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If you missed the CBS 'Sunday Morning' telecast this morning, you missed another must see and must think about! Added to all the Country isn't thinking about related to our wars of choice and after the magnetic ribbons etc. 'patriotism'!

"12 years also is a long time. We now have a lifetime responsibility
to a generation of service members, veterans and their families."
Dr. Jonathan Woodson 11 Sep. 2013: 'With 9/11 Came Lifetime Responsibility' {two tax cuts, especially for the wealthy, came with these two recent unpaid for wars, nor the results of, DeJa-Vu all over again from the previous decades and wars from! Ignore the many issues, by those served, no need to fund!}

Collateral damage: The mental health issues facing children of veterans
March 16, 2014 - How many of these homecomings have you seen on television since we went to war in Iraq and Afghanistan more than a decade ago? How many children, looking into a returning soldier's eyes for the parent who went away?

These are supposed to be happy endings, happily-ever-after moments. But often they are anything but.

"Before his deployment, he was always kind of the fun parent," said 15-year-old Abigail Barton, who lives in Newburgh, Ind., Her father, Aaron Barton, is a veteran of the Iraq war.

"I just figured he'd come home and he'd start, just like he used to, start taking us to the park, playing basketball, getting ice cream, all that stuff," said Abigail. "And it just immediately changed, it was completely gone."

"Yeah, I was scared to go out of the house at the time," said Aaron. "Crowds make me nervous. I'm always still looking for snipers."   read more>>>

"Thirty Days With My Father" is a gritty memoir written by a woman haunted by what some psychologists describe as second-generation post-traumatic stress disorder.

"Thirty Days with My Father: Finding Peace from Wartime PTSD"

"If military action is worth our troops’ blood, it should be worth
our treasure, too" "not just in the abstract, but in the form of a
specific ante by every American."
-Andrew Rosenthal 10 Feb. 2013

Originally posted to DKos Military Veterans on Sun Mar 16, 2014 at 08:25 AM PDT.

Also republished by Military Community Members of Daily Kos.

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Comment Preferences

  •  Tip Jar (13+ / 0-)

    "If military action is worth our troops' blood, it should be worth our treasure, too; not just in the abstract, but in the form of a specific ante by every American." -Andrew Rosenthal 10 Feb. 2013

    by jimstaro on Sun Mar 16, 2014 at 08:25:49 AM PDT

  •  Tipped& rec'ed (6+ / 0-)

    nosotros no somos estúpidos

    by a2nite on Sun Mar 16, 2014 at 08:35:34 AM PDT

    •  I Actually (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Horace Boothroyd III, Vetwife, llbear

      Did miss this report, having tuned in later then the beginning.

      Thankfully they had it posted up quickly, usually often not the case, when I visited the site to catch what I did miss!!!

      "If military action is worth our troops' blood, it should be worth our treasure, too; not just in the abstract, but in the form of a specific ante by every American." -Andrew Rosenthal 10 Feb. 2013

      by jimstaro on Sun Mar 16, 2014 at 08:39:08 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  The Obama Administration (5+ / 0-)


    This Veterans' Administration, for the past five years, along with the Executive Branch and it's Cabinet, have finally been taking on the long ignored Veterans' issues, and the new from these recent wars, by the flag waving patriotic public served and thus through their Representatives! Sadly many many of the Brothers and Sisters have perished from these ignored issues, demand wars give tax cuts with and put said wars costs, no bid contracts for private government contractors, on the credit card, send the very few into, and many still will. And the representatives, especially in the now House of Representatives, take issues caused by that under funding, budget still mostly borrowed, and more and lay blame on the Agency and not themselves, the people served follow that lead, for decades now!!

    Where were the 'offsets' to federal spending as the rubber stamping, more then the off the books wars with no-bid contracts, was going on and claiming 'patriotism' for?

    "If military action is worth our troops' blood, it should be worth our treasure, too; not just in the abstract, but in the form of a specific ante by every American." -Andrew Rosenthal 10 Feb. 2013

    by jimstaro on Sun Mar 16, 2014 at 08:46:55 AM PDT

  •  I grew up in San Diego and there is an interesting (7+ / 0-)

    social dichotomy there.

    On one hand the entire county was geared for serving the Navy.

    On the other we were taught not to talk about 'the war'. Which for our grandparents cohort meant WWII and Korea. And Vietnam for our parents. We were also taught at a very young age not to stare or make remarks about the disfigured. All this was an attempt to not trigger the adults around us who had endured war.

    •  And in, (6+ / 0-)

      Especially military towns, many join the conservative speak and lay blame on the Veterans Administration, never comparing to the same in the private sector as they seek the long term goal of privatizing for corporate profit, for any and all problems many created by under funding and especially during and after our wars, while ignoring many of the issues from the veterans of. Ignore means no need to pay and conservative administrations make sure the VA stayed backwards, costing much more to fix as the blaming continued!!

      "If military action is worth our troops' blood, it should be worth our treasure, too; not just in the abstract, but in the form of a specific ante by every American." -Andrew Rosenthal 10 Feb. 2013

      by jimstaro on Sun Mar 16, 2014 at 09:52:22 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Horace Boothroyd III, twas the same for me- (7+ / 0-)

      albeit as a military dependent. (bit over half my life to date).

      I babysat for MIA/POW families.  I also had the misfortune to babysit for families whose dads were in 'Nam and later watched as these same kiddos went to 'Nam themselves...

      I also started volunteer work at the mil hospital as a teen as a result of literally rounding a corner & coming face to face with an earless, noseless, melted civilian napalm casuality.

       My main volunteerism my senior year in HS was to babble, sing, hold the claw of an airman whose arms were fucking charred almost off while a PT scrubbed & then pulled tiny pieces of black skin off.  Every single day from then until I die I will hear his screams & remember so many others who suffered-just in my small corner of the world.

      Bodybags, screams, courage with horrific disability, saying hello for the first time to a dad whose kiddos I babysat for & then a few short years later saying goodbye to those same kiddos as they left for 'Nam etal impacted my teen years & my becoming.

      Much to the military dad's horror or anger or both some of their military brats broke that golden rule silence.  

      Protested, marched & asked (er shouted) way too many questions.  The brats became the enemy in some cases.  Some were never forgiven; some never got the chance to be asked forgiveness before coming home in a body bag.

      Was not a "healthy" atmosphere in that time & place for all concerned.

       I'd like to think that my boomer cohorts helped to break out/through some of the silence that had surrounded us..then I read a diary such as this & realize how little has changed in all these decades.

      My first marriage was to a 'Nam vet, 5 years older than me, whose cohorts were definitely in a completely different space than mine. Hawks & doves..yet through the unspoken knowing-that special brotherhood-bonds formed.  Strong bonds. Made for some mighty interesting times...

      Methinks it is the way it has always been wherever there are wars & warriors over the ages.  Warriors only have one another.  Because of that special understanding.  Because of the neglect from those they served.  And it is so very wrong.

      What my friends, spouse, 'Nam vets did not have then is in place today.  There was no personal understandings of PTSD & no real help beit in military or civvie life for flashbacks or TBI or strange illness (Agent O).  No help in re-entry or acclimation to the world.  

      We had a formal military wedding.  All but one of the guardsmen/wedding party were damaged forever by 'Nam & thus by extention their families.  Navy. Marine. Army. Air Force.  Non com & officer alike.  Only the Coastguard buds were unscathed at that time & place.

      All branches represented at one wedding long ago-yes a micro yet a stunning one to realize how encompassing & to what effects over generations to come...

      Over 40 years later, to know that the sounds of silence is still in force(d) & that funding, understandings & services are still lacking for all those who came after our gen's wargames is soul searing and heart breaking.  

      And as far as this anti war demonstrating old dove is concerned, it is an indictment against all those "in charge" for well over a half of a century (or more).  

      •  You have a lot of diaries to write. (5+ / 0-)

        I hope you do.

        Jim Starowitz and I have repeatedly tried to convince people on this site that Viet Nam era military were spit on - not by hippies who were likely to provide them solace and comfort - but by the general public who ignored them and the damages done to them.

        I think you might be able to cut through that blindness that even liberals have.

        Those who fought the war in Afghanistan won it. Get them out of Afghanistan NOW . . . It's long past time. The time has come to repair this country and care for its' veterans.

        by llbear on Sun Mar 16, 2014 at 12:27:08 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  AMENS!!!!!!! n/t (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Santa Susanna Kid, llbear, DaNang65

          "If military action is worth our troops' blood, it should be worth our treasure, too; not just in the abstract, but in the form of a specific ante by every American." -Andrew Rosenthal 10 Feb. 2013

          by jimstaro on Sun Mar 16, 2014 at 01:08:56 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  No hippie, dove, Panther, activist that I ever (5+ / 0-)

          knew or was around EVER disrespected a 'Nam vet.

          Jeez, why would we-they were us!!  Our brothers, our fathers, our loved ones, our classmates.  My first goodbyes to classmates occurred when I was a freshman.  And was still saying goodbyes as a HS senior (good ole draft)

          I was almost 30 before I even (intimately) knew anyone who had not served in 'Nam.

          But I can only speak to my personal experiences-coming of age within a military community, then later as a military spouse & later as a civilian-all while living in various spots on this planet.

          You are correct. Solace, comfort and tender repairings. Still happening all these years later with chance reconnects after a 40ish year span or for some on a 24/7 basis.

          Too many & too much forgotten; so many of the happenings/truths of then.  

          I may have sounded cold (or crazy) for a peacenik dove when I swore I'd take my then baby sons to Canada or break their legs before I'd let them serve in a 'Nam (said to hawks no less) but I meant it.  Well, not about breaking their legs.  

          Instead, I did not keep or let the sounds of silence surround their own upbringing-from the moment of their cognition they were given truths, access to obtaining the validity of those truths & the freedom necessary to pursue truths they sought.

          So they knew of people, places, events, PSAs/subjects-good/bad/ugly-family or historical.  Beit a Calley or a King.  An STD or divertissement.  A fire bombing or a Panthers free breakfast initiative.

          Every day of their lives-subtle or ala raucous dinnertime debate or "forbidden fruit" laying around to pick up & read...

          I believed & still do that keeping a silence or whitewashing truths does not protect but harms.  Eventually, harms in ways that cannot be easily undone or overcome.

          Hoped to cause a ripple effect & stop the generational perpetuating.

          Don't know the outcome-may never know.  But my kiddos, their buddies & my grandkiddos had or have or will have that access, that exposure, to voices & happenings past & present instead of silence or whitewash from me.

          PS: Thank you but I cannot do diaries just verbose comments here & there.  I never know if I will be able to tend to one due to needs of child with disabilities.

        •  Those (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Santa Susanna Kid, llbear, worldlotus

          In the anti-war movement, all I knew and interacted with, were the only ones recognizing something deep was wrong. They joined us vets to push for what always was, recognition of what finally became known as PTSD. Many, like some vets, went into the professions to help the brothers and sisters and carried that over into the civilian population as they started to recognize that many were getting misdiagnosed, thus harmed, from the professions not seeing what personal trauma was doing, from children to adults.

          Then, mostly of conservative ilk, there were many making handsome livings lecturing and writing books denying that PTS existed, causing greater harm.

          Until these recent times there was no funding for, along with all the other issues ignored, and the funding still is not up to what it should be.

          Deficits are Debt with huge interest rates, and under funding causes the problems to be attacked, and when problems from surface it costs tons more to correct or even attempt to, causing problems elsewhere!!

          "If military action is worth our troops' blood, it should be worth our treasure, too; not just in the abstract, but in the form of a specific ante by every American." -Andrew Rosenthal 10 Feb. 2013

          by jimstaro on Sun Mar 16, 2014 at 02:24:27 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

  •  Rep Miller and conservative company (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    llbear, worldlotus


    Seeking to once again sweep GWS under the rug and out of mind as they've maintained ignoring, just what the country likes, another of the major issues of veterans:

    House to ask for autonomy for Gulf War Illness board

    After this VA administration, and Executive Branch Cabinet, Finally, are tackling not only this issue but the many others ignored by the country and through their reps even with the still grossly under funded VA budgets especially with and after our wars!!!

    "If military action is worth our troops' blood, it should be worth our treasure, too; not just in the abstract, but in the form of a specific ante by every American." -Andrew Rosenthal 10 Feb. 2013

    by jimstaro on Sun Mar 16, 2014 at 10:03:12 AM PDT

  •  I grew up in the Navy, along with my siblings. (6+ / 0-)

    We were affected by growing up as military dependents and my heart goes out to today's military families because they are in an invisible and endless war. I live in a town with a large military presence and to most townies here, they are barely tolerated (except for buying things).  The children are educated in schools on post/base so they are even more segregated from the town and other children.  It's a weird relationship to witness and underscores the average citizen's discomfort with real "troops".  Where's the "support" everyone has plastered on their cars?

    What is life? It is the flash of a firefly in the night. It is the breath of a buffalo in the wintertime. It is the little shadow which runs across the grass and loses itself in the sunset. Crowfoot

    by Catkin on Sun Mar 16, 2014 at 10:13:56 AM PDT

    •  Notice (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      worldlotus, llbear, chimene


      How fast them magnetic ribbons, even some of the decals, were oft from the cars etc. and never to be replaced as the oh so 'patriotic' meme's increased, FOX speak!!

      You sound like someone who grew up in a Southern Military town. My first duty out of Navy boot was Meridian Miss. Naval Air Station, McCain's old mans name was on the training air strip, Jet training. We had a lifer from that town who ended up stationed there at the same time, he stayed for a couple of years, me only one, and even his old friends wanted nothing to do with him. This was back in '67-'68.

      "If military action is worth our troops' blood, it should be worth our treasure, too; not just in the abstract, but in the form of a specific ante by every American." -Andrew Rosenthal 10 Feb. 2013

      by jimstaro on Sun Mar 16, 2014 at 10:44:52 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  I grew up mostly in the West and Pacific Rim. (0+ / 0-)

        My uncle ended up in Meridian in the early 1960s, then left the military and returned to Kalamazoo.  It's weird for me because my Dad, brother and son all spent time in a branch of the service and none of us are flag waving, crazy tea-party patriots. (who are those guys?)
         My brother was a pilot in USAF, while my son was in the Coast Guard.  My own feelings about that life are complicated; still sorting it out, as are my siblings.  My parents were the ones who made the moving an adventure and kept the memories alive.  I even have the slides to prove it!

        What is life? It is the flash of a firefly in the night. It is the breath of a buffalo in the wintertime. It is the little shadow which runs across the grass and loses itself in the sunset. Crowfoot

        by Catkin on Mon Mar 17, 2014 at 09:56:01 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  Catkin, so true & well said! Especially this: (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      DaNang65, angelajean
      It's a weird relationship to witness and underscores the average citizen's discomfort with real "troops".
      In a nutshell, the average citizen has no clue about military life.  There is no reference point for them to relate to in order to understand or to empathize.

      Like you, I grew up in the military. In all probability, I exist because of the military..and war.

      That being said, I instantly had a rather late "aha" moment as I read your comment.  

      The last place I lived as my father's dependent happened to be unique in that the area was a military hub (my words) populated by civilians/townies, active duty, military retirees, Civil Service and military trainees with 4 different military installations within a short radius.

      So, you had active duty, military retirees, civil service living amongst civilians/townies as well as on base/post housing.  For an example, we lived in a little "'burb city" outside a base but my dad worked at a different base in the metro city.

      We used facilities at all the installations but the majority of the time used our local one.

      Even though we shared commonalities (military life) there was a segregation of sorts between the off base military & the on base military.  We went to different schools, dads worked different installations (or maybe not if retired).

      Throw in the civvies which added another dimension to the overall segregation.

      You can probably relate-moving often & being the "other" has the potential to quickly alter a kiddos affect or attachment.  Reading your comment made me realize just how isolated on base/post kiddos are & to a lesser extent their off base military cohorts.

      It just never seemed to register to us back then just how weird/different we appeared to those with roots.  Or how isolated we actually were.

      Back in those long ago days we brats had a greater freedom than probably today with regards free access on base/post.   So we at least did get to interact with some of the on installation kiddos.

      Funny thing though about insular societies such as I grew up in is I might have had the freedom to roam (at will) the hospital, the flight decks etc while living off base/post-those on base/post not so much.  (Not that we were immune to the invisible arm of the code of conduct-trust me-it could reach waaaay off base)

      Now I will be wondering if the age old problem re political understandings or empathy is directly a result of having no frame of reference.  No context.

      They were the townies.  Didn't live it.  Don't get it.  Will never get it.  As a result they can only relate to the John Wayne type movies & parades (?)

      •  Thanks for your reflective reply! (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        DaNang65, worldlotus

        The town I refer to in my first comment could be southern, but is far north (Alaska)!  How red and narrow is the culture up here.  My own childhood was luckier; my Dad was stationed mostly on the Pacific Rim and we had an almost charmed childhood (that could be old age and nostalgia, of course) until he neared retirement in a Central Valley city which had a very southern feel, too.  If you were not from there, you were foreign and unwelcome.  My brothers called it the armpit of all our duty stations!  It was almost the death of our family....Yes, I had NO idea what living in one house and seeing extended family could be like!  However, all my siblings and I married people who grew up in one house in one town.  I guess we found it novel and different?
        I was the youngest child and had fewer adventures outside the home, but my brothers have great stories about exploring
        the bases.  The favorite place of all was Midway Island where the entire 2 square miles was safe, Naval, and open to explore.
        I taught on the post here in Alaska at one time and was deeply drawn to the current crew of dependents...children whose parents (sometimes both) went to war, then went back to war, then sometimes did not return.  We have generation coming into adulthood with unresolved grief and family issues.  I have found much insight from Military Brats by Mary Edwards Werstch and some comments written by Pat Conroy about the military child and the service we give.  We are a tribe of nomadic, indigenous, invisible citizens.  It's a gift and a challenge.  I hope to reach out to those coming of age now, after a childhood of repeat deployments.

        What is life? It is the flash of a firefly in the night. It is the breath of a buffalo in the wintertime. It is the little shadow which runs across the grass and loses itself in the sunset. Crowfoot

        by Catkin on Sun Mar 16, 2014 at 04:33:36 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  It isn't just near military bases. (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      DaNang65, worldlotus

      It can be here at DailyKos as well.

      Although military families have some staunch support here, it is often hard to come by. Look at the amount of recs on this diary, for example.

      I encourage the military families that I know to get out into their local communities. It doesn't always work but many of us try our best. We know that we have to meet the civilians around us more than halfway.

  •  thanks for this post (8+ / 0-)

    Hits home a bit ..My husband's first born committed suicide in 2010....Another cross my husband bears.   He was a hobo drifter upon return from Nam and never really knew this child and by the time he got to know him in late nineties... damage of absent father was already done.  Tears welling.

    We the People have to make a difference and the Change.....Just do it ! Be part of helping us build a veteran community online. United Veterans of America

    by Vetwife on Sun Mar 16, 2014 at 10:44:55 AM PDT

  •  jimstaro, thank you for bringing voice for those (7+ / 0-)

    who have none so that others may hear.

     Hear. Know. Understand. Act.

    Thank you for your continued service, thank you.

  •  A sub-set of the kids of veterans are those who (7+ / 0-)

    survive the loss of a parent during the last 12 years of unmerited war. If you remember I used to try to keep track of how many kids are in that group. I always failed. I just couldn't handle trying to count that number.

    Those who fought the war in Afghanistan won it. Get them out of Afghanistan NOW . . . It's long past time. The time has come to repair this country and care for its' veterans.

    by llbear on Sun Mar 16, 2014 at 12:16:58 PM PDT

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