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The first Republican presidential primary votes won't be cast for more than two years, but you need not look beyond New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie's carefully staged press conference to see that the GOP's clown show is already in full swing:

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie holds a press conference in front of school children on November 6, 2013
That's not a press conference—that's a photo op, disguised as a press conference. But if you're a political junkie, it's great news, because it means 2016 is here. On the other hand, if you're a kid in school, you might find yourself getting sucked into being a prop for someone else's political ambitions, which can be super-duper boring, as the expressions on these children's faces show.

Chris Christie isn't the GOP's only presidential wannabe, but he's clearly the flavor of the moment, and yesterday Rand Paul was more than willing to play the media's game in order to capture some of the spotlight:

During a Senate committee hearing on post-Sandy recovery efforts, Paul asked Housing and Urban Development Secretary Shaun Donovan whether it was appropriate to use federal relief funds for television ads, a clear jab at the New Jersey Republican who starred in ads touting the Jersey Shore.

“Some of these ads, people running for office put their their mug all over these ads while they’re in the middle of a political campaign,” Paul said at Senate Homeland Security hearing on recovery from superstorm Sandy.  “In New Jersey, $25 million was spent on ads that included somebody running for political office.  Do ya think there might be a conflict of interest there?”

That somebody, of course, was Chris Christie, and while Paul did not name him by name, the fact that he engaged Christie seems to have paid off, as he got broad coverage for it in the political press. And even better for Paul (in the context of a 2016 primary battle), Donovan defended Christie's action—so not only did Paul throw a punch at Chris Christie, the Obama administration came to Christie's defense.

How will Chris Christie respond to Paul's barbs? We'll get a chance to find out pretty soon: On Sunday, he'll appear on Meet the Press.

10:13 AM PT: Christie will also be on Fox News Sunday, Face the Nation, and This Week—and will have a guest appearance on The Michael J. Fox Show tonight.

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Comment Preferences

  •  GOP-on-GOP fighting... (25+ / 0-)

    Today's answer to mud-wrestling.

    “When it comes to this, I shall prefer emigrating to some country where they make no pretense of loving liberty—to Russia, for instance, where despotism can be taken pure and without the base alloy of hypocrisy.” —Abraham Lincoln

    by Pragmatus on Thu Nov 07, 2013 at 09:03:37 AM PST

  •  Christie is waaaay out in front now....gotta dirty (13+ / 0-)

    him up a bit.....which should be no problem.

  •  To quote Rand Paul (38+ / 0-)

    Meet the Press[5][6] is a weekly American television news/interview program airing on NBC. It is the longest-running television series in American broadcasting history, despite bearing little resemblance to the original format of the program seen in its television debut on November 6, 1947.[7] Meet the Press is the highest-rated of the American television Sunday morning talk shows.[8]

    Slow thinkers - keep right

    by Dave the Wave on Thu Nov 07, 2013 at 09:04:52 AM PST

  •  How about spending $25B to shut down (14+ / 0-)

    the government as political grandstanding, he asked while thinking of no one in particular.

    coughs

    Excuse me, I seem to have gagged on some Ted Cruz.

    I'm on a mission! http://www.dailykos.com/comments/1233352/51142428#c520 Testing the new site rules.

    by blue aardvark on Thu Nov 07, 2013 at 09:05:33 AM PST

  •  Who did Paul Plagiarize for that line? (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    blue aardvark, TomP, shoeless, Matt Z

    I mean really.

    What stronger breast-plate than a heart untainted! Thrice is he arm'd, that hath his quarrel just; And he but naked, though lock'd up in steel, Whose conscience with injustice is corrupted. King Henry, scene ii

    by TerryDarc on Thu Nov 07, 2013 at 09:05:36 AM PST

  •  Black kettle, black potbelly... (14+ / 0-)
    “In New Jersey, $25 million was spent on ads that included somebody running for political office.  Do ya think there might be a conflict of interest there?”
    Oh, the humanity! Rand Paul shuts down the government and preens, and moans, and costs everyone 25 BILLION dollars. Free campaign ads — for him. Do ya think there might be a conflict of interest there?

    Conservatives are dreamers, too. They look at a past that never was and say, "Why not?"

    by Mike732 on Thu Nov 07, 2013 at 09:05:56 AM PST

  •  He is correct. And a higher bid was accepted (9+ / 0-)

    so Christie and his family could be in the ads.

    And he cost the state millions to avoid being on the same ballot as Booker

    "The poor can never be made to suffer enough." Jimmy Breslin

    by merrywidow on Thu Nov 07, 2013 at 09:08:27 AM PST

  •  If Christie runs, ands gets the nomination (6+ / 0-)

    I wonder how irked the Tea Party will be.  Enough to boycott the election?  That's what sank the Slaveocracy Democrats in the 1860 election which paved the way to the Civil War.

    All we can do is hope that the teabaggers fulfill their promise of tearing SOMETHING apart, and let it be the GOP.

    “When it comes to this, I shall prefer emigrating to some country where they make no pretense of loving liberty—to Russia, for instance, where despotism can be taken pure and without the base alloy of hypocrisy.” —Abraham Lincoln

    by Pragmatus on Thu Nov 07, 2013 at 09:08:32 AM PST

    •  No, actually (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      shoeless, IM

      They ran their own candidate [Bell] while some of the compromisers ran still another [Breckinridge].
      Now that would be interesting.

      •  Bell was not on any Democratic ticket. (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        shoeless, Old Sailor

        He was the candidate of the Constitutional Union Party.

        The 1860 Democratic Convention in Charleston SC was deliberately sabotaged by the so-called Southern "fire-eaters" who were opposed to the chief candidate Stephen Douglas.  It ended up a hung affair, and adjourned to Baltimore, where again the convention was torn asunder.  Finally rid of its anti-Douglas chairman Caleb Cushing, the Democrats ultimately nominated Douglas.  Cushing meanwhile became chairman of a new, rump Democratic Convention which nominated John C. Breckenridge.  Thus there were four major candidates running for President:  Lincoln, Douglas, Breckenridge and Bell.  Lincoln won with about 39% percent of the popular vote.

        “When it comes to this, I shall prefer emigrating to some country where they make no pretense of loving liberty—to Russia, for instance, where despotism can be taken pure and without the base alloy of hypocrisy.” —Abraham Lincoln

        by Pragmatus on Thu Nov 07, 2013 at 09:37:56 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  If Paul wants a reaction, ask him why he was (10+ / 0-)

    afraid to be on the same ballot as Corey Booker, why did he cost the state millions for an election 2 weeks before another election?

    "The poor can never be made to suffer enough." Jimmy Breslin

    by merrywidow on Thu Nov 07, 2013 at 09:09:23 AM PST

  •  What Rand fails to understand (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    MrJersey, JeffW, JJ Zucal

    Governors do this all the time. Whether or not they are running for re-election.
    They promote their state.
    And, when they have a good TV presence and are well known, they appear in ads for their state.

  •  This is the kind of vapid partisan red meat (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    shoeless, Blicero

    story that should be booted off the front page and replaced by things like the NSA spying update diary by Jesselyn Radack that has 304 recs in the tip jar and counting.

    Gentlemen, you can't fight in here! This is the War Room!

    by bigtimecynic on Thu Nov 07, 2013 at 09:10:54 AM PST

  •  Like sands through an hourglass... (7+ / 0-)

    So are the days of our "OMFG ITS STILL 2013 STAHP STAHP PLEASE FOR THE LOVE OF BABY JEEBUS PLEASE STOP MSM...SSSSSSTTTTTTTTOOOOOOPPPPPPPPP!!!!!!!!"

    /insert various Star Trek captain facepalm jpegs here/

    No one is asking you to clap louder. We're asking you to stop pissing into the tent. --John Cole, Balloon Juice.

    by Wave Breaker on Thu Nov 07, 2013 at 09:11:00 AM PST

    •  It's like the Christmas movies (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      shoeless, JeffW

      and music and sales and decorations... gets earlier and earlier all the time.

      All the time.

      But at least (so far) we haven't had to deal with life-sized animatronic Chris Christie's in the lawn and garden department at Lowe's.  Unless they've dressed him as Santa Claus that is.  Which... heyyyyy...

      No.  They wouldn't.

      Would they?

      I'll believe corporations are people when one comes home from Afghanistan in a body bag.

      by mojo11 on Thu Nov 07, 2013 at 09:45:58 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  yes but who will the Christian god personally (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    norm, mconvente, shoeless, Ljanney

    tell to run?

    that person will win, you know.

    Dawkins is to atheism as Rand is to personal responsibility- LutherCEO

    by terrypinder on Thu Nov 07, 2013 at 09:13:17 AM PST

  •  Popcorn time is here a little early! (5+ / 0-)
  •  By the look on the children's faces it seems (6+ / 0-)

    they would rather be in school...

  •  Late Night TV Comics grateful for the GOP nt (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    mconvente, JeffW

    *Austerity is the opposite of Prosperity*

    by josmndsn on Thu Nov 07, 2013 at 09:18:22 AM PST

  •  I'm sure (12+ / 0-)

    that he will go down in history as one of our Great Presidents, such as Pres. Rudy Giuliani, Pres. George Pataki but not as great as Pres. Fred Thompson.

  •  Great! (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    wishingwell, JeffW

    We get to play, "Jobs? What jobs?" for another year.

    We can discuss this and wonder what to do about that, but in the end, the ONLY thing that matters is voter turnout. Ya CAIN'T go to the dance if you AIN'T bought your ticket! Go team go.

    by franklyn on Thu Nov 07, 2013 at 09:26:10 AM PST

  •  Girl on the bottom right says it all... (5+ / 0-)

    She has that "does anybody believe what this guy is saying, cause I sure don't" look on her face. :)

    The roaches always win if you turn out the lights.

    by Jyotai on Thu Nov 07, 2013 at 09:28:10 AM PST

  •  Those faces (6+ / 0-)

    are priceless. It's only the kid in the glasses on the right that looks even vaguely interested, and he could be daydreaming...

  •  Elections are why I'm here (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    mconvente, JeffW

    Gotta get my fix.

  •  I am looking forward to hearing Governor Christie (6+ / 0-)

    having to deny sea level rise and the human component in climate change after his state was just traumatized by Superstorm Sandy.  You know that he will have to do that to have any chance of securing the Republican nomination when his fellow competitors will be denying the very idea of climate change.  Jersey residents know what's up after seeing the shoreline devastated and looking at lower Manhattan going underwater for the first time in living memory.

    And it feels like I'm livin'in the wasteland of the free ~ Iris DeMent, 1996

    by MrJersey on Thu Nov 07, 2013 at 09:45:21 AM PST

    •  Can't wait (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      JeffW

      for the debates.

      Should be highly entertaining although nauseating at the same time.

    •  I'm curious how many of the devastated Jersey (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      SilentBrook

      residents voted for Christie, convinced by his hoodie and sneakers tour he really, really cares about them.  Hugged some of them, even.

      Humans are so damned easy.  Christie, like all politicians, cares about Christie--and from an article I read a couple of months ago, his wife, who gets very little attention, is on the same page, just much quieter.

      “The road to success is always under construction” --Lily Tomlin

      by CarolinNJ on Thu Nov 07, 2013 at 10:28:27 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  As you know, there is no unified NJ political (0+ / 0-)

        press, as such, so much of the corrupt slimy dealings that inhabit both parties go unnoticed by the NJ electorate.  The only TV coverage is marginal from both Philly and NYC and notice that the very first thing that Christie did when he came to office was to achieve the Republican dream of killing the NJ Network (with the connivance of the Essex County Democrats so that Steve Audobato could get his very on TV station).  For both parties in Jersey, their unifying principle is keeping the voters attention on the hugs and fleece, and keeping their slimy deals buried in the political swamps where the mob buries their bodies.  

        And it feels like I'm livin'in the wasteland of the free ~ Iris DeMent, 1996

        by MrJersey on Thu Nov 07, 2013 at 12:04:50 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  In some very weird way is Christie becoming (4+ / 0-)

    the new John McCain?  He certainly has the verbal abuse down so click off that box.

  •  Christie is the current darling of the media, even (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Danali, Old Sailor, JeffW, SilentBrook

    the hosts on MSNBC are in awe of him and I cannot see most of them asking him any tough questions. They are too busy gushing over him and showing him love except for just a few of them in the evenings.

    I appreciate Ed  and Rev Al for not being afraid and almost standing alone in exposing the real Chris Christie and showing he is not a moderate and that he is a  conservative and a union trasher and basher of teachers.

    Keystone Liberals on Twitter @ KeystoneLibs , Join PA Liberals at http://keystoneliberalsforum.aimoo.com/

    by wishingwell on Thu Nov 07, 2013 at 10:07:48 AM PST

    •  Not Chris Hayes! (0+ / 0-)

      He was cutting him up good last night like the fat turkey he really is.

      "The real wealth of a nation consists of the contributions of its people and nature." -- Riane Eisler

      by noofsh on Thu Nov 07, 2013 at 10:36:33 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Good, glad to hear that, I often do not get around (0+ / 0-)

        to watching Chris. Most of my free time tends to be afternoons to early evening hours.

        Keystone Liberals on Twitter @ KeystoneLibs , Join PA Liberals at http://keystoneliberalsforum.aimoo.com/

        by wishingwell on Thu Nov 07, 2013 at 02:37:50 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  It may not matter for Paul (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    JeffW, Ljanney, SilentBrook

    since he's threatening to resign as senator and go back to doctorin'. Which he claims he would be perfectly happy doing, if it meant people would leave him the hell alone. By which he means, of course, not point out his plagiarism.

    What a narcissistic bitch.

    We need to call his bluff on the resignation threat!

    What is valued is practiced. What is not valued is not practiced. -- Plato

    by RobLewis on Thu Nov 07, 2013 at 10:09:44 AM PST

  •  I could make a joke about Christie requesting a (0+ / 0-)

    larger clown car with better shocks but since I am a bit overweight myself and many of my friends and family struggle with weight, I should keep my mouth shut.  But it is one of those times, the joke was right there and considering Chris does make fun of his weight himself but still I always feel bad when I do this. As bashing overweight people is done far too often and it can be cruel.  So I apologize..but the clown car would need to be a little larger .

    Keystone Liberals on Twitter @ KeystoneLibs , Join PA Liberals at http://keystoneliberalsforum.aimoo.com/

    by wishingwell on Thu Nov 07, 2013 at 10:10:02 AM PST

  •  Are those Coal Miners in that picture? (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    JeffW

    Just for a moment I thought I saw coal miners but of course I could be wrong. School kids are never "paid political props" for a politician. My mistake...

    "I think it's the duty of the comedian to find out where the line is drawn and cross it deliberately." -- George Carlin, Satirical Comic,(1937-2008)

    by Wynter on Thu Nov 07, 2013 at 10:11:23 AM PST

  •  Don't Laugh Too Soon..... (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    CarolinNJ, duha, SilentBrook

    Everyone who says Christie doesn't travel well west of the Delaware might be in for a surprise.  When he was elected everybody waited for the big mouth to get him in trouble, and it didn't.

    He's an exceptional politician; he completely co-opted the Democrats in NJ.  He's tactically smart and the media loves him.  Plus the Establishment Republicans will fund him like nobody else.

    Make no mistake.  He's the most dangerous candidate, because the Tea Partiers will beat each other up and split the crazy vote.  Christie will sit back and rack up delegates while Cruz and Paul armwrestle over who's more pure.

    He brings a 'pox on both houses' mentality which will resonate.  His stands on the issues aren't that much different than the average wingnut, but all people will see is the Obama hug and say, 'Hey, he's not so bad'.

    I say this as someone who knows a lot of teachers who hate him like the devil.  But he's starting his campaign right now, and he'll have the best organization out there come primary time.

    •  remember Giuliani with the non-stop 9/11 (0+ / 0-)

      stuff?  Christie's non-stop Sandy stuff will wear thin as well.
      He can't hide behind a tragedy forever which he grossly mismanaged both in preparation and in recovery.  The truth will come out.

      "The real wealth of a nation consists of the contributions of its people and nature." -- Riane Eisler

      by noofsh on Thu Nov 07, 2013 at 10:35:52 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Christie has zero chance at the nomination (0+ / 0-)

    Well, okay, if the Rs lose the House by a big margin in 2014, and lose a bunch of statehouses and state leges, sure, maybe they'll be scared straight.  Maybe then they'll be ready to turn to Christie.

    But it would take a walloping of unusual size.  Just barely defeat one of their crazies, and you have the opposite effect from encouraging moderation.  Beat Cuccinelli by only 3 points, and you just encourage them to double down on crazy.  They just become convinced that a Cuccinelli just isn't crazy enough, or not forthright enough in his craziness, to win.  Or they become convinced that it was backstabbing by RINOs that did them in.  The legend of the Dolchstoss is strong with these people.

    Sorry, but Christie is a back-stabbing RINO to plenty enough of these people to deny him the nomination.  That doesn't change until and unless these people die off or leave the party.  If they have to wait for them to die off from old age, the Rs are going to be in the wilderness a good long time.  Their best bet for a speedy recovery is some epidemic of head explosions brought on by losing the House by a 100 member swing.  Insofar as that's unlikely, Christie 2016 is unlikely.

    The states must be abolished.

    by gtomkins on Thu Nov 07, 2013 at 10:21:07 AM PST

    •  Republican Primary voters are not a monolith (4+ / 0-)

      They're not ALL crazy.  And in a situation where multiple Tea Partiers will be going for the nod, the guy who hangs back and collects his 40% here and there will be the winner.

      A lot of R's want to WIN, not just show.  Not everyone wants to go out in a blaze of purity.  That's where Christie comes in.

      After 8 years of squabbling, to have someone say, "I can do bipartisanship" will be a tough message to beat in the general.  And if they want to get there, they'll have to nominate the Stomach Stapler.

      •  I think the exact same thing but it gets little (0+ / 0-)

        attention here at KOS. Christie is a real force to be reckoned with and all the insults and diminishing of his chances here ain't  going to change it.

        "Love is what we were born with. Fear is what we learned here." Marianne Williamson

        by Canadian Green Card Alien on Thu Nov 07, 2013 at 11:27:20 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  Not all crazy, but the crazies are in charge (0+ / 0-)

        The first approach to your objection is purely empirical.  Recent history shows their party consistently follows its crazy wing's lead, no matter how obviously bad the politics (nominating fringe Senate and gubernatorial candidates), no matter how much the presumed "moderates" outnumber the presumed crazies (a House R caucus with only 30 wingnuts refuses to vote them down over shutdown and default).

        Why this is so is a less clear, and admittedly, if we aren't sure about the mechanics of this dominance of the crazies, we can't be sure those mechanics won't change to allow Christie to be their nominee.

        At least a partial explanation of the dominance of the crazies is that the they are only insane about public policy.  Set them a practical task, such as insuring that no back-stabbing RINO gets the nomination, and they are eminently sane.  Your suggested strategy for a moderate R to lay low and collect his 40% second places until he's secretly amassed a majority runs into all sorts of problems.  They've stacked the delegate allocations so that states where a candidate who isn't willing to swear a blood oath to seventy crazy ideas could get anywhere close to 40% don't have squat for delegates.  Even if Christie tried to win this way, he would have to be the only one doing it (and if it's such a great idea, why aren't there just as many candidates trying to win this way as by going full crazy?), and then, even if he were cornering the market on the few states where a non-crazy could get 40% of the R primary electorate, the crazies would see this coming a mile off and take countermeasures.  Again, they've really already prepared themselves against any such strategy as you suggest, because they have winner-take-all in so many of their states, especially delegate-rich states.

        I would argue that, going to a deeper level of explanation, the crazies are so avid and so organizationally successful because they are the Republican Party.  After they couldn't beat a Truman with a Dewey, the non-crazy Rs basically gave up on trying to maintain an ideological alternative to the New Deal.  They took on Eisenhower, a New Deal Democrat, in exchange for promising him to drop their attempts to repeal the New Deal.  The whole history of our politics since has been the story of their gradually forgetting that deal, going back on what they promised Eisenhower in order to survive as a party.

        What you call moderate Rs are what their party's true believers think of as RINOs.  On this one point I am in agreement with them.  Moderate Rs have no reason to exist.  They haven't evolved any new ideology to extend or improve the New Deal consensus they entered into with the Ds in 1952, in any way different from how the Ds would extend and improve.  Moderate Rs are simply confused.  They should either become Ds if they agree with the New Deal, or they should become real Rs and join the crazies in trying to tear down the New Deal.

        We shouldn't be confused as well.  On our part, there is too little awareness that we need to extend and improve the New Deal, too little to inform a distinct D public policy identity.  The real Rs are helping us with that, helping us regain a shared understanding of who we are, so that we can stop being plagued by so many DINOs.

        The Republican Party should have been allowed to die a natural death in 1948.  Had there not been this charade created by the deal with Eisenhower, there would have been space for a new, honest, opposition to the Ds to arise.  Instead we went with a misguided faith in a phony "bipartisanship".  Our aim now should be to destroy the Rs as a party, which mostly means letting them destroy themselves.

        The states must be abolished.

        by gtomkins on Thu Nov 07, 2013 at 02:41:01 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Other than your headline, I cannot agree (0+ / 0-)

          For a party that follows its crazies' lead, one must ask how they keep nominating the most moderate among them, such as Mitt whose fingerprints were all over the blueprints of the ACA, and McCain whose bipartisan sounds in the 2000 primaries even caught my ear (admittedly, I was less than enthusiastic about Gore, and his tepid efforts to win the post-election period were unsurprising to me). I'll grant that the crazies have skewed the GOP so horribly to the right that the difference between their moderates and the crazies is negligible in real terms, being merely an argument over whether 25 or 26 angels dance on the head of a pin.

          Your analysis of the '52 election ignores that the GOP had not held the White House for 20 years, after controlling it for 56 of the previous 72 years with a business-focused Robber Baron ethos. The first crazies came from the wealthy who viewed FDR as a class-traitor, willing to suborn a potential coup'd'etat from Smeadley Butler, and who glomed onto anti-communism that followed from their false equivalence of the New Deal with Marxist-Leninism.

          But they didn't make a deal with Ike to acquiesce to these sound policies; they backed Ohio Gov. Bob Taft, and their convention looked like a potential deadlock despite Ike's shoe-in among the larger electorate; and a smaller rump backed California Gov Earl Warren. Warren played kingmaker, cutting a deal with Ike to throw his support to the General for appointment to the next open Supreme Court seat (which just turned out to be Chief Justice).

          After Ike, they tried Nixon and nearly won; if Tricky Dick hadn't imploded after losing the Cal. gov race in '62, they probably would've given him another shot. Goldwater was the most prominent face left, but his disasterous pasting by LBJ put the crazies off until Nixon's return engagement ended in impeachment and Ford still beat Reagan for the next nomination (and might have been reelected had he not "freed" Poland in the debates).

          The idea that the GOP moderate wing is superfluous isn't really backed up by these facts. As the shutdowns (last months' and Gingrich's) showed us, the American people value sound governance. The moderates are organized around providing this, even to the point that Nixon offered Teddy Kennedy a more progressive national healthcare system than the ACA is.

          The only thing that gave the crazies their prominence was the malaise of the Carter years, as the chickens of extending Vietnam 5 years past its freshness date and the Iranian coup that put the Shah into power came home to roost. When Reagan's acting ability allowed him to look sane in the debates against all the concerns of his genuine extremism, he gave the crazies a taste of actual power, but moderation returned briefly during Bush the Elder's term. The crazies got enough lip service from ol' Poppy to back him in '92, but enough moderates and fringe independents  moved to Perot and split enough to let Clinton win.

          The crazies finally took command in the vacuum of Bush the Lesser's head, amid the inertia and laziness that drove him after his "Poppy" issues were dealt with. They've dragged a series of mediocre candidates to give them lip service, but lip service only goes so far. The crazies want real change: the dismantling of the entire progressive impact of the twentieth century. But the moderates, while they'll happily take the fruits of such change, are interested in competent governance that stays out of business's way, with no real interest in the social issues that energize the crazies.

          As for destroying the Republican party, we can't wait for them to implode, because the planetary risks are now too great to delay. While it is great fun to watch them stew in their internecine battles, we don't have the luxury of waiting them out anymore. The moderates have gotten a taste of Robber Barony, and America can't last without a middle class, much less address the climate change that is inevitable, but might yet be arrested and ultimately reversed.

          PrezObama's only mistake in the sequester is that he assumed that the Republicans would be more loyal to their oath of office to serve the people than their oath to Norquist to never close tax loopholes.

          by SilentBrook on Thu Nov 07, 2013 at 09:46:03 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  It still looks like the crazies are in charge (0+ / 0-)

            The McCain whose moderation impressed you was the 2000 version.  He lost that year, denied the nomination in favor of the certifiable nonentity Dubya, because his moderation impressed you, while Dubya drove relentlessly Right.  McCain won in 2008 because he didn't repeat the mistake of impressing you with his moderation.  He fell all over himself renouncing any moderate stand he had ever held in order to please the hard Right.  He went Tea Party even before there was a Tea Party, by choosing Palin to be his running mate.  Palin's endorsement now probably carries greater weight in winning their nomination than McCain's.

            Romney may actually have been fairly moderate in many of the public policy choices he made as MA governor.  But, please, the guy who believes that the Ds only win elections because they have bribed 47% of the electorate to vote for them with socialist safety net handouts, is not even a bit moderate in his political convictions.  He's just flexible.  As governor of MA, he'll author Romneycare, despite its socialist safety net leanings, because that was as conservative an accomplishment as he could get as MA governor, and he thought he needed an accomplishment or two to burnish his resume for his run at the Presidency.  But when it came down to it, after failing in 2008 by using your suggested 40%, run as the only moderate, strategy, in 2012 he succeeded by systematically renouncing any half-way moderate thing he had ever done, Romneycare most of all, and running to the Right of the crazies in the field.  Huntsman is the guy who tried your 40% strategy in 2012.  How many delegates did he win?

            So, sure, recent history suggests that I spoke hastily in saying that Christie could not be the nominee, since recently they have indeed shown a pattern of giving the nod to politicians with some faint history of moderation, but who atone for such past sins (even Perry had to atone in 2012 for having once been less than totally inhumane in his approach to immigration reform) by their present savage craziness.  But there are two problems in imagining that Christie will follow this path.

            For one thing, there's Christie himself.  Does it seem terribly likely that he has the temper or temperament to abase himself to the Right as Romney did?  It's what he'ld have to do to get the nomination.

            For another thing, there's the temper and temperament of the Right itself, as it has evolved since the 2010 election.  I can't see them accepting the charade anymore, this process by which they held their noses and accepted some RINO as the nominee -- as long as this RINO humiliated himself by recanting his sins of moderation -- because their money people wanted some sort of moderate face on things.  

            As a final point, I suspect we have evolved past the point where there is any longer any actual tension between their money people and their crazies.  Romney made his 47% comment in private to a bunch of money people.  The idea that 47% of the electorate are welfare state moochers is about as hard Right crazy as you could imagine, and now we know that such is exactly what their allegedly moderate money people believe.  Everybody knows it now.  No longer any need for charades.

            Christie isn't any use to either their crazies or their money people.  He's not getting their nomination.  His only possible path to the WH is party-switching.  Sadly enough, the state of our party is such that he might actually be able to get our nomination.  But that's a subject that would take volumes to do justice to.

            The states must be abolished.

            by gtomkins on Sun Nov 10, 2013 at 09:36:54 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

  •  repurposing promos (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    JeffW
    Christie will also be on Fox News Sunday, Face the Nation, and This Week—and will have a guest appearance on The Michael J. Fox Show tonight.

    Warning - some snark may be above‽ (-9.50; -7.03)‽ eState4Column5©2013 "I’m not the strapping young Muslim socialist that I used to be" - Barack Obama 04/27/2013

    by annieli on Thu Nov 07, 2013 at 10:24:40 AM PST

  •  Paul's Taxpaid Conflict of Interest (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    JeffW, SilentBrook
    Some of these ads, people running for office put their their mug all over these ads while they’re in the middle of a political campaign,” Paul said at Senate Homeland Security hearing on recovery from superstorm Sandy.  “In New Jersey, $25 million was spent on ads that included somebody running for political office.  Do ya think there might be a conflict of interest there?”

    Well, in DC, millions are spent every year on Senate Homeland Security hearings on recovery from disasters that include Paul running for Congress, putting his mug all over the while he's in the middle of running a political campaign.

    I think Paul's interest is nothing but conflicts.

    "When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro." - HST

    by DocGonzo on Thu Nov 07, 2013 at 10:32:11 AM PST

  •  Fuck Christie (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    JeffW

    I won't be listening to a single thing that lying sack of shit says.  It's time to ramp up the disrespect and opposition to everything that Christie says and does.

    "The real wealth of a nation consists of the contributions of its people and nature." -- Riane Eisler

    by noofsh on Thu Nov 07, 2013 at 10:33:57 AM PST

  •  Good luck (0+ / 0-)

    the MSM has already crowned him the next POTUS. Gotta love the media. Lame stream is right!

  •  Look Deeper (0+ / 0-)

    Gov Christie is holding himself up as an example of bipartisanship and pragmatism.  And that is true in a New Jersey in which the legislature is populated with politicians who are in general pragmatic and bipartisan.  The Tea Party is not a major force in NJ and are not testing for purity of actions and being instransigent obstructionists.  But on the national stage that is NOT the case.  The barbs directed at Gov Christie for working with Pres Obama in the wake of Sandy were from national voices not local-to-NJ ones.  If (when) Gov Christie starts officially running for national office he will be skewered even if he tries to make a Romney-style run from his past record.

  •  I swear I read this as (0+ / 0-)
    if you're a kid in school, you might find yourself getting sucked into being a prop
    What I thought it said:
    if you're a kid in school, you might find yourself getting sucked into a prop
  •  Chrispy Kreme Christie (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    SilentBrook

    The students' looks of total deeply entrenched boredom -- priceless!  They look like, "Wake me when this nightmare is OVERRRR."

  •  Christie: best GOP choice? (0+ / 0-)

    Even with his moving further right - vetoed the minimum wage, vetoed gun legislation, refused to put women's health funding in his introduced budgets, opposed marriage equality - Chris Christie might be the Republicans' best chance in 2016.  Moderate Republicans might look to him in primaries rather than those who are far, far to the right than he.

    By then, hopefully, the "tea party" will have been rendered irrelevant so there will be sane GOP hopefuls.

    Don't wait until 2014 ... begin voting out the trash in November!

    by JJ Zucal on Thu Nov 07, 2013 at 04:41:39 PM PST

  •  Christie (0+ / 0-)

    Why don't they bring out the throne and coronate him with the crown right now. Why wait, he thinks he is already Henry the Eigth.

  •  Chris Christie (0+ / 0-)

    I think I saw him playing in the Sopranos program as the hit man.

  •  Never (0+ / 0-)

    This over weight clown will never win another election, I am ashamed to be from nj, with him as governor.  

    •  Sorry for the mean comment (0+ / 0-)

      But he is a clown,

      •  What do you have against clowns? (0+ / 0-)

        I mean I know they are kind of creepy. What kind of person would invite an adult who dresses in complete makeup and a wild outfit to play with their children? But to compare them with Christie is an insult beyond the pale of clown white.

        PrezObama's only mistake in the sequester is that he assumed that the Republicans would be more loyal to their oath of office to serve the people than their oath to Norquist to never close tax loopholes.

        by SilentBrook on Thu Nov 07, 2013 at 09:53:06 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  Awwww. Did widdle Wandie not get (0+ / 0-)

    a weather disaster all his own to exploit?  Poor baby.  Lessee - - he's from Kentucky, right?  Maybe if he prays really, really hard God will send him his very own tornado between now and silly - - I mean primary - - season.

    Not sayin Christie wasn't exploiting Sandy.  Of course he was.  That's what politicians do.  Clearly, this is a case of sour grapes: "I can't have it so it must be nasty."

    Btw - - did Rand complain when Bush stood arm-in-arm with heck-of-a-guy Brown?  Oh, silly me, I forgot.  Both Bush and Brown were republicans and Bush wasn't going to run for office again in future.

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