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This week in the war on voting is a joint project of Joan McCarter and Meteor Blades

Obama-appointed U.S. District Judge Nelva Gonzales Ramos ruled this week that the state of Texas must turn over legislators' emails related to the much-disputed 2011 voter ID law they passed:

According to Texas, 189 state legislators had asserted legislative privilege over the documents to try to prevent this outcome.

"The motive and intent of the state legislature when it enacted SB 14 is the crux of this Voting Rights Act case," Ramos wrote. "The Court finds that the overall balance of factors weighs in favor of disclosure on a confidential basis."

The order came in a consolidated case, Veasey v. Perry, combining two lawsuits filed last summer by the United States and Rep. Marc Veasey (D-Texas).

Plaintiffs in the suit are seeking to learn where there was discriminatory intent on the part of those legislators. Under authority provided by the Voting Rights Act of 1965, federal judges overturned that voter ID law in 2012 because it hurt the poor. But when the U.S. Supreme Court overturned Section 4 of the VRA in Shelby County v. Holder in 2013, the earlier ruling became moot and Texas officials implemented the law. The combined lawsuit, however, is being pressed forward under the VRA's Section 2, which the high Court did not gut.

Even if discriminatory intent is found in the emails, Department of Justice attorneys will have argue why they should be admitted into evidence in the case.

Illinois legislators propose constitutional amendment to block voter suppression: Providing some pushback to the widespread effort to make it hard for certain people to vote, the Illinois House of Representatives voted 109-5 to amend the state constitution to prevent voter suppression "based on race, color, ethnicity, status as a member of a language minority, sex, sexual orientation, or income."

The proposed amendment must now pass the state senate.

Although voter suppression isn't a particular problem in Illinois, unlike many other states, House Speaker Michael Madigan, a Democrat, told the State Journal-Register: “The purpose of the amendment is to ensure that all citizens have an opportunity to register and vote and to prevent the passage of inappropriate voter-suppression laws and discriminatory voting procedures.”

More on the war on voting can be found below the fold.

Andrew Young urges Obama to put photos on Social Security Cards: The veteran civil rights leader told President Barack Obama and former Presidents Bill Clinton and Jimmy Carter during a three-day "summit" commemorating the 50th anniversary of the signing of the Civil Rights Act that the national dispute over voter I.D.s could be resolved if the president signed an executive order requiring Social Security cards to include photographs.

"Everybody needs an ID," Young said during a break at a civil rights conference at the Lyndon Johnson presidential library in Austin. [...]

Young, a former United Nations ambassador and aide to Martin Luther King Jr., said he's not against photo identification per se, so long "as the cards are free and easily accessible."

Young chairs a non-partisan voting rights group called Why Tuesday? Clinton and Carter seemed amenable to the idea, but the White House offered no response.

While some voting-rights advocates like the idea, at least one Republican hates it. Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky said in statement:

“This is a really bad idea. The Social Security card is only supposed to be used for Social Security benefits. This idea would make it easy for the federal government to convert the Social Security card into a national identification card.”
Previously covered states moved quickly to restrict voting after Supreme Court's Voting Rights Act decision.

Dana Liebelson at Mother Jones reported that a survey of states the magazine conducted shows that states that were once required by the Voting Rights Act of 1965 to get pre-clearance from federal authorities for any changes in their voting laws moved swiftly to make changes that no longer must be approved in advance as a result of the U.S. Supreme Court's overturning of a key provision of the act.

Eight of the 15 previously covered states passed or implemented voting restrictions in the wake of the June 25, 2013, Supreme Court ruling compared to three of 35 states that were not covered under Section 5 of the VRA.

States that were previously covered in some part by Section 5 moved quickly after it was invalidated. Within two hours of the Shelby decision, Republican Texas Attorney General Greg Abbott announced that the state's voter identification law—which had previously been blocked by a federal court—would be immediately implemented. Alabama Attorney General Luther Strange, another Republican, also immediately instated his state's voter ID law. About one month after the Shelby decision, Republicans in North Carolina pushed through a package of extreme voting restrictions, including ending same-day registration, shortening early voting by a week, requiring photo ID, and ending a program that encourages high schoolers to sign up to vote when they turn 18. In October, Virginia purged more than 38,000 names from the voter rolls. Mississippi's Republican secretary of state, Delbert Hosemann, told the Associated Press in November that the state was going to start implementing its voter ID law by the June 2014 elections.
Other changes, such as Florida's alleged moving a voting center in an African-American neighborhood to one distant from public transportation, have also been implemented since the Court's ruling.

Bill Clinton says voter I.D. laws threaten civil rights progress:

Strict voter identification laws being implemented in some states threaten to reverse the progress made by landmark civil and voting rights legislation passed nearly fifty years ago, former President Bill Clinton said Wednesday.

“This is a way of restricting the franchise after 50 years of expanding it,” Clinton said of new voter ID laws that have recently been passed in some states.

Arkansas approves rule on absentee ballot identification:

Henceforth, absentee voters who do not provide proper I.D. when casting their ballots will have until noon Monday after the election to show authorities that they are who they say they are. The rule overrides an earlier decision by Democratic Attorney General Dustin McDaniel saying no additional time to show authorities I.D. could be allowed because state law does not provide for it. Absentee voters must also be notified by first class mail that they must submit proper I.D. for their votes to be counted.

Sen. Cardin introduces bill to restore felons' voting rights: The Maryland senator wants to create a nationwide standard for restoring the rights of felons to vote. Across the nation, states have wildly varying rules regarding this, a few making it next to impossible for such rights to be restored, others make it automatic when a felon completes his or her prison sentence or parole period.

In a press release on Cardin's official website, it is noted that the original co-sponsors of Cardin's proposal, S. 2235, include Patrick Leahy and Bernie Sanders of Vermont, Richard Durbin of Illinois, Sheldon Whitehouse of Rhode Island, Cory Booker of New Jersey and Tom Harkin of Iowa. All but the left-independent Sanders are Democrats. Rep. John Conyers of Michigan, also a Democrat, introduced comparable legislation in the House. Cardin said:

“When prisoners are released, they are expected to obey the law, get a job, and pay taxes as they seek a fair shot at being rehabilitated and reintegrated into their community. Along with these responsibilities and obligations of citizenship should be the right to vote. The patchwork of state laws leads to an unfair disparity and unequal participation in Federal elections based solely on where an individual lives, in addition to the racial disparities inherent in our judicial system. Congress has a responsibility to remedy these problems and enact a nationwide standard for restoration of voting rights.”
Yale Law Professor Heather Gerkin gives some early kudos to the Election Performance Index.

PolitiFact kicks Dick Morris's butt on voter fraud claim.

Jaime Fuller calls voting rights Democrats' most important project for 2014.

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Comment Preferences

  •  Haven't Republicans always wanted a national ID (12+ / 0-)

    And Democrats always resisted one?

    Learn about Centrist Economics, learn about Robert Rubin's Hamilton Project. www.hamiltonproject.org

    by PatriciaVa on Sat Apr 12, 2014 at 09:03:43 AM PDT

    •  But Rand Paul is not really on the (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      BMScott

      GOP reservation on issues like that.

      New Republic: So are the left-wing blogs as bad as the Tea Party ones in this case? -------------------------Chuck Schumer: Left-wing blogs are the mirror image. They just have less credibility and less clout.

      by AlexDrew on Sat Apr 12, 2014 at 10:18:17 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Like King Midas enjoyed eating golden food. (0+ / 0-)

      It reminds me of Oscar Wilde's statement that one of the greatest tragedies in life is getting what you wish for. Imagine that the media really was as liberal as the conservatives are always whining. Wouldn't they pair their demands for voter ID with the resources (not just money, but paralegal assistance with the paperwork) to get everyone an ID?

      They're not doing that because if everyone did have ID's, the GOP would have less cause to whine about how elections were stolen from them (Not that it would stop them: they won in 2000 by 538 votes in Florida and a truckload of technicalities to get them that close; and in 2008, they whined that some cases of registration fraud--they haven't any evidence that any of the Mickey Mice that disgruntled ACORN staffers registered had actually voted--was enough to cast a shadow on Obama's winning margin of some 10 million.

      Freedom's just another word for not enough to eat. --Paul Krugman's characterization of conservative attitudes.

      by Judge Moonbox on Sat Apr 12, 2014 at 07:28:58 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Countries with extensive social benefits pretty (0+ / 0-)

      much universally have a national ID not just for voting, but for being able to receive the benefits and tracking to efficiently administer taxation and law enforcement records.

      Considering the growing problem of identity theft this would also have major benefits in making identity theft far more difficult.  

      Our current system of social security cards and birth certificates makes identity fraud very easy.  Other than a person's approximate age and sex there is little identification on most birthcertifates.

      There is actually a long history of conservatives opposing national ID cards, as it does make it easier for the role of government to be expanded and be more efficient.  Notably in the 1960s the John Birch Society made this a major issue.

      The most important way to protect the environment is not to have more than one child.

      by nextstep on Sun Apr 13, 2014 at 02:44:48 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Oh, sure, this is "brilliant" (13+ / 0-)

    We change how we look. We get SS cards for our children when they are born, they do not look as they did at 3 days old in ten, twenty, thirty years of age. Do people have to have pix taken every five or ten years? Why would anyone want to show their SS card for ID only to have the possibility of someone absconding with their SS number for nefarious purposes? What a disastrous idea.

    •  I believe the (6+ / 0-)

      much violated law is still on the books that you can't be asked to provide your SS number for anything other than, well, SS.

      The Privacy Act of 1974 basically says

      Please note that this Act stipulates that no one can deny you a government service or benefit for failing to provide your SSN unless federal law specifically requires it.

      You aren't legally required to provide your SSN to businesses unless one of the following is true:

      • You'll be engaging in a transaction that requires notification to the Internal Revenue Service; or

      • You're initiating a financial transaction subject to federal Customer Identification Program rules.

      We willingly give over our SS to get crappy credit cards, utilities, and education, etc.  I don't like the idea of the SS card/picture ID for practical reasons which you have stated.

      The bottom line is -- photo ID is bullshite when one looks at the actual numbers of people who vote more than once or in an incorrect district.

      " My faith in the Constitution is whole; it is complete; it is total." Barbara Jordan, 1974

      by gchaucer2 on Sat Apr 12, 2014 at 09:48:23 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Good point as I was 10 when I got my social (6+ / 0-)

      security number and card. At almost 60 now, I do not look like I am 10 yrs old. I have been mistaken for someone in their late 40s early 5os but it has been a while since someone said....

      Hey you look no older than 10.

      LOL

      Keystone Liberals on Twitter @ KeystoneLibs , Join PA Liberals at http://keystoneliberalsforum.aimoo.com/

      by wishingwell on Sat Apr 12, 2014 at 09:48:32 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  It would be interesting to see the contortions red (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    HoundDog, wishingwell

    state GOpers would have to go to to oppose ss photos. Randy Paiul's statement above is probably their best line of attack but really, social security card with i. d. isn't good for votering identification? :)

  •  Let's see AARP response to pix on SocSec/cards. (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    shaharazade, JeffW

    decent wages don't eliminate jobs. Republicans eliminate jobs; and workers, and prospects, and then excuse it all and call for more austerity. there is no end to their ignorant, arrogant avarice. only political dinosaurs support their treachery.

    by renzo capetti on Sat Apr 12, 2014 at 09:15:43 AM PDT

  •  So it would be easier to steal your SSN (10+ / 0-)

    I don't want my social security card to become an official ID with a photo.  Besides which, babies are getting social security cards. How often would we have to get an new ID?

    •  True carrying around social security cards and (0+ / 0-)

      showing them for ID  seems like a recipe for the chance for more identity theft which is already a big problem.

      I never carry my social security with me. It is a lock box at home should I need it.

      Keystone Liberals on Twitter @ KeystoneLibs , Join PA Liberals at http://keystoneliberalsforum.aimoo.com/

      by wishingwell on Sat Apr 12, 2014 at 09:50:03 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  SSA has always opposed such ideas. (5+ / 0-)

      The Social Security card is not and never has been an identification card.  It's official purpose is only to establish the person's earnings record.  This repurposing of the card as an identifier would have a lot of opposition, I believe, from both the right and the left.  Practically, it would also mean an incredibly large workload for the Social Security Administration since the entire population would have to be issued new cards periodically, with updated pictures. That's over 300,000,000 SSNs that would have to be frequently reissued with updated photos.  SSA's staffing has been cut by about 9,000 employees over the past few years, so how, in this era of mandated fiscal austerity, could they do this?  Just not practical, even if philosophical objections to establishing a national identifier could be overcome.

    •  I agree. (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      BlueSue

      My SS card was issued when I got my first job, as a teenager.  My name appears to be inscribed using a typewriter.  Never had any reason to replace it.

      On the other hand, Rand Paul's complaint that it would amount to a "national identification card" rings a bit hollow, as the Republicans are effectively requiring such a card for anybody who wants to vote.

      Well, technically, they're doing it the Republican way:  Make it more complicated by having different rules for each state.  But the principle is the same -- big government and more rules are OK, but only if you're a Republican.

  •  hmmm... all other industrial nations have (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    thomask, BYw

    national IDs and yet we don't have one despite the fact that we need passports (almost) to go to any other country now, Yet the Paulistas would assume that the black helicopters would ascend on us as though we're not already oppressed by credit ratings, the IRS, and (gasp) racial profiling.....

    “This is a really bad idea. The Social Security card is only supposed to be used for Social Security benefits. This idea would make it easy for the federal government to convert the Social Security card into a national identification card.”

    Warning - some snark may be above‽ (-9.50; -7.03)‽ eState4Column5©2013 "I’m not the strapping young Muslim socialist that I used to be" - Barack Obama 04/27/2013 (@eState4Column5).

    by annieli on Sat Apr 12, 2014 at 09:17:01 AM PDT

    •  The US differentiates itself from almost .. (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      wishingwell, AlexDrew

      ...all other nations in that we grant so many powers to the states.  Indeed, I'd say that it's a competitive advantage.

      I have no problem with a free ID card issued by a state.

      Learn about Centrist Economics, learn about Robert Rubin's Hamilton Project. www.hamiltonproject.org

      by PatriciaVa on Sat Apr 12, 2014 at 09:29:18 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  especially for reproductive rights (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        terrybuck, shaharazade, Eric Nelson
        Indeed, I'd say that it's a competitive advantage.

        Warning - some snark may be above‽ (-9.50; -7.03)‽ eState4Column5©2013 "I’m not the strapping young Muslim socialist that I used to be" - Barack Obama 04/27/2013 (@eState4Column5).

        by annieli on Sat Apr 12, 2014 at 09:32:37 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  Free and easily obtained (0+ / 0-)

        If the GOPers are going to demand ID cards, then let them go door-to-door with digital cameras and card laminators to issue them to every eligible voter.  That would be a great way to register the voters, too.

        Knowledge without conscience is the ruination of the soul -- François Rabelais

        by ccyd on Sat Apr 12, 2014 at 09:47:22 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  How many people over the age of 18 (0+ / 0-)

          do not have a DL or State ID? Why wouldn't you have one?

          New Republic: So are the left-wing blogs as bad as the Tea Party ones in this case? -------------------------Chuck Schumer: Left-wing blogs are the mirror image. They just have less credibility and less clout.

          by AlexDrew on Sat Apr 12, 2014 at 10:21:37 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Lots. n/t (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            BYw

            Don't tell me what you believe, show me what you do and I will tell you what you believe.

            by Meteor Blades on Sat Apr 12, 2014 at 01:50:35 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  Round figure? Lot's means nothing. (0+ / 0-)

              If we are claiming voter suppression, shouldn't we know what we are talking about?

              Reality. Based. Community. Remember?

              New Republic: So are the left-wing blogs as bad as the Tea Party ones in this case? -------------------------Chuck Schumer: Left-wing blogs are the mirror image. They just have less credibility and less clout.

              by AlexDrew on Sat Apr 12, 2014 at 03:39:30 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  I've been engaged in voter registration for.... (3+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                ccyd, BYw, jbsoul

                ...50 years and writing about voter suppression for four. So I think I can say, without reservation, that I know what I am talking about.

                According to the Brennan Center, studies show that about 11 percent of U.S. adults have no government-issued photo ID.

                Don't tell me what you believe, show me what you do and I will tell you what you believe.

                by Meteor Blades on Sat Apr 12, 2014 at 04:05:26 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

                •  Just to be technical, the important measure is (1+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  AlexDrew

                  the percentage of US citizens without government ID.  Percentage of US adults would by definition include non US citizens.

                  The most important way to protect the environment is not to have more than one child.

                  by nextstep on Sun Apr 13, 2014 at 02:51:11 AM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

                  •  Thank you nextstep, that was (0+ / 0-)

                    my follow-up point.

                    New Republic: So are the left-wing blogs as bad as the Tea Party ones in this case? -------------------------Chuck Schumer: Left-wing blogs are the mirror image. They just have less credibility and less clout.

                    by AlexDrew on Sun Apr 13, 2014 at 03:41:11 AM PDT

                    [ Parent ]

                  •  Except that's not the definition ... (0+ / 0-)

                    ... that the Brennan Center is using. By "U.S. adults" they mean citizens.

                    Don't tell me what you believe, show me what you do and I will tell you what you believe.

                    by Meteor Blades on Sun Apr 13, 2014 at 08:27:51 AM PDT

                    [ Parent ]

                •  Congratulations on your 50 years!!! (0+ / 0-)

                  New Republic: So are the left-wing blogs as bad as the Tea Party ones in this case? -------------------------Chuck Schumer: Left-wing blogs are the mirror image. They just have less credibility and less clout.

                  by AlexDrew on Sun Apr 13, 2014 at 03:40:15 AM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

  •  Voting should be easy and mandatory (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    a2nite, wishingwell

    An SS card with photo and difficult to tamper with like a driver's license seems like a step in the right direction.

    Daily Kos an oasis of truth. Truth that leads to action.

    by Shockwave on Sat Apr 12, 2014 at 09:17:06 AM PDT

    •  The thing is photos would have to be updated like (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Shockwave, Bill Channing, BYw

      drivers licenses, I would guess every 10 yrs or so because we change. My original social security card  is about 45 yrs old. I no longer look 10  at the age of almost 60

      So that could be an issue too as photos have to be updated at least every 10 yrs or so as people change as we age. Imagine if we had the same photo on our drivers license as when we were 16. As I get old, I would love that actually. LOL

      Keystone Liberals on Twitter @ KeystoneLibs , Join PA Liberals at http://keystoneliberalsforum.aimoo.com/

      by wishingwell on Sat Apr 12, 2014 at 09:52:39 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Thanks (4+ / 0-)

    nosotros no somos estúpidos

    by a2nite on Sat Apr 12, 2014 at 09:20:44 AM PDT

  •  Thanks. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    BMScott

    "Seriously, Folks, WTH?" - ("What the Heck? "h/t Joan McCarter, Seriously, Florida. WTF?)

    by HoundDog on Sat Apr 12, 2014 at 09:51:06 AM PDT

  •  The only way photos on all social security cards (0+ / 0-)

    would work well  is that every 10 yrs, the photo would need to be updated as kids have social security numbers and cards.

    1. Have a lot of photo places where photos are done and replaced free of charge. But please do not use the state photo license centers who have very restricted hours and few are open more than a couple of days a week.

    2. Make the photo places more acccessible and more of them in every town. Because right now, few counties in the entire county have more than one and no evening hours and it is very hard to get to the photo drivers license centers with them closing at 4 most places and are not open everyday. So have photo places with Saturday and evening hours.

    3. There would be a big increase in risk for stealing of social security cards and numbers which often results in identity theft. There would have to be a way to lower risk  of theft of social security numbers. As once a thief gets hold of a social security number, identity theft can result and it can take years to sort out and people lose hundreds of thousands of dollars and worse yet, some people end up being arrested because the identity thief has warrants out on them..etc.

    Keystone Liberals on Twitter @ KeystoneLibs , Join PA Liberals at http://keystoneliberalsforum.aimoo.com/

    by wishingwell on Sat Apr 12, 2014 at 10:03:13 AM PDT

  •  If SS card is bad because of picture (0+ / 0-)

      Then someone please explain to me why the concept of requiring a birth certificate is supposedly the "gold standard" for ID.
        My birth certificate doesn't have a picture on it - no fingerprints or footprints.   and yet States seem to think it is "golden".

         Now, just because I am older - when I know that a picture is going to be used on an ID - I make a point of looking as terrible as possible.   Any yet when I vote, no one seems to give a hoot.

        A real get out the vote campaign would be to ask folks if they have the State Required ID, because at least here in TX - getting registered does not require proof of identity.   If folks are being registered and the registerer know that they lack the ID to vote,  shouldn't we be able to help / fund that part of the process?       For some seniors, do they know how to contact the State in which they were born to get that paper, or know how to send the funds?  Is there  a process to help them financially to send off for the ID they need - heck even put it in the mail - if that is legal.    I mean seriously - what if I had a bunch of money orders - is any State going to not process a request because the amount sent is too high.  

         

  •  Require "papers." (0+ / 0-)

    Why not require every citizen to have and carry "papers?"

    Worked for the Gestapo.

    The government is, already, scrutinizing and storing every email, text and phone call.

    Every citizen should be required to have a current passport.

    No different than a social security card with a picture on it.

    The truth about frogs in heating water is that they'll jump out if they can.

    Americans, apparently, are not as smart as frogs

    Number of Americans incarcerated in 2012 in federal, state and local prisons and jails: 2,228,400 or 1 in every 108 adults, the highest incarceration rate in the history of the world

  •  Re: the Illinois legislature's proposed amendment (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Meteor Blades, Eric Nelson

    "based on race, color, ethnicity, status as a member of a language minority, sex, sexual orientation, or income."

    This amendment appears to me to be pretty useless.

    A future Repub legislature in Illinois could easily circumvent this amendment. None of the voter suppression laws in place elsewhere cite any of these identifying factors as a reason for implementation. If they cite anything at all, they cite "voter fraud."

    This amendment would require proving that one or more of these factors were the underlying intent. Even though we all know that is the case, good luck proving it in a court of law.

    The amendment needs to be re-written to guarantee the right to vote without need of excessive identifying documents or procedures. It can even state what the minimum standard would be - which could be what it was before all this voter fraud nonsense was started.

    They should also include the right to early voting and guarantee of equal number of voting machines per capita of registered votes in each precinct.

  •  Why don't corporations vote in elections? (0+ / 0-)

    By vote, I mean cast a ballot, pull a lever, piss their pants while waiting for hours in line.


    Try explaining to your pet slug that you just had escargot for dinner.

    by glb3 on Sat Apr 12, 2014 at 10:31:54 AM PDT

  •  Good.. (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    BMScott, deha, Meteor Blades, BYw

    ..Deal on this:
    ~~~~~~~~~
    Federal Judge Orders TX to Produce Legislative Docs That May Prove Polling Place Photo ID Restriction Law Was Racially-Motivated

    Just over a week ago, it was North Carolina legislators ordered by the court to cough up documentation relating to passage of new, draconian restrictions on voting rights in their state. Now, legislators in Texas are facing much the same thing,
    [...]
     U.S. District Court Judge Nelva Gonzales Ramos has directed the State of Texas to serve upon the U.S. Department of Justice (DoJ) documents that relate to the question of whether "state legislators, contrary to their public pronouncements, acted with discriminatory intent in enacting SB 14," the Lone Star State's polling place Photo ID restriction law.

    That law had previously been found to be discriminatory against minority voters in TX, and thus rejected by both the DoJ and a federal court panel as a violation of the Voting Rights Act (VRA). It was then re-enacted by the state of Texas almost immediately after the U.S. Supreme Court gutted a central provision of the VRA in the summer of 2013

    ..I suspected as much for both North Carolina and Texas as Ari Melber questioned

    And this - more good:  

    Cardin Leads Reintroduction Of Bill To Create Nationwide Standard For Restoring Voting Rights For Americans Released From Prison | S. 2235, the Democracy Restoration Act

    Because this is what the Roberts court completely ignored as the real need of Section 5 @ work:

    Data shows that the law really did work at preventing voting restrictions: Between 1982 and 2006, the Justice Department blocked more than 700 voting changes on the basis that the changes were discriminatory.

     - emphasis added

    And this from - The Sentencing Project: | 2010 & 2012 (pdf)

    State-Level Estimates of Felon Disenfranchisement in the United States, 2010

    A remarkable 5.85 million Americans are forbidden to vote because of “felon disenfranchisement,” or laws restricting voting rights for those convicted of felony-level crimes.
    [...]
    Our key findings include the following:

    • Approximately 2.5 percent of the total U.S. voting age population – 1 of every 40 adults – is disenfranchised due to a current or previous felony conviction.

     • Ex-felons in the eleven states that disenfranchise people after they have completed their sentences make up about 45 percent of the entire disenfranchised population, totaling over 2.6 million people.

     • The number of people disenfranchised due to a felony conviction has escalated dramatically in recent decades as the population under criminal justice supervision has increased. There were an estimated 1.17 million people disenfranchised in 1976, 3.34 million in 1996, and over 5.85 million in 2010.

     • Rates of disenfranchisement vary dramatically by state due to broad variations in voting prohibitions. In six states – Alabama, Florida, Kentucky, Mississippi, Tennessee, and Virginia – more than 7 percent of the adult population is disenfranchised.

     • 1 of every 13 African Americans of voting age is disenfranchised, a rate more than four times greater than non-African Americans. Nearly 7.7 percent of
    2 STATE-LEVEL ESTIMATES OF FELON DISENFRANCHISEMENT IN THE UNITED STATES, 2010
    the adult African American population is disenfranchised compared to 1.8 percent of the non-African American population.

     • African American disenfranchisement rates also vary significantly by state. In three states – Florida (23 percent), Kentucky (22 percent), and Virginia (20
    - emphasis added
    Very good steps toward correcting Criminal Injustice it seems to me

    Thx MB

  •  My SSC is as old as I am (0+ / 0-)

    My Social Security Card is as old as I am. Would it have a picture of me as a newborn? If not what's the cost of replacing it every few years to keep it current? Talk about a bad idea. We need to just bite the bullet and have a universal ID. The current non-system is so easy to abuse no one in their right mind would design it that way from scratch.

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