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long-term joblessness
Some 3.7 million Americans are now counted among the long-term unemployed, out of work for 27 weeks or more. This is a big improvement over what it was when it peaked at 6.8 million in April 2010. But it is still three times what it was in January 2008, the last tally before the Great Recession really got under way. And it's devastating to those caught in the trap. Especially so since the federal program to provide unemployment compensation to eligible people in this category was allowed to expire in December.

Many claims have been made about why there are so many Americans in the long-term unemployed category now. One of the leading ones calls the problem "structural." Boiled down to its essence, it's an argument that workers are at fault for not having the right skills. To believe that means accepting that workers who had the right skills up until the Great Recession began suddenly lost them or that employers came to the realization as the economic downturn continued that workers they thought had had the right skills actually didn't.

It's certainly true—in good times and bad—that some people who want jobs don't have the right skills to get a good one. It's also true that the longer someone is unemployed, the more their skills erode, either from lack of practice or from technological and managerial advances. But if there were really a major mismatch between available jobs and available workers with the right skills, wages for filling those jobs would rise. And there is no evidence for that. Moreover, while education matters, many of the needed skills are learned on the job. It's a rare hire that's a perfect match of skills and requirements.

The reality is that long-term joblessness does not equal structural unemployment. In fact, between March 2007 and March 2011, more than 28 percent of Americans added to the ranks of the long-term unemployed had a college or post-college degree.

And that ratio has not changed a lot in the past three years. Heidi Shierholz at the liberal Economic Policy Institute says:

The figure [above] shows there is a dramatic increase in long-term unemployment relative to before the recession started at all levels of education. While workers with higher levels of education face substantially lower long-term unemployment rates—which is always true, in good times and bad—they too have long-term unemployment rates that are more than three times as high as before the recession started. Long-term unemployment is high not because workers lack the right education or skills, but because employers have not seen demand for their goods and services pick up enough to need to significantly ramp up hiring.
You can read EPI's detailed analysis with breakdowns of long-term unemployment by gender, race/ethnicity, age, occupation and industry.

Originally posted to Daily Kos Labor on Mon Apr 14, 2014 at 11:30 AM PDT.

Also republished by Kossacks for the Homeless Person, Hunger in America, and Daily Kos.

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Comment Preferences

  •  let's see... (17+ / 0-)

    ageism, racism, disability, lookism, cronyism, kleptocracy, racketeering.....

    The reality is that long-term joblessness does not equal structural unemployment. In fact, between March 2007 and March 2011, more than 28 percent of Americans added to the ranks of the long-term unemployed had a college or post-college degree....
    Long-term unemployment is high not because workers lack the right education or skills, but because employers have not seen demand for their goods and services pick up enough to need to significantly ramp up hiring.

    Warning - some snark may be above‽ (-9.50; -7.03)‽ eState4Column5©2013 "I’m not the strapping young Muslim socialist that I used to be" - Barack Obama 04/27/2013 (@eState4Column5).

    by annieli on Mon Apr 14, 2014 at 11:32:28 AM PDT

  •  Adequate = ready to serve money (8+ / 0-)

    In any way it requires. Young people, old people, and sick people are "inadequate", too.

    Thanks for another good one, MB.

  •  The "skills" many long-term unemployed lack... (29+ / 0-)

    ...are the ability to be much younger and accept really low wages, while working long hours. They also lack the cash to buy the goods and services that have low demand.

    Meanwhile, our bridges are falling apart, roads are producing more and bigger potholes, and our electrical grid needs updating. And the House gets ready to yet again repeal the ACA.

    Float like a manhole cover, sting like a sash weight! Clean Coal Is A Clinker!

    by JeffW on Mon Apr 14, 2014 at 11:36:30 AM PDT

    •  Well, yeah! (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      blueoasis, JeffW, Aunt Pat
      And the House gets ready to yet again repeal the ACA.
      That's obviously the best use of the Representatives' time.
      /snark

      "My country, right or wrong; if right, to be kept right; and if wrong, to be set right." -- Sen Carl Schurz 1872

      by Calamity Jean on Tue Apr 15, 2014 at 02:34:04 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  "That Thing Youre Doing Right There? Its A Felony" (0+ / 0-)

      Older workers say the darndest things!

      Hire a bunch of young good looking employees and tell them their promotion can be found in your pants.  If someone complains, fire them and all their friends.

      Men are so necessarily mad, that not to be mad would amount to another form of madness. -Pascal

      by bernardpliers on Tue Apr 15, 2014 at 07:16:49 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  in terms of education (0+ / 0-)

      The skill that many educated people lack is the that of learning.  In my lifetime, the ability for me to remain employed is the ability to learn. The best decision I made in college was to treat it is a learning opportunity rather than a job training program.

      This is why I don't believe in job training programs, unless you are going to provide then and people are going to retrain every 5-10 years. High school should be preparing you to suceed as you enter mid career.  College should help you remain employed for as long as you wish to work. I went to a high school where we learned how to draft using pencil and paper.  Where would I be now with those skills?  I have a job because in high school I was taught to read to learn and think critically which lead to college and other opportunities.  College is not for everyone, but then we need high schools, not polytechnics.

      As far as the younger worker, that is always true.  There is always a new graduating class, and if you don't make yourself useful, they will.  

    •  like Martin Mull, I'm only as old as the woman (0+ / 0-)

      I'm with....which, these days, makes me unable to be much older than I truly am.  I'm okay with that.

      Living in Portland, or Portlandia if you will...the younger generation is more concerned with bike lanes than smooth roads or substantial bridges or uncongested freeways.  They can't afford cars, insurance or gasoline, so they are content to take the bus, where they can lose themselves in their smartphones and zone out for 45 minutes, or let their pet lab drag them along the streets as they ride their primary means of transportation...a skateboard.

      Nobody under the age of 30 is much concerned about the dilapidated state of our roads, it seems.  They use them as pedestrians or cyclists or skateboarders, and are as contemptuous of car drivers as car drivers are of them.

      Painted bike lanes are not infrastructure improvements in any real measure.  

      L'enfer, c'est les autres....Jean-Paul Sartre

      by Keith930 on Tue Apr 15, 2014 at 07:31:56 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  oops...forgot the Martin Mull link which makes (0+ / 0-)

        sense of my opening comment....

        L'enfer, c'est les autres....Jean-Paul Sartre

        by Keith930 on Tue Apr 15, 2014 at 07:34:33 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  It's been a while, but the last time (0+ / 0-)

        I drove in Portland (assuming you're talking the West Coast one), driving was about as bad as imaginable by U.S. standards -- certainly worse than L.A., and comparable to New York on a small, criss-crossy scale.  I understand they've since improved infrastructure leading to PDF, making escape a bit easier.

        And yes, you're right -- even back then, there was near warfare between the Spandex and Beamer factions.

        Let the well-being of your fellow man be as dear to you as your own. -- Pirkei Avos

        by Not A Bot on Tue Apr 15, 2014 at 08:09:54 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  What gets me is that they need so many network ... (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      mmacdDE, nchristine

      security people to begin to safeguard this country's technical backbone, yet there isn't any training or any interest in hiring those of us that designed, built, and managed the systems for all those years.  Many of us would require little to no time to get ramped up to backfill the needs in terms of quality personnel that have a secure background, good solid work skills and maturity to do the very sensitive jobs in the security sectors of government and business like the nation's energy sector and such:  Long term older workers could fill the needs as we have decades of experience along with the college degrees.

      But no.  Even our President can't see the BS mantra for what it is regarding the big lie about not having the skilled people to do the jobs here....  So sad, as I, and many of my professional peers wonder just who he is surrounded by that feeds this BS into his ear which he in turn verbalizes in public.......  We vote, and we remember as not all older workers suffer from dementia, or Alzheimer's, or cost employers more in terms of medical costs or whatever the flavor of the day is in terms of excuses and such as they would have many believe.

      The private sector needs cyber security safeguards as well as the medical profession (H.I.P.P.A. regulations), and all one hears in the news is about is just how vulnerable this country is on all fronts.

      Time for somebody to get some guts and call the BS for what it is.

      “My soul is from elsewhere, I'm sure of that, and I intend to end up there." - Rumi

      by LamontCranston on Tue Apr 15, 2014 at 08:33:24 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  I'll be 64 this summer (17+ / 0-)

    I have a B.A. (literature, minors in French and theology), two graduate degrees in literature and a J.D.  I've taught high school lit and practiced enviro law but . . . .  Older women need not apply.

    I have a writing skill and am about to use it.  I have a new rich client who wants to be coddled and I won't over charge her -- which I could, easily.

    Best value?  Obamacare.  Thanks, Mr. President for my physical, blood work, boob checks, and soon to be colonoscopy and dental work.

    " My faith in the Constitution is whole; it is complete; it is total." Barbara Jordan, 1974

    by gchaucer2 on Mon Apr 14, 2014 at 11:37:51 AM PDT

    •  Ain't that the truth. (7+ / 0-)

      I'm in the gopher hole b/c of a refusenik gov. But next year, maybe....

      English usage is sometimes more than mere taste, judgment and education - sometimes it's sheer luck, like getting across the street. E. B. White

      by Youffraita on Mon Apr 14, 2014 at 11:46:25 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Thanks, Mr. President (4+ / 0-)

      FDR had social security; President Obama's accomplishment of the ACA is up in the same ballpark.

      All over the United States, people are doing what I'm doing with their recent new Obamacare health insurance.  They are visiting doctors, buying medications, having procedures done.......and the vast majority of this medical and economic activity would not have taken place absent the ACA.  

      I'm onshoring all of my medications instead of using a Canadian pharmacy that I've used the last 5 years without health insurance.

      Since this is all new economic activity that would not have otherwise occurred, the aggregate economic effect of this must be substantial as a one time economic boost.   I'd really like to see someone put a number on the level of United States economic stimulation occurring over the past 4 months from the commencement of Obamacare.

      The other economic review that should be done should address comparative health care costs, insured population metrics and macro economic stimulation between states that upgraded Medicaid vs. states that didn't.

  •  Skill match is a problem (6+ / 0-)

    It seems like employers are very specific in the skills they want and it's a problem for anyone to keep adjusting.  You can retrain a few times and when you are younger you tend to have more flexibility with regards to location, etc. but you get older and you have a family and spouse with a career and you just can't magically become the perfect match they want over and over again.  

    •  The Skill Is to Be Earning a Full Employee's Profi (8+ / 0-)

      for the company 25 seconds after you sign the last induction form.

      It's probably best if you've interned in your job for a year or more, ideally for free.

      We are called to speak for the weak, for the voiceless, for victims of our nation and for those it calls enemy.... --ML King "Beyond Vietnam"

      by Gooserock on Mon Apr 14, 2014 at 11:46:42 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Employer training (7+ / 0-)

      It's what I wanted to yell at Bill Clinton a couple years ago. What, are employers on strike from training employees? Woe is us, we have this giant pile of money and just can't figure out how to share a teeny fraction of it, even to help our own businesses! Here, privatized schools, turn out some more worker drones for us.

      Government and laws are the agreement we all make to secure everyone's freedom.

      by Simplify on Mon Apr 14, 2014 at 12:47:17 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  I wonder ... (5+ / 0-)

      How much of this "specific" skill search is to enable H-1B visas?

      I'm in IT.  I laugh every time I see a job posting requiring any acronym techology for xyz number of years.  (HTML5 for 3 years is a great example).  The odds are that the technology has not even EXISTED for that number of years.

      The resumes are screened by computers, so unless an applicant lies on their resume ... no match.

      •  a lot is about H1B visas (5+ / 0-)

        There an immigration trick I learned about 25 years ago in SV, because an H-1B job has to be made public, and a qualified citizen is supposed to have priority.

        So you (the employer) asks the guy you want to hire for every crazy specific detail that's remotely relevant to the job. And then you create a classified ad with as specific and crazy as you can make it.

        Since no other person can possibly qualify for that specific skill set of the guy you want to hire, you've worked around the employment requirement.

      •  Bingo! (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        mmacdDE, nchristine

        I've posted many times before about this, and you've hit the nail on the head when it comes to the tech industry!

        Create a "Purple Squirrel" opening, reject anyone who applies, hire an H1 candidate... Complain that there are not enough H1 visa candidates available, get congress to up the number dramatically in the immigration bill!

        Plus in tech (since I'm in it!) Never hire anyone over 50 even though they have gobs of relevant experience, a) they actually want to get paid for their skill, b) they cost too much in insurance (plus all the other "risks" involved).

        At the same time you're doing this, tell the workers in their 20's they don't have enough experience, and can only be hired for bargain basement pay.

        Have seen this played out for almost 10 years now!

        You have your right to your opinion, I will grant you that, but do not denigrate my right to mine!

        by MrQA on Wed Apr 16, 2014 at 04:51:12 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  Absolutely (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      MrQA, mmacdDE, nchristine
      It seems like employers are very specific in the skills they want
      You've hit it on the head, which is why long term unemployment is up regardless of educational level. It's not enough to have an education, or even the right degree, if you don't have the right experience as well.  In my own field (electrical engineering), I see that pretty clearly in that we're divided into defense, telecom, semiconductor, etc...and companies are not generally willing to hire folks from one segment into another.  

      As for employer-provided training, that's pretty much become a thing of the past.  

      So is the solution more training and more education?  I don't think so, since I suspect that employers will just keep getting pickier and pickier as long as they can do so.

      Political Compass: -6.75, -3.08

      by TexasTom on Tue Apr 15, 2014 at 08:46:58 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  there's no reason a lack of skills has to mean a (6+ / 0-)

    low paying job. It used to be that one could do a tedious dirty job and get paid well. Now the only places you can get that kind of work is on the drill floor tripping pipe in N Dakota. All the dirty, boring, dangerous jobs no longer pay.

    “Conservation… is a positive exercise of skill and insight, not merely a negative exercise of abstinence and caution…” Aldo Leopold

    by ban nock on Mon Apr 14, 2014 at 11:38:42 AM PDT

  •  I have had a practical nursing license (12+ / 0-)

    for longer than a year. And I can't get a job because I have no experience, yet I have to get hired to get experience. Beginning to think I should give up on nursing. :(

    I love president Obama!!!

    by freakofsociety on Mon Apr 14, 2014 at 11:39:24 AM PDT

    •  A customer of mine (4+ / 0-)

      just got her LPN and is now working third shift at ... well, I forget exactly, but it's not a hospital. Wishing you the best of luck: and something better than third shift. Have you tried applying at nursing homes?

      English usage is sometimes more than mere taste, judgment and education - sometimes it's sheer luck, like getting across the street. E. B. White

      by Youffraita on Mon Apr 14, 2014 at 11:55:21 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Yet our society needs more trained professionals (0+ / 0-)

      such as yourself with to serve the needs of an aging population along with the even created demand the ACA has placed on more medical attention in all practices needed to serve many more citizens.

      So sad, and I understand your frustration.

      “My soul is from elsewhere, I'm sure of that, and I intend to end up there." - Rumi

      by LamontCranston on Tue Apr 15, 2014 at 08:38:53 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  I think the real "structural" problem (11+ / 0-)

    is that we have not really adjusted to the basic fact of the industrial revolution, labor is replaceable in great measure with machines.  Coupled with the knowledge revolution that has played out over the last 25 years or so, there is less and less need for labor and more options for the location of the labor that is needed.  

    The real question, it seems to me, is can we face the fact that we can't grow our way into full employment as currently defined, and the follow up question, can we change how the produced wealth is distributed?

    I worked for Fisher Body back in the early 70's in Marion Indiana.  We had approx. 3500 workers at that plant then.  There are approx 1400 now, and they produce more parts.  Where does the captured wages of the 2000 people who used to work there go?

    "I said, 'Wait a minute, Chester, You know I'm a peaceful man..." Robbie Robertson

    by NearlyNormal on Mon Apr 14, 2014 at 11:39:32 AM PDT

    •  You Missed a Step. (4+ / 0-)

      PROBLEM SOLVING is now replaceable.

      Humans only can do 2 things: labor, and problem solving.

      Both are automatable now. Hell your brain surgeon can be working from Bangalore.

      We are called to speak for the weak, for the voiceless, for victims of our nation and for those it calls enemy.... --ML King "Beyond Vietnam"

      by Gooserock on Mon Apr 14, 2014 at 11:50:16 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Can we grow our infrastructure? (9+ / 0-)

      Really. With bridges falling down and substandard rail and water mains breaking every year: infrastructure, built mostly over a century ago, is going south.

      In a sane society, a lot of government money would go to repairing and replacing the failing infrastructure -- and coincidentally creating tons of jobs.

      But the Teahadists are insane, and oppose anything that might benefit everyone (including themselves).

      English usage is sometimes more than mere taste, judgment and education - sometimes it's sheer luck, like getting across the street. E. B. White

      by Youffraita on Mon Apr 14, 2014 at 11:59:42 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Industrial anything needs to be reconsidered. (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Sunspots

      industrial agriculture
      industrial manufacture
      industrial cleaning

      I think the problem is size and uniformity/monopoly, which is inconsistent with natural diversity. Too big fails. Period. Then there is also the element of time. The length of the day is constraining. The seasons are constraining. Temperature is a constraint. Think of all the energy that goes into fiddling with the temperature and still the air is unbreathable. I think our screwed up integument is to blame. People get distracted by being too hot or too cold and somebody's taught them they need to control the environment, instead of slowing down or putting on more clothes.

      http://hannah.smith-family.com

      by hannah on Mon Apr 14, 2014 at 12:31:28 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  It is unlikely that we will return to (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Ahianne

        handcrafting basic tools, or pulling plows with oxen.  I think it unlikely that we will die on the buckboard being taken to town for our failed appendix.  There will certainly be industrialization and mass production, the question is how to limit and channel it so that we control it rather than it controlling us....Which really means that some larger version of "we" needs to control the production function.

        "I said, 'Wait a minute, Chester, You know I'm a peaceful man..." Robbie Robertson

        by NearlyNormal on Mon Apr 14, 2014 at 04:37:13 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  And this does not even count the folks who are (17+ / 0-)

    underemployed and doing jobs that do not make good use of their skills and education.

  •  Two Words: Ben Carson (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Youffraita

    The point being, if highly educated neurosurgeons can be plagued by dumbassery / lack of skills, surely a similar fate can befall all those below.

    And another way to look at it is that many with college degrees are "over-educated" - they should have learned to weld instead so they could right now today be gainfully employed in the fracking industry.

  •  Yeah, I figure the skill I'm missing is (14+ / 0-)

    Youth.

    I'm proficient in at least one CAD tool, Familiar with at least two others.  At an interview a year ago, They set me down in front of a CAD tool I've never used before, they gave me some sketches to turn into models and drawings.  I was able to make the models and the drawings, I even found two mistakes in their sketches.  "Not a good fit" I was told.  

    Another outfit was visibly surprised that I'm older than my resume suggests (the 1first 10 years are missing).  Eventually I was told they were looking for someone with less experience.  Three weeks later they wanted me to come in on a contract while they tried to find a guy with less experience.  Six weeks after that, they got their man and wanted me to come back to train him (untrainable) for a day.....

    “that our civil rights have no dependence on our religious opinions, any more than our opinions in physics or geometry.” Thomas Jefferson

    by markdd on Mon Apr 14, 2014 at 11:57:06 AM PDT

    •  Heh... (4+ / 0-)

      Let them have the untrainable one.

      The laziest girl at work is supposedly on track to become assistant manager. Of course, first she has to pass her test and get a driver's license...and she doesn't know how to parallel park. Or stay in her own lane. So I'm not TOO worried.

      But only a simpleton would promote this lazy ditz.

      English usage is sometimes more than mere taste, judgment and education - sometimes it's sheer luck, like getting across the street. E. B. White

      by Youffraita on Mon Apr 14, 2014 at 12:05:22 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  When I was about 50 (4+ / 0-)

      my boss wanted to hire a consulting firm for an IT project so the firm sent in the token oh wow technical geek to get the contract.  Once they had the contract they replaced the oh wow technical geek with a kid just out of college without even an IT related degree and I was told this kid was going to "mentor" me.  I thought, oh no, the consulting firm expects ME to mentor HIM and they expect to be paid for it.  All the kid did was take 2 hour lunches because when he was hanging around it was too obvious he was totally clueless.  

  •  People are unemployed because nobody (7+ / 0-)

    has hired them. That their own lack of skills is to blame is a convenient fictionc-- convenient for the employers who have managed poorly and keep a work-force occupied when their enterprise stagnates or goes into recession and convenient for the unemployed, who derive some satisfaction from believing that they are the captain of their ship and in control of their own fate. The myth that one is in control is better than feeling useless and discarded. It's the same dynamic that leads the victims of violent physical assault to blame themselves.
    I used to think it was a matter of pride, but a sense of self-confidence and self-direction is really necessary if a person is to survive. Giving in to the victim status is not healthy. At a minimum, a person needs to be angry to generate the energy to take retaliatory action.

    Conditioning the acquisition of the resources a person needs to survive on the payment of currency and then refusing that person access to currency is abusive in the extreme. We excuse it under the umbrella of a lesser included offense, or even a lesser evil. Making people "sing" for their supper and insisting that "there is no free lunch," is less severe than killing people whom we don't like because they are disobedient outright, but the culture of obedience, which presumes to be entitled to punish all who do not obey, is really more primitive than that of other "natural" predators who mainly kill in self defense or to eat.  Obviously, the cognitive brain does not necessarily produce moral behavior.

    Abuse as a lesser evil is what we have to address. One step in that direction would be to do away with state sanctioned executions. After all, if the state, after due deliberation, can kill someone in cold blood, what's to inhibit an individual doing it in the heat of passion. Why is it better to kill one's own kind after thinking about? Isn't that an abuse of the cognitive function?

    Death is not the worst fate. Persistent abuse and torture are.
    Spousal abuse, child abuse, elder abuse, prisoner abuse -- all have to be addressed. Everybody dies; nobody has to be abused or deprived of the necessities of life. All we have to do is take turns and share.

    http://hannah.smith-family.com

    by hannah on Mon Apr 14, 2014 at 12:19:32 PM PDT

    •  "to blame" in a zero sum game (0+ / 0-)

      if we're willing to point at proximate causes instead of ultimate causes, it's tempting to blame "lack of skills."  Yes, the reason you lost the game might be relative lack of skills, but there will always be someone with more skills than you.

      The question should be, why are the rules of the game written to produce more losers than winners?

      For example, there's a push to teach interview skills in the public schools.  Improving the abilities of students to compete in a zero sum game, by definition, produces no net benefit to society. Yet some are convinced that it's a good idea because COMPETITIVE!

  •  MB, neoliberal talking points do not jive... (4+ / 0-)

    ...with the headline nor the content of this post! Get with "the program!"  :-)

    "I always thought if you worked hard enough and tried hard enough, things would work out. I was wrong." --Katharine Graham

    by bobswern on Mon Apr 14, 2014 at 01:17:00 PM PDT

  •  At some point we will have to face the fundamental (5+ / 0-)

    fault in our economic model. The division and distribution of the proceeds from excess production.

    The whole point of industrialization (as well as advancing science and medicine) is/was to make life better for more people by requiring less of our waking hours toiling to survive. We have forgotten that and allowed the parasite class to steal all of the gains we produce.

    There are thousands of options that we can implement to address various symptoms of this disease, all of which will alleviate some of the pain, but all of them only serve to delay the inevitable result of being stuck with a 19th century mindset in a 20th century industrialized world, with 21st century technology making most of what came before, obsolete.

    "Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities." - Voltaire

    by Greyhound on Mon Apr 14, 2014 at 01:55:53 PM PDT

    •  It's also a problem with the international (5+ / 0-)

      political model.  We have 20th century nation states unable and unwilling to regulate 21st century global corporations in a way that would enable them to capture tax revenue and regulate labor conditions.  

      •  This is the model imposed by those very same (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Sunspots, kurt

        corporations, which is the same model imposed when they were called robber barons, and before that when they were "the nobility" and "the church", and so on.

        Other than the gadgets and some of the names, there is nothing new about this at all. They play the same game over and over because they own the game and can't lose as long as people, whether through coercion or delusion, continue to play it.

        "Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities." - Voltaire

        by Greyhound on Mon Apr 14, 2014 at 02:56:25 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  BEENGO!!!!!!!! (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    worldlotus, ferg
    Long-term unemployment is high not because workers lack the right education or skills, but because employers have not seen demand for their goods and services pick up enough to need to significantly ramp up hiring.
    NO DEMAND for their goods and services.

    How many more times must we go over Econ 101?

    Not only are current businesses not seeing enough demand for goods and services, the people with Billions in liquid cash sitting on the sidelines don't see it either-- which is why they are not investing in new businesses in the U.S.

    I was astonished but not really surprised at the mostly_crickets_ response to Meteor Blades Night Owl diary last week pointing out well over a Million jobs would result with a serious investment in infrastructure.

    I can only conclude numerous people here just don't get it or are totally clueless regarding how our economy functions. Apparently economic growth happens magically; neither the private sector NOR the federal government are required to DO anything. just sit back and watch....... what?

    "We are beyond law, which is not unusual for an empire; unfortunately, we are also beyond common sense." Gore Vidal

    by Superpole on Mon Apr 14, 2014 at 06:13:10 PM PDT

  •  Degrees are not fungible. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    PsychoSavannah
    The reality is that long-term joblessness does not equal structural unemployment. In fact, between March 2007 and March 2011, more than 28 percent of Americans added to the ranks of the long-term unemployed had a college or post-college degree.
    Try getting a job as a Electrical Engineer with a Masters in Education and no relevant experience.

    Even if your degree was fungible, your experience isn't.  If you worked for say, 20 years as a travel agent, it doesn't help you land a position that requires 20 years experience in a different vocation.

  •  Long term Unemployment is caused by (0+ / 0-)

    A. Offshoring our jobs

    B. Shifting the tax burden to the middle class and poor so they have no disposable income to prime the economy

    C. Spending $trillions on war

    D. Not spending on infrastructure.

    Thans "we hate government but love corporations and billionaires" GOP

  •  Lots Of Unemployed Project Managers Out There (0+ / 0-)

    Ten years ago, we fantasized that PM's would create a cultrure of rational management and a career path for SMEs to rise through the ranks.  Now PMs are hired as temps, which means the employees are free to ignore them and management sees them as natural scapegoats.  Project management is returning to the traditional model of unskilled people throwing bricks at each other while screaming gibberish, except now it is a zero sum game where the only way to increase your own budget is to sabotage someone else.

    Men are so necessarily mad, that not to be mad would amount to another form of madness. -Pascal

    by bernardpliers on Tue Apr 15, 2014 at 07:03:10 PM PDT

  •  Its pretty obvious looking at the chart that each (0+ / 0-)

    level of education increased its amount by a similar ratio thus all but proving its an across the board difference.

    What i mean is compare the 2007 bar to the 2013 bar at each level and state the ratio difference between the two (How many 2007s does it take to make the 2013 bar) and you can see that ratio looks pretty consistent across the board.

    Thats what you would expect from a general across the board change and not one caused by the skewing of some sub groups.

    Join the DeRevolution: We are not trying to take the country, we are trying to take the country back. Get the money out of politics with public financed campaigns so 'Of the People, By the People and For the People' rings true again.

    by fToRrEeEsSt on Tue Apr 15, 2014 at 07:05:55 PM PDT

  •  One-And-Done Application Pipeline At Big Company? (0+ / 0-)

    I also think that  applicants only get one shot at applying at big companies.  Apply again and your previous application and their notes will come up in the application database.  Given that the HR oompa-loompa is looking for easy reasons to screen out applicants, they'll go with the easy out (and confirmation  bias) to use the previous reason for rejection.

    Men are so necessarily mad, that not to be mad would amount to another form of madness. -Pascal

    by bernardpliers on Tue Apr 15, 2014 at 07:11:36 PM PDT

  •  Hmmm.. I think new graduates may be skewing (0+ / 0-)

    those higher education numbers.

    It is hard to tell from those figures at BLS, but we know recent graduates have been having an extremely hard time finding work.  As we add tens of thousands of new graduates to the ranks of those looking for work, the number passing 27 weeks is bound to grow..

    I would like to see those stats broken out between recent grads and older people with degrees looking for work, to get a better picture.

    That said.. it sucks all over..  We need a jobs program that not only funds infrastructure, but encourages private sector hiring.  We need to steal back the jobs that were sent overseas for the last 20 years.  How?  Dunno..  Buy America programs.  Deep tax discounts for certain industries in blighted areas?

  •  because it's trade/industrial policy, not (0+ / 0-)

    education/skills

    But nobody wants to hear that

    L'enfer, c'est les autres....Jean-Paul Sartre

    by Keith930 on Tue Apr 15, 2014 at 07:21:54 PM PDT

  •  Oh, There's Structure There, Alright (0+ / 0-)

    I doubt that's what they mean by "structural", but let's say that unemployment in this country is systematic. That is to say, it's being generated by the system, and there are structural factors in it.

    The reason it's now much harder to get hired if you're unemployed is because the entire economy is really downsizing. There's a level of unemployment (around 1%) that's simply caused by our trade policies, which ship wealth-producing jobs overseas. We're moving increasingly to two-tiers of jobs: one that's highly-skilled and highly-paid, the other that's designed around shipping products from overseas to people in this country. Since less wealth is being produced in the U.S. (because there's less production, which is what produces wealth) there's less to go around.

    At the same time, every job now has an increased technology component, which makes the time you've been out of a job increasingly obvious because technology now changes faster than it did. And each job has become more specific as a result, so that if you try to move out of your job, even while you have it, it's much harder to find a fit.

    Employment in the U.S. is now a game of musical chair, in which hundreds of thousands of chairs are pulled out of the circle each year. This makes it more of a patronage system than a free market in labor. Increasingly, it's who you know (already tied into the system) that determines if you get a job or can keep it.

    I maintain the best way to get another job is to never be unemployed. If you find yourself without a paycheck, you need to start your own company.

    Probably you need to then go to the customers of your former employer and see if they'd like to move on to another company. Yours.

  •  I am the 1% (0+ / 0-)

    with an advanced degree and long-term unemployed. Do I get a membership card with that?

    "Know that it is easier to get into something than it is to get out of it." - Donald Rumsfeld

    by teej on Wed Apr 16, 2014 at 05:11:10 AM PDT

  •  Not necessarily inconsistent (0+ / 0-)

    Many of the people with advanced degrees hold degrees in philosophy, English lit, history, and other humanities subjects. Colleges (formerly the primary job market for humanities PhDs) are cutting back on those, because they can't demonstrate that they help students get jobs (which is the only reason my students give for why they're in college). So something like 50% of the history PhDs are unemployed (or "independent scholar," which is a fancy term for "unemployed").

    Cutbacks (engineered by the GOP -- for them it's a feature not a bug) in Federal funding for science research, humanities research, and the arts have made it even harder to find employment in many fields that require advanced degrees.

    The skills most employers seem to want and value seem to be the ability to extract money from people who don't have any, and to create slick sales and marketing presentations to pop up on people's smartphones even though they don't want them. And you need to be willing to do it as an intern or on wages of under $20 an hour. They don't teach those skills in graduate school, so yes, there's a mis-match.

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