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BREAKING: Judge puts US Rep. John Conyers on primary ballot.
@AP
Rick Hasen:
I had said that Conyers had a very strong argument that the law limiting petition circulators to residents was likely unconstitutional. The court agreed today, holding that the case was indistinguishable from earlier Sixth Circuit precedent, binding on the trial court, Nader v. Blackwell.  The arguments that the state made to try to distinguish the Nader case seemed quite weak to me.
Paul Rosenberg:
Recently, however, cognitive linguist Anat Shenker-Osorio has taken on a much deeper and wide-ranging examination of how progressives and others think and communicate about economic issues, which she presented at length in her book ”Don’t Buy It: The Trouble With Talking Nonsense About the Economy.” (My review here.) So I asked her to bring me up to date on the latest developments in her work, in partnership with Lake Partners and for clients who include the Center for Community Change. She explained that her work is based on brand-new dial tests of large representative samples of likely voters in 2014, and that what they’re looking for is intensity — motivation to get voters to the poll in a low-turnout off-year election. But the results should generalize to motivating volunteers as well as base turnout in 2016 as well.

“What progressives and, yes, even just Democrats, need to be doing is talking less about the economy as some fickle entity they intend to appease and more about the purse-string issues that directly affect you, me and other potential voters,” Shenker-Osorio told me.

“So, less ‘I can better manage the economy,’” she continued, “And more ‘With work increasingly demanding more while offering up less, we’re overdue for new rules.’ If Republicans want to talk ‘family values,’ it’s time they start valuing families.”

“That means recognizing that Americans need paid time for illness or caring for family, affordable childcare, and a fair wage,” she elaborated. “It also means that putting food on the table for your family shouldn’t require that you’re never home to eat it. People who work hard deserve more than a decent living — they deserve a decent life.”

If it sounds sort of simple, well, it is, in a way. Think of it as progressive message discipline.

And Rosenberg again:
The Black Knight in “Monty Python and the Holy Grail” has nothing on Chris Christie. As he was being dismembered, the Black Knight insisted, “It’s just a flesh wound.” But Christie? “Wound? What wound?” is more his style. And in a sense that makes him the perfect presidential standard bearer for the GOP establishment wing. Just not in the way they had hoped.

Paul Waldman:

Is opposition to Obamacare really about race? That’s the highly charged question that has bubbled up in the last day or so, starting with a Senate hearing and then bursting into the news media. I won’t keep you in suspense: The answer is, “Yes, but . . . .”  Not all opposition to the Affordable Care Act, and not from all people, and not at all times. But two things are clearly true. First, some conservatives with large megaphones have worked hard to use the ACA as a tool of race-baiting, encouraging their white audiences to see the law through a racial lens. And second, a growing body of evidence demonstrates that race plays a role in many people’s opposition to the law.
Greg Sargent:
What would happen if Grimes described Kentucky Kynect — not Obamacare, but Kynect — as a success, by saying: “In Kentucky, we got it right?”

Look, the argument for Grimes keeping Obamacare at arm’s length is understandable. Her situation is obviously nothing like Jensen’s. With popular Governor Beshear evangelizing for Kynect and hitting McConnell over repeal, that leaves Grimes free to achieve distance from Obama and instead focus on jobs, the minimum wage, and equal pay. The Grimes camp is determined to avoid getting drawn into Washington arguments. She is focused on grounding her campaign in the state and contrasting that with McConnell’s chief vulnerability, his decades in Congress that have done little to alleviate Kentucky’s economic travails.

But even if that makes some sense, the idea that a Democrat must refrain from openly describing Kynect as the policy success that it is – the exchange has signed up over 400,000 people for health care, large numbers of them previously uninsured, many coming from a very poor, unhealthy, rural region — is really unfortunate and depressing.

Jonathan Bernstein:
Greg Sargent [see above] gets a great nugget from Democratic pollster Celinda Lake, who "recently conducted a statewide poll in Kentucky for an unnamed client and found that Kynect polls very positively, in contrast to Obamacare, which is underwater.”

Kynect is the Kentucky version of the Affordable Care Act exchange. To the extent the polling is correct, these results are another example of people loving the ACA but hating Obamacare.

Which just isn’t very surprising. People still don’t really know what “Obamacare” is. Why should they? There’s nothing labeled “Obamacare” that anyone has to deal with; almost nothing labeled “Affordable Care Act;” and there aren't even all that many noticeable parts of the new system. Of course, Kynect is one of those new things, but there’s no reason for anyone in Kentucky to know that it has anything to do with the national law.

See also our own Charles Gaba aka Brainwrap, same topic.

if you haven't seen or taken the time to read The Case for Reparations, make sure you do. We'll be talking about it for a while. And here's a Ta-Nehisi Coates blog to go with it. This is a piece we and many others will be talking about for weeks to come. For example:

Demos:

An Expert Responds to Ta-Nehisi Coates on Reparations

No matter how many conversations we have about America’s past, there’s always some sort of obligatory outrage whenever America’s dark history is synthesized, criticized and laid out before mainstream audiences without any filters. For some of us, the stories of America’s past are nothing new, but for others that history 101 failed (or maybe black history 101?), articles like Ta-Nehisi’s must-read cover story The Case for Reparations is a total eye opener. Coates eloquent essay into America’s past makes the important connection of how the wealth, privilege and white supremacy of the past connect directly to wealth and privilege today. Coates doesn’t directly call for a monetary sum or specific governmental policy to enact reparations, but rather wants to start a national conversation on the topic and it seems, at the very least recognition of the ills that America has wrought far far beyond slavery.[My bold]

Adrianna McIntyre:
21 things Obamacare does that you didn't know about
Gail Collins:
“That is part of the charm of this body,” said Senator Orrin Hatch, yearning for the good old days when “we all had a chance to bring up amendments whether they were germane or not.”

Hatch was trying to explain why his party was torpedoing a bill to extend a huge pile of tax benefits for everything from homeowners to students to Nascar racetracks. It was an extremely popular package, but it went nowhere. However, several Republicans congratulated Ron Wyden, the new Finance Committee chairman, for his great work in putting together a bipartisan piece of legislation that they were rejecting because of Reid’s refusal to entertain a series of charming amendments about Obamacare.

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Comment Preferences

  •  by the way (36+ / 0-)
    You've still got a few hours to finish Coates' "Case for Reparations" before @MHPShow this AM. Here's the syllabus http://t.co/...
    @MHarrisPerry

    "It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends upon his not understanding it!" — Upton Sinclair

    by Greg Dworkin on Sat May 24, 2014 at 04:28:29 AM PDT

  •  Republicans scuttle tax breaks.... (10+ / 0-)

    ....seriously, the president was correct. They ARE a messed up party, and deserve the title, "party of stupid!"

    Whatever the Foxteapublicans say, the opposite is the truth.

    by Forward is D not R on Sat May 24, 2014 at 04:39:22 AM PDT

  •  Christie's Toast is getting burnt in the FL sun (14+ / 0-)

    as he plans on spending the summer stumping for Rick Scott -- HA HA HA HA HA HA HA

    Embattled New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, tagging along with Gov. Rick Scott during a campaign stop at Port Tampa Bay on Thursday, said he plans to stump with Scott throughout the summer.  (link)

    As we express our gratitude, we must never forget that the highest appreciation is not to utter words, but to live by them. John F. Kennedy

    by JaxDem on Sat May 24, 2014 at 04:50:40 AM PDT

  •  FINALLY, someone has called it out! (29+ / 0-)
    “That means recognizing that Americans need paid time for illness or caring for family, affordable childcare, and a fair wage,” she elaborated. “It also means that putting food on the table for your family shouldn’t require that you’re never home to eat it. People who work hard deserve more than a decent living — they deserve a decent life.”
    Years ago I was a proposal slave, which meant working nights, weekends, and holidays as well as a full 40-hour week. The overtime was never our idea--it was management's. There was a whole lost summer in 1991, when we delivered the thing on Labor Day weekend and I felt as if I'd just flown nonstop to Australia and back three times without a break.

    All those lost summers and evenings and holidays (I worked three July Fourths at one company) factored into my decision to retire as soon as Social Security would let me. Have never regretted it.

    "Religion is what keeps the poor from murdering the rich."--Napoleon

    by Diana in NoVa on Sat May 24, 2014 at 04:56:05 AM PDT

  •  I don't see where a pundit is mentioning this (26+ / 0-)

    but it is worthy of note:  Open Carry Texas, the open carry advocates who have done such things as to "carry heavy" into several restaurants and fast food joints, intimidated 4 Moms who were meeting over gun control, spit on a gun regulation advocate and threatened to "publicly out" anyone who called the cops over their insistence on their constitutional rights by publishing their personal information online as a punishment for calling 911.

    It seems their brain trust has finally realized having a bunch of guys wearing their "cool guy gear" (their term, not mine.  IMHO no amount of camo army surplus gear can make a beer belly cool) and carrying enough firepower to frustrate the Nazis at the Battle of the Bulge is not a good public look for them.  It seems patrons and staff are intimidated by armed gangs of men for some strange reason (if they walked into a restaurant and I was there with the grandkids, I would leave immediately.  Some of these clowns appear to be "locked and loaded and saying "My bad" after you blow off a 7 year old's head does not seem sufficient)

    Now they are asking their members to "educate" the public sans the hardware.  I can only say thank goodness.
    http://digbysblog.blogspot.com/...

    I just hope some pundit picks up on this and comments on it so other open carry advocates will take the hint  

  •  On some basic level it is pointless... (13+ / 0-)

    ...to attempt to estimate the monetary value of reparations. The economic impact is just one aspect. The path we've taken as a society, as a nation has created so much in externalities of all sorts that translation to a single spreadsheet valuation grossly minimizes the damage.

    Coates implores us to put down the spreadsheet and contemplate the multiple impacts and consequences to human existence and the well being of our communities.

    Change does not roll in on the wheels of inevitability, but comes through continuous struggle. --Martin Luther King Jr.

    by Egalitare on Sat May 24, 2014 at 05:00:28 AM PDT

  •  LOL the comments on Waldman (10+ / 0-)

    he's all "baiting" and "reverse racist-ing" - nothing annoyed me more this week than hearing Joe Scarborough stating how deeply offended he was about Sen. Rockefeller's comments regarding Obamacare & race. There must be some big ass bubble encasing that round table of morning yahoos.
    This from Waldman....non-stop barrage coming from Fox & conservative radio personalities since 2008:

    The idea that Barack Obama is leading an army of black people coming to exact revenge on whites for past sins has been a staple of conservative rhetoric since the beginning of his presidency. Often, this is framed in terms of reparations for slavery: whatever policy Obama happens to be advocating at the moment, including health-care reform, conservative audiences are told that it is an effort by Obama to take their money and give it to black people to right a historical wrong for which they are blameless.
    •  FWIW (8+ / 0-)

      In my view, this is one of the reasons why Obama's gone "Softly, softly" on a number of things many of us -- myself included -- wish he'd gone pedal-to-the-metal on: Not single-payer and frog-marching Dubya and Cheney to the Hague, but simple stuff like holding bankers accountable, and making more than just a little push on government investment in the economic recovery.

      Geithner was on Stewart the other night bemoaning the fact that we suddenly went in Austerity Mode, but that wasn't just aping Europe (and that ridiculous RW "study" with all the errors in it). They just didn't want a black guy to be seen as the one who saved the country from depression. And if Obama had pushed harder on it, we would have heard more bullshit about "the angry black man" who's "coming to get us!!!"

      Sad. Really, really sad.

      "If you're going to go down with the ship, make it a submarine." - Wayne Shorter

      by Oliver Tiger on Sat May 24, 2014 at 05:18:33 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Obama is and always has been reactive (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        LEP

        The only deviations from this lifelong MO were running for president and pursuing the ACA. The former he did brilliantly if dishonestly by running as a pretend progressive, and the latter he tremendously watered down from what it could and should have been to appease industry and ConservaDems and Blue Dogs, which was itself reactive. Pretty much everything else he did, he was forced to do, like ending DADT and not defending DOMA, or did only after making sure that it would be politically popular, like getting out of Iraq. He's not what I'd call a bold leader. That would involve risk and conflict, and Obama's all about avoiding risk and conflict, be it with banks or the GOP.

        "Reagan's dead, and he was a lousy president" -- Keith Olbermann 4/22/09

        by kovie on Sat May 24, 2014 at 06:55:05 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Your comment doesn't disprove that race may still (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Shawn87

          be a factor in how Obama determines policy.

          Conservatives are not necessarily stupid, but most stupid people are conservatives. John Stuart Mill

          by Micheline on Sat May 24, 2014 at 08:50:45 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Nor does it prove it (0+ / 0-)

            I have no idea what specifically motivates Obama on this or that specific policy decision, but I do strongly suspect that whatever the motivation(s), it's more about avoiding negative reactions than bringing about positive ones.

            The reason that the Repub line "governing from behind" was so effective is that there's truth to it IMO. Fear plays a major role in his decision-making and policy-setting approach, and that's no way to govern or lead.

            "Reagan's dead, and he was a lousy president" -- Keith Olbermann 4/22/09

            by kovie on Sat May 24, 2014 at 09:13:26 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

        •  I have a parallel critique of FDR. (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          kovie, Shawn87, moviemeister76

          Why wouldn't he stand up to Bilbo and the other Dixiecrats and outlaw lynching and extend Social Security to African American domestics/janitorial workers?  He's not what I would call a bold leader.

          One of my continuing irritations with many of the Obama critics on this site is that they are much more indulgent of FDR's and LBJ's shortcomings than they are of Obama's.  

          Coates does a really exceptional job of taking the long view of these issues.  He doesn't spare Obama (and I am especially on board with his criticism of Obama's respectability politics), but he isn't kind to FDR and the other White leaders who have enabled this nation's exploitation of Black people. And despite his even handedness and the modest of his request, Coates' essay has attracted some of the most ignorant racist commentary I have ever read in the Atlantic's comment sections.

          •  I've never denied FDR & LBJ's shortcomings (0+ / 0-)

            Some of which were egregious, including these and others. FDR also interred Japanese-Americans without just cause, and refused to bomb concentration camps and train lines leading to them and devote meaningful resources to ending the Holocaust. LBJ escalated what what clearly an immoral, murderous, unnecessary and unwinnable war, for purely political reasons (that ended up backfiring on him and the party so it was a complete failure).

            But with respect to their major, signature accomplishments, with all these and other flaws, no, I don't believe that they were as cautious and half-assed as Obama's been on his major, signature accomplishments. They probably took these accomplishments about as far as was politically possible at the time, whereas I've never believed that Obama did that with the ACA and how he dealt with the meltdown. He went for the safe midpoint between what was maximally attainable and politically risky, and what was minimally acceptable and politically doable. History will not be kind to him on that.

            Btw, Washington was a self-interested slaveowner, Lincoln was too cautious in how he conducted the war, TR was a military imperialist and racist, and Wilson was a naive idealist and segregationist racist. Yet they, along with FDR, were arguably our five greatest presidents. I don't put Obama quite there.

            "Reagan's dead, and he was a lousy president" -- Keith Olbermann 4/22/09

            by kovie on Sat May 24, 2014 at 12:26:33 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  Thank you for your response, (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              moviemeister76

              but have you read the Coates piece?  I'd be interested to know what you think of it.  To me, imperialism and racism (things you correctly attribute to Washington, Lincoln, etc.) are a very big deal, and I think the Coates piece demonstrates why.  What's more, the essay points to the systemic nature of this nation's oppression of Blacks (continuous from slavery to the foreclosure crisis) that precludes the kind of "this president is better than that one" critique I object to so often on this blog.  

              I have long been a fan of the late Derek Bell's "Faces at the Bottom of the Well," which argues that this country is so fatally flawed by its racism and imperialism that to correct it would require starting all over again (although I fear what might happen with a new constitutional convention, especially if it had to include wingnuts).

            •  You're leaving something out (0+ / 0-)

              FDR passed the New Deal on the backs of black people, by supporting legislation which allowed the legal theft of their land and their possessions. Similar things happened to many poor whites throughout the South as well. That's the deal he made to get it passed. There's no way in hell any modern president would or could make that kind of deal today.

              Two hundred fifty years of slavery. Ninety years of Jim Crow. Sixty years of separate but equal. Thirty-five years of racist housing policy. Until we reckon with our compounding moral debts, America will never be whole. - Ta-Nehisi Coates

              by moviemeister76 on Sat May 24, 2014 at 09:06:35 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

          •  Yes!!! (0+ / 0-)

            Yes to everything you wrote. I really get annoyed when folks just want to ignore many of the reasons why FDR was able to pass the New Deal, reasons that, thankfully, weren't available to Obama.

            Two hundred fifty years of slavery. Ninety years of Jim Crow. Sixty years of separate but equal. Thirty-five years of racist housing policy. Until we reckon with our compounding moral debts, America will never be whole. - Ta-Nehisi Coates

            by moviemeister76 on Sat May 24, 2014 at 09:02:11 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

  •  Hooooooo boy! (5+ / 0-)
    “That is part of the charm of this body,” said Senator Orrin Hatch, yearning for the good old days when “we all had a chance to bring up amendments whether they were germane or not.”

    Hatch was trying to explain why his party was torpedoing a bill to extend a huge pile of tax benefits for everything from homeowners to students to Nascar racetracks.

    Okay, when the GOPhers are filibustering NASCAR tax breaks, that's when they're messing with their heartbeats. That goes directly to their Red state base, and those mouth-breathers (and, most importantly, Bill France Jr.) are not going to care that Harry Reid is a big ol' meanie.

    We have to keep the Senate, people. The other side has gone completely dog nuts!

    "If you're going to go down with the ship, make it a submarine." - Wayne Shorter

    by Oliver Tiger on Sat May 24, 2014 at 05:07:30 AM PDT

    •  Aside from NASCAR, this is totally in line (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      starduster, Josiah Bartlett, Shawn87

      with the GOP's tradition of being for tax breaks for the rich and against them for everyone else. And you could even argue that a tax break for NASCAR would he seen as benefiting the non-rich, as most fans are regular people. Of course, it would be the rich owners of NASCAR racetracks who'd actually benefit, as ticket and concession prices wouldn't go down a cent.

      I truly do believe that folks like Hatch genuinely despise regular people, as the GOP is, fundamentally, beyond specific policy positions on the issues, about anti-democratic aristocratic elitism, derived, ironically, from pre-revolutionary plantation society, founded by British aristocrats. Of course, this isn't Lincoln's northern reformist Republican party, but the party of William Buckley, who grew up on a former plantation. They hate poor people and minorities, and aren't particularly crazy about the middle class.

      "Reagan's dead, and he was a lousy president" -- Keith Olbermann 4/22/09

      by kovie on Sat May 24, 2014 at 06:48:41 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Chris Christie toast??? Put a shmear on it... (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    starduster

    Breakfast of Champions!!!

    The modern conservative is engaged in one of man's oldest exercises in moral philosophy;the search for a superior moral justification for selfishness

    by CTMET on Sat May 24, 2014 at 05:14:05 AM PDT

  •  talk about reparations will increase racism (0+ / 0-)

    and racial hostility.

    •  And it's at such a manageable level now... (7+ / 0-)

      "If you're going to go down with the ship, make it a submarine." - Wayne Shorter

      by Oliver Tiger on Sat May 24, 2014 at 05:21:18 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  I was tempted to write (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        a2nite, teacherken, Shawn87

        gwt worse than now? but it could, so a fair point.

        "It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends upon his not understanding it!" — Upton Sinclair

        by Greg Dworkin on Sat May 24, 2014 at 05:24:45 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  my question about reparations has (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Stude Dude, judyms9

          always been:  Let's say it happens today--we write the reparations checks. Then in three or five or ten generations from now, when racism still remains just as much a problem as it is now (because reparations won't do anything to actually change that), and future generations remain just as much the victim of past and current racism as today's generation is, why would they deserve reparations any less?  Do we give reparations to every succeeding generation that remains a victim of racism? Or do we make reparations to one generation (ours) and then tell all future generations "sorry, you're too late--we've already paid for that"?

          That is why I am against even the principle of reparations--it it nothing but a facile way for us to ease our conscience, pretend we've taken care of the problem, and let us all off the hook. It is the typical American attitude that enough money can remove our responsibility for anything, and that we can do any brutal or dishonest thing we want as long as we "make everything OK again" by writing a check later. The US has always been very good at fucking over a group of people, waiting till they're mostly all dead, then giving money to their survivors or descendants and saying "oops, sorry--here, this will cover it. We're even-steven now. No hard feelings, eh?"

          If we really want to end racism, then LET'S END RACISM. Writing a check to ease our conscience by pretending that makes it all better now, won't do that.

          In the end, reality always wins.

          by Lenny Flank on Sat May 24, 2014 at 06:16:31 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  no it won't but the counter principle (5+ / 0-)

            is this: you can't end racism and then say we're done. TNC says it several ways:

            The Case for Reparations: An Intellectual Autopsy

            Four years ago, I opposed reparations. Here's the story of how my thinking has evolved since then.

            http://www.theatlantic.com/...

            and

            More, I hope it mocks people who believe that a society can spend three-and-a-half centuries attempting to cripple a man, 50 years offering half-hearted aid, and then wonder why he walks with a limp.
            http://www.theatlantic.com/...

            "It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends upon his not understanding it!" — Upton Sinclair

            by Greg Dworkin on Sat May 24, 2014 at 06:28:48 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

          •  You should read the article (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            I love OCD, Satya1

            It's really not about the money at all.

            I made my argument from the perspective of housing, but I strongly suspect that reparations arguments could be made from the perspective of criminal justice, education, health care, or from any number of angles.

            Your beliefs don't make you a better person. Your behavior does.

            by skohayes on Sat May 24, 2014 at 06:35:46 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  Coates makes a wise choice there (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              Greg Dworkin, skohayes

              And we should follow up by not only reading his article but by studying some of his excellent source material.

              Because what does writing a bunch of checks accomplish if places like North Lawndale continue to exist?  What Coates introduces  (probably not entirely new) is the idea that maybe reparations could be focused on resolving the inequalities in housing and other areas that AAs face today.  Throwing cash at the problem would be better than no reparations, but direct focus on the current challenges today might yield better long term results.

              Letting the national dialog be reduced into discussions merely about check writing formulas and DNA testing and "none of my ancestors ever held slaves" misrepresents the need for justice here.  

              It's like Coates is calling for a million man study group.  This nation badly needs the discussion and coming to terms with America's original sin.

              I'm not liberal. I'm actually just anti-evil, OK? - Elon James White

              by Satya1 on Sat May 24, 2014 at 09:22:36 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

          •  How about if reparations are paid (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Shawn87

            in ways that directly address the current legacy of racism?  What if reparations could be done as a huge housing program to improve cultural integration, housing stock quality and equitable financial backing?  How about if school funding received massive aid to make quality pre-K universal, modify local districts or boost funding?

            The point is, Coates never talks about merely "writing checks".  He just thinks the national discussion needs to happen.

            I'm not liberal. I'm actually just anti-evil, OK? - Elon James White

            by Satya1 on Sat May 24, 2014 at 09:33:28 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

    •  read it first (5+ / 0-)

      then let's hear what you have to say. it's not what you think.

      Brilliantly written and argued, this @tanehisicoates essay on #Reparations will change an open mind. http://t.co/...
      @ron_fournier

      "It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends upon his not understanding it!" — Upton Sinclair

      by Greg Dworkin on Sat May 24, 2014 at 05:24:04 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  So what else is new (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Egalitare, Shawn87

      I voted Tuesday, May 6, 2014 because it is my right, my responsibility and because my parents moved from Alabama to Ohio to vote. Unfortunately, the republicons want to turn Ohio into Alabama.

      by a2nite on Sat May 24, 2014 at 05:31:54 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  That's a classic self-hating liberal thing to say (3+ / 0-)

      Ooh, I don't want to be seen as TOO liberal lest those mean conservatives think that I'm a limp-wristed, minority-loving, America-hating commie.

      Can we PLEASE stop looking at policy in terms of what the other side thinks or would do? It will ALWAYS be a bunch of mean-spirited and selfish assholes and there's nothing we can do about it. We can, though, and should, marginalize it. And waving white flags is clearly not the way to do that.

      We should pursue policy based on what makes sense and can work, not on what our enemies might think of it. Period.

      "Reagan's dead, and he was a lousy president" -- Keith Olbermann 4/22/09

      by kovie on Sat May 24, 2014 at 06:38:58 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Ooh, a new 2nd-favorite oxymoron! (5+ / 0-)

    "progressive message discipline"

    Of course, and sadly, nothing in the near future is likely to unseat my long-time favorite oxymoron:
    "Justice Clarence Thomas."

  •  but there’s no reason (0+ / 0-)

    for anyone in Kentucky to ..know that it has anything to do with the national law."

    So Democrats will forever be prevented from making gains since they will be unable to claim credit for legislation they are responsible for because those who are the recipients of the programs can't handle the truth?  Why even try?  

  •  It's below your dignity as a journalist! (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Oliver Tiger

    To even ask me about a flesh wound! Just how stupid are you to think that I even have a flesh wound?

    "If this Studebaker had anymore Atomic Space-Age Style, you'd have to be an astronaut with a geiger counter!"

    by Stude Dude on Sat May 24, 2014 at 05:55:14 AM PDT

  •  White Privilege (0+ / 0-)

    It's sort of a sore point with me. Yes, it's true that I'm too pasty and blue-eyed to get hassled for doing anything while brown or black. OTOH, that privilege has been a lot corroded and tainted by white collar dumping on adopted by pig farmers bigotry. Then back in the icky '80s and nasty '90s, there was older Boomer dumping on younger Boomer bigotry. Grrr....

    "If this Studebaker had anymore Atomic Space-Age Style, you'd have to be an astronaut with a geiger counter!"

    by Stude Dude on Sat May 24, 2014 at 06:20:04 AM PDT

    •  It doesn't matter (6+ / 0-)

      If you're rich and white, you get better treatment than someone who's rich and non-white.

      If you're middle-class and white, you get better treatment than someone who's middle-class and non-white.

      If you're poor and white, you get better treatnment than someone who's poor and non-white.

      If you're penniless and white, you get better treatment than someone who's penniless and non-white.

      White privilege is a thing. White privilege is real. Just because you're not a Koch brother doesn't mean you don't have white privilege.

  •  So, what choice do we really have. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    judyms9

    We can vote for whoever the republicans put up, the extreme RW candidate or we can vote for the Democratic, moderate RW candidate. I always vote against the republicans. I only wish there was a better choice.

    "Remember, Republican economic policies quadrupled the debt before I took office and doubled it after I left. We simply can't afford to double-down on trickle-down." Bill Clinton

    by irate on Sat May 24, 2014 at 06:26:27 AM PDT

  •  Any so-called "Democrat" who tries to run (0+ / 0-)

    on not being a Democrat, by distancing themselves from and even openly criticizing core Democratic values and programs such as a robust social welfare system, public education and a sensible tax and regulatory system, doesn't deserve to win, and I actually prefer that they don't, unless it's a situation in which they could make the difference between Dems being in the minority or majority. And even then, I'm not so sure, as evidenced by the great damage done to the party and country by the likes of Ben Nelson and Joe Lieberman.

    If you truly do reject the core beliefs of the Democratic party, then you're not a Democrat and need to stop pretending to be one and hypocritically benefiting from the party support that it gives you. Become a Republican already and get the fuck out of our party. And if you're simply ashamed of being a Democrat or afraid that it will hurt you politically, and think that running against it while continuing to officially be a Democrat, as a "not one of THOSE Democrats" (meaning liberal), then the same applies: get the fuck out of our party.

    "Reagan's dead, and he was a lousy president" -- Keith Olbermann 4/22/09

    by kovie on Sat May 24, 2014 at 06:33:41 AM PDT

    •  The fact is, moderates and Blue Dogs (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      judyms9, Oliver Tiger, I love OCD, Shawn87

      are necessary to have a majority. Howard Dean proved that in 2006, with his 50 state strategy.
      Of course, that majority included horrendous Democrats like Bart Stupak (tried to introduce an anti-abortion amendment to the ACA), but it also got a stimulus passed, and the ACA.

      Your beliefs don't make you a better person. Your behavior does.

      by skohayes on Sat May 24, 2014 at 06:41:23 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Our job is to keep pulling harder left by showing (0+ / 0-)

        how progressive policies address the nation's problems in rational and moral ways.  

        Building a better America with activism, cooperation, ingenuity and snacks.

        by judyms9 on Sat May 24, 2014 at 06:52:25 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  I'm not convinced that running as a conservative (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        tb mare

        on social and economic policy is the most winning strategy. It's simply the safest strategy in some districts and states, for cowards and fools. Show me a single district in the entire US where Social Security, public education and the 4th Amendment are unpopular. There are none. Sure, you have to talk and frame things differently in different places, but your core stances should be the same as a Dem, nationwide. That's the real 50-state strategy.

        One country, one platform.

        "Reagan's dead, and he was a lousy president" -- Keith Olbermann 4/22/09

        by kovie on Sat May 24, 2014 at 06:58:47 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  While I generally agree .. (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Shawn87

        The operative word here is moderate, some of these blue dogs actively work to scuttle democratic bills and are vocal against the most basic and sound dem principles, that has been the problem.

        I felt that most bills were being opposed just to show that they weren't liberal and to get donations, the primary of Blanche Lincoln had a profound effect on the other senate blue dogs, Machin is pretty conservative but not as terrible as Lincoln and Nelson. Look at Begich in Alaska, he is defending social security and running on Obamacare so is Pryor. In order to have a house majority will we have blue dogs but we must continue to selectively target those who actively work against the Dem party's basics tenets.

        Due to gerrymandering, the best case scenario is that we keep the senate and pick up a few seats in the house if the public backlash against the GOP Benghazi whitch gets real.

  •  Even the doggiest Blue Dogs vote (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Shawn87

    with Dems 98% of the time when it's a crucial vote.  

    I'm not looking for a love that will lift me up and carry me away. A love that will stroll alongside and make a few amusing comments will suffice.

    by I love OCD on Sat May 24, 2014 at 06:58:45 AM PDT

  •  One of those 21 things: (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Shawn87, codairem
    4. States are allowed to function as laboratories for tort reform, kind of.

    Specific tort reform efforts — changing the way the system handles medical malpractice lawsuits — didn't make it into Obamacare. However, the law authorizes the Secretary of Health and Human Services to make funds available for states to experiment with different kinds of medical malpractice reform and initiatives to identify, analyze, and reduce medical errors.

    However, there are limits to what these projects can do: they cannot take away a patient's ability to sue if they prefer that over the alternative. So far, it seems that most of the funding has targeted research.

    An entire provision's funds being redirected to 'research' on an already-disproven right-wing meme.

    This is federal wingnut welfare.

    "What could BPossibly go wrong??" -RLMiller "God is just pretend." - eru

    by nosleep4u on Sat May 24, 2014 at 07:04:56 AM PDT

  •  Thanks for the quote about Coates article (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Greg Dworkin, Shawn87

    Hopefully people will absorb what you highlighted and not get derailed into RW narratives and detours.  I think Coates was wise to emphasize that it shouldn't be just about payments, DNA tests, etc.  It should be about this country coming to terms with its violent past and learning about who we are.

    As I read the Coates piece I found myself thinking about the theory behind the South Africa truth and reconciliation movement.

    I'm not liberal. I'm actually just anti-evil, OK? - Elon James White

    by Satya1 on Sat May 24, 2014 at 10:03:43 AM PDT

    •  yes, indeed (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Shawn87, codairem

      it's for that reason John Conyers introduces "HR 40" every session.

      In January of 1989, I first introduced the bill H.R. 40, Commission to Study Reparation Proposals for African Americans Act. I have re-introduced HR 40 every Congress since 1989, and will continue to do so until it's passed into law.
      http://conyers.house.gov/...

      "It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends upon his not understanding it!" — Upton Sinclair

      by Greg Dworkin on Sat May 24, 2014 at 11:22:04 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Yeah, I know (0+ / 0-)

        I read the whole Coates article yesterday and did a few googles on some of the historical references he made.

        I'm sure there is scholarly work out there on this, but I haven't seen anyone connect the dots of history and include such gems of wisdom in the bargain as well.

        A truly excellent piece.  For me its a chance to rededicate more effort into justice for AAs.  I knew most of the details Coates brought up, but it is the connections and emphasis on our national history that really knock this out of the park for me.  I have ordered some of the books he referenced.  I live in Chicago so it maybe has more relevance for me.  Yet there are many other places in the US that are a lot like North Lawndale.

        Thanks again Greg - for everything you do at DK.

        I'm not liberal. I'm actually just anti-evil, OK? - Elon James White

        by Satya1 on Sat May 24, 2014 at 05:45:22 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

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