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What follows is an announcement made several days ago, and bears repeating for those who may not have seen it via twitter or MSM news outlets

Live Q&A with Edward Snowden: Thursday 23rd January, 8pm GMT, 3pm EST

Edward Snowden will be answering questions submitted by the public on his official support site, freesnowden.is, this Thursday 23 January at 8pm GMT, 3pm EST. The support site is run by The Courage Foundation and is the only endorsed Snowden Defence Fund.
This is the first Snowden live chat since June 2013 and will last for an hour starting at 8pm GMT, 3pm EST. Questions can be submitted on twitter on the day of the event using the #AskSnowden hashtag. Edward Snowden’s responses will appear at http://www.freesnowden.is/...

The live chat comes exactly a week after US President Barack Obama gave an address in response to the public concerns raised by Edward Snowden’s revelations about US surveillance practices. In the live chat, Edward Snowden is expected to give his first reaction to the President’s speech.

Courage (formerly the Journalistic Source Protection Defence Fund) is a trust, audited by accountants Derek Rothera & Company in the UK, for the purpose of providing legal defence and campaign aid to journalistic sources. It is overseen by an unremunerated committee of trustees. Edward Snowden is its first recipient.

The freesnowden.is website was commissioned by the trustees of Courage to provide information on the threats Edward Snowden faces and what can be done to support him, and details all revelations made to date in a convenient central archive.

Some of the data that has been released and documented thus far includes:

200 million text messages a day collected and analysed

An NSA presentation from 2011 describes the untargeted bulk collection of SMS messages on an enormous scale. The Dishfire system collects nearly 200 million SMS records every day, which are then processed to extract contact, financial, travel and other information with an automated processing tool called Prefer. Several unpublished GCHQ memos shows that the agency uses the tool to access information about UK citizens it would otherwise have to make a formal request for under the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act.

NSA has two data centres in China

Documents show that the NSA uses “a covert channel of radio waves” transmitted from hardware implants to compromise target computers that would be difficult to reach by other means – for example, because they are not connected to the internet.The radio signals transmitted by compromised machines can be picked up by a portable base station placed miles away. According to further unpublished documents, the NSA has set up two data centres in China – possibly through front companies – from which it engages in offensive operations.

50,000 networks infected with NSA malware

A presentation from 2012 explains that, through its Tailored Access Operations (TAO) department, the NSA has employed offensive Computer Network Exploitation (CNE) attacks against more than 50,000 networks worldwide. A published slide from the same presentation shows the distribution of networks targeted.
The list goes on and on and on.

#######

In order to participate, you have to have a twitter account, and when submitting a question, use the hashtag #AskSnowden

Originally posted to Lisa Lockwood on Thu Jan 23, 2014 at 08:47 AM PST.

Also republished by Whistleblowers Round Table.

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Comment Preferences

  •  Even if you don't want to ask a question, (24+ / 0-)

    and disagree with what Edward Snowden has done, being a fly on the wall as questions and answers are submitted should be fascinating.


    Information is power. But, like all power, there are those who want to keep it for themselves. Aaron Swartz

    by Lisa Lockwood on Thu Jan 23, 2014 at 08:47:08 AM PST

  •  some interesting questions there (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Lisa Lockwood, allenjo, joe shikspack

    so far. A lot of dumb ones and some funny ones too.

    Thanks for the heads up, LL!

    If I can't dance I don't want to be part of your revolution. ~ Emma Goldman

    by Lady Libertine on Thu Jan 23, 2014 at 11:04:26 AM PST

  •  The Courage Foundation (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    joe shikspack, Lisa Lockwood

    For our fallen solders who come home from Afghanistan to Dover AF mortuary, "God bless the cause of "The Good War" for which they died" - As if any war can be called Good in its 13th year, America's longest war.

    by allenjo on Thu Jan 23, 2014 at 11:32:11 AM PST

  •  Snowden's travels...... (0+ / 0-)
    On 23 June 2013 Hong Kong announced Edward Snowden had left Hong Kong and WikiLeaks confirmed he was “bound for the Republic of Ecuador via a safe route for the purposes of asylum”. WikiLeaks journalist and legal adviser Sarah Harrison was to accompany Snowden to Moscow, and from there Harrison planned to accompany him to Ecuador through stopovers in Cuba and Venezuela. Ecuadorian Foreign Minster Ricardo Patino confirmed on Twitter that his government had received an asylum request.
    Snowden travelled to Moscow carrying refugee travel documents issued with the help of Ecuador’s London consul Fidel Narvaez in case of any problems (in the event when he reached Moscow the State Department announced they had cancelled his passport), although these were subsequently withdrawn due to errors in authorisation. Edward Snowden later wrote to Ecuador’s President Rafael Correa thanking him for his country’s support and noting the “decisive action of your Consul in London, Fidel Narvaez, guaranteed my rights would be protected upon departing Hong Kong – I could never have risked travel without that.”

    Attempts to reach asylum in Latin America

    Effectively stranded in the transit zone of Moscow’s Sheremetyevo airport by the US cancelling his passport, Snowden did not board his booked onward flight to Havana the following day. It was not clear whether different airlines would accept Snowden’s temporary travel documents and the US began issuing warning messages to a variety of potential destinations or stopover points. As with Iceland, it was a legal requirement that Edward Snowden be in Ecuador in order for his asylum request to be processed. President Rafael Correa stated his government would still consider Snowden’s application if he could reach an Ecuadorian embassy, saying: “the situation can be processed and resolved there” but that its assessment of the application “could take weeks or months”. He later clarified that Ecuador would not reissue authorised travel documents to extract Snowden from Moscow: “The right of asylum request is one thing, but helping someone travel from one country to another – Ecuador has never done this.”

    The legal requirement to be within national territory before an asylum request can be processed is common to many countries and fears grew that the US might seek to prevent Snowden flying across its allies’ airspace to reach any Latin American countries willing to take him. These fears were realised when the plane of the Bolivian President Evo Morales en route from a Moscow summit was forced to land in Vienna, having been denied airspace transit by France, Spain, Portugal and Italy at the behest of the US on suspicion that Edward Snowden was on board (see Political interference for details).

    more at http://www.freesnowden.is/...

    For our fallen solders who come home from Afghanistan to Dover AF mortuary, "God bless the cause of "The Good War" for which they died" - As if any war can be called Good in its 13th year, America's longest war.

    by allenjo on Thu Jan 23, 2014 at 11:44:43 AM PST

  •  lame (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    allenjo

    If I can't dance I don't want to be part of your revolution. ~ Emma Goldman

    by Lady Libertine on Thu Jan 23, 2014 at 11:47:56 AM PST

  •  he picked a good starter Q (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    allenjo, NonnyO
    Q @savagejen Do you think it is possible for our democracy to recover from the damage NSA spying has done to our liberties? #AskSnowden

    A What makes our country strong is our system of values, not a snapshot of the structure of our agencies or the framework of our laws. We can correct the laws, restrain the overreach of agencies, and hold the senior officials responsible for abusive programs to account.

    If I can't dance I don't want to be part of your revolution. ~ Emma Goldman

    by Lady Libertine on Thu Jan 23, 2014 at 12:19:57 PM PST

    •  Obama’s whistleblowing protection act? (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      2thanks, Lady Libertine, NonnyO

      What do you think about Obama’s whistleblowing protection act? #AskSnowden

      One of the things that has not been widely reported by journalists is that whistleblower protection laws in the US do not protect contractors in the national security arena. There are so many holes in the laws, the protections they afford are so weak, and the processes for reporting they provide are so ineffective that they appear to be intended to discourage reporting of even the clearest wrongdoing. If I had revealed what I knew about these unconstitutional but classified programs to Congress, they could have charged me with a felony. One only need to look at the case of Thomas Drake to see how the government doesn’t have a good history of handling legitimate reports of wrongdoing within the system.

      Despite this, and despite the fact that I could not legally go to the official channels that direct NSA employees have available to them, I still made tremendous efforts to report these programs to co-workers, supervisors, and anyone with the proper clearance who would listen. The reactions of those I told about the scale of the constitutional violations ranged from deeply concerned to appalled, but no one was willing to risk their jobs, families, and possibly even freedom to go to through what Drake did.

      My case clearly demonstrates the need for comprehensive whistleblower protection act reform. If we had had a real process in place, and reports of wrongdoing could be taken to real, independent arbiters rather than captured officials, I might not have had to sacrifice so much to do what at this point even the President seems to agree needed to be done.

      For our fallen solders who come home from Afghanistan to Dover AF mortuary, "God bless the cause of "The Good War" for which they died" - As if any war can be called Good in its 13th year, America's longest war.

      by allenjo on Thu Jan 23, 2014 at 12:29:32 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  emptywheel asks (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    allenjo

    If I can't dance I don't want to be part of your revolution. ~ Emma Goldman

    by Lady Libertine on Thu Jan 23, 2014 at 12:33:55 PM PST

  •  Obama's speech before oversight report issued (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Lady Libertine, NonnyO

    do you think it’s a shame that #Obama gave his #NSA speech before his Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board reported?

    The timing of his speech seems particularly interesting, given that it was accompanied by so many claims that “these programs have not been abused.”

    Even if we accept the NSA’s incredibly narrow definition of abuse, which is “someone actually broke the rules so badly we had to investigate them for it,” we’ve seen more instances of identified, intentional abuse than we have seen instances where this unconstitutional mass phone surveillance stopped any kind of terrorist plot at all — even something less than an attack.

    To back that up with the government’s own numbers, according to the NSA Inspector General, we’ve seen at least 12 specific, intentional cases of “abuse” by the NSA.

    In contrast, the federal government’s independent PCLOB report on the NSA’s mass phone surveillance today (which stated the NSA has spied on at least 120,000,000 American phones under this program) said this:

    “We are aware of no instance in which the program directly contributed to the discovery of a previously unknown terrorist plot or the disruption of a terrorist attack.”

    At the press conference, Judge Wald stated this program, which has been operated in secret for years, has no basis in law. The panel determined this kind of mass surveillance is illegal and should be ended.

    When even the federal government says the NSA violated the constitution at least 120 million times under a single program, but failed to discover even a single “plot,” it’s time to end “bulk collection,” which is a euphemism for mass surveillance. There is no simply justification for continuing an unconstitutional policy with a 0% success rate.

    In light of another independent confirmation of this fact, I think Americans should look to the White House and Congress to close the book entirely on the 215 BR provision.

    For our fallen solders who come home from Afghanistan to Dover AF mortuary, "God bless the cause of "The Good War" for which they died" - As if any war can be called Good in its 13th year, America's longest war.

    by allenjo on Thu Jan 23, 2014 at 12:36:13 PM PST

  •  oh here we go (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    allenjo

    If I can't dance I don't want to be part of your revolution. ~ Emma Goldman

    by Lady Libertine on Thu Jan 23, 2014 at 12:46:14 PM PST

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