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It is beginning.  Destroying history to change history.  In Delaware a principal forbids his teacher from allowing a Holocaust survivor to enter a classroom and give their personal perspective on what it was like to be a Holocaust survivor... This setup has been a regular function in the school.  Same players, new policy... and it was blamed on Common core.....

The principal's own words...

“What common core standard are the kids learning by listening to her.” 

The second statement was:

"We are not here to teach the Holocaust…they will get that in High School..."

Could it be that the principal is a closet  Nazi, and wants this historical revision. Perhaps he is a white supremest, and soon will  lead teachers to quietly forget Black History Month as well?  Already in the lesson packets there is no mention anywhere that slavery is bad or immoral; in fact, perhaps there are plans to soon begin teaching slavery is the great Conservative way to ensure cheap labor.   Or perhaps, any mention of how great the Democratic Party was in the 20th Century, will likewise be banned,  dropped from being taught entirely, and only pap from the Republican corporate era will be allowed to enter the curriculum?

Hyperbole?  Or a real threat?  Who knows?  it could be either or both!

Always in the past, it used to be that teachers could work around such guidelines.  As in this case they could ask someone to come in and tell true stories to enlarge their student's perspectives..

"But... we are not here to teach the Holocaust....."
Because does having her speak teach reading text?  No..  Does having her speak teach mathematical concepts? No. .

Therefore it cannot be important;  therefore by this principal, it is forbidden...

“What common core standard are the kids learning by listening to her.” 
And from the words of Delaware's next head of its teacher's union on this:  "Is what this principal said just relative to this one school? No. We are hearing this from across the state. The humanities are being stripped from our schools in favor of test prep and everything Common Core..."

And so it begins..... selective , bland, cut-and-paste pieces of curriculum inserted into our children's brains with no cognitive structure.   No longer is a school supposed to teach about the life lesson or experiences of others, but rather, only cut-and paste pieces of common core standards....  As a parent, having my child hear an actual holocaust survivor, (something I've never had the opportunity to hear), is a far more important lesson than the ridiculous stupid crap David Coleman calls curriculum.

Perhaps this principal, being an evangelical Christian, has something against Jews and this is his vengeful way of using Common Core to exercise it? Perhaps elsewhere, those with prejudices will do likewise, blame the stringent standards of Common Core to prevent certain parts of our past history from ever being taught....

Soon (and this actually falls within the context of today's current reading material teaching the Common Core standards)  our children are likely to get subliminally taught......

"In the beginning was the Corporation.  And all about it ... was good....".

This is why every single parent alive today who has ever become involved with their children's education and who has actually with their own eyes, looked at the Common Core materials being sent home, becomes horrified and quickly becomes violently opposed to Common Core.
It is a far greater threat to civilization than anything the Koch Brother's funded ALEC ever dreamed to be.  Right now almost all of us  know the Koch Brothers are warped, frustrated old men.  But in a generation,  college graduates will think there is no better ideal way to be.

It begins by outlawing the teaching of the Holocaust because of Common Core.

Originally posted to kavips on Sun Mar 23, 2014 at 11:17 PM PDT.

Also republished by Teachers Lounge.

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Comment Preferences

  •  There will always be free thinkers, (5+ / 0-)

    no matter how hard their parents and the culture at large try to brainwash them.

    I should know. ;-D

    English usage is sometimes more than mere taste, judgment and education - sometimes it's sheer luck, like getting across the street. E. B. White

    by Youffraita on Sun Mar 23, 2014 at 11:41:38 PM PDT

  •  Common Core (5+ / 0-)

    Is a Department of Education push to get ALL schools in the US to teach the same things to all kids with the same standards.  So that an education in Mississippi and Arkansas means the same as in New York and California.  

    The Common Core is backed by the NEA and supported by the Obama Administration.

    What this sounds like is a teacher trying to change the age teaching about the Holocaust takes place vs where it should be taught in the Common Core standards. Just like they don't teach Algebra to 1st graders.  The 1st grader won't get any value from that but would lose time that could be better spent learning the basics of addition.

    The other part is having a person with no teaching experience show up and talk to kids (not young adults with a grasp of history who are able to asks thought out questions), is not learning.  

    Specially when the person is talking about something the school is not even teaching.  It would be like having a person show up in the middle of learning about early American history to talk about the cold war.  No context or background.

    Is Common Core a good thing? Arne Duncan, Secretary of Education appointed by Pres. Obama fully supports it as one of the best ways to improve the US Educational system and improve teaching with in the public school system. (undermining the weak claims of "charter" schools and private schools)

    Stupid question hour starts now and ends in five minutes.

    by DrillSgtK on Sun Mar 23, 2014 at 11:52:29 PM PDT

    •  some facts in your comment go against this account (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      OHdog, OregonWetDog

      Here is another view... that I think provides a clearer picture over what Common Core is really doing to America.

      •  I looked at this. (4+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        cfm, Iberian, rlb, IamGumby

        The source material in your blog post cited talks about a survey that questions the effectiveness of the implementation of the standards, not the standards themselves. The author of the blog post extrapolates that to mean the standards are flawed. That is not a good reading of what the source material says. Do you disagree?

        •  Not sure what you saw??? (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          OHdog, OregonWetDog

          There is plenty of evidence that Common Core is not a valid teaching technique.

          There is no evidence that it is...  

          Can you find independent analysis stating that Common Core is actually a good thing to teach?

          Please, we don't need google searches showing us endorsements by those marketers tied to Common Core.  We need independent analysis.

          I've been looking for a year and a half.  I don't think it is there....

          All independents say ditch it.

          •  Can I? Yes. (0+ / 0-)

            I've linked a bunch in this thread, and similar threads, in the past. Google will find them, but the difference is you actually have to read them - as well as have an idea what's in common core - before you can form a real opinion about them. So no, I'm not going to dig up more links when you're not going to read what I posted anyway. This conversation is got other people - you seem to have your mind made up before you began.

        •  The standards ARE flawed. They were written by (6+ / 0-)

          BUSINESSPEOPLE and POLITICIANS.

          NO educator had a hand in writing them. NONE.  

          And when they were sent to educators for "review", to a one, they all REJECTED them. But Pearson and Gates ignored them.

          They are DEVELOPMENTALLY INAPPROPRIATE.

          "Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity." --M. L. King "You can't fix stupid" --Ron White -6.00, -5.18

          by zenbassoon on Mon Mar 24, 2014 at 08:43:23 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Aren't the individuals listed here (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            IamGumby, reenactor

            educators? All of these teachers and educators rejected the standards?

            I'm asking this as a sincere question. If the work that these people did was rejected and replaced with inappropriate standards, I really want to know how that happened, and I trust you to give me the information that explains what occurred.

            http://www.corestandards.org/...
            COMMON CORE STATE STANDARDS INITIATIVE
            K-12 STANDARDS DEVELOPMENT TEAMS
        •  Yes it is a piss poor standard precisely (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Roadbed Guy, OHdog, MarkW53

          because it allows such deeply flawed implementations to still meet the standard.  

          You have watched Faux News, now lose 2d10 SAN.

          by Throw The Bums Out on Mon Mar 24, 2014 at 08:53:31 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

    •  Uh yeah . . . about this: (5+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      salmo, Bob Love, OHdog, MarkW53, Oh Mary Oh
      Is Common Core a good thing? Arne Duncan, Secretary of Education appointed by Pres. Obama fully supports it as one of the best ways to improve the US Educational system and improve teaching with in the public school system.
      here's how Science (the magazine) summarizes things:
      With the appointment of Arne Duncan as the Secretary of Education, the Obama Administration has swallowed whole the prevailing ideology about the salutary influence of markets and choice, originally concocted by libertarians, neoconservatives, and Republicans.
      link
      •  Duncan (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        joe from Lowell

        I'm unclear what argument you're making here.  Common Core has more supporters than Arne Duncan. You seem to be claiming that since Arne Duncan supports it, it must be some libertarian agenda. I imagine Arne Duncan also thinks the sun rises every day, does that mean that's a neocon plot too ?

        Maybe it's the wrong link. Can you expand what you mean? I'd like to know more.

        From my perspective, a set of reasonable standards can help protect us from McCharter schools. Which common core standards do you find unreasonable ?

        •  In this case . .. . (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          OHdog
          Common Core has more supporters than Arne Duncan.
          it might be good / wise for a Common Core apologist to cite some of the "more supporters" rather than that dipshit.

          And to me, the sun rising in the east seems just a tad more inevitable and unchangeable than the US educational system.

          In that countries like Finland, where the sun also rises in the east, somehow manage to have a sane educational system.

          •  Apologist huh? (4+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            joe from Lowell, Iberian, rlb, IamGumby

            Looking for supporters? Let me google that for you.

            http://www.corestandards.org/...

            Many, many states and school districts have adopted it. Are there certain standards within common core you find unacceptable, or is that too specific of a question?

            •  Well-handled, reenactor. (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              reenactor

              I love these people who don't think they have to know anything about a topic to decide exactly what they think about it.

              It's like the Bush administration all over again; just do the ol' ideological gut-check.

              Art is the handmaid of human good.

              by joe from Lowell on Mon Mar 24, 2014 at 06:08:13 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

            •  Yes it is (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              slatsg
              Are there certain standards within common core you find unacceptable, or is that too specific of a question?
              The "big picture" is that there are fundamental and deep problems with the very premise that underlies Common Core.

              For example, Common Core requires an insane amount of completely counter-productive testing.

              AND, I am firmly opposed to national standards.   Why should I be shackled to what goes on in states like these?

              •  you're wrong about the testing. (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                IamGumby

                From the FAQ on the common core site:

                Are there data collection requirements associated with the Common Core State Standards?
                No. Implementing the Common Core State Standards does not require data collection. Standards define expectations for what students should know and be able to do by the end of each grade. The means of assessing students and the data that result from those assessments are up to the discretion of each state and are separate and unique from the Common Core.

                http://www.corestandards.org/...

                Common Core doesn't include creationism, by the way. In fact, it's a set of standards that students are to meet, NOT a curriculum (i.e. exactly what they learn). Curriculum is determined usually at the school district level.

                •  On the other hand, ANSI would reject CCSS out of (1+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  OHdog
                  •  I feel like we're Gish galloping here. (0+ / 0-)

                    So a competing standards institute doesn't like them. What do YOU think, and more importantly, why?

                    •  You didn't read the link, did you? (0+ / 0-)

                      To sum up:

                      They were written in a manner that violates the nationally and international recognized process for writing standards. The process by which they were created was so fundamentally flawed that these “standards” should have no legitimacy.
                      OK?

                      As for "a competing standards organization":

                      The American National Standards Institute (ANSI) has served in its capacity as administrator and coordinator of the United States private sector voluntary standardization system for more than 90 years. Founded in 1918 by five engineering societies and three government agencies, the Institute remains a private, nonprofit membership organization supported by a diverse constituency of private and public sector organizations.

                      Throughout its history, ANSI has maintained as its primary goal the enhancement of global competitiveness of U.S. business and the American quality of life by promoting and facilitating voluntary consensus standards and conformity assessment systems and promoting their integrity. The Institute represents the interests of its nearly 1,000 company, organization, government agency, institutional and international members through its office in New York City, and its headquarters in Washington, D.C.

                      ... ANSI promotes the use of U.S. standards internationally, advocates U.S. policy and technical positions in international and regional standards organizations, and encourages the adoption of international standards as national standards where they meet the needs of the user community.

                      The Institute is the sole U.S. representative and dues-paying member of the two major non-treaty international standards organizations, the International Organization for Standardization (ISO), and, via the U.S. National Committee (USNC), the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC). As a founding member of the ISO, ANSI plays a strong leadership role in its governing body while U.S. participation, via the USNC, is equally strong in the IEC.

                      Yeah. "Just another" competing standards organization.
                      •  I know who they are. (0+ / 0-)

                        And read the link too. Thank you for quoting it. Just wanted to hear what you think. I didn't say "just ", either.

                        •  What do I think about what? (0+ / 0-)

                          The fact that you are promoting a set of standards that would not be certified by the "sole U.S. representative and dues-paying member of the two major non-treaty international standards organizations" due to such poor development processes? Is that what you would like to know what I think about?

                          I do notice you aren't addressing the point I made. Would you like to know what I think about that?

                          Try to be a little more clear and forthright.

                          •  Perhaps I missed the point. (0+ / 0-)

                            I thought your point was that a competing standards organization didn't like them. My response - sorry I wasn't clear - was "so what?" You quoted stuff from the article, I agreed those things were in the article. Is there a particular line of thinking you want to talk about? I'ts not enough just to tell me another body has some hate for it. You have something specific you want to talk about relating to this, I can. My lunch is over though so you'll have to wait a few hours.

                          •  No problem. My point, pretty clearly, was that the (0+ / 0-)

                            major standards organization in the country would not have certified the Common Core standards, because they were developed in such a manner as to belie all principles of open standards.

                            You are promoting those standards (CCSS) as a Good Thing.

                            If it's necessary, I guess my question would be, "Why are you promoting something that fails all ANSI certification standards as a Good Thing?"

                            I'ts not enough just to tell me another body has some hate for it.
                            If you are going to claim that ANSI is a small fish amongst organizations dedicated to standards, it's going to significantly reduce your credibility.
                          •  Okay. (1+ / 0-)
                            Recommended by:
                            IamGumby

                            I'm not sure exactly what ANSI wants, although I got the gist of it. Here's the thing. I teach. The standards in my content area are actually excellent. They're well thought out, achievable, and obviously modeled directly on the standards produced by our two largest professional associations. It's only a draft we can look at now - our content area will roll out by the end of the year - but there was a public comment phase before the next draft.

                            So while I can appreciate your perspective, what affects my life more than what some standards body (no matter how illustrious) says about common core is whether I can see them work - and I can. Good thing too because we're two years down the road for implementation.

                •  Sorry. It IS a curriculum-- (1+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  OHdog

                  Test companies write scripted lessons to "prepare" for the test. Which is all that's left.

                  I suggest doing research here.

                  "Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity." --M. L. King "You can't fix stupid" --Ron White -6.00, -5.18

                  by zenbassoon on Mon Mar 24, 2014 at 08:48:40 AM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

                  •  Nope. (1+ / 0-)
                    Recommended by:
                    IamGumby

                    A standards document lists skills to be learned by a particular grade. That's what common core is.

                    Curriculum designed by a company to be sold to districts, while it may be common core compatible, does not make common core a curriculum. Districts choose curriculum.

                    There is no standardized test as a part of common core. Elsewhere on the thread I linked to a common core FAQ.

                    Source: teacher with a couple degrees here.

                    •  PARCC is the test everyone is going to go to. (0+ / 0-)

                      "Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity." --M. L. King "You can't fix stupid" --Ron White -6.00, -5.18

                      by zenbassoon on Mon Mar 24, 2014 at 10:31:15 AM PDT

                      [ Parent ]

                    •  If teachers say it's a curriculum, believe it. ^0^ (0+ / 0-)

                      "Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity." --M. L. King "You can't fix stupid" --Ron White -6.00, -5.18

                      by zenbassoon on Mon Mar 24, 2014 at 10:32:04 AM PDT

                      [ Parent ]

                      •  If someone says that (1+ / 0-)
                        Recommended by:
                        IamGumby

                        They don't know the basic terminology of our profession. I call bullshit.

                        •  Try again. Do your research: (0+ / 0-)
                          The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation has partnered with the Pearson Foundation, the world’s largest publishing company, to create a curriculum for the nation aligned to the CCSS.  According to the Gates Foundation’s press release, it will spend $20 million to develop resources aligned to the Common Core State Standards including:

                              Game-based learning applications
                              Math, English language arts and science curricula built into digital formats
                              Learning through social networking platforms
                              Embedded assessments.

                          Other participants is the effort are:  Educurious Partners, Florida Virtual School, Institute of Play, Reasoning Mind, Quest Atlantis, Digital Youth Network and EDUCAUSE.

                          The Gates Foundation expressly admits that its intention is to align learning tools with the Common Core State Standards and “to fundamentally change the way students and teachers interact in the classroom, and ultimately, how education works in America.”

                          Sources:

                          Gates Foundation Announces Portfolio of Innovative Grants to Develop New Teaching and Learning Tools that Support Teachers and Help Students
                          http://www.gatesfoundation.org/...

                          Foundations Join to Offer Online Courses for Schools
                          http://www.nytimes.com/...

                          Then there's this:

                          Follow The Money

                          From Common Core's OWN WEBSITE:

                          In December 2009, the Gates Foundation also made a grant of $550,844 to Common Core, Inc.,“to develop K-10 [English Language Arts] curriculum aligned to the Common Core standards,” which were still under development. According to data on the Gates Foundation website, it appears Common Core, Inc., was the first organization to receive grant money, in “2009 and earlier,” specifically to develop a curriculum based on the standards.

                          According to Common Core, Inc.’s website, “with the advent of the Common Core State Standards in 2010, we decided to begin designing a library of content-rich, standards-based curriculum materials. Two months after the standards were finalized, we released the Common Core Curriculum Maps in English Language Arts. The first truly CCSS-based ELA curriculum tool, these maps (now renamed The Wheatley Portfolio) are in use by tens of thousands of teachers nationwide.”

                          Although the Common Core State Standards were not released until June 2010, the bio for Common Core, Inc.’s president and executive director, Lynne Munson, claims, “In six short years Lynne has made Common Core… a noted provider of CCSS-based curriculum tools.”

                          "Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity." --M. L. King "You can't fix stupid" --Ron White -6.00, -5.18

                          by zenbassoon on Mon Mar 24, 2014 at 11:07:01 AM PDT

                          [ Parent ]

                        •  When you have the SAME standards and the SAME (0+ / 0-)

                          tests (PARCC), that means the CURRICULUM is the same also.

                          All test prep.

                          All the time.

                          Badass Teachers are not amused. ^0^

                          "Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity." --M. L. King "You can't fix stupid" --Ron White -6.00, -5.18

                          by zenbassoon on Mon Mar 24, 2014 at 11:08:51 AM PDT

                          [ Parent ]

              •  Your map shows states where creationism is taught. (2+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                reenactor, Linda Wood

                Texas is the biggie on any map for anything to do with education. It has dominated text book publishers for decades and absolutely determined what the rest of the country even has available to purchase.  You can attribute the largest amount of the dumbing-down of textbooks and curricula to the influence of Texas.  It has hit science education particularly savagely.  

                Guess what?  Texas is one of five states to refuse to adopt Common Core.  

                Most of the other states are DELIGHTED to finally INCLUDE science standards for evolution and climate change in the Common Core.  It has been prohibitively expensive to get educational materials for those subjects because it's not taught in Texas.  Now, with 45 other states all needing textbooks and curricula that include evolution and climate change, educational publishers are actually creating them!  

                Even if it does nothing else besides rid our nation of Texas' stranglehold of stupidity on educational publishing, Common Core will be a welcome force just for THAT.  

                "Growth for the sake of growth is the ideology of the cancer cell." ~Edward Abbey

                by koosah on Mon Mar 24, 2014 at 08:00:31 AM PDT

                [ Parent ]

                •  Yeah, but those topics don't happen to (1+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  OHdog

                  be covered by common core . .. .

                  Most of the other states are DELIGHTED to finally INCLUDE science standards for evolution and climate change in the Common Core.
                  My point was more along the lines of "why should some states be tied to the totally dumbass states in any regard?"  
                  •  These standards improve what they're doing . NT (0+ / 0-)
                    •  How would you know that w/o testing (0+ / 0-)

                      (which in other posts you claim is not required by Common Core - against all Common Sense and empirical observation).

                      In any event, the reality in this type of thing is that they won't be pulled up, the better states will be pulled down.

                      •  What an interesting perspective. (0+ / 0-)

                        We do assessment all the time in education apart from massive end of the year tests. You might remember from your time in school. Yearly tests, usually mandated by states, are helpful benchmarks, but on of our least important indicators.

                        I'm pretty sure you haven't looked directly at the standards, or you'd understand they're rigorous. Most educator's concerns go in the opposite direction I'm afraid, especially K5 and 1st grade.

                        •  Also (0+ / 0-)

                          Concerning common sense - all this stuff is written down. You don't have to guess or have hunches about it. Poring through the thread, I've linked repeatedly. Search for common core FAQ for a start - always a useful place to begin. If you have any questions about what you see I'm happy to talk about it.

                          •  Well you repeatedly say there is no testing (0+ / 0-)

                            when Wikipedia makes it clear that there is:

                            Assessment[edit]

                            According to the Common Core State Standards Initiative website, formal assessment is expected to take place in the 2014–2015 school year, which coincides with the projected implementation year for most states.[28] The assessment is being created by two consortiums with different approaches.[29] The PARCC RttT Assessment Consortium comprises the states of Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, District of Columbia, Florida, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Massachusetts, Mississippi, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, and Tennessee. Their approach focuses on computer-based ‘through-course assessments’ in each grade together with streamlined end-of-year tests. (PARCC refers to " Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers" and RttT refers to the Race to the Top.)[29] The second consortium, called the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium, comprises 31 states focusing on creating "adaptive online exams.” Member states include Alaska, California, Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Idaho, Iowa, Maine, Michigan, Missouri, Montana, Nevada, New Hampshire, North Carolina, North Dakota, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, South Dakota, U.S. Virgin Islands, Vermont, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming.[30][29] The final decision of which assessment to use will be determined by individual state education agencies. Both of these leading consortiums are proposing computer-based exams that include fewer selected and constructed response test items, unlike the Standardized Test that has been more common.

                            linik

                            That sounds ALOT like "testing" to me, so it seems like you have a 'hunch' that there isn't and have been putting that misinformation all over the comments for this diary.

                            Basically, if there wasn't it'd be a lot like states (or whatever level of government) creating a speed limit and then not doing any enforcement - it's just a bizarre scenario that you propose.

                          •  Standardized testing is a state initiative. (1+ / 0-)
                            Recommended by:
                            IamGumby

                            Common core is simply standards. You're conflating them.  RttT is Arne Duncan's no child left behind. Did you notice that two different agencies make the most common tests?  Common Core is not both of them , it's something else. The tests are sold to states that want to assess the standards, but they are not the standards, and standards are not tests.

                            You didn't quite understand the  Wikipedia article. Sometimes a little knowledge can lead you astray.

                          •  I don't really care who makes the tests (0+ / 0-)

                            testing IS "expected" based on the Common Core standards.

                            Except that it is called "assessment" - an attempt at obfuscation, I suppose, that allows persons of your mindset to claim that there is no connection between Common Core standards and the testing the inevitably follows to evaluate whether those standards are being met or not.

                          •  No (0+ / 0-)

                            It's professional terminology, and also you're wrong.

                          •  In that case how many Common Core states (0+ / 0-)

                            do * not * have testing linked to the adoption of the standards?

                            If it's so completely optional, I'm guessing there'd be at least * some * !!

                          •  Testing standards (1+ / 0-)
                            Recommended by:
                            IamGumby

                            Usually have to do with Race to the Top these days (which followed no child left behind). Your question is exactly as valid as asking how many states using common core have a department of transportation. I'm sure they all do, but it doesn't have anything to do with common core.

                          •  Testing (1+ / 0-)
                            Recommended by:
                            reenactor

                            Well, first, you're assuming that "which test to use" means which of these two tests to use, implying that the common core forces school districts to use one or the other. And your assumption is wrong, as you would have noticed if you had read the very next sentence:

                            While some states are working together to create a common, universal assessment based on the Common Core state standards, other states are choosing to work independently or through these two consortiums to develop the assessment.
                            In other words, no one is required to give either of those tests.

                            Second, your analogy is entirely inapt. The speed limit is a law. The Common Core is not. Let me state this as clearly as I can: No one is being forced to participate in the Common Core. Those who do participate in the Common Core are not forced to use either of these tests.

                            Does the Common Core refer to tests? Yes, it does, because end-of-grade testing has been going on for just about as long as we've had schools. But "refer to" does not mean "require."

                            Since the Wikipedia article you quoted includes a list of the standards themselves, can you tell me precisely which of those standards you object to? And if your strongest argument is "they might lead to something bad," you don't really have an argument.

                            Reenactor is not spreading misinformation, but you seem to be. There are certainly valid arguments against the Common Core out there, but they don't include the ones  you're making here.

                            "Seeing Leela fly off the Hexadecapus and crash through the moon dome and survive inside a stuffed animal by breathing a balloon was a dose of reality." Farewell, Futurama--I will avenge you!

                            by IamGumby on Tue Mar 25, 2014 at 06:45:31 PM PDT

                            [ Parent ]

                          •  In reality that is not true (0+ / 0-)
                            No one is being forced to participate in the Common Core. Those who do participate in the Common Core are not forced to use either of these tests.
                            There are financial incentives in place that basically make participation mandatory (either in Common Core or something equally nefarious).
                            No one is being forced to participate in the Common Core. Those who do participate in the Common Core are not forced to use either of these tests.
                            Again that is completely disingenuous - they don't have to use either of those two tests - but they do have to use a standardized test of some type.
                            Reenactor is not spreading misinformation, but you seem to be
                            I quoted directly from Wikipedia that assessment is required.  It seems like you two are trying to get away with some type of sophistry by making the point that assessment is NOT for all intents and purposes equivalent to testing.

                            It is.  I think any reasonable person would agree with that conclusion.

                          •  When I'm Engaging . . . (0+ / 0-)

                            . . . with someone who accuses me of sophistry and intentional lying, its time for the conversation to come to a close.

                            Did I say, "assessment is not for all intents and purposes equivalent to testing?" No, I said that NOWHERE in the Common Core as written is there a testing requirement.

                            Is your shocking assertion that "some sort of standardized testing is required" accurate? You betcha! It has been since NCLB. NCLB was implemented in 2001. Development of the Common Core began in 2009, so of course it assumes standardized testing, because schools that receive federal aid must adopt standardized testing. States have the option to design their own tests, and that's what my state has chosen to do. The requirement for standardized testing does NOT come from the Common Core; it predates it.

                            Do states adopting the Common Core receive financial incentives? You betcha! The incentives are from Race to the Top, and are doled out to any state that adopts "college- and career-ready standards." Some states adopt the Common Core, and receive the grant. Other states do not adopt the Common Core, and also receive the grant. Texas and Virginia rejected the Common Core, and are still receiving their RttT grants.

                            Now I'll restate my earlier comment: You called me a sophist and a liar. I'm done with you.

                            "Seeing Leela fly off the Hexadecapus and crash through the moon dome and survive inside a stuffed animal by breathing a balloon was a dose of reality." Farewell, Futurama--I will avenge you!

                            by IamGumby on Wed Mar 26, 2014 at 06:51:44 AM PDT

                            [ Parent ]

                          •  I NEVER accused you of intentional lying (0+ / 0-)

                            essentially, that accusation about me is just more sophistry on your part that proves my point - maybe you were trying to be ironic or something, who knows.

                            And about your Virginia and Texas "gotcha" comment, you may have missed when I said this:

                            either in Common Core or something equally nefarious
                            (with the part that you obviously missed in bold).
                  •  Also, standards: (0+ / 0-)

                    Most widely used science standards are these:

                    http://www.nextgenscience.org

            •  Citing Common Core to Support Common Core? (0+ / 0-)

              Is not very good.  Is Colgate the best toothpaste ever?  Why, yes! If you ask Colgate.

            •  They are developmentally inappropriate. They do (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              Roadbed Guy, OHdog

              NOT take into account the cognitive development of a child.

              40,000 Badass Teachers are not wrong on this

              "Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity." --M. L. King "You can't fix stupid" --Ron White -6.00, -5.18

              by zenbassoon on Mon Mar 24, 2014 at 08:45:57 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

        •  That Arne Duncan supports Common Core is (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Roadbed Guy, OHdog

          a good reason to be very suspicious of it. Just as the appointment of Arne Duncan discredits anything President Obama says about education.

          •  You know who else hates common core? (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            joe from Lowell

            The Republican controlled assembly and senate in my state. They have it in for education more that Arne Duncan does, who I agree is far from perfect.

            •  Indiana, by any chance? (0+ / 0-)

              The alliance against Common Core in Indiana draws from Democrats like our Superintendent for Public Instruction and the Tea Party contingent of the Legislature.  Both feel, for their own reasons, that it represents an excessive intrusion into state and local control of education.  

              "Politics should be the part-time profession of every citizen who would protect the rights and privileges of free people and who would preserve what is good and fruitful in our national heritage." -- Lucille Ball

              by Yamaneko2 on Mon Mar 24, 2014 at 08:41:03 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

          •  What a lousy way to understand education. (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            reenactor, IamGumby

            You don't know the first thing about what's actually in common core, do you?

            That's ok. You don't have to.

            What's not ok is for you to think that you don't have to know anything about what's in common core, in order to know exactly what your position on common core is.

            That is not ok. That is not how the reality-based community works.

            And I say this as someone who doesn't even like common core.

            Art is the handmaid of human good.

            by joe from Lowell on Mon Mar 24, 2014 at 06:09:56 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

    •  Common Core is a STATE initiative, (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Iberian, koosah, IamGumby

      the federal government is supporting their implementation, but it was NOT and is NOT a federal initiative.

      The Common Core initiative is the product of the National Governors Association and the Council of Chief State School Officers.

      The story surely doesn't support the poster's hyperbolic title.

      •  Common Core is not a state initiative (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Roadbed Guy, OHdog

        Although it was crafted to appear like one.  It is a Federal initiative that was delegated, handed off to hand picked semi-private corporations so it would not be a Department of Education initiative...

        But not for the third of a billion dollars of Department of Education funding to formulate it, it never would have existed.

      •  NO. It is a result of Pearson and Bill Gates. (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Roadbed Guy, OHdog, slatsg

        Follow the money.

        NO repeat NO educators were involved in the creation of this.

        And "State School Officers".  Like TONY BENNETT

        "Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity." --M. L. King "You can't fix stupid" --Ron White -6.00, -5.18

        by zenbassoon on Mon Mar 24, 2014 at 08:49:58 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  The diarist certainly is over-reacting. (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      IamGumby, Roadbed Guy, OHdog

      OTOH Arne Duncan us no friend of public education. His Race to the Top has been described, accurately IMO, as NCLB on steroids. His comment that Hurricane Katrina was the best thing to happen to public eduction in New Orleans should have led to his dismissal. A stupid, callous, insensitive comment like that from a member of the Bush cabal would have led rightfully to outpourings of protest here and on other liberal sites.

      Yes, the Common Core is opposed by some members of the lunatic RW but that doesn't necessarily mean that they are a good thing.

      The make of the Standards Development Work Groups, the team that put together the language arts and mathematics standards is interesting.

      Of the 25 individuals on the two teams, (four people are on both) six are associated with the test-makers from the College Board, five are with fellow test-publishers ACT, and four are with Achieve. Zero teachers are on either Work Group. Source.
      The Common Core standards were not developed in a transparent manner. The standard-setting and writing of the standards included a significant number of people from the testing industry, but did not include a significant number of experienced teachers, subject-matter experts, and other educators from the outset, nor did it engage other informed and concerned interests, such as early childhood educators and educators of children with disabilities. There was no consensus process. The standards were written in 2009 and adopted in 2010 by 45 states and the District of Columbia as a condition of eligibility to compete for $4.3 billion in Race to the Top funding. The process was dominated from start to finish by the Gates Foundation, which funded the standard-setting process. There was no process for appeal or revision, and there is still no process for appeal or revision. Source.
      It appears that your take on what occured on that New Jersey school is just as skewed as the diarist's. This is not teaching Algebra to first graders. This is teaching the Holocaust to eighth graders. I taught eighth graders for many years and they are totally capable of understanding the Holocaust.

      And having first person accounts us extremely valuable. When I covered the Vietnam War I would have Vietnam veterans and peace activists speak to my class. It was a very positive experience for the students and not made history come alive but allowed them to hear different viewpoints, and it certainly improved their understanding of that event.

      A proud member of the Professional Left since 1967.

      by slatsg on Mon Mar 24, 2014 at 07:24:32 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Eighth Grade? That's very reasonable. (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        slatsg, OHdog


        Most of the Holocaust education in Eighth Grade took place in the context of reading "The Diary of Anne Frank" (the play, not the actual diary).  We saw a French film on life in the concentration camps.  

        The Common Core standards for History and Social Studies go on at length about how students should be able to write about history.  Objective knowledge is not covered.  If the student denies the Holocaust and properly cites "evidence" from the Institute of Historical Review (an organization of Holocaust deniers), the Common Core does not stand in the way of confirming that student's knowledge of history.  

        I wish that I were Godwinning here.

        "Politics should be the part-time profession of every citizen who would protect the rights and privileges of free people and who would preserve what is good and fruitful in our national heritage." -- Lucille Ball

        by Yamaneko2 on Mon Mar 24, 2014 at 08:59:44 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  You say, (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        IamGumby
        The make of the Standards Development Work Groups, the team that put together the language arts and mathematics standards is interesting.
        And you quote your source, saying,
        Of the 25 individuals on the two teams, (four people are on both) six are associated with the test-makers from the College Board, five are with fellow test-publishers ACT, and four are with Achieve. Zero teachers are on either Work Group.

        I question your source and your assertion that the development of the standards included zero teachers and only persons standing to gain financially from the development of the standards.

        Because I have read as much as I can of the writings by one of the developers of the math standards, Hung-Hsi Wu of UC Berkeley, I know that at least one member of that group is an educator who has worked with public school teachers and students to examine and evaluate methods of teaching and instructional materials and has written extensively on this work.

        Most of the educators listed on the development teams are indeed university faculty, and fewer are public school teachers. But much of the concern about public education is that American children are not receiving a foundation that prepares them for college. These educators are working along with classroom teachers to improve public education, not to privatize it.

        Of the 51 members of the working group, the COMMON CORE STATE STANDARDS INITIATIVE K-12 STANDARDS DEVELOPMENT TEAM in Mathematics, there are listed:

        5 public school teachers, including 2 NBCTs;
        20 professors of mathematics from the Universities of Michigan, Georgia, Arizona, Minnesota, Vermont, Maryland, Arkansas, Missouri, Florida, and California, the State Universities of New York, Arizona, and Louisiana, and several independent colleges, including Yale, the Harvard Kennedy School, and Bennington College;
        16 state government specialists in math and education from the states of Minnesota, Louisiana, Arkansas, Ohio, Hawaii, Maryland, Arizona, Massachusetts, Nebraska, New Mexico, Florida, and Oklahoma;
        3 additional university faculty specialists in math education;
        1 public school principal;
        and 6 members of education groups you might question, one from the College Board.

        Of the 27 members and 2 co-chairs of The Common Core State Standards Initiative Validation Committee in Mathematics, there are listed:

        3 public school teachers, including 1 NBCT;
        15 university and college professors of mathematics;
        2 university officials or specialists in education;
        1 district superintendent;
        2 public school principals;
        and again 6 members of education groups you might question, one from ETS.

        http://www.corestandards.org/...
        http://www.corestandards.org/...

        If the work of these groups has been undone or hijacked, I apologize if I am not up to date on the process. But the repeated assertion that the Common Core State Standards were developed without the work of teachers or educators is a false assertion, as far as I know.

        •  Here is the July 1, 2009 announcement ... (0+ / 0-)

          by the National Governors Association regarding the makeup of the Standards Development Groups and the Feedback Groups. The Validation Groups had yet to be created. Link

          From what I could see there were no teachers on either the Mathematics or Language Arts development groups.

          A proud member of the Professional Left since 1967.

          by slatsg on Mon Mar 24, 2014 at 07:20:39 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  I read your link, and it updates (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            reenactor

            to this:

            http://www.nga.org/...

            COMMON CORE STATE STANDARDS INITIATIVE K-12 STANDARDS DEVELOPMENT TEAMS

            Within the list,
            the MATHEMATICS WORK TEAM has 51 members,
            the MATHEMATICS FEEDBACK GROUP has 22 members,
            the ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS WORK TEAM has 49 members, and
            the ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS FEEDBACK GROUP has 12 members.

            Virtually all of them are educators.

            Your link to the July 1, 2009 announcement was updated on November 10, 2009, saying,

            http://www.nga.org/...

            Common Core State Standards K-12 Work and Feedback Groups Announced
            November 10, 2009
            WASHINGTON—The National Governors Association Center for Best Practices (NGA Center) and the Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO) today announced the individuals who will develop the K-12 standards for English-language arts and mathematics in the Common Core State Standards Initiative (CCSSI)…

            The Work Group for K-12 standards development is composed of individuals representing multiple stakeholders and a range of expertise and experience in assessment, curriculum design, cognitive development, early childhood, early numeracy, child development, English-language acquisition and elementary, middle, and postsecondary education…

            The November announcement then links to the list I posted above. I hope you will read it, with attention to the credentials of all the persons in it, and then help to correct the false impression created by so many people here and elsewhere that no teachers or educators were involved with the development of the standards.
            •  Interesting (0+ / 0-)

              The lists came out a little more than four months apart. I compared the two lists. The second contained of some the original names and quite a few additions.

              The original announcement stated that the K-12 standards work was to be completed by December of 2009 and then in November, approximately a month before the deadline, another announcement was made naming a new development group.

              I am curious about what happened to change the make-up of the groups and what happened to some of the original members. How much work was completed by the original group? Why were the changes made? Were changes made in response to criticism of the original make-up of the group?

              I quick survey of the site doesn't seem to reveal much.

              If I find that the second group did the majority of the work I will make that correction in future statements. I also believe it is important to explain why the changes were made.

              I would still not impressed with the make-up of the new committee. Eight teachers out of eighty members is only 10%. That's better than the 0% of the original group but not impressive by any means. Nonetheless, accuracy is important.

              A proud member of the Professional Left since 1967.

              by slatsg on Mon Mar 24, 2014 at 10:41:19 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

        •  If this is true . .. . (0+ / 0-)
          But much of the concern about public education is that American children are not receiving a foundation that prepares them for college.
          it is almost surely so because of poverty and poverty-related issues.

          not problems with curricula, lazy-ass teachers, or whatever the scape-goat of the day might be.

    •  NEA took back their endorsement. And (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Roadbed Guy, OHdog, slatsg

      What does Arne Duncan know about education? He never spent a DAY in a classroom, nor does he have ANY early childhood or childhood development experience.

      And students in middle school are (or were) required to read Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank.

      So having a survivor speak makes EMINENT sense. It is a PERFECT opportunity for ENRICHMENT.

      You sound like you're not a teacher. Leave education to the educators. ^0^

      "Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity." --M. L. King "You can't fix stupid" --Ron White -6.00, -5.18

      by zenbassoon on Mon Mar 24, 2014 at 08:41:22 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Common Core is not the issue (9+ / 0-)

    The common core actually allows for the introduction of primary source material and the English language standards have a lot to say about responding to non-fiction texts and interviews.

    I agree that the principal is misguided but using the Common Core as an excuse to cancel the guest speaker is a non-sequitur.

    I am an arts teacher in my 13th year and I find that the common core standards support the arts . The testing materials, top down dictates, and the programs grifting public money to private companies are wrong but they should not be equated with the standards themselves.

    •  As a once supporter (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      joe from Lowell, OHdog

      of Common Core, I would have to speculate that the different viewpoints supporters and detractors have, is directly related to how close they are to the inner workings of Common Core.

      As an art teacher, you are probably less involved than would be an ELA teacher or math teacher for example....

      Very few of those working closely with Common Core are supportive of this national curriculum. Likewise, very few parents who have studied Common Core can stomach it either.

      •  National curriculum (6+ / 0-)

        It has not been presented to our faculty as a national curriculum. It is a set of goals.

        I see it as everyone agreeing on the destination, but teachers still get to map out how they get there.

        I am very involved with both the ELA and Mathematical Practice Standards. I have a whole new way to justify my theatre program. The first Mathematical Practice standard states. "Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them." In theatre, we are presented with problems all the time and have to talk through strategies for solving them.

        What is in the standards that is problematic?
        (Not the testing, the recommended book lists, or the interpretation by ignorant individuals)
        Is there something in the text of the standards that is a problem? (This is a sincere question, not an angry response.)

        I have heard such extreme reaction to Common Core on both ends of the political spectrum, and I don't see the harm in saying that everyone on the fourth grade should learn long division and high school kids should read more non-fiction.

        •  The problem is what is in Common Core (0+ / 0-)

          and with what intensity it is being taught...  It sounds like you are in a good situation where the standards are far away, and offered as an ideal and teachers get to determine in their own way how to reach that ideal....

          My reality is that Common Core is fabricated in cubicles of a company like Pearson, and then is sent in packets per day to be handed out to every student, and that the test at the end of the year, covers absolutely nothing in those packets...

          That is the reality of Common Core.  And I should mention that teacher,s as the diarist shows with his holocaust example, are,  required to teach nothing else but what is in those packets....

          If the packets were good, it would be a whole different ballgame.  But name one thing that corporate sends out, that is good?

          •  That's not how it works. (0+ / 0-)

            Look, this is my career. First of all, standards are not curriculum. Yes, businesses sell curriculum, but would you like to buy curriculum developed by teachers instead? Try http://www.teacherspayteachers.com .  Current trend is to have teachers work in collaborative groups to design curriculum using a curriculum management app; it provides autonomy and us cheaper for the school.

      •  Couple problems here. (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        cfm, ballerina X, Iberian

        1. You seem to think that arts teachers are not subject to the same general initiatives as other subjects. This is not true. One of the things we do is support the curricular and topical goals of other subjects. Why is that ? Well, in music , my area, our national standards recommended by Nafme - a teacher's organization - has relating music to history , culture ,and the other arts and sciences as a value. That's also in our draft to the music common core standards, which we have.

        2. It's not a full curriculum. It's a set of standards. I am pleased to help you understand the difference, ask anything you want.

  •  What common core standards would be taught? (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Elwood Dowd, dhonig, Iberian, Linda Wood

    These ones:

    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.6-8.9
    Analyze the relationship between a primary and secondary source on the same topic.

    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.6-8.8
    Distinguish among fact, opinion, and reasoned judgment in a text.

    http://www.corestandards.org/...

    Also, here's a common core lesson plan about the Holocaust designed for grades including grade 8. How can that be? Because there's nothing in the common core standards that says you can't teach the holocaust in eighth grade.

    http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/...

    I question your citations and the veracity of your claim. Cheers

    •  Thank you for the link (0+ / 0-)

      to the holocaust 8th grade lesson. I forwarded it on to those defending themselves against the principal involved.

      Again, using Common Core links to validate Common Core is rather poor form, In case you didn't see it above, it is like asking Colgate if Colgate toothpaste is the best toothpaste ever...... Their answer, will be .."of course."

      Can you find independent analysis?  So far, all, and I mean 100%, has rendered a verdict that is 100% anti-Common Core.

    •  That exercise would be interesting... (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      OHdog

      The exercise is to draw a pie graph apportioning blame for the Holocaust.  One of the options is none other than Yahweh Himself!  Fox News calling in 3...2...1...

      You are right that there is nothing in the Common Core standards that says you can't teach the Holocaust.  The problem is that there is nothing in the Common Core History/Social Studies standards that prescribes any knowledge of any documented historical fact.  A student can glide through the Common Core in Grades 6-8 without knowing that we fought in a war between 1941 and 1945, let alone that the war actually started in 1939.  Armed with materials from the Holocaust-denying Institute for Historical Review, a student steeped in anti-Semitism by his parents can write cogent essays from false premises, and that student will meet the standard.  

       

      "Politics should be the part-time profession of every citizen who would protect the rights and privileges of free people and who would preserve what is good and fruitful in our national heritage." -- Lucille Ball

      by Yamaneko2 on Mon Mar 24, 2014 at 09:17:39 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  The word "core" (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    TakeSake, ballerina X, Linda Wood, koosah

    It means the center, not the whole apple.

    "Common core" tries to ensure that each school include a minimum set of coursework in each grade.  It does NOT dictate the entire class day.

    •  Reality is different from perception (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Roadbed Guy, slatsg

      One can spin words all they want.  What is IN the packets is  WHAT is Common Core, and if a teacher is not allowed to deviate from WHAT is in those packets, than no matter what the national marketer of Common Core's website speaks, what is IN the packets IS Common Core.

      And unfortunately it is not good.

  •  Apparently... (0+ / 0-)

    Teachable moments are not in the standards.

    The United States for All Americans

    by TakeSake on Mon Mar 24, 2014 at 04:56:55 AM PDT

  •  You're way off with your "secret Nazi" theory. (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    slatsg, nextstep, OHdog, riprof

    This isn't about the principal being some radical freak; it's about Common Core and high-stakes testing putting schools in a straightjacket, so they feel compelled to stick exactly to the approved script and not "waste" an hour on anything that's not on the test.

    Art is the handmaid of human good.

    by joe from Lowell on Mon Mar 24, 2014 at 06:04:39 AM PDT

  •  You got a link to an actual news report? (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    reenactor

    Because all I'm pulling up is a link to a completely unrelated blog post.  Also, you don't bother to name the principal or the school.  In fact, this whole piece is very thin on any verifiable facts.

    •  You have to scroll down. The story is there. (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      riprof

      The diarist is off base with his Nazi/Christianist  scenario. The comment right above yours is exactly correct. Administrators in many states will be evaluated based upon test scores, which will by based on the Common Core instated where they have been adopted.

      A fellow administrator told me that his teachers would be expected to precisely follow the prescribed curriculum and any deviation would result in disciplinary action. In some schools, teachers have actually been required to follow scripts.

      It's ridiculous.

      A proud member of the Professional Left since 1967.

      by slatsg on Mon Mar 24, 2014 at 07:38:29 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  The ammount of (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    koosah, Linda Wood

    believes and rumors and super mega strong opinions about Common Core is bewildering.

    I knew the right wingers hated it and thought it was a secret UN ploy to make our children robots, but it seems after the last few days inhere there is also a left wing conspiranoia for Common Core.

     The Principal is an ASS, Common core is his excuse.

    •  I'm not even sure the principal exists (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Iberian, reenactor
    •  You only are just finding out about why the (0+ / 0-)

      left and teachers don't like  CC$$?

      "Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity." --M. L. King "You can't fix stupid" --Ron White -6.00, -5.18

      by zenbassoon on Mon Mar 24, 2014 at 08:51:39 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  The backlash against Common Core is NOT partisan (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      slatsg

      It is parents of all types regardless of political persuasion who have seen it up close.  That said, of course political types are jumping on the bandwagon to apply that as support for their own ideas...

      But it is parents who love their children who mostly do not care about politics one way or another, who are fighting back and doing so on local levels across the nation.

      Almost every Common Core state has a bill submitted to their legislature that either delays parts or removes Common Core from that state's agenda...

      IT is not politics driven.  IT is children driven.

  •  Should have had speaker at school after normal (0+ / 0-)

    school hours, even invite parents to attend.

    This would have allowed for a wider audience.

    The most important way to protect the environment is not to have more than one child.

    by nextstep on Mon Mar 24, 2014 at 08:43:10 AM PDT

  •  Actually we ARE here to teach the holocaust. (0+ / 0-)

    It's the central moral lesson of the the 20th c.

    Dick Cheney 2/14/10: "I was a big supporter of waterboarding"

    by Bob Love on Mon Mar 24, 2014 at 08:48:29 AM PDT

  •  Hyerbole . . . (0+ / 0-)

    and a "parade of horribles" does nothing to improve and clarify discussions of the Common Core and public education in general. You may have the beginnings of an interesting and thoughtful diary in this piece, but beginning with speculation about whether the Principal in question is a Nazi or a white supremacist undermines your point from the beginning.

    You've also made some statements that confuse me. Which "lesson packets" take no stand on the immorality of slavery? Are they lessons from the school? From the common core? I'd like a link to these lesson packets, or to wherever you found that information.

    You also don't seem to acknowledge (unless I missed your response) reenactor's absolutely correct statement that there is no "Common Core Curriculum," just "Common Core Standards." There is a significant difference between curricula and standards--the terms are not interchangeable. Reenactor also pointed out that the Common Core does not mandate or provide standardized tests.

    I have no respect for Arne Duncan, and sincerely doubt his commitment to universal, high-quality public education. In many ways, I'm already on your "side," or at least on parts of it. But while a diary like this makes for a good rant (and as I've said before, I enjoy and frequently engage in rants), as a foundation for a serious discussion of the many problems associated with standardized testing, and the very real threats to our public schools, it fails entirely. In my opinion, of course.

    "Seeing Leela fly off the Hexadecapus and crash through the moon dome and survive inside a stuffed animal by breathing a balloon was a dose of reality." Farewell, Futurama--I will avenge you!

    by IamGumby on Mon Mar 24, 2014 at 08:50:55 AM PDT

    •  Lesson on lesson packets (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      IamGumby, OHdog

      Lesson packets are how some states drive Common Core.  An educational conglomerate (Pearson is usually the vilified one) lobbies and wins a state contract to perform that state's curriculum for Common Core.

      Instead of textbooks, daily packets are FedEx'd to the school with lessons that are "certifiably" aligned to Common core.  The teacher and student open their packets at the same time.  They work through the exercises, etc.

      Then when the test is administered, hopefully if all the packets were complete, the test measures the ability of students...

      This certifies that all students are taught exactly the same thing.  Depending on the culture of the school, whether additional and entertaining materials can be joined, is open for discussion.  Since teachers will be fired, and since principals will be fired, and since schools will be closed if the tests show the students to be doing poorly, one can expect that little effort will be spent on anything not related to the test....

      Of course, these packets are copyrighted. and releasing these items would violate every confidentiality agreement everyone in the education field must now sign... So, I can't show you what we know...

      But , you can research what parents say...   such as this one.

      •  Thank You (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        OHdog

        Thanks for letting me know about this; I assumed that Pearson (and other companies as well, I'd bet) create materials that school districts can purchase, rather like the old textbook companies (wasn't Pearson one of those as well, or am I remembering it wrong?) had workbooks etc. to supplement the insanely expensive textbooks they sold. I've been fortunate in my state (teaching first middle school English, now high school English) that none of my school districts chose to go that way. I did, however, leave one school district in part because the district was planning on producing its own mandated curriculum, requiring every teacher in every class teaching the same subject and grade to teach the exact same things in the exact same way on the exact same day. In other words, total district control of classrooms. I presume that if an opportunity should open up for interesting class discussion, the teacher would have to cut it short in order to "cover" the required materials and not fall behind. This was shortly before the CC was implemented, so it wouldn't surprise me if that district has since opted for Pearson materials.

        I can see how prepackaged materials associated with the Common Core, and promoted by their designers, could seem attractive to some school districts. I would hope that school boards would refuse to knuckle under to that sort of clearly profit-driven interference in the classroom. I honestly can't understand why any school district would be happy with handing students pre-printed materials--for all of the reasons you've pointed out--but I know that some do it. I'm sorry that's what's going on in your school district, and it really helps to understand your position a lot better. Thanks for filling me in on this.

        "Seeing Leela fly off the Hexadecapus and crash through the moon dome and survive inside a stuffed animal by breathing a balloon was a dose of reality." Farewell, Futurama--I will avenge you!

        by IamGumby on Mon Mar 24, 2014 at 10:12:29 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  The opinion you're responding to is inaccurate. (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          IamGumby

          While common core aligned curriculum exists, common core is not curriculum - it's merely a series of standards describing what kids should do and be able to do. In my content area, it is excellent. Most districts these days have their teachers design curriculum as it is both adapted to the community and much cheaper for the district.

          •  I Must Have . . . (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            reenactor, Linda Wood

            . . . written this comment in a confusing way, which is abominable, since I'm an English teacher. I was trying to point out that the diarist's complaint about the Common Core, mixed in with the "packets" thing, is misguided: First, because as your excellent comments point out, standards and curricula are not the same thing. Second, everything this diarist seems to be upset about has little to do with the standards--it's based in curriculum decision made at the district (and sometimes state) level. The more I read of the diarist's comments, the more I think that he or she is seriously misinformed. Companies can make all the packets that they want; no one is forcing any particular school district to purchase them.

            At my high school, we do exactly what you've just pointed out; we come in every summer, sit down in content area groups, and hammer out our own curriculum. We work at grade levels but also at department levels, to make sure that the curricula for each grade level is aligned with the previous and the next. Again, whatever problems exist in the diarist's school system seem to occurring on the local level. Most telling is that despite several requests, the diarist has not provided any examples of anything from the Common Core itself to support his or her claims.

            We have absolutely no problem finding interesting and challenging ways to teach the Common Core, and our Principal generally trusts us (although of course, he reviews the plans before approving them).

            Anyway, I've really appreciated your comments in this thread!

            "Seeing Leela fly off the Hexadecapus and crash through the moon dome and survive inside a stuffed animal by breathing a balloon was a dose of reality." Farewell, Futurama--I will avenge you!

            by IamGumby on Tue Mar 25, 2014 at 07:25:56 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  I may have skimmed. (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              IamGumby

              Sorry I misread your post. Thank you for your time and effort helping people to understand what common core really entails.

            •  I really appreciate (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              IamGumby

              the points you and reenactor have made in this discussion, especially here, when you say,

              We work at grade levels but also at department levels, to make sure that the curricula for each grade level is aligned with the previous and the next.
              I think most American parents and community members would have assumed that school districts have always coordinated curricula in order to progress in a sequence from grade to grade, at least to some extent, as you describe your work with your colleagues here. But the fact is that lots of districts do not do this, and have not done this for decades, which comes as a shock to a lot of people. One of the important things about the Common Core, at least in principle, I think, is that for some basic skills and knowledge there is an effort to build knowledge through a logical sequence.

              The need for this coordination is not only because students who change districts, or who move from state to state, so often find themselves lost, behind the curve, or ahead of the curve in their new school. It's also because even students who are in the same school, and who stay within the same district throughout their elementary and secondary years, may have very different levels of experience with subject matter and information from other students in their grade level because of the lack of coordination and cooperation.

    •  The reality is (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      OHdog, slatsg

      that Common Core is ALL about standardized tests...  How can one teach the same thing to everyone and validate it so one can compare results across the nation, if one does not use a standardized test that is the same for everyone?

      (There are actually 2 standardized tests.  PARCC and Smarter Balanced Assessments.)

    •  Standards versus Curriculum? (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      OHdog

      What we have here.... is the equivalence of someone standing up at a school board meeting and eloquently arguing that because religion has played a part across human existence, that we should teach something about religion, all religion if necessary, in our schools.  The resolution passes.

      The reality is that the only person they can find to teach it, is the extremist evangelical pastor who sets up his tent in the empty part of the Wal*mart parking lot....

      Find out what is going on in the schools themselves, before you defend Common Core.....  Again, look up what parents are saying...

      (Hint: you certainly won't find it on any Common Core sponsors' websites..)

      •  Your Experience (0+ / 0-)

        is certainly concerning, and as I mentioned above, now that I understand your situation a little better, I understand your concern better.

        I've been working with the Common Core in my state since its implementation; I've only worked for one school district, however, and the district has not opted for prepackaged materials. Part of that may be because we are constantly trading off with a couple of other districts for the title of "poorest in the state," so I don't think the Board could approve such purchases even if they wanted to. Teachers are expected to turn in lesson plans (very detailed plans, and very time-consuming to complete) to the administration every two weeks, in advance of teaching them. It's cumbersome, but I don't really mind, as teachers are still given a tremendous amount of leeway in how they present the lessons to students. We are absolutely told that "handouts" is not teaching; and if they see too many of them, they speak with the teacher and add requirements to the lesson plans he or she submits.

        Now, in my state as well, we have to adhere to extremely strict certification standards for our teachers. The only way that an evangelical pastor could come in to teach one of our classes is as a long-term substitute, and that tenure would be seriously limited, again, because he or she would presumably not be qualified according to the State requirements. These certification requirements aren't limited to core academic subjects.

        I'm in full agreement with you about prepackaged materials and the profit motives behind many educational "reform" movements, including CC. It does rather sound as though many of things you that you are experiencing are Board and District decisions, rather than mandates from the state or federal government. Am I right in that conclusion?

        Thanks again for taking the time to respond to me so thoroughly. Any conversation about what's happening to public schools these days is worth having.

        "Seeing Leela fly off the Hexadecapus and crash through the moon dome and survive inside a stuffed animal by breathing a balloon was a dose of reality." Farewell, Futurama--I will avenge you!

        by IamGumby on Mon Mar 24, 2014 at 10:24:27 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  I'm inclined to take the principal at his word. (0+ / 0-)

    It stinks, but I can easily imagine a principal getting worked up about standards, which are unfortunately treated like a ceiling rather than a floor like they should be.  I see no reason to speculate that he is a neo-Nazi or something like that.

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