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the 2012 prediction that Obama beats Romney
RAND American Life Panel, the same organization that looked at the drop in uninsured due to ACA
The above is a reminder that the RAND panel that just suggested a drop in the uninsured is familiar to this site, and has a track record. Their 2012 election poll was one of the most accurate.

Adrianna McIntyre:

If RAND’s latest report is accurate, the uninsured rate among 18-64 year old adults in the United States fell by 23 percent—from 20.5 percent to 15.8 percent—between September 2013 and March 2014. And if RAND is right, that’s big news—but it’s probably not the news we were expecting.
CBPP:
How many uninsured people have gained health coverage since the Affordable Care Act’s major coverage expansions took effect January 1?  While 2014 health coverage data from the major federal surveys won’t be available until mid-to-late next year, new data from three independent surveys suggest that health reform’s Medicaid expansion and subsidized marketplace coverage likely are already making substantial progress in reducing the ranks of the uninsured.
The number of uninsured is dropping. The exact number is TBD, but it's beyond debate as to the direction of the trend.

More politics and policy below the fold.

Sally Kohn:

According to new polling by Public Policy Poling conducted for MoveOn, in voters support Medicaid expansion in key states by wide margins: 52 to 35 percent in Kansas, 58 to 33 percent in Florida, 59 to 30 percent in Pennsylvania, 54 to 38 percent in Georgia. All are states where Medicaid expansion has been blocked by Republican politicians.  In Virginia, where the GOP has also blocked Medicaid expansion, a previous poll found that even a majority of state Republican voters support extending coverage for the state’s low-income residents.  And other polls show that three-out-of-four Americans nationwide, including a majority of Republicans, support Medicaid expansion.  
The next few pieces are on the Medicare (not Medicaid) reimbursement data dump.

Nicholas Bagley:

Starting as early as today, CMS will publicly release comprehensive data on physician billing practices in Medicare, including information about specific, identifiable doctors. The move is controversial: the AMA, for one, is “concerned” that the data “will mislead the public into making inappropriate and potentially harmful treatment decisions and will result in unwarranted bias against physicians that can destroy careers.” And I’ll bet a few doctors in Miami, with its extraordinary rate of Medicare spending, are sweating bullets.

CMS hopes the data will “help consumers compare the services provided and payments received by individual health care providers. Businesses and consumers alike can use these data to drive decision-making and reward quality, cost-effective care.” The word choice here—“consumers,” not “patients”—is a cue that CMS wants to enlist market forces to discipline errant physicians. Call it consumer-directed health care, Medicare-style.

There’s reason for skepticism, though. Information disclosure is a common regulatory tool. It’s been studied a lot. And in most settings, it just doesn’t work.

WaPo:
An analysis of government data released Wednesday shows that the cost of drugs administered by doctors accounts for a growing piece of Medicare’s spending and varies widely from region to region in the United States, raising questions about whether some physicians may be misusing the pharmaceuticals.

Most of the 4,000 doctors who received at least $1 million from Medicare in 2012 billed mainly for giving patients injections, infusions and other drug treatments, those records show.

Looks like Day 2 data dump stories from @wsj @latimes are a lot more cautious than Day 1 pieces, emphasize caveats.
@charlesornstein
For example, WSJ:
Among the highest-reimbursed doctors in their fields were a Michigan oncologist with $10 million in 2012 payments and a Rhode Island anesthesiologist at $3.5 million, both of whom have been indicted for fraud in federal courts. Also among the highest reimbursed was Jean Malouin, a family-medicine doctor in Michigan, but that is because she reimburses other doctors in a special demonstration program backed by the agency that oversees Medicare. The Michigan oncologist has pleaded not guilty. An attorney for the anesthesiologist says his client is innocent.

That diversity underscores crucial gaps in the new data. Medical groups and policy makers have asserted that the figures lack context needed to show which doctors may be abusing the system and which are simply hard workers and overseers of complicated medical practices, or those whose specialties involve high overhead costs, such as radiation oncology, that lead to bigger bills.

Jennifer Raff:
Dear parents,

You are being lied to. The people who claim to be acting in the best interests of your children are putting their health and even lives at risk.

They say that measles isn’t a deadly disease.
But it is.

They say that chickenpox isn’t that big of a deal.
But it can be.

They say that the flu isn’t dangerous.
But it is.

They say that whooping cough isn’t so bad for kids to get.
But it is.

They say that vaccines aren’t that effective at preventing disease.
But 3 million children’s lives are saved every year by vaccination, and 2 million die every year from vaccine-preventable illnesses.

They say that “natural infection” is better than vaccination.
But they’re wrong.

The above? A thing of beauty.

Michael Lind:

Between Democrats who talk like Roosevelt or LBJ, but offer little or nothing to working-class whites not poor enough to qualify for means-tested welfare, and Republicans who sound like Ayn Rand but end up supporting Social Security and Medicare, the white working class has little to choose from. So non-racist, non-Southern members members tend to identify with the one of the two economically-conservative, plutocrat-funded parties that is dominant in their states and neighborhoods.

The white working class has not rejected the party of pro-working-class economic progressivism, because in today’s America no such party exists. They can’t turn down a new New Deal that nobody offers them.

Fact Tank/Pew:
A greater share of mothers are not working outside the home than at any time in the past two decades, according to a new Pew Research Center report. After declining for several decades — bottoming out at 23% around the turn of the century — the share of stay-at-home mothers has risen in fits and starts over the past decade and a half, to 29% in 2012, according to the Pew Research analysis of census data.

While there are many reasons driving this trend, one likely reason is the rising cost of child care. A 2010 Census paper (which focused on married stay-at-home mothers) commented that “[e]specially for mothers who have more than one child under 5, the cost of day care might be higher than she could support unless she has fairly high earnings.”

Charles M. Blow:
Voter apathy is a civic abdication. There is no other way to describe it.

If more Americans — particularly young people and less wealthy people — went to the polls, we would have a better functioning government that actually reflected the will of the citizenry.

But, that’s not the way it works. Voting in general skews older and wealthier, and in midterm elections that skew is even more severe.

"The idea that you’d purposely try to prevent people from voting? Un-American. How is it that we’re putting up with that?"-Obama in Texas
@JillDLawrence

Originally posted to Daily Kos on Thu Apr 10, 2014 at 04:30 AM PDT.

Also republished by Obamacare Saves Lives.

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Comment Preferences

  •  I'm glad it's 'raised', (12+ / 0-)

    "raising questions about whether some physicians may be misusing the pharmaceuticals."  We've known this forever, c'mon now.

    http://lazyactivismrules.wordpress.com/

    by LazyActivism on Thu Apr 10, 2014 at 04:39:27 AM PDT

  •  Public disclosure of physician ratings (2+ / 0-)

    does seem badly misguided . .. . .

    CMS hopes the data will “help consumers compare the services provided and payments received by individual health care providers. Businesses and consumers alike can use these data to drive decision-making and reward quality, cost-effective care.” The word choice here—“consumers,” not “patients”—is a cue that CMS wants to enlist market forces to discipline errant physicians. Call it consumer-directed health care, Medicare-style.
    Ultimately it would seem to make care for high risk and difficult to treat conditions all that much more difficult, and low quality as physicians shy away from such areas in fear of the rankings . ..
    •  More useful to gauge fraud (12+ / 0-)

      There are jokes about lawyers who manage to bill 36 hours in a single day, day after day. It would be interesting, to say the least, for the Feds to drill down into the data and find out if there are doctors regularly billing far more than a person could possibly really do in a day.

      Example: A relative of mine spent several years in a nursing home. When I took over her finances, I kept finding Medicare payments to a podiatrist -- including for dates when she was hospitalized. I strongly suspect that he went in, saw a couple of people, cut a few toenails, and billed Medicare for specialized services (which is what Medicare will pay for) for every single patient, month after month.

      The fact that the geographic spread is very uneven lends credence to the fraud theory. The number of radiology or chemo services per population shouldn't vary that much between, say, Florida and Arizona.  

      •  nice balanced piece here as to where to go (8+ / 0-)

        from here:

        The promise and peril of new Medicare data
        Newly-released Medicare payment data offer key clues to how physicians practice, get paid—if reporters proceed carefully
        http://www.cjr.org/...

        "It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends upon his not understanding it!" — Upton Sinclair

        by Greg Dworkin on Thu Apr 10, 2014 at 05:25:14 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  It also exposes legal but sleazy practices that (3+ / 0-)

        Congress has prevented Medicare from stopping. Friends of Senator Menendez having been doing really well under this system and apparently it is legal. Yesterday's NYT had a story about how the two Docs with the highest Medicare reimbursements in the country slushed hundreds of thousands to Menendez through Harry Reid's PAC. Not pleasant reading for those of us who hope Dems are better than that...reality bites.

      •  Sure, going after fraud is totally laudable (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Heart of the Rockies

        but I hardly think that this needs to be the approach.

      •  Oh, yes (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        wintergreen8694, SoCalSal

        When my dad fell and broke his hip, then moved into a rehab after the replacement, there were doctors who would make regular visits to this rehab, find their patients on the list and go visit them, then (I'm sure) bill Medicaid for stopping in the room for 2 minutes.
        My father had a rare form of leukemia that had been in remission for over 10 years, and his oncologist showed up and wanted to do all kinds of tests to check on the leukemia. My mom threw him out, I'm proud to say.

        Your beliefs don't make you a better person. Your behavior does.

        by skohayes on Thu Apr 10, 2014 at 06:35:55 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  When did doctors become the Enemy? (0+ / 0-)

          btw the "2 minutes" in the room is the tip of the iceberg. You don't know about the time spent on phone calls looking for lab results, checking x-rays, consulting with other physicians, physical therapy, chart review. PAPERWORK. All in the service of your father.  Oh, and, btw he survived leukemia long enough to break his hip. Did he treat himself?

          You're welcome.

          •  It's Florida (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            sfbob

            My father went in that rehab and a week later was back in the hospital with aspiration pneumonia, stayed for 2 weeks (because of an untreated bedsore that got infected) and then back to another rehab.  Two weeks there and back to the hospital where they were talking about amputating his leg because he hadn't gotten the correct wound treatment at the second rehab. Unfortunately, the pneumonia killed him before they could decide on whether an 86 year old man in poor health could withstand an amputation surgery.
            I could tell you about my 50 year old girlfriend who went to a local hospital to have a hysterectomy, whoever closed her incision sewed her catheter in and they had to go back in and get that out, and then she developed a MRSA infection and instead of being in the hospital for 3 days, it turned out to be three weeks. The hospital's lawyer made sure to visit her on her release date to inform her that state law prevented her from recovering any damages from the hospital. I thought that was a nice touch.
            By the way, I work for a 3 vet practice, I understand about checking lab results, consultations, physical therapy, etc. I also know that the staff does most of the leg work.

            Your beliefs don't make you a better person. Your behavior does.

            by skohayes on Thu Apr 10, 2014 at 09:14:35 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

    •  The other day I was thinking about (10+ / 0-)

      that too. It's been bugging me for a long time.

      This constant focus on us as consumers reduces us to sheep grazing on the latest gizmo pushed by yet more Media hype.

      The power's that be would like nothing more than for all of us to be zombie shoppers.

      Who could forget Bush's advice in the days following 9/11 to "just go shopping?"

      I was stunned, horrified, and deeply insulted. Bet a lot of folks were.

      There is something in us that refuses to be regarded as less than human. We are created for freedom - Archbishop Desmond Tutu

      by Onomastic on Thu Apr 10, 2014 at 05:31:32 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Me too! (4+ / 0-)

           I also remember, "Come to New York and spend money," But I think that was Giuliani...

        Compost for a greener planet.............got piles?

        by Hoghead99 on Thu Apr 10, 2014 at 05:42:26 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  TPTB want to reduce us all to being (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          skohayes, tb mare, a gilas girl

          cogs in the wheel that solely exist to do their bidding and increase their profit line.

          It's a soul and creativity destroying materialism. It's a big part of why the focus on teaching to the test in our schools has always bothered me.

          I want our children to be free to discover, to create, to learn how to think critically, to be all that they can be.

          It is what I've always wanted for all of us.

          Instead we're bombarded with 24/7 ads, messages, and policies that reduce us to being the thing that the "economy" relies upon while our real needs are constantly ignored and devalued.

          There is something in us that refuses to be regarded as less than human. We are created for freedom - Archbishop Desmond Tutu

          by Onomastic on Thu Apr 10, 2014 at 06:49:44 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Rec'd for Pink Floyd! (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Onomastic

            That album could be released today and still be relevant, though my fave is definitely "Dark Side of the Moon".

            Your beliefs don't make you a better person. Your behavior does.

            by skohayes on Thu Apr 10, 2014 at 07:11:29 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

          •  Actually, I think there's a more mundane (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            sfbob, Onomastic

            force at work: the hegemonic power of "the business model" approach to all things.

            It's the cultural power derived from the rise of the MBA and all its cultural attendants.

            A huge change in the academy that spread out across the culture.

            Words can sometimes, in moments of grace, attain the quality of deeds. --Elie Wiesel

            by a gilas girl on Thu Apr 10, 2014 at 08:40:11 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  If I remember correctly, that rise of the (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              a gilas girl

              MBA occurred during the Reagan years when greed and selfishness suddenly became virtues.

              I don't think you can separate out the rise of the "business model" from the philosophy and Interests that Reagan represented.

              There is something in us that refuses to be regarded as less than human. We are created for freedom - Archbishop Desmond Tutu

              by Onomastic on Thu Apr 10, 2014 at 10:18:22 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

      •  "Be afraid, go shopping" because consuming (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Onomastic, sfbob

        Is the value the greedy rotten rich place in us.

        nosotros no somos estúpidos

        by a2nite on Thu Apr 10, 2014 at 07:28:35 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  Post WWII when the economy boomed (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      sfbob

      and the desire for consumer goods, including houses, cars, appliances, etc. swelled.  The belt tightening, and for some outright deprivation, during the depression and WW II with domestic rationing created a big pent up demand.  Shoes, tires, sugar and gasoline were all among the rationed items.

      Later in the century manufacturing and even food production moved off shore for cheaper labor and fewer environmental and workplace regulations. What we have left is a consumer-driven economy.  And consumer, as you point out, has now become our role in society rather than citizen.

    •  Replaceable consumers AND (0+ / 0-)

      disposable laborers. We're overpaid and greedy, yet subject to a massive propaganda campaign that tells us we're this close to purchasing megayachts and becoming Jay-Z's best friend.

      I'm living in America, and in America you're on your own. America's not a country. It's just a business.

      by CFAmick on Thu Apr 10, 2014 at 08:11:17 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Some time around 1982 (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      sfbob

      I think.

      I remember the moment they stopped being "patients" and became "consumers", that was 1979.

      I had a Master's student who wrote a Thesis on just this topic circa 1994, so I do remember some details.

      Words can sometimes, in moments of grace, attain the quality of deeds. --Elie Wiesel

      by a gilas girl on Thu Apr 10, 2014 at 08:38:08 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  It began during the Reagan years... (0+ / 0-)

      ...when "choice" subsumed the concept of "duty."

      Citizens have a "duty," consumers have "choices."

      If one assumes that a "consumer" can thrive or perish due to their "choices," gov't can be made ever less relevant.

  •  What's funnier than Joe Scarborough and Bill (11+ / 0-)

    Kristol making 2016 election predictions?........Not much.

  •  That's one thing I hadn't considered -- people (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    LI Mike, Heart of the Rockies

    opting not to take employer insurance.

    I know we declined employer insurance for one of us for many years, simply because we both tended to work for companies that offered it and double coverage did us little good.

    By the same token, with insurance so damned expensive and employee contributions rising, I can see people deciding that they don't need it.

    Question: Are employer-provided plans in the same risk pool as the rest of us, or are they a special case?  

    The real verdict on employer-provided insurance will be delivered over the next 5-10 years, as we become more familiar with the exchanges, the insurance, the subsidies, etc.
    Employers with workforces earning below the median national income will, as things stand today, have a strong incentive to stop offering health insurance benefits.

    LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

    by dinotrac on Thu Apr 10, 2014 at 04:44:33 AM PDT

  •  Obamacare is a winner (7+ / 0-)

    And the Republican's failure to expand Medicare is a loser; and a killer as per:

    http://thinkprogress.org/...

    Dems need to get out there and espouse the ACA full tilt!

    "One of the more serious temptations which stifles boldness and zeal is a defeatism which turns us into querulous and disillusioned pessimists, sourpusses." ― Pope Francis

    by GoodGod on Thu Apr 10, 2014 at 04:45:47 AM PDT

  •  Thanks for the roundup, Greg, and that's an (17+ / 0-)

    excellent column by Charles Blow but there's something he left out.

    We make it VERY hard for people to vote in this country. Why on Tuesday? This isn't the 18th century--Sunday is no longer reserved for church, it's for sports on TV and shopping. Other countries let people vote on Friday, Saturday, and Sunday.

    We don't spend any time teaching civics to students in public schools.

    Campaigns throw millions of dollars into TV ads about candidates.  Well, I've got some news for ya, campaign managers: people who are busy working three crap jobs that pay $7 an hour haven't got time to watch TV. They're not going to see any ads. Same with direct mail. They don't have time to read it.

    Campaigns depend on phone banks. Who the hell has a landline nowadays? Only senior cits. Everyone else has a cell phone for obvious reasons--it's a hell of a lot more convenient. Even if the working class has a land line they're too busy working the crap jobs for $7 an hour to answer it.

    We need precinct walkers to get the word out to voters and tell the story. We need to make it easier to vote--absentee voting, mail-in ballots, the works.  In Australia people are fined if they don't vote, so election officials provide polling places on beaches and in maternity wards.

    I just wrote an entire short story about teams of people going out into the precincts and recruiting local unemployed youth or unemployed anyone to take part in playlets about the issues--raising the minimum wage, immigration reform, universal public preschool, and so on. Where people waiting for a bus might not have time to read a newspaper or watch a TV news broadcast with political campaign commercials, they might pay attention to a grassroots flash mob enacting a five-minute playlet about why it's better to vote Democratic.

    Another point is to forestall Rethug tactics re putting up fake Web sites that emulate Democratic candidates' Web sites and directing donations to the Rethug party. And in Baltimore the Rethugs posted fake flyers telling people to vote in the presidential election on the WRONG day at the WRONG time at the WRONG place!

    That's what campaigns need to spend their money on if they want the working class to vote. Because as Markos says, if Dems turn out,  we win.

    "Religion is what keeps the poor from murdering the rich."--Napoleon

    by Diana in NoVa on Thu Apr 10, 2014 at 04:48:13 AM PDT

  •  Lind is wrong (6+ / 0-)

    The President and Dems have proposed a lot to the working class only to see it blocked immediately by the GOP.  But of course that's Obama's fault for not being LBJ-y enough.  As if any other president ever was.

    •  A very salient point. (5+ / 0-)

      People tend to forget that FDR for example NEVER had to deal with the GOP in the 12+ years he was president.  They were such a minority that he could all but ignore them and focus instead on the different coalitions within the Dem Party.

      Imagine how progressive Obama would have been for example if the Dems had 75 senators and 300+ representatives.  Nancy Pelosi had over 300 pieces of legislation that languished in the Senate in 2009-2011.  Had even HALF of them passed we'd be looking at a far different America right now.  Obamacare for example would have been a Medicare for all expansion.  The stimulus would have been far more robust relying far less on tax cuts.  Social Security would have been enhanced.  Minimum wage would already have been at $10.10.  Gitmo would have been closed and we would have been out of Afghanistan and Iraq long time ago.  

      This is your world These are your people You can live for yourself today Or help build tomorrow for everyone -8.75, -8.00

      by DisNoir36 on Thu Apr 10, 2014 at 06:23:48 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  There should be bullets sweat in Florida, (13+ / 0-)

    South Florida especially, over the release of Medicare billing practices.  As columnist and author Carl Hiaasen is fond of pointing out, Florida leads the country in Medicare fraud.  In fact,  in his book Bad Monkey, I believe he said Medicare is the largest employer in South Florida.  

    As we express our gratitude, we must never forget that the highest appreciation is not to utter words, but to live by them. John F. Kennedy

    by JaxDem on Thu Apr 10, 2014 at 04:54:43 AM PDT

  •  Thank you, Greg for a superb compilation. (10+ / 0-)

    The piece by Charles M. Blow should be mandatory reading everywhere.

    I usually share a number of posts in Abbreviated Pundit Round-up on social media.   Hope everyone shares that one.

    People have been beat up for so long that they've forgotten they can do something about it.

    We need to help them remember any way we can.

    There is something in us that refuses to be regarded as less than human. We are created for freedom - Archbishop Desmond Tutu

    by Onomastic on Thu Apr 10, 2014 at 05:11:00 AM PDT

  •  More ACA benefits that you probably didn't know (4+ / 0-)
  •  The Case Against Obamacare Just Took Another Blow (5+ / 0-)

    http://www.newrepublic.com/...

    from Jonathan Cohn.

    "It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends upon his not understanding it!" — Upton Sinclair

    by Greg Dworkin on Thu Apr 10, 2014 at 05:32:29 AM PDT

    •  The numbers will get even better. (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      skohayes, Heart of the Rockies

      Once all of the numbers settle from this first round, sometime next month, the "How many haven't paid", "How few are young?", etc. Republican distraction points will all sink.

      Of course the comparatively small ~1 million who lost insurance, mentioned in this New Republic article, is still not good. But how many typically drop insurance over 2 quarters? And how many of this number are right wing "conscientious objectors" (shooting themselves in the foot if they get sick... although perhaps now emboldened that they can purchase insurance, after the fact, if they do)?

      "One of the more serious temptations which stifles boldness and zeal is a defeatism which turns us into querulous and disillusioned pessimists, sourpusses." ― Pope Francis

      by GoodGod on Thu Apr 10, 2014 at 06:30:04 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Saw another article at that link (3+ / 0-)

      House Republicans Are Quietly Giving in to Obamacare

      I wonder how many of them knew at the time, or know now, that the leaders used the same doc fix bill to smuggle a bipartisan Obamacare fix through the House uncontested.

      The tweak itself is relatively minor. It eliminates a provision of the Affordable Care Act that capped deductibles for small-group health plans at $2,000 for individuals and $4,000 for families.

      But when the Associated Press laid it all out on Sunday—including the fact that GOP leaders sought the fix at the behest of powerful business organizations—Matt Drudge freaked out and accused Republican leaders of "expanding Obamacare."

      Your beliefs don't make you a better person. Your behavior does.

      by skohayes on Thu Apr 10, 2014 at 06:45:14 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  If I were 20-25, and I saw the horrors (0+ / 0-)

    Of a Bush administration, then see Obama elected, and keep doing the same thing, I would not be interested in voting either.

    Let's see.
    Tax cuts for the rich
    Refusing to prosecute torture
    Refusing to prosecute war crimes
    Increasing fracking and off shore drilling

    Despite the admittedly good thing Obama has done, I can understand why today's yute may not vote.

    What we call god is merely a living creature with superior technology & understanding. If their fragile egos demand prayer, they lose that superiority.

    by agnostic on Thu Apr 10, 2014 at 06:24:28 AM PDT

    •  They're busy with college and jobs (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      katesmom

      Midterms and state elections simply aren't motivating enough for them to bother.
      Getting college students registered to vote influences the number who get out and vote.
      As Markos is fond of saying, if we turn out, we win.

      Your beliefs don't make you a better person. Your behavior does.

      by skohayes on Thu Apr 10, 2014 at 06:52:11 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  We could use manditory voting (0+ / 0-)

    It works in other countries it could work here.

    New Plan: Obamacare Old Plan: Nobodycares

    by groupw on Thu Apr 10, 2014 at 08:32:59 AM PDT

  •  The Jennifer Raff piece (0+ / 0-)

    is, indeed, a thing of beauty.

    One of the best things I've read on the internet, I have to say.

    thanks, Greg, for finding and sharing it.

    The good thing about science is that it true whether you believe it or not
    The above quote has me pondering a change in my sig line (been the same for 8 years now).

    Words can sometimes, in moments of grace, attain the quality of deeds. --Elie Wiesel

    by a gilas girl on Thu Apr 10, 2014 at 08:34:01 AM PDT

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