Skip to main content

It’s been one of those weeks where so many things have come to light that I simply do not know where to begin writing first. I sit there and think, which of the various things that I have been listening to or reading about have actually annoyed me to the point of actually writing about. I have realised that I am just generally annoyed.

When I thought about it more, I concluded that the underlying theme of these various stories is a complete and utter contempt by bourgeois governments (that lay claim to being utterly democratic) of the vast majority of people that they govern. Whether they govern competently or not, whether there is anything resembling a democratic mandate or not; it is the utter contempt in which they hold the majority of the population that has really gotten my goat.

I also realised that this is not only confined to governments, it is a view shared by the leadership of religious authorities, by arms of the state (police, armies, etc.) and even by the heads of sporting associations.  This contempt is a reflection of the fact that those in power think/know that when push comes to shove, they know who they serve and it is not the vast majority of people; it is a tiny elite hiding behind the word “democracy” while actually not even slightly being accountable to that majority. It is the abuse of power by those that have it wielded against those that view themselves as powerless. Having just spoken to my postman about my frustration, he agreed and said “this is a long term problem, what can you and I do about it”?

 photo e4cf2fda-af30-4419-a80c-34be035f7234_zps10c6a859.jpg

Some of it is actually ironically and accidentally funny. So, in a week where a purported attempted takeover of Birmingham’s schools by so-called Muslim fundamentalists is met by a cry for the teaching of “British Values” of democracy by the education secretary Michael Gove, we see the purchase of water cannons for use against protestors in London and the agreement that they will be used by British police; note this refers to the mainland as they have been used in Northern Ireland for quite some time. The irony it burns.

“We want to create and enforce a clear and rigorous expectation on all schools to promote the fundamental British values of democracy, rule of law, individual liberty and mutual respect and tolerance of those with different faiths and beliefs," department officials explain (http://www.bbc.co.uk/...).”
One needs to ask how important democracy is in Britain when they are prepared to use water cannons against their own population. It is not only the water cannons, the actions of the police against anti-Fracking protestors have been atrocious; so what, is democracy fine as long as we do not try to stop the actions of politicians in modern society? So what about individual liberty and mutual respect?
 photo 43348283-b91e-4e33-bb1e-2c4aea64c2a5_zps79e1d7d1.jpg

Under a government whose view of housing policy is the creation of a housing bubble (which has even gotten the IMF a bit worried), refusal to regulate private rentals and protect tenants, the attempt to sell off what little social housing remains and, of course, the social cleansing of inner London due to reduction of amount of housing benefits given to those whose income is insufficient to pay rents (which has not been alleviated by their squeeze on wages and the undermining of conditions of work), and the fantasy that private housing will simply be built and will be accessible for those on lower income, we now are being treated to a policy of spikes being put outside buildings in London to keep the homeless from lying on spaces hitting the news.

 photo 1aa49847-42f2-4d2e-8d31-794206c206ce_zpsbbe21d79.jpg

These anti-homeless spikes were not only put outside of posh new housing in Southwark, South London; these spikes were put up in front of some Tesco supermarkets and Vue Cinemas, after all, we do not want the great unwashed to actually have a place to sit or lie down … some more of those British values, I guess. This was so grotesque that the posh mayor of London, Boris Johnson, actually had something to say about it; in context, Boris has complete and utter contempt for anyone not of the ruling class, so this must be considered rather gauche even for him.  

Pickets were planned, there was even some direct action of pouring concrete over some of the spikes. Some of the spikes were removed just as pickets were planned to start (like those below at Tesco); but these are all over the place ...

 photo 76de666a-5ef1-4ed0-8d8f-768cee8906c9_zps86bc0ae1.jpg

So, it looks like a win, and it is a win … but it is the complete contempt of the great unwashed which was behind all this … was it a question of going too far or with too much arrogance? Was it because they believed all the ideological trash about the poor leeching off the fat of the land or because they thought that everyone bought into it?

On the Church and State

Two stories in the last few weeks simply made me both physically ill and absolutely furious. These relate to Ireland, stories that are historical but yield truths beyond the fact that they are historical.   In the first story, the bodies of 800 children from a mothers and “orphans” home in Galway have been found in a septic pit; most of these children died of malnutrition and illness under the care of the church.  This is one of those stories which everyone who lived near these homes knew about, but only spoke in whispers, no one spoke openly about it; the treatment of children in these so-called care homes was known. They sat alongside "non-orphaned" children in schools …  these children, who given the manner of their birth treated them as lesser by teachers, by nuns, by the church and the state. The state could not even be bothered to inspect these homes leaving the Church in complete control. And when these children died, their “caretakers” couldn’t be bothered to even give these children a “Christian” burial. This was not one place, it was not an outlier amongst good care for these children; it was a general problem.

“Unmarried mothers incarcerated until they signed over their babies, healthy children sold to be adopted by wealthy Americans and disabled infants, who had no sale value, abandoned in “Dying Rooms”, and their bodies dumped by the brides of Christ in a septic tank.

This was a nationwide industry founded on human suffering. In a country utterly corrupted by its own twisted version of Catholicism and run by a complicit elite, young women who “fell pregnant” were condemned. They had sinned and were left to the mercy of perverts and brutes. Their children were a tainted commodity to be sold or discarded at the whim of people considered “religious” (http://www.irishexaminer.com/...).”

 photo e57f78f9-0cef-40b9-a675-10a867e2df31_zpsc987980c.jpg

Photo: http://www.irishcentral.com/...

In the second story, it was found that children in orphanages were used for medical experimentation.  Essentially 2000 children of unmarried mothers were treated with Diphtheria inoculations in care homes and orphanages without consent being asked of these mothers as part of a drug trial for Burroughs Wellcome between 1930 and 1936 before being released for general use. Who cares about these children or what their “slutty” mothers have to say about anything?!

 photo a5592d56-bac9-48d4-b920-1d4f74518c58_zps6d3bb2f3.jpg

Photo: http://www.irishcentral.com/...
“The fact that no record of these trials can be found in the files relating to the Department of Local Government and Public Health, the Municipal Health Reports relating to Cork and Dublin, or the Wellcome Archives in London, suggests that vaccine trials would not have been acceptable to government, municipal authorities, or the general public (http://www.irishcentral.com/...).”
While all of the coverage of these stories will be concentrated upon these poor children, the underlying causes will probably never be mentioned. Why? Because those underlying causes relate to the reproductive rights of women and this is what is not going to be examined in any of the inquests or enquiry’s which will now be conducted. Inability to access birth control and control over our own reproduction is what leads to this situation. The denigration and objectification of the children caused by normal human interaction; yes, people have unwanted pregnancies will not be addressed.

Safe and legal abortion is still inaccessible in Ireland; this is due to the power of the Catholic Church over the political and personal lives of women. It derives from the strength of patriarchal ideology. It comes about due to the collusion of church and state not only in the fact that the state left these poor children in the hands of a Church obsessed with controlling women’s bodies leading to a fetishism of foetuses, but not a lick of concern about the results of their policies, the illegitimate children.

So while many, if not all, religions claim to be moral arbiters, and even worse, they claim to be the sole moral arbiters arguing that morality must derive from religion, we can ask what do you mean by morality?! We also need to ask if the so-called morality of these religions is actually the same morality that the rest of us hold and if not why do they still exert the social control irrespective of the disgust so many of us feel when we read these stories?

Before Americans get too smug, please do not forget the Pill trials on Puerto Rican Women (and their forced sterilisation). Let us never forget the forced sterilisation of Native American women (leading to genocide), forced sterilisation of Latinas, Asians, Black, poor women and disabled women. We can never forget the Tuskegee syphilis experiment on Black men in Alabama.  

Eugenics in the form of sterilisation abuse in the US was practiced under control or permission granted by a secular state and codified in law and it is not something that is specific to the US either (go and look at the link).  No government or religion’s hands are clean; the secondary status of women is woven into the fabric of the world’s dominant religions.  

While we can say that these are history and relate to the past, I wish I could say that these stories only relate to the past in so many places.  In some instances, it is the power of a patriarchal religion, in others it is state sanctioned, sometimes, the two collude together. Patriarchy still wields control in many forms.  The lack of respect for and the objectification of women can be seen all over the world: from the rapes and murders of Dalit girls in Uttar Pradesh, to honour killings, to the use of rape as an arsenal of war throughout the world, to the lack of control over our reproductive rights and coerced sterilisation.  

In the US, the Church working under the Catholic Benefits Association has managed to prevent its employees from receiving birth control as part of its health benefits package. Yes, they won the appeal. So, while the US loves claiming the separation of church and state proudly in its constitution, the power of the Church and refusal laws “of conscience” are not only being used to prevent access to birth control. The church owns hospitals and in those hospitals, birth control, abortion and voluntary sterilisation are proscribed . Guess what, that is not only the case in the US, it is also the case in Italy where refusal laws mean that women accessing abortion becomes harder and harder as 70% of OB/GYNs and 50% of anaesthetists have registered as objectors, in Portugal 80% of gynaecologists refuse to perform legal abortions (see, http://globaldoctorsforchoice.org/..., p. 15).

And if you think that forced or coerced sterilisation has disappeared from the US, let me remind you of the sterilisation of women prisoners in California in the period of 2006-2010; yes, in this century and even with laws forbidding the practice.  

“According to the prisoners’ rights advocacy group Justice Now, people in California women’s prisons have been illegally sterilized, nearly four decades after sterilization abuse guidelines were implemented at the state and the federal level. Justice Now’s investigations revealed that between 2006 and 2010 at least 116 people in two California prisons were sterilized as a form of birth control via tubal ligation during labor and delivery. At least a couple dozen more prisoners—predominantly Black, Latina, and indigent women and transgender people—reported being sterilized by hysterectomy and oophorectomy under highly questionable and abusive circumstances. Reports include patients being falsely diagnosed with cervical cancer and later finding out from medical records that the cancer never existed, undergoing sterilization surgery without their knowledge, being asked to sign consent forms while under sedation, being denied less-invasive, often more appropriate treatment options that would not take away their ability to have children, and being denied second medical opinions and proper follow-up care. Later research from the Center for Investigative Reporting found that nearly 250 prison tubal ligations occurred since 1997 (http://rhrealitycheck.org/...).”
Lots of Circuses, but where is the Bread?

Many people know the term “Bread and Circuses” as coming from the ancient Roman’s provision of wheat to people along with expensive spectacles to win the support of the population (or to actually provide spectacles to distract them from their misery and to get them to support a government that did little for them). Extremely useful in that it provided the populace with food, at the same time offering them the spectacle, to ensure the support of the plebs for governments that knew that starving them could bring some serious difficulties in maintaining control of the system.  

“[…] Already long ago, from when we sold our vote to no man, the People have abdicated our duties; for the People who once upon a time handed out military command, high civil office, legions — everything, now restrains itself and anxiously hopes for just two things: bread and circuses (Juvenal, Satire 10.77–81).”
What is becoming a common practice in the days of privation of the majority due to austerity (in the advanced capitalist world) or to general mal-functioning of governments which trumpet the wonders of capitalism (everywhere else) is the provision of the spectacle with absolutely no attention to provision of bread or even more so the reduction of incomes by which people need to purchase food, clothing, heating, water and have access to decent housing.

Two of the main spectacles these days can be found in the World Cup and the Olympics. In all cases, the places that win these events promise that they will bring long-lasting positive changes and benefits to the majority of the population, especially the poorest and most deprived, in the places in which they are located. Invariably, massive amounts of money are poured into building the arenas for the spectacles. This is the case whether “austerity” (read that as immiserisation) is being forced down the throats of the populace or whether the populace has been and is currently living in misery and poverty and is in desperate need of basic things like housing, schools, health care, food, sanitation, running water, electricity and employment.  

While everyone in Brazil supposedly loves football (and it is a country that loves its football), the issue of priorities of governments which supposedly have the money to waste in a short-term spectacle but cannot provide for the basic needs of the population even in an emergent capitalist economy. Somewhere along the line, the demonstration that Brazil has “arrived” on the international stage as a powerhouse (demonstrated by having both the World Cup and the Olympics) actually seems to be of more concern to Brazilian politicians (even those claiming to a leftist persuasion) than whether the poor actually have housing, food, sanitation, water, and the possibility of a future beyond continued impoverisation. In Brazil, this has included “pacification” measures for certain favelas; confirmed  police brutality, worries about gentrification and rising housing prices as these favelas are “pacified”, security for tourists prioritised over the needs of residents, it leads  a rather cynical part of me wonders if these “pacified” favelas will be open to tourists during the current World Cup and the future Olympics?

 photo b2cdb5b0-86c2-460d-92ac-1ae3a135d5ed_zpsb39ad9dc.jpg

There have been protests of workers, the poor, they are not confined to the left; strikes have broken out on public transport, airport workers have gone out; the teachers have even gone on strike.  Protestors are protesting against $11 billion that has been spent for getting the cities involved ready for the World Cup, they are protesting against corruption, police violence, the desperate need for social investment in housing, education, health care, sanitation, access to clean water ... these problems will not disappear after the football tourists and Olympic visitors have left.  While listening to the news waiting for the spectacle to begin, there was an interview on the BBC that was beautiful in its cynicism. It was argued that once the spectacle begins, the protests, the strikes, the misery of the people would all be laid aside for the spectacle.

I am certain that Dilma Rousseff really hopes so given that she was booed at the opening match between Brasil and Croatia in São Paulo and that the police used tear gas and rubber bullets against protestors at a metro station 8 km away before kick-off time.

I want to end tonight’s rant with a bit of humour … which clearly demonstrates that I have a rather sick sense of humour.  One may wonder why a picture of “red” Ed Miliband posing with a copy of The Sun’s World Cup Pride freebie issue may actually provoke a furore. The answer is not particularly complicated.  

In fact, it goes back to the Hillsborough Disaster where 96 Liverpool football fans were killed. What ensued after this tragedy was an official cover-up, the vilification of the victims of the disaster, and a, shall we say, more than problematic inquest into the deaths. A new inquest has been called after being fought for so hard and long by the people of Liverpool.  There was also the horrific libellous reporting of The Sun which argued that the deaths were a result of drunkenness and that people were stealing from the dead and dying which led to a complete and utter boycott of the Sun in Liverpool.

 photo 81c04a22-0440-4ad9-bd58-2466fc13f1e1_zpsa176bca1.jpg

So, a picture of “Red Ed” Miliband, leader of the Labour Party,  posing while holding a copy of freebie piece has not been well received (as an understatement).

 photo dee2c001-3521-4afd-961a-a229687c47cc_zps2c04bc14.jpg

Apologies notwithstanding, there are a lot of people not particularly happy with Mr. Miliband. A Labour Local Chancillor, Martin Cummings, has resigned from the Labour party following the picture's publication.  Surely, Miliband, could not have possibly missed a campaign going back 25 years around the death of 96 people, it is impossible that he could not have heard of the campaign against The Sun in Liverpool (you cannot get a copy of the wretched paper there), heck, how could he have missed the news discussing Liverpudlians putting signs up telling their post-person (known as Postie) not to leave the freebie World Cup issue of The Sun in their mailboxes and the fact that Posties refused to  deliver in in several places?  

 photo b9366f60-b507-4a22-867e-8688a7794688_zps02741329.jpg

Photo: http://www.liverpoolecho.co.uk/...

Hell, surely he could have spoken to Andy Burnham, his Shadow Secretary of State for Health before posing with a copy of The Sun.  I am wondering if his PR team was sleeping on the job … you simply cannot make this stuff up!  The word is contempt!

Methinks that returning their contempt is only fair and demonstrations, political actions, direct action and all forms of campaigns (including holding them accountable at the ballot box) are only fair play! So have at it people ...

Originally posted to Anti-Capitalist Meetup on Sun Jun 15, 2014 at 03:00 PM PDT.

Also republished by Sexism and Patriarchy, Feminism, Pro-Feminism, Womanism: Feminist Issues, Ideas, & Activism, and Community Spotlight.

EMAIL TO A FRIEND X
Your Email has been sent.
You must add at least one tag to this diary before publishing it.

Add keywords that describe this diary. Separate multiple keywords with commas.
Tagging tips - Search For Tags - Browse For Tags

?

More Tagging tips:

A tag is a way to search for this diary. If someone is searching for "Barack Obama," is this a diary they'd be trying to find?

Use a person's full name, without any title. Senator Obama may become President Obama, and Michelle Obama might run for office.

If your diary covers an election or elected official, use election tags, which are generally the state abbreviation followed by the office. CA-01 is the first district House seat. CA-Sen covers both senate races. NY-GOV covers the New York governor's race.

Tags do not compound: that is, "education reform" is a completely different tag from "education". A tag like "reform" alone is probably not meaningful.

Consider if one or more of these tags fits your diary: Civil Rights, Community, Congress, Culture, Economy, Education, Elections, Energy, Environment, Health Care, International, Labor, Law, Media, Meta, National Security, Science, Transportation, or White House. If your diary is specific to a state, consider adding the state (California, Texas, etc). Keep in mind, though, that there are many wonderful and important diaries that don't fit in any of these tags. Don't worry if yours doesn't.

You can add a private note to this diary when hotlisting it:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary from your hotlist?
Are you sure you want to remove your recommendation? You can only recommend a diary once, so you will not be able to re-recommend it afterwards.
Rescue this diary, and add a note:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary from Rescue?
Choose where to republish this diary. The diary will be added to the queue for that group. Publish it from the queue to make it appear.

You must be a member of a group to use this feature.

Add a quick update to your diary without changing the diary itself:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary?
(The diary will be removed from the site and returned to your drafts for further editing.)
(The diary will be removed.)
Are you sure you want to save these changes to the published diary?

Comment Preferences

  •  Tip Jar (24+ / 0-)

    "Hegel noticed somewhere that all great world history facts and people so to speak twice occur. He forgot to add: the one time as tragedy, the other time as farce" Karl Marx, The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte .

    by NY brit expat on Sun Jun 15, 2014 at 03:00:19 PM PDT

  •  Tonight's ACM has be x-posted to: (10+ / 0-)

    "Hegel noticed somewhere that all great world history facts and people so to speak twice occur. He forgot to add: the one time as tragedy, the other time as farce" Karl Marx, The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte .

    by NY brit expat on Sun Jun 15, 2014 at 03:09:00 PM PDT

  •  thanks for this. frankly better to have Miliband (10+ / 0-)

    optics than none at all, although I am a bigger fan of Ralph

    Hell, surely he could have spoken to Andy Burnham, his Shadow Secretary of State for Health before posing with a copy of The Sun.  I am wondering if his PR team was sleeping on the job … you simply cannot make this stuff up!  The word is contempt!
    http://espn.go.com/...

    At least we have no Iranian or Iraqi footie games this summer

    In a series of tweets and shocking photos posted to their social media sites, the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) is boasting to have slaughtered 1,700 Iraqi soldiers in the past week as the militant Islamist group continued its blitzkrieg towards Baghdad.

    Warning - some snark may be above‽ (-9.50; -7.03)‽ eState4Column5©2013 "If we appear to seek the unattainable, then let it be known that we do so to avoid the unimaginable." (@eState4Column5)

    by annieli on Sun Jun 15, 2014 at 03:09:16 PM PDT

    •  I think that Ralph would be simply (10+ / 0-)

      horrified about his two sons politics (that is David -- the Blairite --  and Ed who has happily adopted neoliberalism lite) ...

      I like football, it is fun to watch when it is played well. What isn't half as fun is the corruption of FIFA, the waste of a massive amount of money for the World Cup and the fact that a far better use of money could have been easily found if they simply could be bothered ... what irritates me intensely is the line about how the poor (or poor countries) will benefit from the spending of massive amounts of money on football stadiums that they will not ever have access to, the housing that will never be theirs, the sanitation that is desperately needed (believe me the stadia have toilets and running water)

      sigh ...

      "Hegel noticed somewhere that all great world history facts and people so to speak twice occur. He forgot to add: the one time as tragedy, the other time as farce" Karl Marx, The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte .

      by NY brit expat on Sun Jun 15, 2014 at 03:14:00 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  indeed - the discourse about the construction of (8+ / 0-)

        sporting arenas as "beneficial" development projects and its inherent contradictions especially in the US never seems to have entered the discourse of global urban planning despite the kleptocracy of Olympic games

        Warning - some snark may be above‽ (-9.50; -7.03)‽ eState4Column5©2013 "If we appear to seek the unattainable, then let it be known that we do so to avoid the unimaginable." (@eState4Column5)

        by annieli on Sun Jun 15, 2014 at 03:19:35 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  The places that they built for the athletes (8+ / 0-)

          in London are under the management of a Qatari firm; there is some "affordable" housing there ... the area around it in Newham (which is one of the poorest boroughs in London) is in desperate need of social housing. They didn't turn it over to the council for social housing ... there are rentals on a discount of the London rent and then there are flats that they are selling. The weirdest thing is the name of the streets which sound like they come out of Mussolini's Rome ... Champion this and celebration that and prize this:

          http://www.insidehousing.co.uk/...

          Most of the facilities from the Olympics are still not available to local residents to use ... they are still running around playing the pleasure of the London Olympics.  They rebuilt the duck pond where the temporary police headquarters and then put a park and football and cricket pitch where the army was headquartered. It took almost 2 years to do this ...

          "Hegel noticed somewhere that all great world history facts and people so to speak twice occur. He forgot to add: the one time as tragedy, the other time as farce" Karl Marx, The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte .

          by NY brit expat on Sun Jun 15, 2014 at 03:35:08 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Nothing much has changed when it comes (9+ / 0-)

            to publicly-funded stadiums since Roman days. The games may be less violent usually, but then again the wheat supplies are not to be seen either for those who are in need.

            I'm stopped at a gas station south of Atlanta driving home. It's pouring. Your excellent piece gets me thinking about the baseball team ("Braves") leaving Atlanta proper and going to a wealthy county to the north of town by I think 2017 because of all the public gifts that will be rendered. Atlanta refused to pay the bribes to "free" enterprise, so the quite new and well-designed Turner Field will be abandoned. The hundreds of predominately African American people who park cars and sell hotdogs, etc. will be unemployed. The people who could afford the tickets are mostly white and live to the north, so that's where the team will be going. Seems almost like South African apartheid glory days are here again. Maybe Paul Simon will cut a record.

            garden variety democratic socialist: accepting life's complexity|striving for global stewardship of our soil and other resources to meet everyone's basic needs|being a friend to the weak

            by Galtisalie on Sun Jun 15, 2014 at 04:37:37 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  The Roman circuses was my first thought.Trouble is (7+ / 0-)

              that when you don't have much, you tend to identify and get your sense of self from the identification with symbols of power outside yourself (Camelot - "What do the rich folks do?") So it is hard when people demonstrate against the one thing of pleasure that you identify with.  I know I was glad that Italy beat England -- and if i'm honest its very tribal - Italians are darker, more southern Europe and more Latin and I live in a Latino neighborhood. It had nothing to do with politics or correct political positions. P/The deaths of workers gave me a moment of horrified reality, but it didn't stop me, unfortunately, from cheering when Italy won.  

              •  It was surprisingly a good game (2+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                BMScott, thanatokephaloides

                We were expecting the worst; a defensive snore-fest ... it was a good game, both teams played well. But my big cheers were two-fold, the 35 year old Pirlo controlling the field for the Italians (and almost getting a goal from a set play) and Mario Ballotelli who used to play in Britain for a bit with a beautiful header enjoying himself and not getting into silliness causing ejection (he is a beautiful player but emotionally young). You probably were not subjected to the stupidity of the English commentators that night only calmed down by the wonderful Thierry Henry who just could not be bothered with the bashing of the team who played well but could not beat Italy. But there are some young men playing who will be very good in a bit.

                "Hegel noticed somewhere that all great world history facts and people so to speak twice occur. He forgot to add: the one time as tragedy, the other time as farce" Karl Marx, The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte .

                by NY brit expat on Sun Jun 15, 2014 at 06:03:28 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

                •  I’ve only followed very casually, but (2+ / 0-)

                  didn’t the Italian coach have some very nice things to say about the play of the English squad?

                  •  For very good reason ... (2+ / 0-)
                    Recommended by:
                    BMScott, thanatokephaloides

                    they played well; the problem is not the English team or for that matter Wayne Rooney who has for some reason been the target of incredible harshness by some commentators of sport here (like Alan Shearer) ... their midfield is weak compared to Italy and that allowed Italy to win. Simple as that ... Rooney is not a midfield player (he is a forward), they should try playing him as a proper playmaker ... he is not extremely nimble as the great players in that position, but he did a better job passing to strikers than playing as a striker himself. I am not a big fan of Rooney, it was simply that the Italian team was a bit better and England is simply not as good as them. There are some good younger players, they need to build and strengthen them.

                    "Hegel noticed somewhere that all great world history facts and people so to speak twice occur. He forgot to add: the one time as tragedy, the other time as farce" Karl Marx, The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte .

                    by NY brit expat on Mon Jun 16, 2014 at 03:51:48 AM PDT

                    [ Parent ]

  •  ACM Schedule (5+ / 0-)

    JUNE

    22nd: Justina

    29th: Annieli

    JULY

    6th:
    13th:
    20th:
    27th:
    Geminijen

    Hi Comrades and Fellow Travellers!

    June has been off to a roaring start (and you thought only March roared). Next week is Justina and we end the month with Annieli. This is amazing! We need some volunteers for July. At this point, we only have Geminjen on the 27th; we need 3 more volunteers especially at the beginning of the month.  If you can take a date that would help this important and worthy series keep going.

    Please can you help by volunteering to post. It does not have to be fancy or theory ... it can be about anything from an anti-capitalist perspective ... perhaps an action that is happening that you think is important, a discussion of current events or serious debate ... whatever you feel comfortable with and what you can do!

    Please respond to this post or/and send a private message by kosmail to NY Brit Expat and/or send a message to our email group: dkanticapitalistgroup@gmail.com

    Please, the ACM needs you to write, can you volunteer to keep this great series going?!

    "Hegel noticed somewhere that all great world history facts and people so to speak twice occur. He forgot to add: the one time as tragedy, the other time as farce" Karl Marx, The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte .

    by NY brit expat on Sun Jun 15, 2014 at 03:17:34 PM PDT

    •  Galtisalie ... (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      thanatokephaloides

      can you do something in early July? Can anyone else?

      "Hegel noticed somewhere that all great world history facts and people so to speak twice occur. He forgot to add: the one time as tragedy, the other time as farce" Karl Marx, The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte .

      by NY brit expat on Sun Jun 15, 2014 at 04:18:18 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Question for you, NY brit expat? ..... (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      NY brit expat

      (or anybody else who can answer it)

      You asked:

      Please can you help by volunteering to post. It does not have to be fancy or theory ... it can be about anything from an anti-capitalist perspective ... perhaps an action that is happening that you think is important, a discussion of current events or serious debate ... whatever you feel comfortable with and what you can do!
      Does one have to be a member/editor of the ACM group to write such things?

      And might I get an invite to join?

      Thank you!  

      l-)

      "It's high time (and then some) that we put an end to the exceptionalistic nonsense floating around in our culture and face the fact that either the economy works for all, or it doesn't work AT all." -- Sean McCullough (DailyKos user thanatokephaloides)

      by thanatokephaloides on Mon Jun 16, 2014 at 02:48:11 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  if you want to write for us ... (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        thanatokephaloides

        you need to be a member of the anti-capitalist meetup to post to queue.

        We are an anti-capitalist meetup and our members range from anarchists (of various stripes), Marxists of various stripes and left wing Social Democrats. We only ask that pieces (on whatever you want to write) are written from an anti-capitalist perspective broadly defined ... we are not liberals, we are not progressive, we are anti-capitalist. We may not agree on how to change things or even what we think the future will be; what we do agree upon is that the enemy is the capitalist economic system and that any true change will require its replacement. What we ask is that differences between political lines are treated with respect and that people behave in a comradely manner in our pieces.

        Take a look at earlier pieces (look under anti-capitalist meetup or anti-capitalist meet-up tags or anti-capitalism) or click this link: http://www.dailykos.com/....

        We post on Sunday's at 6pm eastern (11 pm britain, 12 midnight for western europe). If you think that you would be comfortable being a member, please send a personal kos message to me here at dkos: ny brit expat

        and I will add you.  

        In solidarity ...

        "Hegel noticed somewhere that all great world history facts and people so to speak twice occur. He forgot to add: the one time as tragedy, the other time as farce" Karl Marx, The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte .

        by NY brit expat on Mon Jun 16, 2014 at 04:10:09 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  short of bringing back (3+ / 0-)

    the New Modelled Army, some reparations are due vis. Nuremberg trial-type crimes against humanity  

    Warning - some snark may be above‽ (-9.50; -7.03)‽ eState4Column5©2013 "If we appear to seek the unattainable, then let it be known that we do so to avoid the unimaginable." (@eState4Column5)

    by annieli on Sun Jun 15, 2014 at 04:43:29 PM PDT

  •  I'm glad you did a multi-topic piece. (7+ / 0-)

    They are all important topics. The common thread is the interests of the powerful coinciding with government and their pet institutions of feel-good-doling-out (emotional wheat if you will), such as church and sport. As I sat last night for nearly 13 innings, in an annual family baseball outing, my socialist self took it all in and wondered where sports and athletic competition should fit in a just society. I have loved baseball all my life, but the exclusivity and slick advertising aspects in every micropore of the experience are sad. I also love an American football team. When my Dad was really sick last year (he's doing better now), the last words he said to me before I as to go were "Miami Dolphins" with a smile on his face through the pain. We used to listen to the blacked-out games in the late 60s on the radio lying on the living room rug. Those were great memories. The working people deserve to have their rights in sporting teams respected as a form of social capital. Instead sports in the U.S. are captives of capitalism's worst hypocrisies.

    garden variety democratic socialist: accepting life's complexity|striving for global stewardship of our soil and other resources to meet everyone's basic needs|being a friend to the weak

    by Galtisalie on Sun Jun 15, 2014 at 05:07:44 PM PDT

    •  Agreed completely about sports (3+ / 0-)

      used to go to Mets games with my dad as a kid; I love football (what is called soccer) and I love hockey. Used to be you could afford cheap tickets, in Britain some of the teams were owned partly by fans, they had a stake in the team. Then they were bought by the oligarchs and billionaires and the people that love the game cannot even see them anymore except on telly. That is fun, but there is something wonderful about sharing these moments with your family and friends and people you do not know ... everyone is entitled to some happiness and if we can get a small bit in the midst of misery what is the crime? But that is so different from the way things are, tickets are expensive, in the biggest stadiums it is hard to see at the top (in nosebleed company) ... profits are the name of the game ... there are still local teams but they really cannot compete with the big teams; but periodically, no one wins against a shark at the FA cup and it is lovely ... it can be seen as a social good or a public good, something for all for real, rather than the pretense that it is now ... see you have made me whimsical ... it is father's day and now I am remembering going to Shea Stadium with my father back in the days ...

      "Hegel noticed somewhere that all great world history facts and people so to speak twice occur. He forgot to add: the one time as tragedy, the other time as farce" Karl Marx, The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte .

      by NY brit expat on Sun Jun 15, 2014 at 05:28:01 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Great links! Unfortunately, the link to the info (2+ / 0-)

    on the Hillsborough Disaster leads to a dkos diary that can't be found, and the link to the global doctors for choice does not include the story.

    The spirit of liberty is the spirit which is not too sure that it is right. -- Judge Learned Hand, May 21, 1944

    by ybruti on Sun Jun 15, 2014 at 05:37:03 PM PDT

  •  Talking about contradictions in a post modern (7+ / 0-)

    world I am fighting for an ending of border and each workers right to immigrate while many of the folks coming in are from cultures that reflect a more recent semi-feudal culture that is heavily based in patriarchy, the catholic church and evangelical protestant values and is fighting women's control  over their own reproductive rights and the right to abortion which is also an issue I strongly support. The contradictions abound. Sometimes I feel like Alice in Wonderland.

    •  Agreed! We must work on our Cheshire Cat (4+ / 0-)

      routines and smile sagely while fighting to overcome the contradictions which keep pounding us over the head. It is a long road ... but we are all travelling it together.

      "Hegel noticed somewhere that all great world history facts and people so to speak twice occur. He forgot to add: the one time as tragedy, the other time as farce" Karl Marx, The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte .

      by NY brit expat on Sun Jun 15, 2014 at 06:06:36 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  You want to end borders? (0+ / 0-)

      You think that no citizenry should be allowed to set boundaries around its territory?

      •  I'm for a return to 1491 borders. (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        NY brit expat

        What citizens get to play by your rules?

        garden variety democratic socialist: accepting life's complexity|striving for global stewardship of our soil and other resources to meet everyone's basic needs|being a friend to the weak

        by Galtisalie on Mon Jun 16, 2014 at 06:56:13 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  I'm sorry, I don't understand (0+ / 0-)

          Are you saying that the European invasion of North America was hunky-dory because no one should have a right to their own territorial integrity?

          •  I'm saying it was not "hunky-dory" because (2+ / 0-)

            it was an attempt to obtain by brutality and subject to a theory of "conquest" and "title" the commons. Those who were here first and their progeny certainly have a moral claim to sustainably use the land, but that is all it is. We all as humans have to learn how to share our one planet, and European legal doctrines are historical creations human beings can set aside in their best shared interest. Geminijen can address matters for herself, but I also think that national borders are products of the edicts of the powerful, so no I don't respect them. The powerful are ruining our planet and the desperate human beings without power migrate "illegally"--so what would you do with them? It is convenient to the powerful and their mercenaries to now recognize as sacrosanct what they did not previously honor. The world should not be run for the convenience of the powerful and their mercenaries.

            garden variety democratic socialist: accepting life's complexity|striving for global stewardship of our soil and other resources to meet everyone's basic needs|being a friend to the weak

            by Galtisalie on Mon Jun 16, 2014 at 08:16:17 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  Unconstrained migration is also in the interests (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              thanatokephaloides, jackson8

              of the powerful. That's why so many Republican politicians are gung-ho on amnesty for illegal aliens, even though many rank and file Republicans are against it. It serves the interests of many business owners to have a larger pool of poorly-paid workers competing for scarce jobs.

              I don't think any of us should see ourselves as being in the position to "do something with" other human beings. I think we have a right and a responsibility to set reasonable boundaries, as individuals and as groups and as nations. Other people can then decide how to deal with those boundaries.

              I am curious as to whether this "no borders" concept would extend to the idea that we have an obligation to let "desperate human beings" come right into our houses and live there. And if we have a right to decide who can live in our houses, why do we have no collective right to decide who can be part of our country?

              •  So you're for mass deportation of (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                thanatokephaloides

                millions of human beings? Think that should be the Dem. position?

                I'd let even you in if you were hungry and had no shelter. Really, keep positing whatever you want, but at some point tell us what you really think about the brown people, their human rights to basic human needs, and where they should go in your plan to have these needs met.

                garden variety democratic socialist: accepting life's complexity|striving for global stewardship of our soil and other resources to meet everyone's basic needs|being a friend to the weak

                by Galtisalie on Mon Jun 16, 2014 at 09:53:08 AM PDT

                [ Parent ]

                •  So you're not answering my questions (2+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  thanatokephaloides, jackson8

                  I said not one word about mass deportations.  

                  You said you'd "let" me in. I'm asking whether you believe home owners have a right to decide who should be let in, or whether the law should say that if I'm broke, I can simply walk into your house, without waiting for your say-so. And if you believe that people should be able to decide who comes into their house, why can we not decide how many people we want to welcome into our country?

                  •  We have one planet we have to share. (1+ / 0-)
                    Recommended by:
                    thanatokephaloides

                    We each have a right to have our basic needs met without regard to national boundaries. Keep on positing.

                    garden variety democratic socialist: accepting life's complexity|striving for global stewardship of our soil and other resources to meet everyone's basic needs|being a friend to the weak

                    by Galtisalie on Mon Jun 16, 2014 at 10:23:42 AM PDT

                    [ Parent ]

                    •  You're still ducking and dodging (1+ / 0-)
                      Recommended by:
                      jackson8

                      The questions are quite straightforward, so it's interesting that you don't seem able to answer them. Does the fact that we have one planet to share mean that I should be able to walk into your house whenever I please, if I judge that that's what I need to do to solve my own economic problems? And if you have a right to say no, why do we as a collective not have the right to say no to invasion of our territory?

                      •  The "FAIR" debate talking points (2+ / 0-)

                        don't impress me. Pat yourself on the back. You've slain me with your pointed questions. If I feel like answering your questions will you answer mine?

                        garden variety democratic socialist: accepting life's complexity|striving for global stewardship of our soil and other resources to meet everyone's basic needs|being a friend to the weak

                        by Galtisalie on Mon Jun 16, 2014 at 11:35:09 AM PDT

                        [ Parent ]

                        •  What's "FAIR"? (1+ / 0-)
                          Recommended by:
                          jackson8

                          And why have you still not answered me?

                          And what questions do you have for me?

                        •  By the way, surely you have *some* answer (2+ / 0-)
                          Recommended by:
                          thanatokephaloides, jackson8

                          If you're so committed to the idea that everyone has the right to move everywhere, and that the people currently living in a place have no say-so about population size or who can live in their territory, surely you've at least thought about how that's different from saying no one has a right to lock their doors as long as there are homeless people who might need to sleep in their living rooms. So please share your work.

                          •  you are verging on trolling the diary (0+ / 0-)

                            I may be the writer, but I am one of the moderators of this group ... Galtisalie is probably not responding as there is nothing to respond to ...

                            "Hegel noticed somewhere that all great world history facts and people so to speak twice occur. He forgot to add: the one time as tragedy, the other time as farce" Karl Marx, The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte .

                            by NY brit expat on Mon Jun 16, 2014 at 03:58:11 PM PDT

                            [ Parent ]

                          •  I suspect he is trolling. He would not at all (1+ / 0-)
                            Recommended by:
                            NY brit expat

                            respond to my clear questions but is unsatisfied with my responses to his.

                            But hey, I will do my best and write a further response from my smartphone that barely works and won't go horizontal--woe is me.

                            Down below, he raises the Spector of a "billion Chinese" coming to take our jobs and points at my alleged hypocrisy in my own leftist presumably limousine liberal living room. As it happens, I'm sitting in the living room of a polite Obama-hater while the owner of the house teaches my adopted Chinese daughter guitar. Life is good for me and my daughter and miserable for most of the world. I care about that situation and so does everyone in this group. My inquisitioner won't put his cards on the table about the immigrants we have in the U.S. I say give the people who are here full rights as USians. Meanwhile, if we had a democracy of the world as I propose, we'd recognize an international crisis of homelessness and lack of basic human needs being met for billions, with only one sensible solution: From each according to her abillities, to each according to her needs. If I have a big living room with wasted space, I'm part of the problem of an overheating planet, but also need to steward whatever I do have control over lovingly for others. Shame on me if I don't. That's why I'd even help out this anti-immigrant jerk if he truly were in need instead of immigrant-bashing.

                            garden variety democratic socialist: accepting life's complexity|striving for global stewardship of our soil and other resources to meet everyone's basic needs|being a friend to the weak

                            by Galtisalie on Mon Jun 16, 2014 at 04:33:26 PM PDT

                            [ Parent ]

                          •  She isn't anti-immigrant (0+ / 0-)

                            I'm in favor of having borders.  That was what got this conversation going -- your statement that we should abolish borders. I'm also in favor of each country allowing whatever amount of immigration is reasonable for its size, economy, resources, etc. And letting each country decide what the numbers should be. I don't see the argument in favor of demolishing all borders and letting people roam from country to country as they please. As for the US, clearly we need a certain amount of immigration, and immigrants are by and large a blessing to this country. I'm not anti-immigrant, just against 100% uncontrolled immigration.

                            And I still haven't seen the argument as to why it's moral to decide who can enter your house, but not moral to decide who can enter your country. Probably because the argument isn't very persuasive.

                            I wasn't aware that I had failed to answer questions, but I'll look up above.

                          •  Oh, if one of your questions was about what to do (0+ / 0-)

                            about people who broke our laws by coming here -- I think the ones who came here when they were little and had no idea what was going on should be given a path to citizenship. The adults who chose to break the law to come here should not be given a path to citizenship. As for whether they should be deported, I think I'd have different opinions on different situations, but since I'm not in any way involved in law enforcement, no one is going to ask me to adjudicate any of the cases.  

                          •  Very few undocumented workers are a (1+ / 0-)
                            Recommended by:
                            Noisy Democrat

                            public safety risk. ICE deports those. International cooperative policing can deal with public safety risks regardless of nationality. The rest are left to live lives in the shadows, where they can be exploited and excluded from political processes. The same thing goes on in the DR with persons of Haitian descent.

                            Since the earliest days, humans have migrated to survive. Nothing's changed. National boundaries are a construct to exploit, create and then deny global problems. I don't know how your ancestors got here, but I would have been empathetic to them.

                            The boundaries are about denying desperate human reality just across the line.

                            The U.S. won't ratify the U.N. convention on economic rights because it knows that the solutions point to socialism. A lot of details would have to be worked out to make a better world. We discuss that every Sunday night at 6 pm. I can't answer your every concern in this email chain but maybe you will learn something. We'll keep a light on for you and hope you won't be deported.

                            garden variety democratic socialist: accepting life's complexity|striving for global stewardship of our soil and other resources to meet everyone's basic needs|being a friend to the weak

                            by Galtisalie on Mon Jun 16, 2014 at 05:28:10 PM PDT

                            [ Parent ]

                          •  OK, so I get it -- your solution is no countries (0+ / 0-)

                            and then if we start to have massive migrations of millions of people all around the globe, impacting the ecosystems and economies of different areas, instead of having borders to stop the tide, we would just -- try to figure out some other way to solve their problems. I don't think it would work, in fact it sounds like a nightmare, but at least it's an answer. Partially, anyway. Still not clear whether individuals would have the right to decide how many people can stay in their house, or whether the state would decide how many people they're required to accommodate. But it makes sense that if countries don't exist, then obviously the "citizens" of those non-existent countries have no right to defend their borders.

                          •  Ah, I have been in Britain for too long ... (1+ / 0-)
                            Recommended by:
                            Galtisalie

                            when I say verging on or bordering on, that is my saying that they are doing so in a polite manner. :) The use of the term xenophobic was deliberate as well, but there are other terms that would describe this person's views as well ... I loved the fear of Chinese and Middle Easterners ... very interesting ...

                            I guess that this person would not welcome those refugees fleeing a war zone ... let them rot in refugee camps and all that rubbish ...

                            I have realised that there are those that can be sheparded towards a more loving feelings for humanity and the planet and there are those that are lost; for the latter either they learn or find their own way among the right wing and even worse enemies of humanity.  If there was an inkling of hope, I would say, go for it. On the other hand, there is no reason you should be subjected to harassment by someone. You are kind for trying ... but do not be too shy to give a yell out if you need help ... that is what solidarity means! :)

                            "Hegel noticed somewhere that all great world history facts and people so to speak twice occur. He forgot to add: the one time as tragedy, the other time as farce" Karl Marx, The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte .

                            by NY brit expat on Mon Jun 16, 2014 at 05:05:07 PM PDT

                            [ Parent ]

                          •  :) (1+ / 0-)
                            Recommended by:
                            NY brit expat

                            I will next time! I've got a cold and drove for 24 hours this weekend and was on break at work when the battle was started. Not at my best, see, e.g., "email chain," but I always believe in doing one's best for the great cause of humanity, however poor that is. I would have been happy to engage earlier with the commenter, but I was at work and suspected the commenter wasn't in good faith, so why bother.

                            garden variety democratic socialist: accepting life's complexity|striving for global stewardship of our soil and other resources to meet everyone's basic needs|being a friend to the weak

                            by Galtisalie on Mon Jun 16, 2014 at 06:28:09 PM PDT

                            [ Parent ]

                        •  Galtisalie (1+ / 0-)
                          Recommended by:
                          Galtisalie

                          Sorry I wasn't here to help; next time something like this happens, give me a shout out and I will be here to help.  We have an old maxim here, do not feed the troll!

                          "Hegel noticed somewhere that all great world history facts and people so to speak twice occur. He forgot to add: the one time as tragedy, the other time as farce" Karl Marx, The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte .

                          by NY brit expat on Mon Jun 16, 2014 at 04:23:22 PM PDT

                          [ Parent ]

      •  when do citizens determine their borders? (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Galtisalie, thanatokephaloides

        and if they think they do how? It is governments (and their military and international negotiation) that determine borders and try to change them; that is easily proven looking at history.

        I am wondering if you are going to raise Texas as a place where "citizenry" determined their borders? Those borders were created in an effort to prevent the end of slavery declared by the Spanish in Mexico as the economy in Texas was dependent upon it (and racism). There was no heroism as promulgated by propaganda involved in this so-called citizens border creation (remember, these were white land (and slave) owners, the large numbers of people working as slaves never counted as citizens. The borders of the US were established by conquest, by international agreement (see the Louisiana Purchase) and on the genocide of native americans. So when have citizens established their borders?

        Even the idea of citizenship differs between countries, some due to birth, others do to a whole series of historical circumstances. I am wondering where the idea of citizenry securing borders comes from honestly?

        We need to eliminate borders certainly; borders create an immediate false distinction between us vs them based upon a fallacious understanding of lines drawn on a map.  It enables the ruling class to play people from different countries off against each other irrespective of the fact that we share class interests. Xenophobia has been a wonderful piece of divide and rule.

        "Hegel noticed somewhere that all great world history facts and people so to speak twice occur. He forgot to add: the one time as tragedy, the other time as farce" Karl Marx, The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte .

        by NY brit expat on Mon Jun 16, 2014 at 08:24:46 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  So you would be in favor of allowing, say, (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          jackson8

          500 million immigrants from China or the Middle East to come into the US? Or why not a billion?

          What would prevent societal breakdown, economic collapse and ecological disaster in the case of that large a flood of people coming here? Or do you think that for some reason, they wouldn't come?

          •  Actually I would, but quite honestly (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Galtisalie

            why would they? The US is on the economic decline on the world stage; China's economy is growing ... wages and conditions of work have been completely eroded in the US and there are strikes and movements to get them raised in China. You think that the US is a paradise? People moved there when their conditions of life and work at home were actually worse, they were economic and political migrants ... some fleeing famine and war. Since they were useful they were welcomed. Now the US economy is a low wage-unskilled labour economy except for those few in a high skilled sector and finance.   why go to a place where the conditions of work are appalling unless you are a skilled labourer and if you are a skilled labourer why go to the states? You are not complaining about skilled labourers, the US has always been happy brain draining the skilled and trained labour from all over the world. So what is underlying your fear of migrants? You think they are lowering wages or taking jobs from Americans? You do realise that prison labour takes jobs from people on the outside, are you complaining about that?

            Listening to you is actually quite amusing. I have been listening to the right-wing in Britain going on about immigration for a while now ... I bet you think that you are not right wing ... I bet you think that you are saying something that is important and worthy while all I see is someone spouting xenophobia (that would be the nice term) but I can think of others.

            Take your bag and go home ...

            "Hegel noticed somewhere that all great world history facts and people so to speak twice occur. He forgot to add: the one time as tragedy, the other time as farce" Karl Marx, The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte .

            by NY brit expat on Mon Jun 16, 2014 at 03:46:59 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

        •  p.s. In a democracy, ideally (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          jackson8

          the people vote for politicians who set border policy that they approve of. The system is definitely imperfect, as  there are powerful interests working for less-constrained immigration, but in some cases the citizens do manage to make themselves heard. Eric Cantor's recent loss was entirely about Cantor's perceived support for amnesty.

          •  Really do you think that the borders of Africa (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Galtisalie

            were drawn by the citizens of Africa? Perhaps you need to look at history; the borders of Europe were not defined by their citizens. You have an odd understanding of bourgeois democracy, the legislature and the executive are not responsible to you; they never have been. They are responsible to those they serve and they are not the people contrary to the constitution and other documents.

            You are giving me a good laugh ... thank you, I needed that  ...

            "Hegel noticed somewhere that all great world history facts and people so to speak twice occur. He forgot to add: the one time as tragedy, the other time as farce" Karl Marx, The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte .

            by NY brit expat on Mon Jun 16, 2014 at 03:54:45 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

  •  What angered me to tears (7+ / 0-)

    the last few weeks are the rape killings in India. It's like these rapist fucks thumbing their noses at the government who promised harsher punishments,but really doesn't do anything. Now they don't just rape these girls they kill them and hang them from trees for everyone to see and doing so terrorizing the women in those areas.  I wonder when enough is enough and the populace will rise up and send those officials packing or take justice into their own hands.
    Seldom in my life have I had violent thoughts against a fellow human, but lately I scare myself.

    El pueblo unido jamás será vencido. The people united will never be defeated

    by mint julep on Sun Jun 15, 2014 at 08:02:22 PM PDT

    •  Me too ... (4+ / 0-)

      Beyond furious, I also was angered to tears. The level of hate for women is impressive, the level of racism (as the caste system is based on race), the heartbreak of the families and the cold indifference of the law as they were Dalit made me want to hurt someone very badly. Outrageous and then it happened with an older woman as well ... the song strange fruit started playing in my head ...

      Mint Julep, do you want to write about it? This women deserve more than a quick mention in a diary here ...

      "Hegel noticed somewhere that all great world history facts and people so to speak twice occur. He forgot to add: the one time as tragedy, the other time as farce" Karl Marx, The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte .

      by NY brit expat on Mon Jun 16, 2014 at 04:00:43 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  I don't know if I can (3+ / 0-)

        every time I think about it I lose my cool. I don't want to hate.
        I can try, but it will take a little time.

        El pueblo unido jamás será vencido. The people united will never be defeated

        by mint julep on Mon Jun 16, 2014 at 06:48:41 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  I have found that releasing my anger in a rant (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Galtisalie

          such as this has strengthened my resolve and helps me to get the emotion channeled in a good way. Think about it, if you want to write and can actually do it, it would be a wonderful thing to write about.

          "Hegel noticed somewhere that all great world history facts and people so to speak twice occur. He forgot to add: the one time as tragedy, the other time as farce" Karl Marx, The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte .

          by NY brit expat on Mon Jun 16, 2014 at 03:56:23 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

  •  Finally saw Philomena the other night. (7+ / 0-)

    It's a slow-building film, but the cumulative effect is moving and powerful. It's based on a true story related to the one about all those children dying in Ireland. A young woman, forced by her father to go into one of those Catholic homes for supposedly wayward girls, and her baby is ripped away from her, sold to Americans. She goes on a journey of discovery to find him.

    In the light of recent discoveries, it's amazing that the film received so much negative push-back from Catholic and Fundamentalist groups in general. They should have the decency to shut up and realize the critique in the film was far too mild for what actually happened. Powerful groups, out of touch and deluded to the end.

    My own views of church and state can be boiled down to this: A poisonous brew, to mix the two. And I find the three monotheisms of the Levant to be essentially odious, toxic and highly immoral, to put it gently. "Morality," to me, being kindness, compassion and empathy in word and deed. "Morality" for too many churches being nothing more than obedience . . . and if one takes the words of the bible literally, they didn't misinterpret scripture on that score, tragically enough.

    •  I didn't need Jefferson to know in my (6+ / 0-)

      heart growing up Southern Baptist that many parts of the good book weren't so good and should be excised if morality is the goal. Meanwhile, as if the bad parts aren't bad enough, people also do awful acts, including denying women the rights to control their own bodies and GLBTs the rights to live in peace and equality, under poor interpretations that have no objective morality.

      Yet, I still do cherish the good parts, and I know many people of various religions manage to do the same. Cultural differences and traditions can be tolerated but not up to the point of being mean to others. It's also not just religion. I was listening to a public radio piece on female genital mutilation in the car. So much of historical culture is paternalistic and cruel.

      Got into a discussion ten days ago with a King James Bible fanatic who had been raised to hate and fear, and been beaten from an early age too. He was oozing racism. I tried to get him to see that he had never once lived a free life because he had been raised in a cult and had the messages reinforced with belts and fists. He retreated into rote defenses, but we have to try to plant seeds of free thought and hope that they will bear fruit.

      Peace.

      garden variety democratic socialist: accepting life's complexity|striving for global stewardship of our soil and other resources to meet everyone's basic needs|being a friend to the weak

      by Galtisalie on Sun Jun 15, 2014 at 10:18:39 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  It did spawn some great music and art . . . (5+ / 0-)

        and, amazingly enough, some bits and pieces of beautiful philosophy. But I think that's in spite of the bible, not because of it.

        If one takes it literally, it's just too filled up with rage. jealousy, sadism and cruelty overall. The god of the bible is, without question, the most evil of all the father gods in any religion -- again, if one takes it literally. No other father god commits genocide so readily, so often, or for such bizarre reasons. And Christian teleology doesn't get off the hook there. It's not all about the genocidal madman in the Old Testament.

        If a person takes the Second Coming literally, for instance, that means billions will die, and then suffer eternal torment. For no other reason than not accepting Jesus as their savior. Of course, the ultimate in irony is that Jews will be condemned as well. Buddhists, Hindus, Taoists, Shinto . . . all non-Christians will be slaughtered. I can't think of another religion that preaches such maniacal eliminationism. Again, if one takes it literally.

        With a backdrop like that, how the bible was ever seen as some kind of moral guide is beyond me.

        I hold to a different creed: No gods, no masters.  

        •  I agree. It certainly needed major editting. (3+ / 0-)

          Speaking of the New Testament, fear of hell and 666 has been the perfect breeding ground for hate and opposition to humane cooperation among the unquestioning.

          What is so hard for the fanatical to admit is that humans wrote the books of the bible, and other humans decided the books were holy. Logic then tells us that it is a human necessity to question the quality of these human acts.

          The KJV man I was speaking with was trying to convince me I was going to hell and that Washington, D.C. was full of Marxists and Communists. I was perhaps one of the first people in his life to tell him in a kind but firm way that there was no hell and the italicized points above. Hopefully it got him thinking, through his sickness. (I did not out my own politics or tell him that he was wrong about Washington, D.C.--would that what he said were true.) He has this truly morbid hell-fixation that tainted every moment of his life and turns a beautiful world into a trap of the devil. He claimed to have walked four times across the country (ironically, he is on SSI for mental illness). I asked him if when he was out walking through the mountains he did not look up at the sky and around him and admire the beauty. I was trying to nourish something that nature might have planted in him, but it could not overcome his cognitive fixation on hell and the need to somehow harmonize every contradiction and accept every word of the bible as true and inerrant.

          "Risking" going to hell for rejecting the doctrine of hell and the other sick parts of the bible was part of my long journey of personal liberation from fundamentalism. I am left walking the earth with freedom and love for the beautiful planet, humanity, soil, and even bugs. Despite my doubts, which I now foster rather than run from, I am able to have a sense of peace I never had when I was fixated on avoiding hell through "salvation."

          garden variety democratic socialist: accepting life's complexity|striving for global stewardship of our soil and other resources to meet everyone's basic needs|being a friend to the weak

          by Galtisalie on Mon Jun 16, 2014 at 04:56:17 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Bart Ehrman is really good on the subject . . . (4+ / 0-)

            of editing. I like his Lost Christianities the most of his books, for several reasons, one of them being it's the least "intro." He is now one of the better known of the popularizers of teaching where the books came from and the divisions that determined inclusion or exclusion in the canon. But Lost Christianities was before he really took off.

            I'd recommend the above title highly.

            Heaven and hell. I got the feeling at a pretty early age . . . that if some organization feels it has to scare the hell out of me or bribe me to join, then it's most likely lacking in substance. And the elaborate nature and sadism of the whole concept of hell and damnation . . . hmmm. It doesn't speak well of the people who thought all of that up. Nietzsche comes to mind with his concept of resentment, in that case.

            Walking through the world in peace. Yes. This is perhaps the essence of Buddhism, which I, personally, find to be the most "moral" of all religions/Ways. To me, it puts Christianity to shame along those lines.

  •  read wiki article on Hillsborough disaster & Sun (4+ / 0-)

    i knew almost nothing about this event

    read the first part, then followed the link to The Sun coverage

    flat out lying

    from 1989 all the way until 2012 until the full inquest was held

    and Murdoch paper with a head strong editor published the lies

    just one of the many steps to the state control that is now all around us

    Henry Giroux hits the nail on the head

    The Specter of Authoritarianism and the Future of the Left: An Interview With Henry A. Giroux

    the regular readers of this diary series probably are regular followers of Henry. The first paragraph

    What we have seen in the United States and a number of other countries since the 1970s is the emergence of a savage form of free market fundamentalism, often called neoliberalism, in which there is not only a deep distrust of public values, public goods and public institutions but the embrace of a market ideology that accelerates the power of the financial elite and big business while gutting those formative cultures and institutions necessary for a democracy to survive.
    just for starters, how can there be a democracy if "citizens" cannot even decide who can vote?
    •  This was also a stick to beat the working class (6+ / 0-)

      in this country, quickly adopted by Thatcher as it was a perfect fit for the lies and destruction she wanted to spread. The new inquest is happening now; the families fought (with the support of the whole population of Liverpool and other places) to get a new inquest to destroy the lies that were spread in the wake of the catastrophe. The truth that fans from the other side went to help and everyone tried to help the dead and dying was evident from the testimony of those present. The time of death of the various victims demonstrated that some could have been helped and the medical examiner could not be bothered to check cause and time of death. It was atrocious with the blame being forced onto the victims and for years people fought and fought to eliminate the lie. The new inquest will exonerate the victims. I doubt it will ever bring peace to the families, but it will go some way towards bringing justice.

      There were a lot of people supporting Liverpool to win the premier league this year (the 25th anniversary and with the  new inquest starting) ... they didn't and I can tell you that hardened people cried when they lost.

      "Hegel noticed somewhere that all great world history facts and people so to speak twice occur. He forgot to add: the one time as tragedy, the other time as farce" Karl Marx, The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Bonaparte .

      by NY brit expat on Mon Jun 16, 2014 at 05:49:41 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

Subscribe or Donate to support Daily Kos.

Click here for the mobile view of the site