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OK so here is the threat

France’s top football clubs, who employ some of the country’s wealthiest professionals, have said they may go on strike this weekend in protest at plans to tax earnings over a million euros at 75 percent.
Here is the reality
French football "is still in the red as all Ligue 1 clubs saw its debt increase at the end of last year, compared to the previous season," according to SPORTS. Ligue 1 "continues to show negative financial results."
Here is a possible compromise.

Get your business model in order and pay your players less, then they wont have so much tax to pay, not forgetting the owners of said clubs.

My personal viewpoint

Earning millions for playing with a ball, seriously; you are going to complain about taxes?

Perhaps their fans could also go on strike over excessive ticket prices?

Perhaps a dose of reality might be good for professional sports as a whole.

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Comment Preferences

  •  Tip Jar. It's so sad. (21+ / 0-)

    "Another world is not only possible, she is on her way. On a quiet day, I can hear her breathing." Arundhati Roy

    by LaFeminista on Mon Oct 21, 2013 at 09:10:33 AM PDT

  •  Poor babies. How they supposed to afford their... (3+ / 0-)

    ski chalets, luxury cars and mansions, if they have to pay more in taxes?

    Really France, don't you know these guys are JOB CREATORS?

    Tax and Spend I can understand. I can even understand Borrow and Spend. But Borrow and give Billionaires tax cuts? That I have a problem with.

    by LiberalCanuck on Mon Oct 21, 2013 at 09:22:03 AM PDT

    •  I care more for the general workers in the clubs (5+ / 0-)

      then again they don't earn millions either.

      "Another world is not only possible, she is on her way. On a quiet day, I can hear her breathing." Arundhati Roy

      by LaFeminista on Mon Oct 21, 2013 at 09:26:29 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Money in sports is obscene, but this misses point (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      dcatalin, roundhead, mint julep, ssgbryan

      The best players -- the ones who would command salaries in excess of a million Euros -- they will have options to play abroad...and many will go abroad.

      The notion that the league would be in better financial shape if it paid players less -- this might be true, but they are in a global market, and many of the players in Ligue 1 could find jobs abroad where they will make the bigger bucks. So, all Ligue 1 owners would be doing is offering an inferior product. In that market, they may not be all that attractive and might even lose more money.

      Look at Major League Soccer in this country. The average wage is $160k, but most players actually make less than that -- and teams have their team salary budget capped at about $3 million, divided over 18-20 players (except for 1-2 star Designated Players and, the rest of the roster, who are paid league minimums of about $45k, or less for homegrown teenagers). MLS has a decent fan base, but more American soccer fans now watch European soccer on TV than our own MLS games. NBC recently paid the English league more to televise its games than they paid MLS (and that was the first time any network paid MLS a real rights fee). Soccer fans here know MLS is a vastly inferior product, much less entertaining than top European leagues.

      If the French league wants to be competitive in terms of the attentions of French fans, they need to retain the best French players, If the top teams in France want to be competitive in European competition, they need to able to sign more non-French star players like Ibrahimovic. There's no question that the proposed high rate would preclude that prospect -- except possibly the team in Monaco, which is positioning itself to become a real power in the French league, and ultimately in Europe.

      Sure, the top soccer/football players are overpaid -- but they are able to leverage their ability to move throughout Europe to command salaries that are well in excess of what is reasonable.  One nation's league can't bring sanity to this market. I'm not sure anyone can, really. There is so much money on the table for all parties -- TV contracts, advertising dollars, jersey sponsorships, etc -- it's hard to reign it in. Just like politics.

      Look at the USA in both regards. Our main sports don't face real international competition, but they still pay big salaries -- in fact, generally speaking, our top athletes in baseball and the NBA and NFL make much more than all but a handful of soccer players. There's just so much money flying around and everyone wants a piece of the action. It's only fair that the real labor -- the talent -- the athletes -- should get the lion's share. It used to be that those on the left marched in lock-step with striking athletes to get greater freedoms and fairer wages, in opposition to greedy multi-millionaire (now billionaire) owners. In the past, owners refused to let players really negotiate with other teams and  used that lack of leverage to hold down their wages.

      I guess the worm has turned.

      Coming Soon -- to an Internet connection near you: Armisticeproject.org

      by FischFry on Mon Oct 21, 2013 at 09:56:52 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  So we should make a special exemption for (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        a2nite

        footballers.

        Interesting idea.

        "Another world is not only possible, she is on her way. On a quiet day, I can hear her breathing." Arundhati Roy

        by LaFeminista on Mon Oct 21, 2013 at 10:10:05 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  I didn't say that...exactly. (0+ / 0-)

          However -- since the European football market is unique, in terms in the ease of labor movement, market penetration (at least in terms of TV), and in terms of the level of regulation at the European level - maybe there could be a compact among the leagues and national governments.

          This would hold down salaries, give teams more control over their assets, and keep down inflationary pressures on ticket prices. It could also restore some level of competitive balance among teams within leagues (usually the same 3 or 4 teams are at the top of each league, and the money they receive for winning their leagues and for qualification into European competitions just reinforces the competitive imbalance) and possibly even create more competitive balance between leagues.

          I don't have it fully thought through -- but, maybe there could be a special status where first division footballers are taxed at a uniform rate throughout the EU -- an exemption and rate set by the Commission, rather than national government. There is a certain logic to it.

          FIFA is trying to create some sanity in the market by setting up a linkage between a team's income and the money it can offer in the transfer in the market. There really is no enforcement mechanism and that can perversely encourage teams to make certain of their status among the elite by spending what it takes to stay there -- since the loss of revenue would be precipitous, if a team slipped out of the elite. Maybe the EC can help here.

          Coming Soon -- to an Internet connection near you: Armisticeproject.org

          by FischFry on Mon Oct 21, 2013 at 10:26:07 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Someone still has to pay the bill, so instead of (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            a2nite

            rich footballers it will be the working poor and middle classes yet again.

            "Another world is not only possible, she is on her way. On a quiet day, I can hear her breathing." Arundhati Roy

            by LaFeminista on Mon Oct 21, 2013 at 10:30:16 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  That's not what I have in mind (0+ / 0-)

              It may be that they would pay higher rates in some countries than they pay now. Moreover, it will take away the incentive to leave (or not to come to France), so in this one respect at least, the French may yet collect as much tax as they would have at the higher marginal rate.

              What I'd also suggest is that this could serve as a model for the rest of the industrialized world -- to achieve some level of uniformity in taxation, across societies (not just in football) -- so that tax havens would no longer work to push all countries in a race to the bottom.

              Coming Soon -- to an Internet connection near you: Armisticeproject.org

              by FischFry on Mon Oct 21, 2013 at 10:46:18 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  Deal with the country your dealing with (0+ / 0-)

                I could easily export my business since it is digitally based.

                Will I? No I wont because I feel some social responsibility.

                I'm sick of the whinging by those with least cause to do so

                "Another world is not only possible, she is on her way. On a quiet day, I can hear her breathing." Arundhati Roy

                by LaFeminista on Mon Oct 21, 2013 at 10:48:21 AM PDT

                [ Parent ]

                •  Are you making way over one million euros? (0+ / 0-)

                  Because if you are making substantially more than that, you're a fool to pay 75% instead of, say 35% elsewhere, if every thing else is equal -- especially, if your'e in a business where you've only got a couple of years to earn at that level, and your career will be over a few years after that.

                  One the other hand, if you' re barely scraping by on, say 1.1 or 1.2 million Euros, then the marginal rate change won't make a big difference. And, if you're making less than one million euros a year, your analogizing to your own situation is way off the mark.

                  Coming Soon -- to an Internet connection near you: Armisticeproject.org

                  by FischFry on Mon Oct 21, 2013 at 11:52:11 AM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

                  •  We are in the next bracket down, which is also (0+ / 0-)

                    been raised I estimate between business, personal, local taxes we are looking at around 49%.

                    This exceptional tax 75% runs for 2014 and 15 only. It is meant to be a solidarity action.
                    and in fact the super-tax only affects about 1500 people in France.

                    So what you are saying because we elected a government that ran on these tax hikes and won that we should just get up and leave? How idiotic.

                    And pre 1970 75% was not considered a supertax at all and income inequality was actually decreasing rather than the crazy concentration of wealth we see today.

                    "Another world is not only possible, she is on her way. On a quiet day, I can hear her breathing." Arundhati Roy

                    by LaFeminista on Mon Oct 21, 2013 at 01:24:39 PM PDT

                    [ Parent ]

      •  The natural state for a competitive market... (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        FischFry

        ...that has reached maturity is to have a handful of big companies dominating.  Obviously this is not good for sports, which is why sports leagues put in controls to artificially promote competition.

        Think of baseball.  Without so much revenue sharing and even the loose salary caps in place now, you might only have 8 teams that could afford to compete.

        International soccer will eventually have to do something.

        •  Has there ever been a Moneyball for soccer? (0+ / 0-)

          I agree, baseball has become better thanks to the revenue sharing and the loose salary cap. But there are still teams that spend $200 million and either don't make the playoffs (Yankees) or the Series (Dodgers), plenty more that spent over $100 million and didn't make it (Phillies, Giants, Angels, Rangers, White Sox, Blue Jays, Nationals, Cubs) and some that didn't spend a ton of money and made the playoffs. Atlanta was $90 million, Oakland was $69 million, and Pittsburgh was $66 million. It's better that teams like the A's and the Pirates had a chance this year than if the playoffs were something like Dodgers, Giants, Phillies, and Cardinals on the NL side and Yankees, Red Sox, Tigers, and Angels on the AL side.

  •  Judging from their theatrics on the field, it is (6+ / 0-)

    more likely that they will feign a strike.

    They usually go to the ground holding a knee if an opposing player even just runs by them.

  •  Move to Lichtenstein guyz!! (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    LaFeminista
  •  Remember Atlas Shrugged... (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    skillet, LaFeminista, a2nite, ferg

    ...where the millionaires and billionaires effectively go on strike to prove to us moochers how much we need them.

    LoL.

  •  It's not that simple (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Korkenzieher, tommymet, FischFry, ssgbryan

    Since soccer leagues are international, the best players making the most money will simply go to teams in other countries where they will pay much lower taxes.  This will leave the teams in France mostly second or third rate.

    If you're not a fan of French soccer teams, well, then who cares?  But if you are a fan then it's a pretty big deal.  And things like sports have pretty high social importance and value.  Maybe not worth the millions they get paid, but important nonetheless.  Ask anyone who has lived in a town/city where the main sports team left.  I lived in Winnipeg when the Jets left, and the atmosphere around the city was downright funereal.

    Sports leagues should probably try to come up with tax arrangements so that jurisdictions (nation, state, or even city) do not have significant tax advantages over others.  Otherwise fair competition becomes a lot harder.

    •  If you regulate the banking industry...top talent (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      LaFeminista, MKinTN

      will move to London.....yada yada yada.

    •  Excuse me whilst I dont give a damn and quite (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      skillet, MKinTN

      frankly the few real fans I know are quite happy watching any football being played either in a stadium or on a local pitch.

      When a business is losing money [throughout Europe]how can you justify paying higher and higher wages?

      "Another world is not only possible, she is on her way. On a quiet day, I can hear her breathing." Arundhati Roy

      by LaFeminista on Mon Oct 21, 2013 at 09:35:23 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  I'm not justifying it (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        mint julep

        I'm just saying that it's not that simple.  There are other ramifications.

        •  I'm saying it is, why should footballers be (0+ / 0-)

          exempt from the general tax code?

          "Another world is not only possible, she is on her way. On a quiet day, I can hear her breathing." Arundhati Roy

          by LaFeminista on Mon Oct 21, 2013 at 10:26:17 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Sports industry (esp soccer) is different (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            FischFry

            Most industries do not have this kind of active and constant bidding on critical small pools of high profile talent.  Nor do they normally operate in environments where we artificially try to maintain a lot of extra businesses because of the nature of competitive leagues in sports, and for the additinal social and morale factors that sports provides to so many people.

            I'm not saying that I want them to be able to avoid the taxes on their millions.  I'm just saying that there are other ramifications.  Sports are important to society, and if you have conditions in one country that creates a large competitive disadvantage, then there are going to be undesireable effects.  Cripple French soccer teams because of tax policy and you may find yourself with a much more right-wing government in the near future.

            I'd much rather see some kind of arrangement where the leagues get together and pool money so that players pay some kind of averaged tax rate across all teams in all their nations, so that there is much less tax benefit/harm from playing for a team in one particular country.

            •  No its no differnt than my business (0+ / 0-)

              and if they are exempted who do you think will pay.

              Hmmm?

              Of course it will be the professional, middle classes and the working poor who pick up the bill

              Will I go on strike, the hell I will.

              "Another world is not only possible, she is on her way. On a quiet day, I can hear her breathing." Arundhati Roy

              by LaFeminista on Mon Oct 21, 2013 at 10:45:02 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

      •  I think (0+ / 0-)

        Enough teams are controlled by people independently wealthy[ie Chelsea, Man City] who don't care that they are losing money to exert upwards pressure on wages even among those teams trying to make money.

    •  French League (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      fenway49

      Is already second-rate.  It has to slot behind the Premiership[England/Wales], Bundesleague[Germany], La Liga[Spain], and Serie A[Italy].  Of the 14 players in France's last WC qualifier, only 3 play in France.   That might even be as bad as the USA national team and MLS which has to be considered third or fourth rate.

    •  Soccer leagues are not international (0+ / 0-)

      Ligue 1 is in France, pro football in other countries are all in different leagues, with an international governing body that won't get involved in where players play.

      But Ligue 1 already is far behind the leagues in neighboring countries. The vast majority of players on France's national team go to play in the UK, Germany, Spain, etc. because French pro soccer's not at the same level.

      I'm a fan of the game, but frankly many teams' supporters need no encouragement to be right-wing these days. There are some shameful things going on in the stadiums (looking at you, PSG, OL, etc.).

      “Republicans...think American standard of living is a fine thing--so long as it doesn't spread to all the people. And they admire of Government of the United States so much that they would like to buy it.” Harry S. Truman

      by fenway49 on Mon Oct 21, 2013 at 10:56:50 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Generally I'm supportive of sports strikes... (7+ / 0-)

    ...since they're generally disputes whether the players or the owners will be pocketing the huge amounts of money people are spending on sports, and the players are the ones who are actually doing the thing that people are there to see.

    But over taxes? Ugh. Ridiculous.

    "When I give food to the poor, they call me a saint. When I ask why the poor have no food, they call me a communist." --Dom Helder Camara, archbishop of Recife

    by JamesGG on Mon Oct 21, 2013 at 09:28:55 AM PDT

    •  I dont mind how much they are paid, but (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Hey338Too

      a dose of reality is needed, when I see so many brilliant and talented young people without even a job.

      Something has to give.

      "Another world is not only possible, she is on her way. On a quiet day, I can hear her breathing." Arundhati Roy

      by LaFeminista on Mon Oct 21, 2013 at 09:39:16 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  So tax the players more, absolutely. (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        LaFeminista, tommymet, Hey338Too

        But of the pot of money going to the teams regardless, through ticket sales, apparel sales, sponsorship, TV deals, etc., I'd rather that money go to the players instead of the owners.

        "When I give food to the poor, they call me a saint. When I ask why the poor have no food, they call me a communist." --Dom Helder Camara, archbishop of Recife

        by JamesGG on Mon Oct 21, 2013 at 09:41:19 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  I think the whole thing is just a farce (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Hey338Too

          when you look at society as a whole the imbalance is clear.

          When I look at how much local government bends over backwards to sooth the egos of these clubs I get angry

          "Another world is not only possible, she is on her way. On a quiet day, I can hear her breathing." Arundhati Roy

          by LaFeminista on Mon Oct 21, 2013 at 09:47:47 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

      •  You should mind (0+ / 0-)

        Even given their talents and the level of work involved to reach those levels, they're overpaid -- especially the ones who will make millions.

        I don't even necessarily object to such a high rate -- though, I think anything over 50% is of dubious economic value and ethical justification -- seriously, how can it make sense to charge a rate that will pay the state more than half of what the person is earning at that level?

        What I'm saying is that there is a reality you are butting up against -- and the solution is to treat footballers alike throughout the EU.

        Coming Soon -- to an Internet connection near you: Armisticeproject.org

        by FischFry on Mon Oct 21, 2013 at 10:58:20 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  A quick experiment (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    tommymet, susanala

    Erase the words "soccer players" or "football players" and substitute "public school teachers".

    Do that, and the attack on the athletes reads just like the crap I heard from Scott Walker when he assaulted public employees unions here in Wisconsin.

    Are soccer players in Europe overpaid? Probably. Are athletes in most pro sports here in the USA overpaid? Certainly. But the pay levels are a result of good-faith, perhaps even collective, bargaining, just like ordinary unions do in the US.

    Deplore the fact that they're rich guys whining about taxes, if you will. I'll agree. But if the argument is that they shouldn't get paid that much, sorry, but someone on the management-ownership side signed off on those contracts. Don't just blame one side. It take two to tango, and it takes two to make a contract. There's no reason an employee shouldn't get the best deal possible.

    The Bush Family: 0 for 4 in Wisconsin

    by Korkenzieher on Mon Oct 21, 2013 at 09:51:11 AM PDT

  •  Ahh, didn't the French already try a system (0+ / 0-)

    where the rich paid no taxes and all taxes that were paid, were levied on the lower classes?  I don't recall that it worked out that swell for the wealthy, they all lost their heads.

    “that our civil rights have no dependence on our religious opinions, any more than our opinions in physics or geometry.” Thomas Jefferson

    by markdd on Mon Oct 21, 2013 at 09:53:08 AM PDT

  •  they could join depardieu (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    LaFeminista, a2nite

    in russia.

    The cold passion for truth hunts in no pack. -Robinson Jeffers

    by Laurence Lewis on Mon Oct 21, 2013 at 10:00:43 AM PDT

  •  Why criticize athletes' salaries? (0+ / 0-)

    Yeah, tickets to games are prohibitively expensive. That's a result in part of the labor costs, but it's also a question of what the market will bear.

    Movie stars make a helluva lot more than athletes -- and their jobs are a lot easier. But, we have to pay way too much to see movies in the theaters -- and way to much for cable TV.

    Then, there's corporate executives -- who, unlike athletes, have careers that last more than a decade  -- and earn obscene wages despite adding much value.

    Baseball has become enamored with a new statistic in recent years. Rather than look at the number of this and home runs, etc., in isolation, the new statistic compares the totality of what a player achieves, in comparison to other players. WAR -- Wins Above Replacement -- estimates how many more games a team wins thanks to a player than they might have won with an average player at that position. That really calculates added value and tying compensation to that would make some sense -- although, some players may offer additional more intangible benefits including selling more tickets and jerseys.

    If only business could use a statistic like that. CEO compensation would plummet to more realistic levels.

    Coming Soon -- to an Internet connection near you: Armisticeproject.org

    by FischFry on Mon Oct 21, 2013 at 10:08:48 AM PDT

    •  Its not over the salaries its over taxes. (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      ferg

      "Another world is not only possible, she is on her way. On a quiet day, I can hear her breathing." Arundhati Roy

      by LaFeminista on Mon Oct 21, 2013 at 10:10:35 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Except, it's both.... (0+ / 0-)

        You say the French teams should just pay the players less so they don't have to worry about the tax hit. To retain players under the proposed tax structure, teams would actually have to pay their players a considerable premium. Otherwise, they will go where taxes are lower.

        The international football market, essentially, is the embodiment of the global marketplace that Republicans talk about when they US tax rates are hurting our businesses. If other labor markets were as fluid as the European football market, the Republicans would be 100% correct in their assessment. French footballers aren't going to stop playing. The best players, though, are going to play elsewhere -- in Italy, or Germany or England or Spain -- or, dare I hope, the USA.

        Moreover, French teams won't be able to entice the best world players to come there, because they would have to offer prohibitive salaries. Even under the current rates, Beckham came only for six months -- a day longer and he would have been subject to the tax rates of a French resident. It wasn't worth it to him to continue.  He's the rare guy who could retire instead -- but other players will just sign with teams in other leagues.

        Coming Soon -- to an Internet connection near you: Armisticeproject.org

        by FischFry on Mon Oct 21, 2013 at 10:38:14 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  The whole of European football is in a mess (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          FischFry

          see a comment of mine above with a link.

          Spanish football even more so.

          There are about 10 financially viable teams in Europe.

          The other complaint I often here is about excessive ticket prices.

          So they should be exempt.

          OK

          Who picks up the bill then?

          Oh right, the usual targets, my small business and my employees, fine I'll pay and I wont go on strike either.

          "Another world is not only possible, she is on her way. On a quiet day, I can hear her breathing." Arundhati Roy

          by LaFeminista on Mon Oct 21, 2013 at 10:42:49 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  European football proves free market's failings (0+ / 0-)

            So, what I'm suggesting is a little governmental intervention at a supra-national level.

            If the EC can act in a way that may restore sanity to the financial picture of football teams, fans across Europe will be better financially and spiritually. And, there would be a lot fewer Manchester United fans -- which, I'm sure we can all agree would be a good thing.

            Coming Soon -- to an Internet connection near you: Armisticeproject.org

            by FischFry on Mon Oct 21, 2013 at 10:51:20 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  The have tried it with a fair play or pay (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              FischFry

              whatever the scheme was called where clubs had to be able to actually pay the salaries they were paying by having a balanced business model.

              It turned out to be a joke.

              "Another world is not only possible, she is on her way. On a quiet day, I can hear her breathing." Arundhati Roy

              by LaFeminista on Mon Oct 21, 2013 at 10:53:17 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  Because FIFA is a joke (0+ / 0-)

                I'm suggesting that the solution is at the EC level.

                You keep saying that others will pick up the bill if players are exempted from this high rate.

                I'm saying you've got it exactly backwards. At that rate, anyone who could make 1.5 million euros would not play in France. So, what tax would the state be collecting from them? Zero.

                To the contrary of what you're suggesting, I would expect that the state will collect less tax from footballers in France, and ultimately from the top teams, who will see revenues go down.

                Coming Soon -- to an Internet connection near you: Armisticeproject.org

                by FischFry on Mon Oct 21, 2013 at 11:03:50 AM PDT

                [ Parent ]

  •  A bit of a misunderstanding about (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    johnny wurster

    the specifics of what's happening here.  This isn't about a bunch of overpaid players protesting the taxes they have to pay - because they don't.  The tax isn't levied on individuals at all, but on the firms that employ them.  This is about keeping the football clubs - which are already in the red, as you've pointed out - from going under completely.

    Of course it affects the business model and of course that will trickle down to players' salaries, without a doubt.  If they're in the red, there's a problem with their business model to begin with.  But what we may be looking at is the ultimate unsustainability of French soccer at the international level, especially during an historically bad period in their economy.  This strike is about a whole bunch of issues bundled together into one bigger mess.

    Saint, n. A dead sinner revised and edited. - Ambrose Bierce

    by pico on Mon Oct 21, 2013 at 10:15:43 AM PDT

  •  will they have picket lines to head-butt scabs /nt (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    LaFeminista, Stwriley, buddabelly

    Warning - some snark may be above‽ (-9.50; -7.03)‽ eState4Column5©2013 "I’m not the strapping young Muslim socialist that I used to be" - Barack Obama 04/27/2013

    by annieli on Mon Oct 21, 2013 at 10:25:30 AM PDT

    •  The French know how to strike... (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      buddabelly, annieli, mint julep

      like no one else. It's always entertaining, no matter what the other issues at play.

      My wife and I were in Paris several years ago when there was a bakers' strike going on. There is no visual of a strike I'll ever see that can compare to what we ran across one day when we were wandering around the city. We happened across a mass of striking bakers confronting the police. They were at the barricades (and they always have barricades at French strike protests, sort of a tradition) in their chef's whites, complete with toques. There was something quite wonderful about watching hundreds of uniformed bakers waving baguettes and throwing bags of flour (of course) at the police. I have no idea if they achieved their goals, but you have to admire the style of the whole thing.

      Our American unions (my own included) could take a few lessons from their French counterparts.

      Strategy without tactics is the slowest route to victory, tactics without strategy is the noise before defeat. Sun Tzu The Art of War

      by Stwriley on Mon Oct 21, 2013 at 11:15:00 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

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