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 Yesterday Gov. Jay Inslee of Washington state suspended the death penalty.

"There have been too many doubts raised about capital punishment, there are too many flaws in this system today," Inslee said at a news conference. "There is too much at stake to accept an imperfect system."
 18 states have abolished the death penalty, six of them in just the last six years.
   It's ironic that more and more states are rejecting the idea of killing its own citizens, while at the same time the Obama Administration is debating whether to assassinate one.

  Much like the marijuana decriminalization/legalization debate, we are seeing a nationwide political change that is growing despite the fact that neither the media, nor Washington, has supported it.
   Violent revenge killings may sell in politics and Hollywood movies, but executing people in an obviously flawed system that is reserved almost exclusively for the poor isn't nearly so sexy.

  Governor Inslee's decision came just a week after a study was released showing that in 2013 a record 87 people exonerated of crimes which they had been convicted.

The number of U.S. criminals exonerated in 2013 climbed to a record high of 87, many of which were cleared due to DNA evidence or proof that the police forced a confession, according to a report released on Tuesday.
8% of the exonerations occurred in death penalty cases.
  Between 1989 and 2013 there has been 1,300 exonerations, only 28% of them because of DNA evidence.

  The trend with states abolishing the death penalty is matched by a global trend.
The number of nations that has abolished the death penalty has gone from 16 in 1977 to 97 in 2012 and another 36 nations hadn't executed anyone in at least 10 years.

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Comment Preferences

  •  Tip Jar (14+ / 0-)

    None are so hopelessly enslaved, as those who falsely believe they are free. The truth has been kept from the depth of their minds by masters who rule them with lies. -Johann von Goethe

    by gjohnsit on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 08:18:04 AM PST

  •  Flawed? (3+ / 0-)

    It is that and so much more. Some of it is just downright corrupt.

    Corrupt in the sense you have police and DA's willing to incarcerate and even murder citizens when it is based upon a lie, flimsy evidence, and coerced confessions.
    Some is even done in the hope it will further their careers. Yes, Mr. & Ms DA I'm looking at you.

    The poor many times cannot afford representation that might set them free or better yet, save their lives in death penalty cases.

    When a country is putting people to death, which in and of itself is bad enough, it rises to another level entirely when we put them to death when we know full well some may be innocent.

    "We can either have democracy in this country or we can have great wealth concentrated in the hands of a few, but we can't have both." Louis Brandeis

    by wxorknot on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 08:46:36 AM PST

    •  I could understand the death penalty (5+ / 0-)

      in a hypothetical world where the justice system only convicted guilty people and gave sentences that they deserved.

        But we don't live in that world. In our world mistakes are made, and you can't fix a mistake when the person is dead.

        Fortunately, the world is moving away from the death penalty. And that movement is happening at the grassroots level despite the media mostly ignoring it.

        It give me hope.

      None are so hopelessly enslaved, as those who falsely believe they are free. The truth has been kept from the depth of their minds by masters who rule them with lies. -Johann von Goethe

      by gjohnsit on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 09:04:03 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Stated perfectly (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        worldlotus, gjohnsit, LibrErica

        and I find it interesting that the movement is happening despite silence in the media.

        My opinion too, is that the death penalty has been more about revenge and "eye for an eye" and has instead operated under the guise of justice.

        It gives me hope too. Thanks for the diary.

        "We can either have democracy in this country or we can have great wealth concentrated in the hands of a few, but we can't have both." Louis Brandeis

        by wxorknot on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 09:31:23 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Silence in some media (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          gjohnsit, wxorknot

          My local paper (Dallas Morning News) has been consistently editorializing against the death penalty for a number of years.

          “Texas is a so-called red state, but you’ve got 10 million Democrats here in Texas. And …, there are a whole lot of people here in Texas who need us, and who need us to fight for them.” President Obama

          by Catte Nappe on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 11:21:36 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  Since Texas is the death penalty capital (0+ / 0-)

            I find it interesting that a real news paper in Texas is coming out against it.
               I gotta admit that my impression of Texas leaves me thinking that the only problem Texans have is that it isn't on pay-per-view. Here's hoping that is only a vocal minority.

            None are so hopelessly enslaved, as those who falsely believe they are free. The truth has been kept from the depth of their minds by masters who rule them with lies. -Johann von Goethe

            by gjohnsit on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 11:38:37 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  Texas has big blue and purple pockets (0+ / 0-)

              It lines up along urban/suburban/rural divides pretty much.

              “Texas is a so-called red state, but you’ve got 10 million Democrats here in Texas. And …, there are a whole lot of people here in Texas who need us, and who need us to fight for them.” President Obama

              by Catte Nappe on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 11:47:30 AM PST

              [ Parent ]

      •  Exactly. (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        gjohnsit

        In our world mistakes are made, and you can't fix a mistake when the person is dead.

        Yes.  Death is irreparable harm.

        •  It's a question of values (0+ / 0-)

          Which is worse to you? Executing an innocent man? Or not executing a guilty one?

            My values say that executing an innocent man destroys the moral justification for the entire system. While simply jailing a guilty man for life is not a crime.

          None are so hopelessly enslaved, as those who falsely believe they are free. The truth has been kept from the depth of their minds by masters who rule them with lies. -Johann von Goethe

          by gjohnsit on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 11:35:51 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

  •  Good nt (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    gjohnsit, worldlotus

    nosotros no somos estúpidos

    by a2nite on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 09:06:17 AM PST

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