make those decision"s . Now I am talking very loud and making my Mom nervous. "Talk to someone" The boy died.
That event happened years ago but it forever taught me about what it meant to be poor in this country. Having a diabetic son I have never been able till recently to buy him insurance at any price.
One day he breaks his knee,I set up payments and my son goes in for surgery as a charity case. His knee is throbbing and he needs a urinal. He buzzes several times for a nurse who is next store but my son is ignored, Finally my son pees on the floor. The nurse comes a half hour later and in a mad voice says "what?" Nothing he replied.
As a diabetic,He needs shots. The nurse forgets. In the morning his blood sugar is over 600. Anybody who know about this sort of thing;knows it should be 120 at the max.

The Doctor who saw my son in the morning  was unconcerned about his blood sugar and said to eat his breakfast. My son took his shot first.
When he was discharged, no followup instructions were given him and I had to scream to get a list of things that he should do to make his knee better.
Charity Care means if you have a broken knee it gets fixed. You pay for everything else. Your treated as someone to get rid of fast.
I am treated at the Veterans Hospital and have always received great care. I have no unkind words to say unless its the several month wait for a surgery that is deemed non life ending.
The Affordable care act,if it does anything, gives some people a chance to feel as if they can be treated with common courtesy when they are sick. I have first hand experience to say the largest hospital in Seattle treats the poor like dogshit
 "Things do not change;we change.""
-Henry David Thoreau

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Comment Preferences

  •  One positive thought, or two. (5+ / 0-)

    Obamacare is making things better.

    And your story reminded me of this:

    “When I was a boy and I would see scary things in the news, my mother would say to me, "Look for the helpers. You will always find people who are helping.”

    ― Fred Rogers

    Many people are helpers, not all have lost compassion.

    We can safely abandon the doctrine of the eighties, namely that the rich were not working because they had too little money, the poor because they had too much. JK Galbraith, 1991

    by Urban Owl on Sat Sep 21, 2013 at 01:57:28 PM PDT

  •  Sorry, but... (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Eyesbright
    The Doctor who saw my son in the morning  was unconcerned about his blood sugar and said to eat his breakfast. My son took his shot first.
    I'm pretty sure this is a blatant lie. No doctor in the world would do this. Not a single one. Please do not make up stories to prove a point.

    Also, as a type one diabetic myself, this jumped out at me:

    As a diabetic,He needs shots. The nurse forgets. In the morning his blood sugar is over 600. Anybody who know about this sort of thing;knows it should be 120 at the max.
    I've had spikes well into the 400s. 600 is ridiculous, and your boy would likely have been comatose. Saying blood sugar should be 120 at the max is pretty absurd, especially in the morning. Look up the "morning phenomenon". Even well-treated diabetics can wake up with blood sugar in the 200s. It's not ideal, but it shows the limitations of the medication and the eccentricities of the human body. And unless you have very high spikes or have spikes for extended periods of time, you're not in any acute danger. It's very bad for your health, but again, you're not going to die from it.

    If you really had a diabetic son, you'd know all of this. But as it stands, I highly doubt you have a diabetic son, or if you do, it's unlikely you've taken the time to understand the disease, the treatment, and its effects.

    Sorry that this comes across as combative, but I hate it when people make up stories like this. It reeks of the kind of spam you see littering Facebook.

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