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Jonathan Chait:
The health-care system still has lots of problems, beginning with the 5 million poor Americans cruelly denied health care by red state Republicans. Compared to an ideal blue-sky health-care system, we still fall short. What’s beyond question is that Obamacare has effected a revolutionary improvement by its own standards.
If it’s so easy to massively improve health care, why didn’t it happen before? Because passing a health-care reform through Congress is incredibly hard. The system’s waste created an enormous class of beneficiaries with a vested interest in the status quo. And the insecurity of private insurance made Americans terrified of change (which was necessarily complex).

And this is what conservatives have never understood. They act as if reforming health care is a mere matter of drawing up a health-care plan on paper and rounding up the votes, something they could do anytime they really feel like getting around to it, rather than a Herculean political task. They further convinced themselves that administering the new law would prove devilish if not impossible. They had it backwards.

The triumphs of Obamacare were designing a plan that could acceptably compensate the losers and generating the resources to cover the uninsured without alienating those with insurance. Designing and passing Obamacare was a project requiring real policy and political genius. Implementing it was easy.

In case anyone needs a Fox News-style interpretation of today's ACA enrollment statistics http://t.co/...
@D_Liebman
More politics and policy below the fold.

ICYMI, here's the WH fact sheet:

HEALTH CARE BY THE NUMBERS

8 million people signed up for private insurance in the Health Insurance Marketplace. For states that have Federally-Facilitated Marketplaces, 35 percent of those who signed up are under 35 years old and 28 percent are between 18 and 34 years old, virtually the same youth percentage that signed up in Massachusetts in their first year of health reform.

3 million young adults gained coverage thanks to the Affordable Care Act by being able to stay on their parents plan.

3 million more people were enrolled in Medicaid and CHIP as of February, compared to before the Marketplaces opened. Medicaid and CHIP enrollment continues year-round.

5 million people are enrolled in plans that meet ACA standards outside the Marketplace, according to a CBO estimate. When insurers set premiums for next year, they are required to look at everyone who enrolled in plans that meet ACA standards, both on and off the Marketplace.

5.7 million people will be uninsured in 2016 because 24 States have not expanded Medicaid.

Jason Millman:
You can see that signups surged in March as expected, and the two bonus weeks of enrollment in April essentially matched signups for the entire month of February. CMS never made a projection for April enrollment because it was not supposed to happen.

If we learned one thing from this enrollment period, it's this: Never underestimate the power of procrastination. California's exchange on Thursday reported that April 15, its last day of enrollment, saw 50,000 people sign up — its best day ever.

Sarah Kliff:
There's a very simple reason that Obamacare hit 8 million sign-ups: Being uninsured is horrible.

But the political conversation over Obamacare was driven almost entirely by people who had, and knew they would be able to keep, their health insurance. It was filled with a lot of assumptions, theories, and speculations about what people who didn't have good insurance, or any insurance, would do. And after Obamacare's disastrous launch, the theory took hold that these people wouldn't find this untested program worth the trouble. It was the permanently insured speculating about the uninsured and the barely insured – and, unsurprisingly, they got it wrong.

Josh Marshall:
On Obamacare, the Republican party has bet big on failure for four years. Now the results are in. And they lost. Big time.

Of course, substance policy success and political outcomes aren't the same thing. And just as importantly they do not always run on the same time scale. So it is entirely possible. I would say it is likely that the GOP will still derive benefits this November from the core of voters who are extremely upset about Obamacare, extremely motivated to vote and also happen to be the same people who routinely turn out in disproportionate numbers in mid-term elections. But on the core of the policy, which I think there is good reason to believe will align with political outcomes in the future, the results are in. And they lost.

Lucia Graves:
Good News for Obamacare Is Bad News for Conservative Pundits

The warnings that insurance premiums will skyrocket next year look increasingly hyperbolic.

Sam Baker:
Obamacare Is On a Winning Streak

Strong enrollment and falling costs are giving the White House a lot of positive headlines.

Greg Sargent:
The announcement of eight million Obamacare sign-ups may finally be enough to jolt commentators into realizing that maybe, just maybe, the Republican plan to build an entire campaign against the law for the next six months might suffer from a few imperfections. The President, for his part, seized on the moment to urge Democratic candidates to stand proudly by the law’s achievements — and to attack Republicans for wanting to strip them away.

Originally posted to Daily Kos on Sat Apr 19, 2014 at 04:30 AM PDT.

Also republished by Obamacare Saves Lives.

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Comment Preferences

  •  I think the "Conservatives" understand, all right (8+ / 0-)
    The system’s waste created an enormous class of beneficiaries with a vested interest in the status quo.
    Perhaps they are being encouraged by the vested interests in the $tatus quo.
  •  I just love it is called Obamacare (25+ / 0-)

    and always have - even during its darkest rollout days.  It will be this President's legacy and that's a pretty good legacy.

    Thanks Obama!

  •  Love that Fox news chart (8+ / 0-)

    Sad but true when it comes to Fox and the Republican party the truth has no meaning to either. As for there supporters they are treated like fools by both, and sad to say that they are fools who in this age of so much information being available to them that they make no attempt to find the truth!

    Dogs and Philosophers do the greatest good and get the fewest rewards (Diogenes)

    by Out There on Sat Apr 19, 2014 at 04:45:26 AM PDT

  •  so here's economist Tom Sargent (7+ / 0-)

    a com mencement speech (short) but could also be an OCare primer:

    1. Many things that are desirable are not feasible.
    2. Individuals and communities face trade-offs.
    3. Other people have more information about their abilities, their efforts, and their preferences than you do.
    4. Everyone responds to incentives, including people you want to help. That is why social safety nets don’t always end up working as intended.
    5. There are tradeoffs between equality and efficiency.
    6. In an equilibrium of a game or an economy, people are satisfied with their choices. That is why it is difficult for well meaning outsiders to change things for better or worse.
    7. In the future, you too will respond to incentives. That is why there are some promises that you’d like to make but can’t. No one will believe those promises because they know that later it will not be in your interest to deliver. The lesson here is this: before you make a promise, think about whether you will want to keep it if and when your circumstances change. This is how you earn a reputation.
    8. Governments and voters respond to incentives too. That is why governments sometimes default on loans and other promises that they have made.
    9. It is feasible for one generation to shift costs to subsequent ones. That is what national government debts and the U.S. social security system do (but not the social security system of Singapore).
    10. When a government spends, its citizens eventually pay, either today or tomorrow, either through explicit taxes or implicit ones like inflation.
    11. Most people want other people to pay for public goods and government transfers (especially transfers to themselves).
    12. Because market prices aggregate traders’ information, it is difficult to forecast stock prices and interest rates and exchange rates.
    http://marginalrevolution.com/...

    For all the ACA critics out there, including on the left, see #1 (and for advocates see them all, esp. 5, 6 and 10). It's an interesting point.

    "It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends upon his not understanding it!" — Upton Sinclair

    by Greg Dworkin on Sat Apr 19, 2014 at 04:46:41 AM PDT

    •  And #4 (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      JaxDem, StrayCat, Sherri in TX

      More people that qualified for Medicaid before the ACA signed up as well, because they were educated about Medicaid benefits that they previously didn't know about.
      I think many states complicate applying for benefits to make it harder than necessary to discourage people from signing up.

      Your beliefs don't make you a better person. Your behavior does.

      by skohayes on Sat Apr 19, 2014 at 04:52:00 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  arguable it wasn't an incentive to sign if (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        skohayes

        you didn't know you benefitted.

        More like, if you get the doc visit for free, you go more often than you really need. Colds and viruses, not flu or chest pain.

        "It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends upon his not understanding it!" — Upton Sinclair

        by Greg Dworkin on Sat Apr 19, 2014 at 05:08:08 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  Yes, they were operating under the dictum (0+ / 0-)

        "if they don't ask, don't tell."

        This served to disguise that our agents of government are supposed to be moved by two things: complaints and demands. This accounts for the significant effort to minimize or avoid complaints entirely by rendering the citizenry compliant before it even occurs to them to complain, never mind make demands.

        The decades-long emphasis that agents of government should aim to be pro-active was actually an agenda designed to head citizen activists off at the pass. "Oh no, don't bother your silly heads; we'll take care of everything in good time." If women and youth and minorities could not be denied the vote, perhaps they could be persuaded to be patient and wait until the "right time" arrived for them to be satisfied.

        http://hannah.smith-family.com

        by hannah on Sat Apr 19, 2014 at 05:36:16 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  That incentives effect behavior is an (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Greg Dworkin, a2nite

      absolutely essential behavior for people who want to manage and/or manipulate people. If incentives don't work, then people are just like horses and can't be made to do. And, if that's the case, then the only other option, other than leaving them alone, is to inflict punishment and hope that in flinching, they'll snort in the water you want them to ingest.
      Incentives are central to wishful thinking and authoritarianism.

      The difference between the authority and the authoritarian is that the former is creative and the latter is a sham.

      The sham is lacking in initiative and invention. Which is why he cannot create. The sham imagines. The sham is Plato's idealist in the flesh. Also a flash in the pan.

      A sham has no shame. Look what a difference a tonal inflection makes!

      http://hannah.smith-family.com

      by hannah on Sat Apr 19, 2014 at 05:28:45 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  that's a terrible commencement speech (6+ / 0-)

      Hello students, here are some specious ideas I pulled out of my butt. In truth, I completely forgot about my role in your graduation ceremony and only remembered this morning as I was brushing my teeth. I wrote this "speech" on the back of a box of cereal.

      I'd like to apologize in advance for anyone that tries to follow my "advice". You'd honestly be better off getting guidance from a Zen Koan.

      OK, here we go. In no particular order...

      •  I agree. And I'd offer that the best (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Stude Dude, bfbenn

        commencement speech ever was made by SS Kresge, founder of Kresge five and dimes and K-Mart, when he stepped to the podium, waited for quiet, and then said, "I never made a dime talking," and walked away, leaving the grads to ponder.  Pondering is good for grads.

        Building a better America with activism, cooperation, ingenuity and snacks.

        by judyms9 on Sat Apr 19, 2014 at 05:39:13 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  Josh Marshall's quote (14+ / 0-)
    On Obamacare, the Republican party has bet big on failure for four years. Now the results are in. And they lost. Big time.
    They didn't just "bet big", they went "all-in":

    House Republicans reach pathetic milestone: 50th Obamacare repeal vote

    50 flappin' times
    and they lost each time
    they're not just stupid
    they're persistently stupid

    As we express our gratitude, we must never forget that the highest appreciation is not to utter words, but to live by them. John F. Kennedy

    by JaxDem on Sat Apr 19, 2014 at 04:49:07 AM PDT

    •  "Stupid".....a pre-existing condition the ACA (4+ / 0-)

      does not address.

      •  see there, another testament to Obama's foresight (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        skillet, Josiah Bartlett, bfbenn

        otherwise the republican/tea party would have been able to cripple the ACA since everybody knows "You can't fix stupid".  Heh...

        As we express our gratitude, we must never forget that the highest appreciation is not to utter words, but to live by them. John F. Kennedy

        by JaxDem on Sat Apr 19, 2014 at 04:55:17 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  It's not "stupid;" it's based on their reading (6+ / 0-)

        of the tradeoffs. (See rules upthread.) They have calculated that the benefit to be gained (by ginning up their teapartyish base, and/or keeping the money flowing from their gajillionaire donors) outweighs the downside of being considered stupid by the left-wing who already considers them terminally stupid.

        If the calculation changes, they will likely stop having these votes. But so far, reality as they read it confirms that it's a beneficial strategy.

        See the rule about: Other people probably know more about their own priorities than you do.

    •  I remarked to one of my conservative (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      skillet, JaxDem, Josiah Bartlett

      followers (trolls) on Twitter the other day that we didn't need more ideologues in office, we needed more representatives.

      Your beliefs don't make you a better person. Your behavior does.

      by skohayes on Sat Apr 19, 2014 at 04:57:51 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  They really have nothing left to lose. (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      JaxDem

      If the health care industry is two trillion dollars a year, that's two more trillion over which Congress has no control because the dollars are flowing in and out of the Treasury automatically. It's the same dynamic with which they are already familiar from Social Security, Medicare, Medicaid and Unemployment Compensation. These are "mandatory" expenditures in the sense that Congress has no influence, no opportunity to be arbitrary or capricious, other than threatening to kill the program entirely. Making participation mandatory for citizens served to obscure that the real Congressional opposition was based on complying with a mandate on them to provide for the general welfare. Congress does not want to be compliant. Most of them want nothing less than to be public servants. That's why they're constantly trying to set up new hoops for the public to jump through (voter I.Ds, pat-downs at the airport, silence in the gallery, immigrant restrictions, minimum taxed wages).

      When there is government by the people, the ruling elite are converted into public servants. We know some dogs bite the hand that feeds them. Some of our agents of government (was it Plato that called them guardians?) are no different.

      http://hannah.smith-family.com

      by hannah on Sat Apr 19, 2014 at 05:51:21 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Plato wrote the manuals for the Republicans (0+ / 0-)

        The Republic and The Laws.

        The greatest principle of all is that nobody, whether male or female, should be without a leader. Nor should the mind of anybody be habituated to letting him (or her) do anything at all on his (or her) own initiative–to his leader he shall direct his eye and follow him faithfully. And even in the smallest matter he should stand under leadership. For example, he should get up, or move, or wash, or take his meals...only if he has been told to do so. In a word, he should teach his soul, by long habit, never to dream of acting independently, and to become utterly incapable of it.
        Also the doctrine of the Noble Lie, as taken up by Leo Straus.

        Back off, man. I'm a logician.—GOPBusters™

        by Mokurai on Sat Apr 19, 2014 at 02:55:17 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  Manly teabagger Nebraska gov candidate (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Stude Dude, Iberian

    beats up on Obama bobble head.

    Your beliefs don't make you a better person. Your behavior does.

    by skohayes on Sat Apr 19, 2014 at 04:53:17 AM PDT

  •  Thanks for the roundup of good news, Greg! (8+ / 0-)

    And thanks for the bar chart, which even I could understand. :)

    It's working, it's working! Hurray for ACA, I say.

    "Religion is what keeps the poor from murdering the rich."--Napoleon

    by Diana in NoVa on Sat Apr 19, 2014 at 04:56:54 AM PDT

  •  does Obama and politician have courage of Snowden? (6+ / 0-)

    a tweet from Greenwald and link to Snowden's article in the Guardian below

    Glenn Greenwald ‏@ggreenwald  23h

    Writing an op-ed criticizing Putin's response while needing asylum is as brave an act as the initial whistleblowing, & shows same integrity

    Vladimir Putin must be called to account on surveillance just like Obama
    I questioned the Russian president live on TV to get his answer on the record, not to whitewash him

    two diaries on the topic of Snowden's questions to Putin

    See how the supporters of Obama, or supporters of the surveillance state, try their hardest to discredit Snowden and change the subject in anyway they can

    after a 10 month story that Greenwald says the biggest revelations are yet to come out, the Snowden detractors will have to figure out more ways to support NSA, CIA, DOD, justice department, etc.

    this diary was up first by Little

    Edward Snowden Responds to Critics of Putin Call-In Query

    and after that a diary by Jesselyn Radack. I am seeing her more often in other places than dailykos these days. We are fortunate that she is still here and has not been run off the site by the protectors of Obama and the democratic party, or whatever those folks are up to

    Media Humiliates Itself: WAPO Gives Platform to Shameless Anti-Snowden Smears

  •  Compared to an ideal blue-sky health-care system (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Hoghead99, judyms9

    Wow. Condescend much?

    No need to conjure up some idealized system.
    Our health care system falls short when compared to a number of the world's best health care systems.

    AND costs twice as much.

    While Democrats were busy conjuring up health insurance reform that protected the wallets of insurance companies, pharmaceutical companies, hospitals, doctors, and everybody else in health care, Americans continue to pay too much for too little.

    LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

    by dinotrac on Sat Apr 19, 2014 at 05:12:44 AM PDT

    •  see Tom Sargent (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      I love OCD, Sam I Am, bfbenn
      1. Many things that are desirable are not feasible.  

      6. In an equilibrium of a game or an economy, people are satisfied with their choices. That is why it is difficult for well meaning outsiders to change things for better or worse.

      http://marginalrevolution.com/...

      "It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends upon his not understanding it!" — Upton Sinclair

      by Greg Dworkin on Sat Apr 19, 2014 at 05:23:24 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  "Not feasible" for the United States to compete (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Josiah Bartlett

        with France and other nations?

        Sad commentary.

        LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

        by dinotrac on Sat Apr 19, 2014 at 05:30:58 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  talk to your fellow citizens (8+ / 0-)

          people are really nervous about major changes. Won't fly. And when you have a grievance industry (aka conservatives) hellbent on exploiting any perceived angst, you can't be a rational player about it.

          I'm for single payer, but country isn't ready for it.

          "It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends upon his not understanding it!" — Upton Sinclair

          by Greg Dworkin on Sat Apr 19, 2014 at 05:34:18 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Step by step. (0+ / 0-)

            I don't much care about single payer. Neither for nor against.
            I had socialized medicine growing up as a military dependent.
            That I am for.
            Which more or less moots the question of single payer.

            LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

            by dinotrac on Sat Apr 19, 2014 at 05:57:03 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  yes, the VA system is an interesting (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              I love OCD, RadGal70

              approach, works very well for many things, not so well or others.

              Tom Sargent, again:

              2. Individuals and communities face trade-offs.
              5. There are tradeoffs between equality and efficiency.

              "It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends upon his not understanding it!" — Upton Sinclair

              by Greg Dworkin on Sat Apr 19, 2014 at 06:05:56 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  Don't know whose auspices, but I know my (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                Josiah Bartlett

                mother is eligible for both VA and Medicare. Prefers VA.

                Is number 5 really equality or quality? The kind of care I grew up with was both high-quality and efficient.  I presume it was also high on equality.

                LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

                by dinotrac on Sat Apr 19, 2014 at 06:09:22 AM PDT

                [ Parent ]

                •  doesn't work as well for mental health issues (1+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  RadGal70

                  assumes narrow network. But I think it's a great model to look at, and most people who use it prefer it.

                  "It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends upon his not understanding it!" — Upton Sinclair

                  by Greg Dworkin on Sat Apr 19, 2014 at 06:13:15 AM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

                  •  Are you sure? They've got an awfully lot of (3+ / 0-)
                    Recommended by:
                    Stude Dude, Josiah Bartlett, Mokurai

                    experience.

                    Again , don't know the auspices because I got most of my care on military bases, but they had child psychologists and the like way back when.  I know because I needed one when  I got expelled from the second grade!  They ran tests, wrote them up, discovered I was gifted, reminded the school district that the recent loss of my father was a very traumatic event, and got me back in school. I remain grateful.

                    LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

                    by dinotrac on Sat Apr 19, 2014 at 06:17:06 AM PDT

                    [ Parent ]

                    •  I nearly flunked third grade in public school (1+ / 0-)
                      Recommended by:
                      dinotrac

                      because I wouldn't do homework on material I already knew. I got zeroes four days a week, and a 100 on Friday, my teacher was explaining to my mother, which gave me an average of…at this point she turned bright red and shut up. My mother decided I needed to go to a better school. Later on, she got me deals with teachers that I could either skip homework if I was acing the tests, or do harder homework that interested me.

                      I did not find out about the nature of my Attention Deficit until I was about 50. Not many teachers or mental health professionals understand that ADHD confers benefits as well as what our society defines to be disabilities.

                      Back off, man. I'm a logician.—GOPBusters™

                      by Mokurai on Sat Apr 19, 2014 at 05:03:19 PM PDT

                      [ Parent ]

                      •  Lots of us have related "problems" -- (0+ / 0-)

                        I have mixed feelings.

                        These days, we have a better understanding of them, but in those days, they didn't slap a label on you and drug you up.

                        I think I prefer the old way by a hair.

                        LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

                        by dinotrac on Sat Apr 19, 2014 at 06:31:27 PM PDT

                        [ Parent ]

                        •  I don't know how the drugs would have affected me (1+ / 0-)
                          Recommended by:
                          dinotrac

                          in school. I took some until I retired, but I think that choosing more appropriate work helped much more. I got into trouble on one job where I had to transcribe content-free conference presentations. I switched to largely procedural technical writing, technology documentation, and Software Development Kits.

                          Having the ADA requirement for accommodations would have helped with a few teachers. Knowing what was going on would have helped me and my mother a lot.

                          Back off, man. I'm a logician.—GOPBusters™

                          by Mokurai on Sat Apr 19, 2014 at 10:05:32 PM PDT

                          [ Parent ]

        •  I'd like to see you explain (5+ / 0-)

          how the fuck we were supposed to get a healthcare system that competes with France and other nations.

          It's easy to throw verbal bombs and spout demagogic bullshit it's an altogether different thing to try and pass legislation that would achieve what you would like.  

          This is your world These are your people You can live for yourself today Or help build tomorrow for everyone -8.75, -8.00

          by DisNoir36 on Sat Apr 19, 2014 at 05:37:57 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  So...just give up and say we can never be (0+ / 0-)

            among the world's best?

            How progressive of you.

            LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

            by dinotrac on Sat Apr 19, 2014 at 05:59:44 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  heh (4+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              tobendaro, Stude Dude, I love OCD, bfbenn

              easy answer: beat the crap out of republicans to be in a position to work with them.

              "It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends upon his not understanding it!" — Upton Sinclair

              by Greg Dworkin on Sat Apr 19, 2014 at 06:06:42 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

            •  That's YOUR answer not mine (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              Josiah Bartlett, Sam I Am

              I never said that.  I realize that there was no possible way to simply destroy the system that was in place for ages and replace it with a France type system.  Incrementalism in this case was probably the best approach.  I would have liked a public option or for states to be allowed to implement a single payer type system earlier but even there I realize that it's not feasible.  Canada used this approach and today they have one of the best systems in the world.  But it took time.  

              You simply cannot blow up a system and seek to replace it overnight.  If ytou think 2010 was bad imagine what would have happened if Obama and the Dems rammed through a complete overhaul of the healthcare system and completely cut the insurance companies out.  For starters we'd have president Mitt Romney and Mitch McConnell would have been Senate Majority Leader.  Only a fucking fool would have proposed that we blow up the whole system and replace it with a France type system overnight.

              So I ask you once again how the fuck were we supposed to get a healthcare system that competes with France and other nations?

              It's not about being a progressive or conservative.  It's about being a fucking realist or a pie in the sky idealist who has no fucking clue how to make his dreams become reality.  Which one are you?

              This is your world These are your people You can live for yourself today Or help build tomorrow for everyone -8.75, -8.00

              by DisNoir36 on Sat Apr 19, 2014 at 06:23:40 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

            •  Or you could try answering the question (0+ / 0-)

              how we were supposed to get past the Joe Lieberman, Ben Nelson, and other Blue Dogs, and President Obama's relentless first-term bipartisan delusion.

              Back off, man. I'm a logician.—GOPBusters™

              by Mokurai on Sat Apr 19, 2014 at 05:06:36 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  Funny how Democrats can't do anything they're (0+ / 0-)

                proud of no matter how big the Congressional majority.

                Somewhere out in the ether FDR and LBJ are disgusted.

                LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

                by dinotrac on Sat Apr 19, 2014 at 07:16:17 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

                •  Funny how I'm proud of getting the ACA done (0+ / 0-)

                  with all of its problems, and you aren't. We think maybe 32 million have signed up in all of its programs, including more than 8 million on the exchanges. Many of those had some other form of insurance, commonly junk insurance, before that. We know that the rate of uninsurance is down five points since September, 18.0%-12.9%

                  Check out the group Obamacare Saves Lives, and the ACA Signups Diaries that brainwrap and I have been writing. (He is back today. We think that the furore and the number of data releases are both going down, although at quite different rates, now that most of the Open Enrollment extensions have ended.)

                  Most of what FDR got passed in his first term was overturned by the Supreme Court. We have had some serious setbacks with the current court, but the ACA mostly survived. LBJ lamented that he had handed the South to the Republicans for a generation. It turned out to be two. We haven't done that. In fact we expect to get the South back in the next decade.

                  Back off, man. I'm a logician.—GOPBusters™

                  by Mokurai on Sat Apr 19, 2014 at 10:17:02 PM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

                  •  32 million have signed up in all of its programs (0+ / 0-)

                    What in the hell does that mean?

                    I've never heard that number before.

                    More people are on Medicaid, and more people are insured than were insured last year. According to Gallup, the number of uninsured Americans have gone down from 17.3% of the population to 15.9%, and they may be even lower now.  

                    If we double the drop from the end of 2013, that gives us 14.5%.  That might be generous, but it allows for the final month of exchange enrollments.  Compare that 14.5% to the high-water mark of 18% Gallup recorded in the middle of last year -- we get a decline of 3.5%.

                    (Note: Again, being generous -- the poll is plus or minus 1% and that 18% looks like an outlier, bracketed by months at 17.1%)

                    Current population of US = 318 million.
                    3.5% of 318 million = 11 million people

                    That would seem to be the upper bound for the number of people who have gained health insurance while the law has been in effect. The actually number might be bit higher, but is probably lower.

                    11 million people is nothing to sneeze at, but it is kind of depressing that we seem only to get back to the coverage levels of the Bush administration.  That might be as bad as it sounds, though.  Lots more people would have had employer coverage before the economic collapse.

                    LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

                    by dinotrac on Sun Apr 20, 2014 at 03:20:11 AM PDT

                    [ Parent ]

                    •  You are way behind on the data (0+ / 0-)

                      Gallup has the uninsured rate at 12.9% for the first half of April.

                      ACA Signups: 8M+!! Only 12.9% Uninsured!

                      From ACA Signups:

                      Estimated Exchange QHPs as of April 15, 2014: 8.03M

                      Estimated Total, all sources: (14.4 M - 23.5 M)

                      Individual QHP Range: (7.47M - 13.03M)  •  Medicaid/CHIP (5.23M - 7.29M)

                      ESIs (106K confirmed; up to 8.2M more possible)  •  Sub26ers (1.60M - 3.10M)

                      If the 8.2M ESIs are confirmed, that brings the estimate into the range of 22M-31M.

                      Back off, man. I'm a logician.—GOPBusters™

                      by Mokurai on Mon Apr 21, 2014 at 08:24:17 AM PDT

                      [ Parent ]

    •  in other words, I'm way more conservative (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      I love OCD, zozie

      than you are, you flaming radical. ;-P

      "It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends upon his not understanding it!" — Upton Sinclair

      by Greg Dworkin on Sat Apr 19, 2014 at 05:24:17 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Hardly, but I am willing to call out a rhetorical (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Greg Dworkin

        trick -- to claim that people who see fault are looking through rose colored glasses and holding up an impossible ideal.

        LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

        by dinotrac on Sat Apr 19, 2014 at 05:31:57 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  in this case? (5+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          puakev, tobendaro, katesmom, I love OCD, askew

          unrealistic expectations on your part. It's a Green Lantern theory that if only the will was strong enough, Dems would lead on this. Therefore, it's entirely their fault (and not in the least the obstructionists in the House and Senate blocking change).

          But it's easier to complain than do. That's a fact.

          "It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends upon his not understanding it!" — Upton Sinclair

          by Greg Dworkin on Sat Apr 19, 2014 at 05:37:29 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  There you go again, Greg...trying to hold both (0+ / 0-)

            sides of the discussion.

            Unless you believe there is never any hope for improvement.
            I have no expectations that we can compete with the best today.  I would like to think that such a thing is feasible. Otherwise, this is as good as it gets.

            LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

            by dinotrac on Sat Apr 19, 2014 at 06:13:54 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  You want better (0+ / 0-)

              propose better or propose how we can get there.  Like Greg said, you're the master of unrealistic expectations with no explanation of how to achieve those expectations.  

              Obamacare IS an improvement and only a fucking moron would argue that it isn't.

              This is your world These are your people You can live for yourself today Or help build tomorrow for everyone -8.75, -8.00

              by DisNoir36 on Sat Apr 19, 2014 at 06:28:23 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  I have proposed better many times. (0+ / 0-)

                And -- What kind of fucking moron makes an assumption with no basis in fact?

                I have NEVER argued that ACA is not an improvement. I have, in fact, argued that, while a steaming pile of crap, it is better than the previous status quo and that Republicans are idiots to push for its repeal.

                LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

                by dinotrac on Sat Apr 19, 2014 at 06:37:01 AM PDT

                [ Parent ]

                •  And what are they then? (1+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  I love OCD

                  And how do we implement them?  

                  Considering that we have a House comprised of a bunch of tea bagging nut sacks who think repealing Obamacare and selling insurance across state lines, tort reform and Health Saving Accounts are the solution I'd LOVE to hear how we would pass anything through that would get us closer to a France type system.  

                  This is your world These are your people You can live for yourself today Or help build tomorrow for everyone -8.75, -8.00

                  by DisNoir36 on Sat Apr 19, 2014 at 06:44:57 AM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

                  •  That's a different issue, but a temporary one (0+ / 0-)

                    if Democrats are actually serious about getting something done.

                    The problem is that it takes winning elections. Are Democrats willing to do that?

                    LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

                    by dinotrac on Sat Apr 19, 2014 at 08:20:48 AM PDT

                    [ Parent ]

                    •  So you have no solution then (1+ / 0-)
                      Recommended by:
                      sooner2703
                      if Democrats are actually serious about getting something done.

                      The problem is that it takes winning elections. Are Democrats willing to do that?

                      I guess the answer is the Democrats obviously are not serious about getting things done because they lost elections and can't win enough elections to actually have a majority large enough to overcome all Republican legislative obstacles.  Never mind the whole gerrymandering thing.  

                      You STILL didn't answer the question.  'Democrats need to win elections' doesn't count.  If Democrats won enough elections to be able to overcome Republican legislative obstructions, we wouldn't be talking about Obamacare.  But since that is NEVER happening any time soon we have to come up with an approach that gets us where we need to be in steps.  You don't seem to understand that one bit.  It's all or nothing with you and considering the Democrats will never be able to provide you with all, you side with nothing as opposed to something.  Then you piss and moan that we're not doing enough.  

                      This is your world These are your people You can live for yourself today Or help build tomorrow for everyone -8.75, -8.00

                      by DisNoir36 on Sat Apr 19, 2014 at 09:04:21 AM PDT

                      [ Parent ]

                      •  2008-2010 (0+ / 0-)

                        You don't seem to understand that one bit.

                        If Democrats are serious, they will reach beyond the choir.
                        Not so much to elected Republicans.  For the time being and some undetermined time into the future, that is pointless.

                        However  -- ACA did more good than bad and people will realize that as they live with it.  Ordinary Americans, even those who vote Republican (a majority of whom, btw, oppose repeal), will be open to improvements.

                        As to siding with nothing as opposed to something, what kind of idiot's argument is that?

                        Never mind that it is patently untrue -- I've been very supportive of ACA. I think it's a pile of crap.  but it's a better pile of crap than the pre-ACA status quo. Republican efforts to repeal it are beyond idiotic -- they border on suicidal. Their own voters don't want that.

                        And, honest, nothing is often better than something.  If ACA made the health care picture worse, it would be right to oppose it.

                        LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

                        by dinotrac on Sat Apr 19, 2014 at 11:58:49 AM PDT

                        [ Parent ]

  •  Kansas legislature takes revenge (5+ / 0-)

    on state Supreme court for a ruling they didn't like- now that's professional!

    On Friday, Brownback signed 19 bills into law — a roster that didn't include the controversial school finance bill providing funding tied to a Kansas Supreme Court ruling and implementing a series of public school policy changes sought by conservatives and denounced by others.

    The governor did sign Senate Substitute for House Bill 2338, which limited the Kansas Supreme Court's authority to organize the judicial branch's budget. The legislation was supported by lawmakers who had expressed displeasure with the Supreme Court ruling that elements of the state's financing of K-12 public schools to be unconstitutional.

    Members of the state's highest court issued a rare public statement condemning Brownback's endorsement of the bill.

    "The Supreme Court of Kansas has strongly opposed this bill since its creation," the statement said. "We are troubled now that it has been signed by the governor. It weakens the centralized authority of the Kansas unified court system in exchange for money to pay our employees and keep courts open. And the money it provides still may fall short of even doing that."

    http://cjonline.com/...

    Your beliefs don't make you a better person. Your behavior does.

    by skohayes on Sat Apr 19, 2014 at 05:15:19 AM PDT

  •  That "fact sheet" has at least one outright lie. (0+ / 0-)

    How many others?

    The outright lie:

    3 million young adults gained coverage thanks to the Affordable Care Act by being able to stay on their parents plan.
    Shame for repeating that.
    If you go back to the sources, they admit that you can't tell how many of those people would be insured anyway. I'm sure that some of those people "gained coverage" while others simply saved a little money and hassle.

    LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

    by dinotrac on Sat Apr 19, 2014 at 05:16:15 AM PDT

    •  You have proof of that? (0+ / 0-)

      Or is this just a anti-Obamacare talking point?


      ODS results in Obama's amazing ability to humiliate his biggest critics, on the right and the left.

      by NoFortunateSon on Sat Apr 19, 2014 at 05:23:09 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  people who argue over every niggling stat (7+ / 0-)

      (all of which are reasonable estimates based on data) don't really have an argument to make.

      "It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends upon his not understanding it!" — Upton Sinclair

      by Greg Dworkin on Sat Apr 19, 2014 at 05:25:38 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Ah -- so much for reality-based anything. (0+ / 0-)

        When facts don't matter, it's easy to declare victory.

        So --- Now that ACA has cured cancer and and ended poverty, we should all go live in bliss.

        AND -- ahem, mr Niggles, you ignore the most important point: If somebody is willing to lie about a, how do you trust them about b?

        LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

        by dinotrac on Sat Apr 19, 2014 at 05:29:55 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  prove it's a lie (6+ / 0-)

          or drop your claim. You've supplied no data.

          "It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends upon his not understanding it!" — Upton Sinclair

          by Greg Dworkin on Sat Apr 19, 2014 at 05:39:03 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  And he never will (5+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            a2nite, puakev, Delevie, RadGal70, askew

            just rant some more about how badly Obamacare sucks.

            This is your world These are your people You can live for yourself today Or help build tomorrow for everyone -8.75, -8.00

            by DisNoir36 on Sat Apr 19, 2014 at 05:41:29 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  see comment (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              NoFortunateSon

              "It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends upon his not understanding it!" — Upton Sinclair

              by Greg Dworkin on Sat Apr 19, 2014 at 05:54:33 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  And read your own comment -- (0+ / 0-)

                The number assumes that everybody who was added to their parents' insurance was uninsured before.

                That would assume, for example, that none of those people were college students who obtained insurance through their schools (or would have), that none of them bought (or would have bought) insurance anyway.

                Which -- GOSH!

                Is what I said.

                LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

                by dinotrac on Sat Apr 19, 2014 at 06:06:30 AM PDT

                [ Parent ]

                •  no it doesn't (0+ / 0-)
                  The number assumes that everybody who was added to their parents' insurance was uninsured before.
                  You assume that.
                •  Why is it A LIE? (0+ / 0-)

                  Its a statitistic of the law. A very fungible number in relation to a talking point. Doesn't make it a lie. You are really reaching here dude.

                  •  The original statistic is not a lie. (0+ / 0-)

                    As put forward in Greg's comment above, it's fine.

                    The line comes right here:

                    3 million young adults gained coverage
                    It's a variation on common numerical and statistical fallacies -- the equivalent, say, of saying you have 93.8% of something when you can only be sure of the first digit.  While highly unlikely, it's not impossible for all of those people to have gained coverage, but you can't say it on the basis of the calculations performed.  Certainly some portion of those 3 million people on their parents' plan would not have coverage otherwise. I can speak anecdotally to this -- We were unable (in spite of the law's guarantee. Stupid health exchange.) to put our daughter on our policy.  She is covered anyway because we bought another policy for her.

                    To see Greg's comment and the excerpt from the developers of the original statistic:

                    http://www.dailykos.com/...

                    LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

                    by dinotrac on Sat Apr 19, 2014 at 08:30:24 AM PDT

                    [ Parent ]

              •  Greg you're giving him too much credit (2+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                I love OCD, askew

                I know you're trying to be fair and reasonable but when someone is wedded to a certain belief or ideology it doesn't matter how fair or reasonable you try to be, they will ALWAYS find fault.  This poster has repeatedly shit all over Obamacare from the very beginning.  I think many of us here would agree that Obamacare is not the perfect or ideal solution and many here would have preferred a single payer or Medicare for All type program.  However, many realists here would acknowledge that it was not possible to get there at the time (in large part thanks to our then Senator) and despite it's short comings we're not about to shit all over the successes achieved by Obamacare.  Whether the estimate is the Republican 'unskewed' number of under 1 million or the reasonable estimate of 3 million or the estimates in the middle of 2.2 or 2.5 million, the fact remains there are a whole lot more people under 26 year old who have health insurance thanks to Obamacare.  But rather than focus on how to improve Obamacare going forward so that everyone has insurance and how we're going to help the Dems regain the House so that we can get closer to single payer some people would rather nit pick and debate what could have been.   It's tiring and frankly unproductive.

                This is your world These are your people You can live for yourself today Or help build tomorrow for everyone -8.75, -8.00

                by DisNoir36 on Sat Apr 19, 2014 at 06:12:43 AM PDT

                [ Parent ]

                •  he's (now) from TX (0+ / 0-)

                  where he lives, it doesn't work right. I take that as my starting point.

                  "It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends upon his not understanding it!" — Upton Sinclair

                  by Greg Dworkin on Sat Apr 19, 2014 at 06:20:42 AM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

                  •  And that's Obama's fault? (2+ / 0-)
                    Recommended by:
                    Josiah Bartlett, askew

                    Or Rick Perry and the SCOTUS' fault?

                    Sorry Greg but I have no tolerance for the sheer ignorance from people who piss and moan about how bad Obamacare is when it's the Republicans in their states who fucked it up.  Teh gubmint sucks, but gimme my Medicaid card.    

                    This is your world These are your people You can live for yourself today Or help build tomorrow for everyone -8.75, -8.00

                    by DisNoir36 on Sat Apr 19, 2014 at 06:31:34 AM PDT

                    [ Parent ]

          •  Seriously? (0+ / 0-)

            You know it's a lie, Greg.

            You are welcome to call it a well-intended effort to estimate something based on unattainable facts, but, when put out as a fact -- and especially when stated as people gaining coverage, it's a lie.

            LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

            by dinotrac on Sat Apr 19, 2014 at 06:02:39 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  you're bullshitting (5+ / 0-)

              the WH put out a reasonable estimate, to be fully determined later. They called it an estimate., Everyone agrees it's an estimate. They even showed their work in terms of where the estimate came form.

              You called it a flat out and outright lie. Which makes you FOS on this one.

              "It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends upon his not understanding it!" — Upton Sinclair

              by Greg Dworkin on Sat Apr 19, 2014 at 06:09:16 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

    •  You call something a lie without proof (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Greg Dworkin, puakev, NoFortunateSon

      And not simply a lie but "The outright lie", while your proof is this:

      If you go back to the sources, they admit that you can't tell how many of those people would be insured anyway. I'm sure that some of those people "gained coverage" while others simply saved a little money and hassle.
      You use as fact to support your claim, your own guess that you are "sure that some" did as equally as your are "sure" that some didn't.  

      You can't call a lie something that you say can't be proven a truth or a lie.  You suspect it is a false claim, and you may be right (you provide and they provide no actual data), but you offer no proof to what is your claim of absolute fact of their "outright lie."  You attack the claim as hyperbole and your respond with your own unsubstantiated hyperbole.  

      Personally, as a writer, I would edit two words I think would address your criticism and that is this:

      3 million young people gained coverage were covered thanks ...
      leaving both your claim and theirs as truthful.

      If you had commented that the claim was "hyperbole" or "unsubstantiated" or "unproven" or "over-hyped" or demanding proof of the claim, I would have had no problem with your comment, even as I support ACA.  It's clearly not perfect and the Administration has made mistakes that should be called out.

      "Out of Many, One Nation." This is the great promise of these United States of America -9.75 -6.87

      by Uncle Moji on Sat Apr 19, 2014 at 05:43:15 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  excellent but arguable (4+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Uncle Moji, puakev, I love OCD, a2nite

        where the estimate came from:

        Between September 2010 and December 2011, the percentage of 19- to 25-year-olds on their families’ insurance increased from 64.4 percent to 74.8 percent, according to the National Health Interview Survey. HHS then took that increase of 10.4 percentage points and multiplied it by the number of people in that age group, which, according to Census data, was 29.7 million in 2010, to arrive at almost 3.1 million newly insured people.

        Their estimate is two years old and has not been updated, though they say they it will be going forward.

        http://www.miamiherald.com/...

        My point is that they said it was an estimate and they showed their work.

        But this politifact piece also looks at other estimates ranging from less than a million (Avik Roy, Romney advisor, and paid to find fault, but even he isn't lying, just using different methodology) to Tim Jost (2.5M) to Glenn Kessler (2.2M).

        That's what's going on here.

        my best guess is that dino picked a lower number and rant then followed.

        "It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends upon his not understanding it!" — Upton Sinclair

        by Greg Dworkin on Sat Apr 19, 2014 at 05:51:59 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  I shouldn't pick on dino (4+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Stude Dude, sweatyb, Greg Dworkin, a2nite

          but what was weird was that dino wasn't explicitly arguing that the total number was wrong or up for debate, per se, (which is what you address) but that the methodology for counting who was included in that number was wrong.

          In other words, dino seemed to be arguing that the reason why someone was covered by their parents insurance mattered in giving credit for that coverage "thanks to" Obamacare.  

          If they were covered simply because they "saved a little money and hassle", they should not be counted in the 3 million.  ie the "lazy bastards" threshold.  

          Really, there are serious and legit things to criticize about the Act, but that has to be one weird eddy to argue vehemently from.  

          Thanks again for your diary.

          Loved the Foxized Graph, which threw me off (as was intended) initially.

          "Out of Many, One Nation." This is the great promise of these United States of America -9.75 -6.87

          by Uncle Moji on Sat Apr 19, 2014 at 06:17:35 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

    •  funny definition of "outright lie" (5+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      puakev, tobendaro, Uncle Moji, katesmom, askew

      3 million young adults have coverage through their parents' plans. Their coverage is possible only because of the ACA.

      I don't understand why you don't think that means they "gained coverage" under the ACA.

      The criticism that these people might have had other options for health insurance is a straw man. And you could easily have applied it to any of the entries in the fact sheet.

      Clearly some of the 8 million sign-ups had other options. Some of the Medicaid and SCHIP sign-ups were qualified before the ACA and just didn't know it. And the 5 million who signed up with private insurers might have signed up anyways.

  •  Yes, people who are directionally challenged (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    a2nite, I love OCD

    do not know whether they are going backwards or forwards, up or down. For the either/or binary thinker, it doesn't matter. The directions are interchangeable. Of course, our circular globe is a help because it doesn't matter which way you go, you always end up where you started, even when you think you're going to fall off the edge.

    Are many people directionally challenged? My guess is that a sense of direction is like rhythm or the ability to cary a tune. Not a necessity and, therefore, even more variable than the senses that are.

    Now, while one might think that a sense of direction is a vision thing because one is supposed to look where one is going, I'm inclined it's connected to perambulation (feet on the ground). It may even be that, if people don't walk, they never know where they are going 'cause their feet have no contact with the material world. "Fly by the seat of your pants" is not exactly a recommendation.
    The sense of touch seems to be critical in keeping us connected to the material world. "Out of touch" politicians are a good example of those who aren't (and why their touching is so often out of place).

    http://hannah.smith-family.com

    by hannah on Sat Apr 19, 2014 at 05:19:09 AM PDT

  •  selfishness (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    a2nite, judyms9, hulibow, askew

    I went to a doctor this week, one I've been seeing for over 20 years.  We have an almost friendly relationship--he wanted his son to marry my daughter.  Anyway, he always struck me as quite liberal.  This visit, I asked him if he was considering retirement--his answer was--government insurance was making it impossible to stay in the game.  It is amazing how self centered reality is--even for a very wealthy man.  His comment made no sense--wasn't worth discussing--is worth getting disgusted over.  NIMBY describes so much of modern political immorality.  I always liked the Brooklyn expression better--"what's in it for me."

    Actions speak louder than petitions.

    by melvynny on Sat Apr 19, 2014 at 05:39:50 AM PDT

    •  Experiencing the opposite (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      I love OCD, askew

      I have visited a slew of health care professionals in the past 3 weeks and have experienced a number of positive Obamacare comments - this is covered, this is preventative, this is consolidated online. One even thanked Obama out loud (in Idaho). Frankly, I was expecting something closer to your experience - but I guess some working in the healthcare trenches get it.

  •  Add its correlate: "I got mine. Screw you." (0+ / 0-)

    Building a better America with activism, cooperation, ingenuity and snacks.

    by judyms9 on Sat Apr 19, 2014 at 05:48:50 AM PDT

  •  High stupidity in the GOP response to (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Stude Dude, Josiah Bartlett, a2nite

    President's weekly address:

    “Republicans want to enable you. We want to be the iPhone party. We believe government ought to be a platform that gives you opportunity and freedom to create a happier, more prosperous, and safer life,” Alexander said, drawing a sharp contrast between Republican and Democrat approaches to government.

    “Just imagine if instead of mandating things for you to do, your government became a platform, just like your iPhone, enabling you to create a happier, safer, more prosperous life,” he added.

    The Tennessee lawmaker said examples of an iPhone government include one that uses more school vouchers and that block grant Medicaid to states giving them more choice in how to run the program.

    Just beyond inane.
  •  25% File Taxes on 4/15, Americans PROCRASTINATE (5+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    tobendaro, Egalitare, Delevie, askew, bfbenn

    on everything.  It's our national behavior. Why would anyone have been surprised that, given problems with the website, there wouldn't have been a last minute surge of sign-ups?  

    Republicans were forgetting that most Americans are not A+ students sitting in the front of the class with their term papers completed the next day having studied for months for the final - We Cram!  We wait until the last minute and flood the libraries.   We get our cars inspected at the End of the MOnth, not the beginning.  We rush to pick up milk at the store because we run out mid-shopping week.  We have convenience stores for a reason.

    I love America.  and I'll finish this comment later...

    "Out of Many, One Nation." This is the great promise of these United States of America -9.75 -6.87

    by Uncle Moji on Sat Apr 19, 2014 at 05:58:02 AM PDT

  •  Grrrlz (0+ / 0-)

    So was "Grrrl" the "Womyn" of the '90s-'00s or something else?

    "If this Studebaker had anymore Atomic Space-Age Style, you'd have to be an astronaut with a geiger counter!"

    by Stude Dude on Sat Apr 19, 2014 at 05:59:27 AM PDT

  •  Will ACA Success Translate To Better Midterms? (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Stude Dude, Delevie, bfbenn

    Think the approval #s for Obamacare will drift up slightly. We will always have the liberals who say they don't like it because it doesn't go far enough. I have always used the 47% term before Romney to reflect the barrier that Democrats have. 47% of the public watched the economy implode under the GOP and watched Sarah Palin on the campaign trail in 2008 and still voted for McCain. Even as they hear of members of their family and benefiting they will still believe the rhetoric of how costly it is. Just another "entitlement". The number for ACA approval should still be under 50% so it might still mislead the GOP into thinking there is great political gains to be had in opposing it. It will probably also mislead Democrats in contested districts into not fully embracing it. The narrative for successful midterms is we have to destroy Republican obstruction that has hindered progress on health care, the economy and social issues. Unfortunately our own Democrats in many contested races are there own worst enemy. They will not preach that narrative.

  •  Here's what's galling, despite all the good (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Leo Flinnwood, Micheline, I love OCD

    news about the ACA numbers:

    ~The five conservative justices are insulated from any consequences for their horrendous, cruel decision to deny 5 million Americans health care coverage, something they did for baldly political reasons.

    ~By turning down Medicaid expansion, refusing to set up exchanges, and putting all kinds of roadblocks in the way of people getting coverage, governors and legislators from red states have made the ACA work far less well for their constituents.  This gives them a leg up at election time, because according to many of their own voters' experience, the law isn't good.  They have deliberately punished their own people, and in many cases will get rewarded for it.

    ~It isn't only Fox News and hate radio that has covered the ACA negatively.  The New York Times and NPR have repeatedly offered negative coverage, and offered up right wing talking points to its readers and listeners.  

    "It ain't right, Atticus," said Jem. "No, son, it ain't right." --Harper Lee, To Kill a Mockingbird

    by SottoVoce on Sat Apr 19, 2014 at 06:28:37 AM PDT

  •  In Texas more than 1 million (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    I love OCD

    "A million people … could get health insurance right away" if Texas expanded Medicaid under Obamacare. Barack Obama on Wednesday, November 6th, 2013 in remarks at a Dallas synagogue

    This is one of many reasons why Wendy Davis has a strong chance of winning, and needs our support.

    That Rick Perry and his party have refused to expand Medicaid is not only mean it is cruel.

    •  Strong chance presently according to polls is (0+ / 0-)

      51% Abbott vs. 37% Davis...
          We're not looking to WIN this election, but to draw into a loss of single digits. Not my wishful thinking but as an act of factual reality. WOMEN are for ABBOTT by around 8 points, MEN by around 20. Yup, that women stat is amazing, but it's still there.

      •  I know those women (0+ / 0-)

        Living deep in the red of Texas, I know those women, they speak in Fox News talking points.

        I wish the Dems were looking to WIN this election, because I think Wendy Davis is a talented and highly capable candidate. There are several things that she has going for her - she knows how to fight, and get media coverage. She speaks truth to power and shows no fear. She would expand Medicaid, and fight for women's reproductive rights. She is proactive on improving education. She won Fort Worth, which seemed impossible. Without her fighting for voting rights, and passing an amendment that allowed women to vote provisionally, when they had similar but different names on their state issued documents, I would not have been able to vote in the last election.

        Wendy strikes me as the kind of woman Texan's like to elect. I know the numbers make her the underdog, but I think she is up for the fight, and just might surprise everyone.

  •  The Fox graph is brilliant. (0+ / 0-)

    And not far from the truth.

    What is so unnerving about the candidacy of Sarah Palin is the degree to which she represents—and her supporters celebrate—the joyful marriage of confidence and ignorance. SAM HARRIS

    by Cpqemp on Sat Apr 19, 2014 at 08:13:20 AM PDT

  •  A comment about a new Faux News show (0+ / 0-)

    More on the atrocity here.

    Still, no Ann Coulter? No Dana Loesch? What about Megyn Kelly? What about the actual puddle of beaver vomit that is Michelle Malkin? Only puddle of beaver vomit Michelle Malkin joining this clusterfuck could get us to go out and buy a TV so we could then have the pleasure of throwing it out the window the first time she appears on the screen.

    We don't want our country back, we want our country FORWARD. --Eclectablog

    by Samer on Sat Apr 19, 2014 at 08:38:42 AM PDT

  •  Rube Golberg's genius (0+ / 0-)

    "Designing and passing Obamacare was a project requiring real policy and political genius".  Yes, it gets the Rube Goldberg award of the 21st century (so far) for most complicated and costly way to accomplish an objective.  Rather than do it the simple and effective way, as many other countries do, we did it the Heritage/Romney way.

  •  I Need Obamacare (0+ / 0-)

    @D_Liebman's chart made me bust a gut!

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