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Chart: 3.6 million private-sector jobs lost in the decade before Obamacare compared to 8.8 million created in the 4 years since Obamacare enacted.
With the release of today's jobs report for March 2014, we now have official data showing four full years of private-sector job growth under Obamacare. Since the President signed the law, a total of 8.8 million jobs have been created in the private sector, a dramatic turnaround from the loss of 3.6 million private-sector jobs in the decade before Obamacare.

Today's report is an important reminder of what's at stake in Washington, where every vote to repeal health reform is a vote to return to the type of job-killing policies that prevailed when businesses shed millions of jobs in the decade before Obamacare. The choice for congressional Republicans is clear: They can join with Democrats to strengthen America's comeback by investing in more policies like the Affordable Care Act that provide economic security and opportunity to hard working Americans and small businesses, or they can try to stand in the way of America's comeback by refusing to do anything in Washington other than stage repeal votes for purely partisan political purposes.

A closer look at the monthly jobs numbers shows how America went from losing nearly 800,000 private-sector jobs a month at the end of the last Republican Administration to gaining jobs again within a year of President Obama signing the 2009 Recovery Act (the Stimulus). And since the President signed the 2010 Affordable Care Act (Obamacare), the economy has been creating an average of more than 180,000 private-sector jobs a month:

Chart: Average Monthly Private Sector Jobs: From losing nearly 800,000 jobs per month in January 2009 to gaining jobs by early 2010 to averaging more than 180,000 per month since Obamacare enacted.
As a result of the comeback in the jobs market, the unemployment rate has dropped by more than 3 percentage points under Obamacare, from 9.9% to 6.7%:
Chart: Unemployment rate drops from 9.9% before Obamacare to 6.7% today.
UPDATE: The following question was asked in the comments:
[Y]ou're writing about it here as if it's been in place for four years, when for all practical purposes it was just implemented (on a practical basis) a few months ago. What's that about?
This is a good question. Here's my answer:
Many of the provisions in the law that Republicans claimed would kill jobs went into effect immediately. Indeed, just three months after the President signed the law, House Republicans put out a 43-page report slamming Obamacare that began with a section entitled, "American Jobs Already Under Attack." Likewise, the Heritage Foundation pressed the argument that the enactment of Obamacare in March 2010 had an immediate negative impact on private-sector job growth.

Now that we've created 8.8 million private-sector jobs since the enactment of the ACA, some Republicans want to argue that "Obamacare didn't go into effect until 2014," but that argument can't be reconciled with what they've been telling the American people for four years or with the fact that many of the ACA's allegedly "job killing" provisions went into effect in 2010 and 2011.

Plus, we've averaged 182,000 monthly jobs created in the private sector in the first three months of 2014, the same as the overall average over the past 4 years, so  the response to the "job-killing" claim is the same whether you look at 2010-2014 or just 2014.

Of course, as the commenter notes -- and as the White House points out every month when the jobs numbers are released -- we need to do much more to strengthen the comeback. But I don't think we should be shy about pointing out the contrast between what happened in the job market under the economic policies of the last decade and what is happening in the job market under Obamacare.

In addition to the jobs comeback under Obamacare, millions of lives have been directly impacted by the expansion of health coverage, and the law is delivering benefits to our economy and our people that have largely gone under the radar during the political debate:
[A]verage premiums for coverage through the marketplaces are about 15 percent lower than the CBO previously projected..... The rate of increase in real health spending per person is at its lowest point in 50 years and more than 3 percentage points under the historical average ....

Just by phasing out the infamous “donut hole” created in the 2003 prescription drug law, the ACA has saved almost 8 million seniors nearly $10 billion. On top of that, real growth in Medicare spending per beneficiary has averaged virtually zero since 2010—that means lower premiums and out-of-pocket costs for our parents and grandparents. And, since the law’s passage, actuaries have extended the life of the Medicare trust fund by almost 10 years..... Since the law passed, average Medicare Advantage premiums are down by more than 9 percent, enrollment in plans has increased by 38 percent and the quality of plans has steadily gotten better.

And slowing down the growth of health care spending doesn't just benefit policyholders, it benefits the country's bottom line:
Chart: Deficit drops from nearly 10% of GDP before Obamacare to 3% of GDP in 2014.
Charts archived at America's Comeback Decade.
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Comment Preferences

  •  Not sure of the correlation between (4+ / 0-)

    job growth and insurance. You could say the same about job growth and distance to Mars.

    Shall we go? Yes, let's go.

    by whenwego on Fri Apr 04, 2014 at 07:09:50 AM PDT

    •  The ACA isn't a job loser. That much is clear. (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Jim Oleske, voteearly

      And it very well could create many jobs over time as millions of people get healthcare.

    •  I'm sure (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      voteearly

      Here in CT healthcare is a growing market.  Growing so fast that our university system is organizing it's education curriculum around steering more people towards healthcare as a career.  There are TONS of jobs and the healthcare facilities are like the Blob, expanding and swallowing everything up in its path.  But then again, CT was one of the few states that embraced Obamacare and actually used some of the money left over from the Tobacco settlement which it has in a trust to prepare early and implement Obamacare effectively.  We were so effective we're teaching other states how to do it now.  

      There is a DIRECT correlation between jobs and Obamacare and CT is proving it.  I it wasn't for healthcare CT would be on the balls of it's ass after our last republican governors left the state billions of dollars in debt before getting arrested (Rowland) or high tailing it out of Hartford (Rell).

      This is your world These are your people You can live for yourself today Or help build tomorrow for everyone -8.75, -8.00

      by DisNoir36 on Fri Apr 04, 2014 at 07:44:32 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  ACA was designed to reduce healthcare spending and (0+ / 0-)

        there is some evidence this is working.

        Trying to provide evidence of a counterfactual is difficult, but the fact that the healthcare market continues to grow does not provide evidence as to the effect of the ACA on jobs.

        •  Right (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          zizi

          because all this growth in the healthcare industry and the clinics that opened up all over have NOTHING to do with Obamacare and it all just happened out of the blue for no reason WHATSOEVER.

          OR

          Maybe places like CT who have reasonable political leaders and business people have been ramping up in preparation for Obamacare to be implemented and they decided to proactively invest hundreds of billions of dollars expanding their medical care facilities, hiring recruiting and training tens of thousands of new employees for the jobs to help meet the increase in demand.  
           

          This is your world These are your people You can live for yourself today Or help build tomorrow for everyone -8.75, -8.00

          by DisNoir36 on Fri Apr 04, 2014 at 07:57:29 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Shockingly,the world is complicated (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            bbctooman
          •  Here is what Kentucky Governor Steve Beshear said (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            zizi, whenwego

            on his decision to expand Medicare:

            At a news conference at the Capitol, Beshear called the decision to expand Medicaid for the poor and disabled "the single most important decision in our lifetime" to improve the health of Kentuckians — who traditionally rank near the bottom nationally in nearly every health indicator.

            Expanding Medicaid could add 17,000 jobs and pump more than $15.6 billion into the state's economy in the next six years by putting more money into the state's medical infrastructure, Beshear said.

            That data came from analysis conducted by University of Louisville and Price Waterhouse Coopers on the potential financial impact of expanding the program that accounts for roughly 14.8 percent of the state's current two-year budget.

            I guess the consensus from Price Waterhouse Coopers is that Obamacare won't kill jobs.....
    •  The diary disproves the Republican contention that (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      denig, Jim Oleske, zizi

      Obamacare is killing jobs!

      •  WAY too early to claim victory on that front... (0+ / 0-)

        See my comment above.

        Adequate health care should be a LEGAL RIGHT in the U.S without begging or bankruptcy. Until it is, we should not dare call our society civilized.

        by Love Me Slender on Fri Apr 04, 2014 at 07:53:54 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Not early at all (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          zizi

          If the Republican were right then there wouldn't have been 8.8 million jobs created but rather there would have been a job loss over that period.  You can argue how much of an impact the ACA/Obamacare had on job creation but there is no way you can argue that it was a job killer as the GOP has.  But I'll take it a step further and claim that if it were not for the ACA/Obamacare my state of CT would have been in far worse shape.  I see the growth right outside my window (and at at few points from inside the hospital rooms) and have been privy through my job to the explosive growth that we have experienced here in the healthcare industry.  there is a direct correlation between Obamacare and this growth.  

          This is your world These are your people You can live for yourself today Or help build tomorrow for everyone -8.75, -8.00

          by DisNoir36 on Fri Apr 04, 2014 at 08:07:02 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  This isn't about Republicans... (0+ / 0-)

            ...though those soaked in ideology want to make it about them.

            This is about large portions of the law being pushed back and some on this site claiming that the limited, self-serving implementation of SOME of the law somehow is a yardstick for the economic impacts of the law as a whole. The FACT is, we won't know the true impacts of the law until years after it is fully implemented.

            But by all means, please continue the happy dance if you so choose.

            Adequate health care should be a LEGAL RIGHT in the U.S without begging or bankruptcy. Until it is, we should not dare call our society civilized.

            by Love Me Slender on Fri Apr 04, 2014 at 08:21:13 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  But John Boehner keeps calling it a job-killer. (0+ / 0-)

              And that is obviously not true. Why won't you accept that simple fact?

              If you don't watch news, you're un-informed. If you watch Fox news, you're mis-informed. (paraphrasing Mark Twain)

              by edg on Fri Apr 04, 2014 at 02:49:27 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

          •  nonsense. you could argue there would have been (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Justanothernyer, whenwego

            Even greater growth without the ACA. Again I don't believe that but with just these numbers you can't really say anything about its impact yet

            •  Or (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              zizi

              you can argue that the growth if not negative would have been really pathetic were it not for Obamacare.

              I guess we'll see when states that did not implement it go completely into the shitter. Already there are tons of reports indicating that states that did not implement it are losing hundreds of billions of dollars.  But he why believe them right?

              This is your world These are your people You can live for yourself today Or help build tomorrow for everyone -8.75, -8.00

              by DisNoir36 on Fri Apr 04, 2014 at 08:29:02 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  even with the individual states it will be tough (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                Justanothernyer

                To tell. Its red states who didn't implement but at the same time most are implementing dumbass tax cuts for the rich along with other regressive policies. I'm not arguing that the ACA is having a negative impact I'm just saying the numbers in this diary tell you little to nothing

      •  Spot on. (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Jim Oleske

        ...wispy longings for a time before Elvis and the Beatles, back when "a girl could cook and still would". You know before the troubles.~Hunter.

        by denig on Fri Apr 04, 2014 at 07:57:31 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  Here is why I call BS on the diarist's assertion: (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Ashaman

      The primary insurance portion of this law has just kicked in...and MAJOR parts of the law have been delayed for several years. We won't know the true economic impact of this law as it stands for many, many years.

      We also don't know how many policy holders will CONTINUE to fund their policies on a persistent basis. I personally know half a dozen people who stopped paying their $50/month auto insurance...thus choosing to drive around without insurance...because they are so strapped for cash. As costs rise and median household income continues to flounder, it will be interesting to see how many exchange policy buyers will be able to afford their new policies...even with subsidies.

      Until then, the jury is out on establishing ANY economic impacts of the ACA.

      Adequate health care should be a LEGAL RIGHT in the U.S without begging or bankruptcy. Until it is, we should not dare call our society civilized.

      by Love Me Slender on Fri Apr 04, 2014 at 07:52:32 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  It's not BS here's why (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Jim Oleske, zizi

        Even though the primary insurance portion of this law just kicked in, preparation has been going on for years now.  For states that accepted the Medicaid expansion and decided to implement their own plan, they've been preparing for a few years for the web sites, the educating and informing people of their new benefits and options.  They've had to hire and train a slew of people for the implementation of the law.  On the business side, private healthcare facilities have invested hundreds of billions to upgrade and expand their facilities, to recruit, hire and train new staff to meet the surge in demand and a whole slew of other people just to prepare for this day.

        If you think there has not been an economic impact as a result of all of this so far, you're sadly mistaken.  None of this has been done in a vacuum.  States like CT have been preparing for literally years for the implementation of this law.  

        This is your world These are your people You can live for yourself today Or help build tomorrow for everyone -8.75, -8.00

        by DisNoir36 on Fri Apr 04, 2014 at 08:02:11 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  I never said there hasn't been an economic impact (0+ / 0-)

          Here is what I said verbatim:

          the jury is out on establishing ANY economic impacts of the ACA
          ...meaning there is no stable basis to cheer or denounce the economic impacts. NOTHING is established relative to a correlation between the ACA and economic impacts until the full force of the law is in place for a time...and as you well know, it isn't even close to fully in place.

          Adequate health care should be a LEGAL RIGHT in the U.S without begging or bankruptcy. Until it is, we should not dare call our society civilized.

          by Love Me Slender on Fri Apr 04, 2014 at 08:06:43 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  ANY economic impact (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            zizi

            sounds alot like "an economic impact."  If the jury is still out on ANY impact what you're saying is you are not sure Obamacare has had ANY impact at all.

            I'm saying it HAS and the jury has already decided.

               

            This is your world These are your people You can live for yourself today Or help build tomorrow for everyone -8.75, -8.00

            by DisNoir36 on Fri Apr 04, 2014 at 08:11:12 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  You can say anything you like... (0+ / 0-)

              It is pure ignorance or ideology to claim to know economic impacts of a law that has not yet been fully implemented...period.

              Adequate health care should be a LEGAL RIGHT in the U.S without begging or bankruptcy. Until it is, we should not dare call our society civilized.

              by Love Me Slender on Fri Apr 04, 2014 at 08:18:57 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  The law was implemented the day it was signed (0+ / 0-)

                it's the height of ignorance and really fucking stupid to assume that nothing was done in preparation for the last four fucking years.  

                This is your world These are your people You can live for yourself today Or help build tomorrow for everyone -8.75, -8.00

                by DisNoir36 on Fri Apr 04, 2014 at 08:26:59 AM PDT

                [ Parent ]

          •  Umm, you don't seem to understand that ... (0+ / 0-)

            "jury is out on establishing ANY economic impacts" is synonymous with "there hasn't been an economic impact".

            If you don't watch news, you're un-informed. If you watch Fox news, you're mis-informed. (paraphrasing Mark Twain)

            by edg on Fri Apr 04, 2014 at 02:53:35 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

    •  The Correlation is important (0+ / 0-)

      Right there in paragraph 2: ...investing in more policies like the Affordable Care Act that provide economic security and opportunity to hard working Americans and small businesses...

      This is a very important correlation since the #1 reason American's were going bankrupt prior to the ACA were healthcare costs. And from a political perspective the R's have been making a false negative correlation between the ACA and the labor market since 2009.

      This is not comparable to space exploration. This is the argument D's need to make in 2014.

      I once new a man from Nantucket. It was my last trip to Nantucket.

      by ConservativeBrainTrust on Fri Apr 04, 2014 at 11:25:54 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Professor Oleske, you're pushing some serious... (3+ / 1-)
    Recommended by:
    Love Me Slender, cville townie, Indiana Bob
    Hidden by:
    zizi

    ...White House spin here. Then again, some (many) would say in this midterm election year that this the place to do that.

    The fact remains that today's BLS jobs report was decent. But, indicative of our nation's long-term jobless rate and the greater reality that the BLS' U3 Index distorts what's actually happening on Main Street, I'd say it's still nothing to write home about. In fact, the BLS' U6--definitely considered to be a more accurate indicator of what's happening on Main Street--jobless rate actually went up a tenth of a point, m-o-m, according to today's published monthly report.

    It's important to talk about numbers in true context, at least when one isn't spinning them. And, it'll still be many years before we catch up to where we should be, assuming we're not hit with another recession/depression in the interim.

    Additionally, I think Obamacare is a significant improvement over the status quo, but we still have a VERY long way to go. And, you're writing about it here as if it's been in place for four years, when for all practical purposes it was just implemented (on a practical basis) a few months ago. What's that about?

    I notice from your biography that you're a former Obama White House staffer. So, it's nice to have you here in "the discussion."

    I also see that you're also an expert on religion and the law. So, while I know this is a bit off-topic, what do you think of this? (See below.)

    No NSA reform can fix the American Islamophobic surveillance complex

    Muslim Americans likely make up the bulk of US domestic spy targets. This is what it's like for innocent citizens to live in fear

    Arun Kundnani
    theguardian.com, Friday 28 March 2014 11.02 EDT

    Better oversight of the sprawling American national security apparatus may finally be coming: President Obama and the House Intelligence Committee unveiled plans this week to reduce bulk collection of telephone records. The debate opened up by Edward Snowden's whistle-blowing is about to get even more legalistic than all the parsing of hops and stores and metadata.

    These reforms may be reassuring, if sketchy. But for those living in so-called "suspect communities" – Muslim Americans, left-wing campaigners, "radical" journalists – the days of living on the receiving end of excessive spying won’t end there.

    How come when we talk about spying we don't talk about the lives of ordinary people being spied upon? While we have been rightly outraged at the government's warehousing of troves of data, we have been less interested in the consequences of mass surveillance for those most affected by it – such as Muslim Americans…

    "I always thought if you worked hard enough and tried hard enough, things would work out. I was wrong." --Katharine Graham

    by bobswern on Fri Apr 04, 2014 at 07:23:49 AM PDT

    •  Attempting to derail a diary is HR'ble (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      NedSparks

      Perhaps you can offer some explanation, but it appears to be a pretty deliberate attempt (with thinly veiled sincerity) to derail a diary on HCR into a diary on the NSA.


      ODS results in Obama's amazing ability to humiliate his biggest critics, on the right and the left.

      by NoFortunateSon on Fri Apr 04, 2014 at 07:36:01 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  I'm discussing a LOT in my comment, and I... (3+ / 0-)

        ...focus upon the subject matter, quite DIRECTLY, from the outset of it, with intensive attribution, no less.

        I also note that I'm a fan of Obamacare. I REALLY AM! I just switched to an off-exchange, premium/gold/preffered program, and it might be the best damn health plan--at an exceptionally reasonable price--that I've ever had! (I'm actually spending less, per month, for it than I was for the truly crappy plan I was in up 'til now.)

        The only one who's derailing anything here is you, in response to my comment. Nice try, but your motives are self-evident. (And, what you're saying is both total bulls**t and it flies in the face of what I've actually written.) Try harder...

        "I always thought if you worked hard enough and tried hard enough, things would work out. I was wrong." --Katharine Graham

        by bobswern on Fri Apr 04, 2014 at 07:43:08 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  "preffered" s/b "preferred," of course n/t (0+ / 0-)

          "I always thought if you worked hard enough and tried hard enough, things would work out. I was wrong." --Katharine Graham

          by bobswern on Fri Apr 04, 2014 at 07:46:49 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  I'm glad you're a big fan of Obama... (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          NedSparks

          You don't have to defend yourself to me.

          I just believe you were derailing a diary, intentionally or unintentionally.

          You feel differently.

          Others in the community may or may not agree or disagree with either of us.


          ODS results in Obama's amazing ability to humiliate his biggest critics, on the right and the left.

          by NoFortunateSon on Fri Apr 04, 2014 at 08:12:17 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  Bob, you can send a message ... (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          fcvaguy

          directly to the diarist. In fact, that's probably a better way to reach him as he may not read through all the comments on the diary.

          If you don't watch news, you're un-informed. If you watch Fox news, you're mis-informed. (paraphrasing Mark Twain)

          by edg on Fri Apr 04, 2014 at 03:00:15 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

      •  What bothers you more, NFS... (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        bobswern, cville townie

        ...the fact that bobswern discusses NSA matters or the fact that he called the diarist on what he perceived as White House spin of job creation and Obamacare?

        Apropos your sig line, I think that is a reasonable question to ask you.

        Adequate health care should be a LEGAL RIGHT in the U.S without begging or bankruptcy. Until it is, we should not dare call our society civilized.

        by Love Me Slender on Fri Apr 04, 2014 at 07:47:26 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  It never fails. A positive diary about the (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        NoFortunateSon, zizi

        achievement of Barack Obama and his administration is always pounced upon with great contradictory fervor of how Obama and his administration is really less than positive...really "not good enough".

        Even if the diary dispels Republican memes there are always members of the the "Obama has failed" coalition who will gladly chime in to pushback even on pushback of Republican propaganda.

        It never fails.

        •  I'm sorry...do we all exist to praise Obama? (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          cville townie, Indiana Bob

          I forgot that my sole mission in life is to praise his name rather than dare cast any skepticism on on his "accomplishments"...silly me.

          Adequate health care should be a LEGAL RIGHT in the U.S without begging or bankruptcy. Until it is, we should not dare call our society civilized.

          by Love Me Slender on Fri Apr 04, 2014 at 08:08:12 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  No, I think your mission is to say Obama "suck" (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            NoFortunateSon, zizi
          •  Accomplishments has quotes! *sad trombone noise* (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            NedSparks


            ODS results in Obama's amazing ability to humiliate his biggest critics, on the right and the left.

            by NoFortunateSon on Fri Apr 04, 2014 at 08:13:26 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  People will ALWAYS find excuses (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              zizi

              to shit on accomplishments no matter how great or small.  They can never differentiate between the real accomplishments and the real failures.  They often conflate the two and paint with a broad brush to reflect their own opinion without ever examining the facts objectively.  It's pretty fucking sad really.  

              The diarist writes a diary simply stating that the GOP said Obamacare would be a job killer and yet despite that in the 4 years since it's become law we've created 8.8 million jobs.  The diarist then shows how those same politicians when they governed from the majority and were able to push through their so called job creating policies actually resulted in millions of jobs being lost in the decade prior to Obamacare being signed into law.  A pretty straightforward diary highlighting how the GOP and their job creating policies are completely and utterly full of shit.  Something nobody here should be able to argue again.  

              Yet despite this some STILL manage to shit all over it with this Obama failed us bullshit.  Take the small victories for what they are and realize that had McLame been president we would have been in FAR worse fucking shape.    

              This is your world These are your people You can live for yourself today Or help build tomorrow for everyone -8.75, -8.00

              by DisNoir36 on Fri Apr 04, 2014 at 08:23:43 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

            •  Is this where I say "clap louder!"? (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              cville townie, bobswern

              Honestly, I'm laughing so hard right now it's difficult to type. Please, PLEASE proceed :)

              Adequate health care should be a LEGAL RIGHT in the U.S without begging or bankruptcy. Until it is, we should not dare call our society civilized.

              by Love Me Slender on Fri Apr 04, 2014 at 08:24:17 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

    •  Critics Claimed Immediate Job Harms (5+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      denig, TheLizardKing, bobswern, zizi, Hawkjt

      Thanks for the comment, boswern. You asked:

      [Y]ou're writing about it here as if it's been in place for four years, when for all practical purposes it was just implemented (on a practical basis) a few months ago. What's that about?
      Many of the provisions of the law that Republicans claimed would kill jobs went into effect immediately. Indeed, just three months after the President signed the law, House Republicans put out a 43-page report slamming Obamacare that began with a section entitled, "American Jobs Already Under Attack." Likewise, the Heritage Foundation pressed the argument that the enactment of Obamacare in March 2010 had an immediate negative impact on private-sector job growth.

      Now that we've created 8.8 million private-sector jobs since the enactment of the ACA, some Republicans want to argue that "Obamacare didn't go into effect until 2014," but that argument can't be reconciled with what they've been telling the American people for four years or with the fact that many of the ACA's allegedly "job killing" provisions went into effect in 2010 and 2011.

      Plus, we've averaged 182,000 monthly jobs created in the private sector in the first three months of 2014, the same as the overall average over the past 4 years, so  the response to the "job-killing" claim is the same whether you look at 2010-2014 or just 2014.

      Of course, as you note -- and as the White House points out every month when the jobs numbers are released -- we need to do much more to strengthen the comeback. But I don't think we should be shy about pointing out the contrast between what happened in the job market under the economic policies of the last decade and what is happening in the job market under Obamacare.

  •  Attributing job changes to the ACA is nonsense (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Love Me Slender, Ashaman, konving

    There are multiple factors governing job growth.  Even among President Obama's policies, the effects of the ARRA are far more powerful than those of the ACA. Note also, that other parts of the government such as the Fed have an impact on job growth.

    Also, note the lack of full implementation of the ACA for most of the period.  Plausible claims of negative effects from the ACA suggest they would have begun in 2013.  (Note: Plausible does not mean correct.)  

    In short, the jobs numbers you cite are consistent with claims that the ACA has cost or generated hundreds of thousands or even millions of jobs.

    •  BINGO...wish I could rec a thousand times. nt (0+ / 0-)

      Adequate health care should be a LEGAL RIGHT in the U.S without begging or bankruptcy. Until it is, we should not dare call our society civilized.

      by Love Me Slender on Fri Apr 04, 2014 at 08:08:58 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Agree on ARRA, Disagree on ACA (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Hawkjt, denig, Turtle Bay

      Your point on ARRA (a.k.a. the Recovery Act or the Stimulus) is an important one, and I think it's worth taking another look at the detailed jobs chart, which dramatically illustrates the turnaround in the job market after the passage of the Recovery Act:

      Chart: Average Monthly Private Sector Jobs: From losing nearly 800,000 jobs per month in January 2009 to gaining jobs by early 2010 to averaging more than 180,000 per month since Obamacare enacted.
      But I don't think people should discount the massive change in economic policy represented by the Affordable Care Act. As David Leonhardt of the Times wrote when it was enacted:
      The bill that President Obama signed on Tuesday is the federal government’s biggest attack on economic inequality since inequality began rising more than three decades ago.

      Over most of that period, government policy and market forces have been moving in the same direction, both increasing inequality. The pretax incomes of the wealthy have soared since the late 1970s, while their tax rates have fallen more than rates for the middle class and poor.

      Nearly every major aspect of the health bill pushes in the other direction….

      And as the Makeshift Academic put it more recently:
      [S]ection 9015 of the Affordable Care Act ... is the single most progressive piece of tax reform over the last 20 years – and arguably since the institution of the graduated income tax.

      In fact, the ACA as a whole is notable not only for the massive benefits that it showers on middle and lower-income Americans, but also for the progressive way it pays for them – by increasing tax rates on wealthy individuals and large companies, eroding corporate welfare, and closing numerous tax loopholes that tend to benefit narrow sets of businesses and wealthy individuals.

      Democrats and Republicans have fundamentally different views on how best to boost the economy and create jobs. The Republican philosophy was reflected in the 2001 and 2003 Bush tax cuts. The Democratic philosophy is reflected in Obamacare. And Democrats should not shy away from a comparison of the job markets under those policies.
  •  Have wages in the health care industry kept up (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    BigAlinWashSt

    to inflation? Yes, there have been increases in employment in the health care services industry but what are the wages? How do they compare to the manufacturing jobs they are replacing?

    To intimate the ACA is creating new jobs but at lower wages then those that are being lost is disingenuous.

    Hopkins Hospital Workers Speak Out against "Poverty Wages"

    The Real News talks to workers at Baltimore's internationally renowned Johns Hopkins Hospital as they prepare for a possible strike in order to obtain a $15 hourly wage

    1199SEIU United Healthcare Workers East, which represents the 2,000 Hopkins employees, says the starting wage is $10.71, and 1,400 people are paid less than $14.91 an hour. The Baltimore Brew reports this wage "qualifies a family of four for food stamps."
    ...
    DANIELS: Well, you know, Hopkins workers are--we're low-paid. And that's just the natural truth of the situation. And if we were getting paid, you know, equal wages, then we wouldn't be out here. And, you know, it's just sad that we have to be this way. And we're low, we're low-paid. Great hospital, low-paid employees. And that's just the way it is.

    NOOR: And what's your message to the leadership at Johns Hopkins today?

    DANIELS: We need fair wages. And they know that. And, you know, if we give them fair work, we deserve fair wages.


    More at The Real News

    •  That's a false argument (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      zizi

      What does healthcare have to do with manufacturing jobs.  One isn't related even in the remotest sense to the other let alone replacing the other.  Heck that's altogether different policy that resulted in the losing of one and creation of the other and the policies were even implemented by different presidents a decade apart.    

      This is your world These are your people You can live for yourself today Or help build tomorrow for everyone -8.75, -8.00

      by DisNoir36 on Fri Apr 04, 2014 at 08:17:05 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  All jobs are related. If someone cannot find a (0+ / 0-)

        higher paying manufacturing job, they will move into other fields, especially the young. As the population ages and health services increase, many jobs are opening in this sector which is traditionally lower paying on the lower rungs.

        The argument put forward by the Real News report is that these wages need to be increased. There is no legitimate reason health care workers should be paid less than assembly line manufacturing workers.

        What is a false argument is using employment figures that do not take into consideration decreasing wage levels and hours worked. One could have zero unemployment by paying people minimum wage and having them work 10 hrs/week. This has been the trend as time has gone by. People eventually break and take any job just in order to exist.

        BLS: Real Wages Declined in 3rd Quarter; Down 3.2% Under Obama
        November 1, 2013

        The real median earnings of both men and women dropped in the third quarter of 2013 and are down 3.2 percent since President Barack Obama took office in the first quarter of 2009, according to data released today by the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

        In non-inflation-adjusted dollars, Americans who worked full-time for a wage or salary had median usual weekly earnings of $775 in second quarter of 2013 and $777 in the third quarter. In current dollars that was $2-per-week increase. However, when adjusted for inflation, median earnings actually declined from the second to the third quarter, according to BLS.
        ...
        Men’s real median weekly earnings have dropped $16 dollars since Obama took office (from $384 to $368). That is a real drop of 4.2 percent.

        Women’s real median weekly earnings have dropped $2 since Obama took office (declining from $304 to $302). That is a real drop of 0.66 percent.

  •  I think the decreasing unemployment rate is bogus (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    BigAlinWashSt

    Yes, the ratio of employed people to the total employable population is increasing. This is good, unless the total employable population is decreasing because people seeking employment who have been out of work for over a year are dropped from this calculation. In other words, this ratio goes up because the denominator (downstairs number) is artificially being decreased. I would like to see the raw numbers of employed to get some prospective on this effect.

    I voted with my feet. Good Bye and Good Luck America!!

    by shann on Fri Apr 04, 2014 at 08:34:44 AM PDT

  •  You're kidding me right? (0+ / 0-)

    "Fragmented and confused, we have no plan to combat any of this, but are looking to be saved by the very architects of our ruination."

    by BigAlinWashSt on Fri Apr 04, 2014 at 08:41:31 AM PDT

  •  Thanks Professor, for (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    BenderRodriguez

    the reminder of some of the distortions from the conservatives aimed at the ACA.

    Oh, and liberals also.

    You will find almost a tougher audience here than on Redstate as we have some devoted anti-President Obama folks on here who are small in numbers but very persistent in their comments.

    No way that you can answer them all to their satisfaction, but good effort anyway.

  •  I appreciate you posting here (0+ / 0-)

    Thank you.

    KOS: "Mocking partisans focusing on elections? Even less reason to be on Daily Kos."

    by fcvaguy on Sat Apr 05, 2014 at 12:21:29 PM PDT

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