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  • Today's comic by Ruben Bolling is Lucky Duck in "State of Denial":
    Cartoon by Ruben Bolling -- Lucky Ducky, in 'State of Denial'
  • These Daily Kos community posts were the most shared on Facebook April 23:
    BREAKING: Jury awards $3 million in first fracking case, by TXsharon

    IRS Targeted Progressive Groups MORE than Tea Party, by ericlewis0

    Duke president says removing toxic ash would cost $10 billion and take decades which is "too much", by HoundDog

  • Whistleblowers pay a big price:
    "Part of the purpose of doing what they've been doing for the last several years, is to destroy you," the ex-NSA mathematician and decorated Navy veteran Thomas Drake says in [the film] Silenced. [...]

    f you become a whistleblower, "You have to mortgage your house, you have to empty your bank accounts," Drake says. The only work he could find, eventually, was as an Apple store clerk. Though every single one of the major charges were eventually dropped—following a piece on Drake in the New Yorker and a 60 Minutes segment, it should be noted—the toll of his whistleblowing was clear. Drake estimated that the charges had cost him over a million dollars in legal fees and lost work. He was ostracized and condemned by his peers. It was emotionally devastating, too; the charges, Drake implies, led to a painful separation with his wife.

  • Mapping the hourly wage needed to cover modest housing:
    Emily Badger and Christopher Ingraham show "what you’d need to earn per hour, working a 40-hour week, to cover the kind of housing that the federal government considers modest in your county."

    “Mapped in finer detail than by state, several geographic patterns are clearer. No single county in America has a one-bedroom housing wage below the federal minimum wage of $7.25 (several counties in Arkansas come in at $7.98).”

  • Apple says 94 percent of its corporate facilities are now powered by clean energy.
  • Even allowances are plagued by gender gap. Seventy percent of boys vs. 60 percent of girls say they get an allowance.
    But unfortunately, it’s not likely because boys do more chores. One study found that girls do two more hours of housework a week than boys, while boys spend twice as much time playing. The same study confirmed that boys are still more likely to get paid for what they do: they are 15 percent more likely to get an allowance for doing chores than girls. A 2009 survey of children ages 5 to 12 found that far more girls are assigned chores than boys.

    And it’s not just that boys are more likely to be paid by their parents, but they also get more money. One study found that boys spent just 2.1 hours a week on chores and made $48 on average, while girls put in 2.7 hours to make $45. A British study found that boys get paid 15 percent more than girls for the same chores.

  • Compensation claims rise eight percent: For the week ending April 19, seasonally adjusted initial claims for unemployment compensation rose to 329,000, up 24,000 from the previous week's revised level. For the comparable week of 2013, the number was 343,000. The less volatile four-week running average rose to 316,750. For the week ending April 5, the total number of people claiming compensation was 2,922,187, down 85,245 from the previous week. For the comparable week in 2013, 5,065,908 persons claimed compensation from state and federal programs. Most of that one-year decrease is a consequence of the failure of Congress to renew the federal emergency unemployment compensation program in December.
  • Giant iceberg breaks away from Antarctica:
    One of the largest icebergs on the planet, about six times the size of Manhattan, has separated from an Antarctic glacier and is floating out towards open ocean. The iceberg is named B-31, and is roughly 255 square miles (660 square km). Its estimated maximum thickness is 1,600 feet (487 meters). Last Fall, it broke off from the Pine Island Glacier. Researchers have been watching it drift away since then, via satellite.
  • Food industry says people won't eat GMO products if they're labeled:
    Big food manufacturers and the biotech industry that produces the seeds for genetically engineered crops contend that mandatory labeling of products containing ingredients derived from those crops — also known as genetically modified organisms, or G.M.O.s — will be tantamount to putting a skull-and-crossbones on them.
  • White House spokesman denies Rolling Stone claim on Keystone XL—sort of:
    The White House didn't offer an official response when POLITICO asked about yesterday's Rolling Stone piece (http://rol.st/... ) saying that two unnamed administration sources say President Barack Obama "all but decided to deny the permit for the pipeline." But White House spokesman Matt Lehrich later wrote on Twitter: "Tip for reporters: nobody who knows POTUS' thinking on Keystone is talking and nobody who is talking knows." He also offered the standard White House statement that the pipeline decision is in the hands of the State Department and will be "made on merits."
  • On today's Kagro in the Morning show, Cliven Bundy, ladies & gents! Greg Dworkin parses the Kaiser polling, then sets the agenda for the day with Harold Pollock's "Pre-Occupied with Medicaid Expansion." It's Occupy vs. "Moral Mondays." And are we an oligarchy yet, or what?

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Comment Preferences

  •  Cliven Comes to Harlem (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    MartyM, Cadillac64, Portia Elm

    Warning - some snark may be above‽ (-9.50; -7.03)‽ eState4Column5©2013 "I’m not the strapping young Muslim socialist that I used to be" - Barack Obama 04/27/2013 (@eState4Column5).

    by annieli on Thu Apr 24, 2014 at 12:04:30 PM PDT

  •  GMO (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Lenny Flank
    Big food manufacturers and the biotech industry that produces the seeds for genetically engineered crops contend that mandatory labeling of products containing ingredients derived from those crops — also known as genetically modified organisms, or G.M.O.s — will be tantamount to putting a skull-and-crossbones on them.
    Yeah, pretty much.  And fewer GMOs bought means they're less profitable, which means less investment in them, which means less food for hungry people around the world.
    •  Please prove your last step statement (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      xxdr zombiexx, JeffW, Ellid

      that less food is going to be available simply because of a requirement to label such GMO foods.

      •  GMO foods started as a means of combating famine (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Lenny Flank, Ellid

        The idea was a noble one.  Tinker directly with the genes of staple crops to make them more nutritious.  Or to increase crop yields, or decrease the amount of fertilizer/pesticide needed for the same yields of crops.

        GMO by itself isn't bad.  Unfortunately we've conflated the egregious business practices of Monsanto and "big agra" with what was otherwise good science.

        The Cake is a lie. In Pie there is Truth. ~ Fordmandalay

        by catwho on Thu Apr 24, 2014 at 12:17:50 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  GMOs are increasing herbicide use (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          JeffW, Lenny Flank, wintergreen8694

          'Superweeds' linked to rising herbicide use in GM crops, study finds
          "Resistant weeds have become a major problem for many farmers reliant on GE crops, and they are now driving up the volume of herbicide needed each year by about 25 percent," Benbrook said.
          http://www.sciencedaily.com/...

          Monsanto selling more Roundup.

          Mission Accomplished.

          "Work for something because it is good, not just because it stands a chance to succeed." -- Vaclav Havel

          by greendem on Thu Apr 24, 2014 at 12:23:30 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Again, we've blamed all GMOs for Monsanto's CF (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            murrayewv

            I won't argue that Monsanto has screwed the pooch with Roundup.  

            I'm just saying that you cannot blame ALL genetically modified organisms for one company's screw-ups, and that's what requiring labels for GMOs from other companies would do.

            The Cake is a lie. In Pie there is Truth. ~ Fordmandalay

            by catwho on Thu Apr 24, 2014 at 12:27:57 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  If they are proud of their technology (0+ / 0-)

              Why are they filing lawsuits to prevent consumers from knowing they are in the products we purchase?

              Shouldn't the consumer have a right to know and freedom of choice?

              "Work for something because it is good, not just because it stands a chance to succeed." -- Vaclav Havel

              by greendem on Fri Apr 25, 2014 at 06:59:59 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

          •  to be fair . . . (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            catwho, Ellid

            resistance happens sooner or later in ALL weeds with ALL pesticides, whether there is any GMO or not. And since Roundup was already being sprayed on non-GMO crops decades before GMOs appeared (and still IS sprayed on many non-GMO crops), there were already Roundup-resistant weeds before the GMOs ever appeared. It's the use of herbicides that produces the resistance, not the presence or absence of a GMO gene.

            In a few decades at the most, virtually all weeds will be resistant, and Monsanto will not be selling any Roundup at all--no matter what anyone does or doesn't do in the meantime.

            Not even big mighty Monsanto can stop evolution from happening.

            In the end, reality always wins.

            by Lenny Flank on Thu Apr 24, 2014 at 12:31:08 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

        •  my opposition to GMOs is based on economics and (5+ / 0-)

          social factors. Monsanto uses GMO products as a club to batter competition and to lock an entire sector of the national economy into a feudal state of dependence. I also don't believe ANYONE has any right to patent a natural product for private profit. And the manner in which Monsanto attempts to attain total control over the way its product is used, and all information about it, is intolerable in a democratic society.

          BUT you are correct--most of the "scientific arguments" against GMOs that I have heard are, quite simply, crap.They are anti-science horse shit, on the same level as the "scientific arguments" made by the anti-vaxxers (and indeed in many cases the anti-vaxxers and the anti-GMO fringe are the very same people).

          There are plenty of good reasons to oppose Monsanto and its practices.  We don't need to make up stupid crackpot shit to do it.

          In the end, reality always wins.

          by Lenny Flank on Thu Apr 24, 2014 at 12:36:49 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  You said: (3+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Lenny Flank, MPociask, Ellid
            We don't need to make up stupid crackpot shit to do it.
            This is pertinent advice to all Democrats on all issues.

            Progressive Democrats must always understand that conflation/fabrication-style advocacy is only right for Red State and the Tea Party, and we are not like them.

            Progressive Democrats who do, and aspire to, governance, governing and public trust administrative stewardship have to scrupulously practice legitimate science, medicine, public health and engineering as part of such advocacy activities by progressive Democrats.

            Daily Kos' primary concern should be always be about governing, governance and the public trust, and the propagation of our values as progressive Democrats.

    •  I disagree that labeling will bankrupt them (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Cadillac64, Calamity Jean, Ellid

      Several countries already require GMO foods to be labeled, and nobody went broke over it. As for the labels themselves, companies were making the same "we'll go broke boo hoo hoo" arm-waving when they were required to list their ingredients, and then again when they were required to list their calories and nutritional information--and nobody went broke from that either.

      The brutal truth is that labeling will make zero difference to anyone, since nobody reads the damn labels anyway, and anyone likely to not buy a GMO-labeled product is already likely not buying whatever they think is GMO.

      It's a tempest in a teacup.

      In the end, reality always wins.

      by Lenny Flank on Thu Apr 24, 2014 at 12:41:34 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  No sympathy to big food companies... (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Cadillac64, wintergreen8694

      ...whose argument pretty much can be translated to this:

      "If we tell people what is in the food we're selling, they won't want to buy what we're selling.
      Really, if customers don't want what you're selling, it seems to me that the appropriate free market solution is to either offer what customers will want to buy or else try educating people to change their perceptions.

      If you can't do either of those things, perhaps you deserve to lose money.

      Political Compass: -6.75, -3.08

      by TexasTom on Thu Apr 24, 2014 at 01:02:46 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Cutting off noses to spite faces (0+ / 0-)

        This isn't about sympathy for big Ag.  It's about feeding the hungry, which GMOs have allowed us to do much better than in the past.  Yes, we have to agree with the corporations on this one, but a simple policy of always opposing whatever corporations want will result in an awful lot of negative side effects.

  •  So Apple's HQ is 94% green (5+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    JeffW, MartyM, TexasTom, Cadillac64, murrayewv

    How about its factories in China? Maybe the people catching nets are made from recycled material?

    Greenwashing ain't just for dirty coal companies it seems.

    GOP 2014 strategy -- Hire clowns, elephants, and a ringmaster and say "a media circus" has emerged and blame Democrats for lack of progress. Have pundits agree that "both sides are to blame" and hope the public will stay home on election day.

    by ontheleftcoast on Thu Apr 24, 2014 at 12:10:51 PM PDT

    •  And their new "mothership" building (6+ / 0-)

      will have lots of parking and be far from any city where people actually live. The lack of nearby transit is notable.

      Car-dependency is more polluting in the long run.

      "Work for something because it is good, not just because it stands a chance to succeed." -- Vaclav Havel

      by greendem on Thu Apr 24, 2014 at 12:25:07 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  It's no worse than other parts (0+ / 0-)

        of Silicon Valley, and actually might be better; it's adjacent to a couple of all-day bus lines (26 and 81) plus at least one express bus route I believe, and I believe there are already free bus shuttles to that area from both the ACE train station in Santa Clara and the Sunnyvale Caltrain station.

        The site was formerly a Hewlett-Packard property, and I don't recall anyone complaining about lack of transit accessibility when they operated the property.

        There's only one rule that I know of, babies -- goddammit, you've got to be kind. -- Kurt Vonnegut

        by Cali Scribe on Thu Apr 24, 2014 at 02:05:45 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Yeah, transit (or the lack thereof) (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          JeffW

          is a problem throughout Silicon Valley. Actually throughout the whole Bay Area. These days I'm fortunate enough to work walking distance from a BART station, but I haven't always been so lucky.

        •  Tech's addiction to suburban "campuses" (0+ / 0-)

          must end. We now understand the connection between long commutes and climate change.

          Salesforce just invested in a new building in downtown SF that is right across the street from the new Transbay Transit Center that is being built.

          That is how you do it.

          Campuses are hard on the planet and embarrassingly, so 1975.

          "Work for something because it is good, not just because it stands a chance to succeed." -- Vaclav Havel

          by greendem on Fri Apr 25, 2014 at 06:56:52 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

  •  U.S. National Research Council says (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    JeffW, Cadillac64

    the U.S. is not properly prepared for an Arctic oil spill:

    http://www8.nationalacademies.org/...

    http://thehill.com/...

    http://www.ogj.com/...

    Issued yesterday

  •  Responsible Serious Adults have to lie cheat an (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Boogalord, JeffW, Calamity Jean

    steal in order to do proper governing: whistelbowers just hurt Murica by telling about crime.

    Government just can't do shit without breaking the law the rest of us have to follow.

    From cops killing people right and left to the N$A's egregious constitutional crimes, we MUST - as decent responsible serious adults - allow this to continue.

    Please: do not report government crime.

    /bullshit.

    Legal means "good".
    [41984 | Feb 4, 2005]

    by xxdr zombiexx on Thu Apr 24, 2014 at 12:17:17 PM PDT

  •  Veterans languish and die on a secret list (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    MartyM, JeffW, LakeSuperior, Cadillac64
    (CNN) -- At least 40 U.S. veterans died waiting for appointments at the Phoenix Veterans Affairs Health Care system, many of whom were placed on a secret waiting list.

    The secret list was part of an elaborate scheme designed by Veterans Affairs managers in Phoenix who were trying to hide that 1,400 to 1,600 sick veterans were forced to wait months to see a doctor, according to a recently retired top VA doctor and several high-level sources.

    For six months, CNN has been reporting on extended delays in health care appointments suffered by veterans across the country and who died while waiting for appointments and care. But the new revelations about the Phoenix VA are perhaps the most disturbing and striking to come to light thus far.

    Internal e-mails obtained by CNN show that top management at the VA hospital in Arizona knew about the practice and even defended it.

    http://www.cnn.com/...

  •  Stewart's takedown of Hannity....so nice....I had (6+ / 0-)

    to watch it thrice.

  •  Dana Milbank is an ass (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    LakeSuperior, T100R, Cadillac64, murrayewv

    "Tax cuts for the 1% create jobs." -- Republicans, HAHAHA - in China

    by MartyM on Thu Apr 24, 2014 at 12:20:47 PM PDT

  •  Well, iceberg b-31 could be that floating... (4+ / 0-)

    ...libertarian dreamboat. Then could build on it, add bouyancy, use it for fresh water initially, and go Galt.

    Until the toilets plug...

    Float like a manhole cover, sting like a sash weight! Clean Coal Is A Clinker!

    by JeffW on Thu Apr 24, 2014 at 12:23:40 PM PDT

  •  B-31??? (6+ / 0-)

    An iceberg 6 times the size of Manhattan Island and it gets the name "B-31"?!?
    Way to tap the vast reservoirs of your imagination, ...er, Iceberg-Naming Authority!

    I'd call it something more along the lines of "Ice-Hearted Ship-Smashin' Bad Muthahfuckah".
    Something that size, that displaces that much water while actually being water, that bad-ass, deserves better than to be dubbed "B-31". ("B" for short?)

    "Non-violence is a powerful and just weapon which cuts without wounding and ennobles the man who wields it. It is a sword that heals." - Martin Luther King, Jr.

    by Gentle Giant on Thu Apr 24, 2014 at 12:30:41 PM PDT

    •  a science aside . . . . . (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      MPociask, Cadillac64, Gentle Giant, T100R

      An iceberg that is floating in the water, does not actually displace any water at all.  Or, more correctly, the volume of water in the ice is exactly equal to the volume of the water it is displacing. So when it melts, it does not increase the volume of water at all. Counterintuitive, but true.

      You can prove this yourself with a simple experiment that you can do in your kitchen. Put some ice cubes in a glass, and fill it right to the rim with water, so it juuussstt barely doesn't run over the sides.

      Then let it sit until the ice melts.

      What you will find is that the water will NOT rise up and run over the cup's rim and spill out onto the table--in fact, the water level inside the glass will not rise at all, not one bit, as the ice melts.

      That is why all the ice floating in the Arctic Ocean, if it melts, will not raise the sea levels one inch.

      The ice that WILL raise the sea levels is the ice that is on LAND--such as Greenland, northern Canada and Russia, and the Antarctic.

      In the end, reality always wins.

      by Lenny Flank on Thu Apr 24, 2014 at 01:07:29 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  When water freezes, it will displace a (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Lenny Flank

        greater volume.

        It crystallizes, causing expansion, rather than the shrinking you'd expect to see from molecular cooling/slowing.

        The same amount of water, yes, but it takes up more space when frozen.

        "Non-violence is a powerful and just weapon which cuts without wounding and ennobles the man who wields it. It is a sword that heals." - Martin Luther King, Jr.

        by Gentle Giant on Thu Apr 24, 2014 at 02:00:15 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  Behind Enemy Lines - Listening To Hannity (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    JeffW, Cadillac64, wintergreen8694

    So he is pointing out all the times Democrats have injected race into public discourse by saying that African-Americans might have been better off under slavery. Well he didn't have anything quite like that so he has to go to instances like Joe Biden sayiing Obama was clean and articulate and other Democratic politicians addressing race. Ya see if you just reference race it is the same as saying African-Americans were better off under slavery.

    So that is how he dispensed with that. Now it's on to how the gummint is coming to getcha.

  •  1-Bedroom Apartments (0+ / 0-)

    Question: why is it important to compare the minimum wage against 1-bedroom apartment costs?  My city is known for its high cost to rent a 1-bedroom, but you can find shared housing for very little.  Minimum wage is almost nothing, but even on minimum wage, if you work 160 hours a month, you can afford to share an apartment with a few other people.  You're not going to find a 1-bedroom for less than $1200, but you can find a 3-bedroom for $1500 (meaning $500 per person) if you don't mind a location farther from public transport.  Sure, not everyone wants to have to share an apartment, but I really don't see why the 1-bedroom apartment has to be the standard.  I barely even know anyone who lives alone.

    •  Once upon a time... (4+ / 0-)

      ...having a place of your own was a reasonable aspiration for working Americans.  When we get to the point where people need to "triple up" in order to afford a place to live, that's just one more sign of the decline of the working class in the US.

      Aside from that, in my area, 1 and 2 bedroom apartments are fairly common, but 3 bedroom apartments are much less so.  

      Political Compass: -6.75, -3.08

      by TexasTom on Thu Apr 24, 2014 at 01:06:40 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Changing social mores... (0+ / 0-)

        And all that, as it also used to be common for unmarried men to live in boarding houses - Abe Lincoln did, for example.  But I do agree with your point, and I'd add that as people get married, have kids, etc., finding roomies becomes even less of an attractive prospect.

    •  But in many communities (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      JeffW

      they have laws against too many unrelated people sharing one domicile.

      (To keep the number of immigrants low, doncha know?)

      Words can sometimes, in moments of grace, attain the quality of deeds. --Elie Wiesel

      by a gilas girl on Thu Apr 24, 2014 at 01:17:23 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  CO-Gov: GOP debate - now 4-5 EST (0+ / 0-)

    Link to Livestream  

    Sorry for late notice but I just heard about it myself.  They will be airing it on tv this weekend.

    "Then why don't all girls belong to unions?" "Well, there's some that thinks it ain't fashionable; there's some that thinks it ain't no use; and there's some that never thinks at all."

    by Cadillac64 on Thu Apr 24, 2014 at 12:59:52 PM PDT

    •  "Getting policy advice from the New Jersey Gov - (0+ / 0-)

      ... is like getting dating advice from The Jersey Shore cast."

      Check your bingo cards - "Outdated Pop Culture Reference" - check!

      "Then why don't all girls belong to unions?" "Well, there's some that thinks it ain't fashionable; there's some that thinks it ain't no use; and there's some that never thinks at all."

      by Cadillac64 on Thu Apr 24, 2014 at 01:15:43 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  And people wonder why Snowden didn't go (6+ / 0-)

    through channels:

    "Part of the purpose of doing what they've been doing for the last several years, is to destroy you," the ex-NSA mathematician and decorated Navy veteran Thomas Drake says in [the film] Silenced. [...]
    If you become a whistleblower, "You have to mortgage your house, you have to empty your bank accounts," Drake says. The only work he could find, eventually, was as an Apple store clerk.

    Though every single one of the major charges were eventually dropped—following a piece on Drake in the New Yorker and a 60 Minutes segment, it should be noted—the toll of his whistleblowing was clear. Drake estimated that the charges had cost him over a million dollars in legal fees and lost work. He was ostracized and condemned by his peers. It was emotionally devastating, too; the charges, Drake implies, led to a painful separation with his wife.

    "Religion is what keeps the poor from murdering the rich."--Napoleon

    by Diana in NoVa on Thu Apr 24, 2014 at 01:03:00 PM PDT

  •  Russia claims a US violation of the treaty (0+ / 0-)

    which controls warship access to the Black Sea, the Montreux Convention.  

    The treaty restricts warships from non-Black Sea nations to continuous stays of no more than 21 days each, but Russia claims that "American warships have twice extended their stay in violation of a scheduled date."  

    If true, this would be a serious violation of the treaty, but may not be entirely factual.  The Russian claim the guided missile frigate USS Taylor stayed in the Black Sea from February 5 to March 9.  However, on February 12, the Taylor ran aground off the Turkish Black Sea port Samsun.  Its commander was subsequently relieved, the ship was inspected and the Navy reports that it left Samsun on February 7, heading for Souda Bay, Greece and repairs including "replacement of the propeller blades and propeller hub."

    So the claim of violation of the Montreux Convention in this case seems to me to be overblown to say the least, and it would be troubling if it were taken seriously enough to threaten the continued stability which the treaty provides.

    Play chess for the Kossacks on Chess.com. Join the site, then the group at http://www.chess.com/groups/view/kossacks.

    by rhutcheson on Thu Apr 24, 2014 at 01:39:15 PM PDT

  •  There was no such thing as an allowance (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    JeffW

    when I grew up in the 50s and 60s. With six of us kids on a postal clerk's salary, there was no money for allowances, and we knew it and it didn't bother us. The only reason we even knew about allowances was because kids on TV got them, lol, probably kids like Dennis the Menace and the Beav. But the thing that always, always burned my ass was that we two older girls did all the housework, depending on what we were capable of at whatever age. My two younger brothers? Not a chore, nary a one. Housework was women's work, according to my mom and my stepdad. Saturday and Sunday mornings, the boys were off to run, swim, and play ball with their friends. We had to stay until our "chores" were done. It ESPECIALLY galled me that we had to clean our brothers' room. And every night we had to take turns washing and drying the dishes, then get everyone's clothes ready for school the next day. We did the washing, the hanging the clothes on the line, the ironing, the putting away, the dusting, the vacuuming. When we wanted to join the Brownies, the Girl Scouts, etc. there was no money, but for the boys, when it was time for Little League or ice hockey, there was no shortage at all. As I always say when the topic of how great the 50s were on Yahoo Answers, my standard reply is "Yeah, the 50s were terrific if you were a white male. Otherwise, not so much".

    I don't know if Ghandi actually said "I love your Christ, but I don't like your Christians", but I'm gonna keep attributing it to him. If he didn't actually say it, he was probably thinking it.

    by pearlsarefuzzy on Thu Apr 24, 2014 at 02:03:09 PM PDT

    •  Sigh... (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      JeffW

      My parents may have been Republicans, but they were definitely into treating all us kids fairly -- my brother had to do his share of the chores, especially on Saturdays when both Mom and Dad were at work (then later on just Mom after Dad died). Since he was 6 years older than me, there were things he could do (and was expected to do) that I couldn't especially when I was only 7 or 8 (as I got older, my responsibilities grew). We were also responsible for keeping our own rooms clean, but Mom or Dad would help us with heavy stuff like vacuuming or putting sheets on the bed or moving furniture if we were too little to do it ourselves.

      After my mom started working, there was a little more disposable income for fun stuff like piano lessons and Girl Scouts (especially since it was the best way for me to learn to cook).

      There's only one rule that I know of, babies -- goddammit, you've got to be kind. -- Kurt Vonnegut

      by Cali Scribe on Thu Apr 24, 2014 at 02:25:47 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  my diary about jobs at the bottom- son fired (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    JeffW

    taking a day off a temp job grounds for firing

    going to a top level academic conference in his sub discipline

    had to go as a last ditch attempt to get an academic job

    http://www.dailykos.com/...

  •  Those allowances are INSANE to start with... (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Lenny Flank

    From the ThinkProgress post on "allowance gender gap":

    One study found that boys spent just 2.1 hours a week on chores and made $48 on average, while girls put in 2.7 hours to make $45.
    Am I reading that correctly - the AVERAGE allowance is $45-50/week?

    Who the heck can afford THAT?

    From what demographic was THAT survey taken?

    The word "parent" is supposed to be a VERB, people...

    by wesmorgan1 on Thu Apr 24, 2014 at 02:52:31 PM PDT

    •  back when I was 10-14, I got my money by (0+ / 0-)

      collecting aluminum cans and returnable bottles (this was back in the early 70's) and recycling them. I'd spend maybe 10 hours a week or so peddling my bike from dumpster to dumpster, then pester my mom to drive me to the recycling center. Back then, bottles brought five cents each and aluminum was ten cents a pound.

      In a typical week, I could easily make $30-40, which was pretty good money back then, especially for a kid. (Heck, my first fulltime job after high school, in 1980, paid $113 a week.)

      I spent it on candy, records, and paperback books. And the occasional new bicycle.

      In the end, reality always wins.

      by Lenny Flank on Thu Apr 24, 2014 at 03:06:34 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Right, but you didn't get that from your parents. (0+ / 0-)

        This article is talking about parents paying kids for performing household chores, not kids working outside the home. (I lived in a rural area - when you were collecting scrap for recycling, I was hauling hay, picking peppers...)

        I'm still trying to wrap my head around that $45 average...**laugh**

        The word "parent" is supposed to be a VERB, people...

        by wesmorgan1 on Thu Apr 24, 2014 at 04:24:11 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

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