Skip to main content

Welcome to what Arianna Huffington has aptly called Third World America - we'd expect riots and revolution in any foreign city with NYC's level of economic and racial segregation.

Both the affluent and the impoverished in NYC can ride the same mass transit system (AKA the subway) and might work in the same office buildings. But at the end of the day - they return home to very separate parts of the city, their children attend dissimilar schools, and their families lead quite different lives.

The subway station at West 116th Street is in the 10027 zip code area (which extends north to West 135th Street). The subway station at West 86th Street is in the 10024 zip code area (which extends south to West 73rd Street). These two subway stations are separated by 30 blocks - a 30 minute walk, 5 minutes by car, 10 minutes by subway - and an ever-widening gap in opportunity more appropriate for a third world kleptocracy, than America's largest and most affluent city.

Economically: Median family income for zip code 10024 (the 86th Street subway stop) is $110,000/year, with only 7% of the population (and only 3% of its children) below the poverty level. By contrast, median family income in zip code 10027 (the 116th Street subway stop) is just $36,000/year, with 30% of its residents (and 40% of its children) living below the poverty level. Moreover, in the area from about West 116th Street to West 168th Street - at least half the children live in households at or near the poverty level.

Educational Attainment: Around the 86th Street subway stop, 75% of the over-25 population has at least a B.A. degree. And very often those degrees are from prestigious elite colleges, with names like Brown, Wellesley, Harvard and Yale. Around the 116th Street subway stop and further uptown, only 30% of the over-25 population has at least a B.A., and their degrees are more likely from regional or community colleges. Graduation from college is a good indicator of lifetime income potential, so the 70% of the adult population in that area without any college degree - is likely to keep falling even further behind.

Racially: 85% of the population from West 73rd to West 86th Street is white. From West 116th to West 135th Street, only 30% of the population is white.

Frighteningly, the areas noted aren't the poorest or the richest zip codes in NYC, nor are they the most racially disparate - NYC has even larger extremes.

The people in these two worlds might be acquaintances at work - but, generally, they aren't friends. An 86th Street resident with a Yale degree is unlikely to have friends uptown who never attended college. That Yalie residing near 86th Street probably grew up somewhere far from NYC. And friends outside that Yalie's current socio-economic group likely reside back in a hometown far from NYC (and frequently, outside the United States).

Mayor DeBlasio's signature proposals: Cutting back on charter schools, offering pre-Kindergarden, and additional affordable housing - won't make a dent in the widening gap between NYC's "two cities". The Mayor's education proposals, even if effective, would take at least a generation to have any impact. And affordable housing will do nothing to close the gap in opportunity and income.

These trends are not just about NYC, they are happening in much of America. Over the past generation, we've had ever-widening income inequality, combined with (at best) stagnant upward mobility and continued de facto segregation/discrimination. This isn't a good picture of civil society. If we saw these characteristics in a foreign country, we'd expect seething discontent and riots.

I'm not sure how this tale of "two cities" ends for America, but if current trends continue, I don't see this story having a good ending.

Source: Unless otherwise noted, all demographic data is from Census.Gov

A version of this diary was originally published on my blog, at:  http://stevenstrauss.tumblr.com/

Steven Strauss is an adjunct lecturer in public policy at Harvard's Kennedy School of Government. Immediately prior to Harvard, he was founding Managing Director of the Center for Economic Transformation at the New York City Economic Development Corporation. Steven was one of the NYC leads for Applied Sciences NYC (Mayor Bloomberg's plan to build several new engineering and innovation centers in NYC), NYC BigApps and many other initiatives to foster job growth, innovation and entrepreneurship. In 2010, Steven was selected as a member of the Silicon Alley 100 in NYC. He has a Ph.D. in Management from Yale University, and over 20 years' private sector work experience. Geographically, he has worked in the U.S., Asia, Europe and the Middle East.

Follow Steven Strauss on Twitter: www.twitter.com/steven_strauss

EMAIL TO A FRIEND X
Your Email has been sent.
You must add at least one tag to this diary before publishing it.

Add keywords that describe this diary. Separate multiple keywords with commas.
Tagging tips - Search For Tags - Browse For Tags

?

More Tagging tips:

A tag is a way to search for this diary. If someone is searching for "Barack Obama," is this a diary they'd be trying to find?

Use a person's full name, without any title. Senator Obama may become President Obama, and Michelle Obama might run for office.

If your diary covers an election or elected official, use election tags, which are generally the state abbreviation followed by the office. CA-01 is the first district House seat. CA-Sen covers both senate races. NY-GOV covers the New York governor's race.

Tags do not compound: that is, "education reform" is a completely different tag from "education". A tag like "reform" alone is probably not meaningful.

Consider if one or more of these tags fits your diary: Civil Rights, Community, Congress, Culture, Economy, Education, Elections, Energy, Environment, Health Care, International, Labor, Law, Media, Meta, National Security, Science, Transportation, or White House. If your diary is specific to a state, consider adding the state (California, Texas, etc). Keep in mind, though, that there are many wonderful and important diaries that don't fit in any of these tags. Don't worry if yours doesn't.

You can add a private note to this diary when hotlisting it:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary from your hotlist?
Are you sure you want to remove your recommendation? You can only recommend a diary once, so you will not be able to re-recommend it afterwards.
Rescue this diary, and add a note:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary from Rescue?
Choose where to republish this diary. The diary will be added to the queue for that group. Publish it from the queue to make it appear.

You must be a member of a group to use this feature.

Add a quick update to your diary without changing the diary itself:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary?
(The diary will be removed from the site and returned to your drafts for further editing.)
(The diary will be removed.)
Are you sure you want to save these changes to the published diary?

Comment Preferences

Subscribe or Donate to support Daily Kos.

Click here for the mobile view of the site