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As anti-Semitism escaltes to a fever pitch in France, French Jews have increasingly decided that there is no future for them in the country.  Officially, in the first quarter of the year, there were 140 documented acts of anti-Semitism, a 40% jump from the first quarter of 2013.  And that includes only the acts that were reported. Now, French Jews are emigrating, mostly for Israel, as they are effectively pogrammed out.

Per the Washington Post:

French migration to Israel in 2013 jumped to 3,200 people, up 64 percent from 2012. A huge uptick in departures already this year has Jewish leaders here predicting that at least 5,000 French Jews will leave in 2014.

How did we get here? France, while possessing a rich history of anti-Semitism dating back at least to the Dreyfus Affair, is home to the largest Jewish population in Europe--only Israel and the United States have larger Jewish populations. More from the Post article:

Here and across the region, they are talking of the rise of a “new anti-Semitism” based on the convergence of four main factors. They cite classic scapegoating amid hard economic times, the growing strength of far-right nationalists, a deteriorating relationship between black Europeans and Jews, and, importantly, increasing tensions with Europe’s surging Muslim population.
It's easy to chalk it up to an outgrowth of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, but even if you ignore the intellectual laziness of using foreign government actions to justify hate and bigotry, the problems are much more diverse. Indeed, the far-right National Front--no stranger to a broad buffet of hate that spans the ethnic, religious, and racial spectrum--is at their height of their power. Last month, they came in first in French elections for the European Parliament with a massive 25 percent of the national vote. Sure enough, despite their attempt at a reformed image, this past week, the party's founder posted a video on the party’s website suggesting a Jewish folk singer should be thrown in an oven. His daughter was forced to publicly rebuke the comments and take the video down.

Violence is up, and the fear that French radicals returning from fighting in the Middle East are going to add to the violence has already begun justifying itself:

A suspected French jihadist who spent time in Syria is in custody over the shooting deaths of three people at a Belgian Jewish museum, prosecutors said Sunday, crystalizing fears that European radicals will parlay their experiences in Syria into terrorism back home.

When Mehdi Nemmouche was arrested in southern France on Friday, he was in possession of firearms, a large quantity of ammunition and a video claiming responsibility for the May 24 attack, a Belgian prosecutor said.

In a one-minute rampage that deeply shook Europe's Jewish community, a gunman opened fire at the Brussels museum. In addition to the fatalities, another person was gravely wounded.

(CBC)

This isn't the first time France has experienced sharp upticks in anti-Semitism, and it probably won't be the last, but for many French Jews it is enough to get them to want to leave the country for good.  The Jewish Agency, which helps resettle Jews who feel a need to immigrate to Israel has already committed an additional $37 million in funds for European emigres.
“I walked into my kosher sandwich shop the other day and the owner asked me, ‘Is it time to leave? Are we Nazi Germany yet?’ ” said Shimon Samuels, the Paris-based international director of the Simon Wiesenthal Center. “We’ve got the National Front in first place. We’ve got Dieudonné, spreading his hate. So I told him, ‘Well, do you really want to be the last to go?’ ” (WaPo)
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Comment Preferences

  •  Racism has always been strong in France. (13+ / 0-)

    I have a friend who is of Hmong ethnicity, who was born in France and moved to the US as an adult. (Side note: France does not have birthright citizenship; she literally is a citizen of no country...) She told me stories of how overt and explicit the racism toward her was growing up, so much more severe than here in Minnesota.

    "Much of movement conservatism is a con and the base is the marks." -- Chris Hayes

    by raptavio on Fri Jun 20, 2014 at 08:47:32 AM PDT

    •  Oh really? (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Rogneid

      With specific regard to the Jews, the pendulum has swing widely back and forth even in fairly recent times. Anti-Semitism was definitely 'out' after the revolution, because it contrasted with Enlightenment ideals it attempted to model itself on. Those ideals then spread thru Western Europe - partly tx to Napoleon - and resulted in decades of acceptance and assimilation in major urban centers, 'even' in Germany.

      •  I can't speak to anti-Semitism in particular. (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Rogneid

        I wouldn't be surprised at all if that was a wide-swinging pendulum.

        "Much of movement conservatism is a con and the base is the marks." -- Chris Hayes

        by raptavio on Fri Jun 20, 2014 at 09:37:20 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  It may have been out of public fashion after the (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        leftynyc, Al Abama, FarWestGirl

        Revolution but there was plenty to go around by the time of Dreyfuss.



        Is it true? Is it kind? Is it necessary? . . . and respect the dignity of every human being.

        by Wee Mama on Fri Jun 20, 2014 at 10:29:06 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  There's always been the tension of Jews (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        leftynyc, AoT, Mets102

        remaining (in whatever way) other-than french. It's a balance of 'stay yourself, but in a way we don't notice.'

        I know that you who hear my singing make those freedom bells go ringing. And so we keep on while we live, until we have no more to give... Don't you know it's darkest before the dawn. This thought keeps me moving on. Pete Seeger bit.ly/1bwCmhK

        by TiaRachel on Fri Jun 20, 2014 at 11:03:08 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  "other than French" is a good way to put it (0+ / 0-)

          The supremacist impulse manifests itself in a sense that everyone in France should be "French" - though often more in a cultural sense than a racial sense - and that people who want to be different should go and be different somewhere else. Loyalty to the French state as well is a strong thread animating the political Right: loyalty cannot be conditional and anyone who thinks so and/or whose "true" loyalties allegedly lie elsewhere again ought to live somewhere else.  The funny thing is that French Muslims (a lot of whom are black Africans) also face these same attitudes, but they're a much larger and more vocal minority than Jews are, with the added factor of being significantly less integrated and successful.

          Domestic politics is the continuation of civil war by other means.

          by Visceral on Fri Jun 20, 2014 at 12:40:06 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

      •  Antisemitism Wasn't Out, Religion Was (0+ / 0-)

        Merely a matter of labels.  Jews were welcome in Revolutionary France.  But only if they stopped being Jews, and became Frenchmen.

    •  But She's From a French Colonial Area (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Rogneid, FG, bigrivergal

      It's got no similar history in the US. However the US has a population of slave descendents who are hated by far more Americans than hate SE Asians.

      Race is partly an identifier and not purely an absolute reason for hatred and oppression. I think there is an enduring animosity toward peoples that are formerly property of others' that adds a special bite to "mere" prejudice against those who seem different.

      We are called to speak for the weak, for the voiceless, for victims of our nation and for those it calls enemy.... --ML King "Beyond Vietnam"

      by Gooserock on Fri Jun 20, 2014 at 09:04:07 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  The French have long had an obsession (5+ / 0-)

    with trying to enforce conformity. Antisemitism is just one facet of it. They are in just an intense conflict with their Muslim citizens and their religious practices. The French really don't like anybody, even each other.

  •  The Dreyfus Affair (12+ / 0-)

    The toxicity of France's persecution of the innocent French captain Alfred Dreyfus on espionage charges from 1894-1899 set the stage for the entire crisis over Jews in Europe in the twentieth century.  

    It is amazing how much residual fallout came about from French anti-Semitism, not the least of which was Theodor Herzl founding the Zionist Conference to argue that Jews would never be allowed to survive in Europe and needed a homeland.

    Herzl saw the writing on the wall in 1897!

    Forty years later, Hitler would prove him right.

    Anyone who sits around in 2014 and dismisses Israel as some travesty has no understanding of the geopolitical forces that required the founding of Israel in 1948 (decades too late, sadly).

  •  French Jews are prepared to strike back (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Rogneid

    Offended, but willing to ignore twisted comedians' French Jews draw the line at violence.  Their detractors will pay dearly for crossing that line.

    In loyalty to their kind, they cannot tolerate our minds. In loyalty to our kind, We cannot tolerate their obstruction.

    by mojave mike on Fri Jun 20, 2014 at 08:59:10 AM PDT

  •  It was the cry of the French crowd at the Dreyfus (8+ / 0-)

    trial "Morte aux Juifs"  (Death to the Jews) that motivated Theodor Herzl to his pursuit of a Jewish homeland through Zionism.  

  •  That's a devastating development (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Rogneid, Brecht, AoT, Bob Love

    it's not the France I remember from the 1970ies. But even then people told me I have blinders on my eyes and that things are not as they look or sound like.

    My niece who studied several years in France had already a different view in that regard as she lived in Aix en Provence and the tensions between Algerian migrant workers and the French population seemed to have been the reason. But I didn't take her comments as being unbiased from her side as well.

    I heard complaints from Africans south of the Sahel Zone, but being a German I didn't take those complaints serious comparing them to German attitudes towards Africans in Germany.

    Now, that's a real bad development. If France gets right-wing and racist, what is Europe then to become? It was France that was always a stronghold against open and official racism.

    Tell me it's not true. I don't want to believe in it.

    We know a hell of a lot, but we understand very little. Manfred Max-Neef

    by mimi on Fri Jun 20, 2014 at 09:10:53 AM PDT

    •  I don't know about France always being (6+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Rogneid, mimi, Brecht, leftynyc, RedsFanForever, AoT

      a stronghold.  Certainly during the Vichy years they were pretty lacking in that regard…

      However, what is going on now is an outrage to "Les Droits de l'Homme" and no one knows where it is going to lead.  

      Rapid immigration from Muslim countries has put a strain on the state and there are huge numbers of residents who are not assimilating in the way that the secular state requires.  The very concept of "la république, laïque et democratique" is being severely challenged.  The French must redefine what it means to be French and many are not finding that very easy.  

      It's the Supreme Court, stupid!

      by Radiowalla on Fri Jun 20, 2014 at 09:26:41 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  sure but viewed with German eyes, France was for (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        AoT

        me the less racist place compared to Germany. So, yes, may be I am biased. And I really haven't lived in France for a longer period of time to know better, nor do I understand enough of the language to get the "subtle" stuff.

        We know a hell of a lot, but we understand very little. Manfred Max-Neef

        by mimi on Fri Jun 20, 2014 at 09:50:27 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Well, yes. (6+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Mets102, TiaRachel, leftynyc, AoT, mimi, Mannie

          However, the Vichy state and its "milice" rounded up French Jews without even being asked to do so by the Germans.  I recently visited Drancy outside of Paris and saw where French Jews were warehoused before being shipped off to German extermination camps.  

          Many French were heroes and many risked their lives to save Jews, but the stain of Vichy is still there.  The good thing is that the French government is now willing and eager to correct the mythology that France was an innocent bystander during the war.  

          It's the Supreme Court, stupid!

          by Radiowalla on Fri Jun 20, 2014 at 10:26:25 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  the history of the Vichy state is known, so (0+ / 0-)

            is "la resistance". And racism in general includes more than this specific time frame of Jewish genocide by the Germans. The jewish genocide always stands out as something specific, extraordinaire and incomparable. I am talking more about homophobia and general racism or hate for foreigners. The French's gentleness, kindness and elegance in conversations that makes people of all races comfortable and feelingl respected. At least that was my impression.

            May be it's not anymore the case. But I doubt that those attitudes would dramatically change.

            Or may be I have not met the "less well behaved" in France. :)

            I make an example: A German thinks about a German white woman who marries an African as "a little bit dumb, gullible or worse" (to say it nicely) (at least they did in my time), a French thinks about a French woman, who marries an African as someone, who transformed the African into a French loyalist and they are grateful for that to their French women. I see a difference in attitude, don't you? They would not discriminate or isolate the French woman because of her marriage to an African.

            We know a hell of a lot, but we understand very little. Manfred Max-Neef

            by mimi on Fri Jun 20, 2014 at 01:44:26 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  I think it depends entirely (0+ / 0-)

              on how the French couple respects the rules of polite society in France.  There is a minimum of public conformity that is expected if you one is to be considered really French.  That means you have to speak good French, dress with some amount of attention, eat at the right time of day and be generally supportive of French culture.  If you stray too far out of the guidelines, then you rapidly become 'The Other."  

              As for intermarriage, I dunno.  I have known some very racially prejudiced French people in the provinces, but a couple such as you describe wouldn't cause heads to turn in Paris.

              I don't, however,  know enough about Germany to answer your question about the difference in attitude.  

              It's the Supreme Court, stupid!

              by Radiowalla on Fri Jun 20, 2014 at 01:58:52 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  it was not meant a question, just some (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                Radiowalla

                observations I made thirty years ago. Life goes on and changes. Thanks for taking time to comment on my OT comment somehow.

                We know a hell of a lot, but we understand very little. Manfred Max-Neef

                by mimi on Fri Jun 20, 2014 at 02:27:37 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

        •  racism vs. cultural supremacism (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Radiowalla

          You could draw a parallel between Fascist Italy and Nazi Germany.  Italian Fascism placed comparatively little emphasis on race, in part because it patterned itself on Ancient Rome (which exercised a hegemonic influence over all of the Mediterranean basin and also drew in people and cultural influences from all over), but in part also because it championed the Il Stato - the State: an institution - while Nazism championed Der Volk - the people: a bond of blood.

          The idea that one's acceptance in French society revolves around one's acceptance of French society would both be born out of a very different mentality and lead to different behavior than what are usually attributed to "racism".  It'd create people who'd rank a lily-white European or American tourist below a black African steeped in French culture as a legacy of the colonial era.  It would think nothing of the outside but harshly examine the inside; seemingly the opposite of how it works in the US for example.

          Domestic politics is the continuation of civil war by other means.

          by Visceral on Fri Jun 20, 2014 at 02:51:00 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  That's about right, (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Visceral

            at least insofar as my experience of French culture has informed me.  When you think about it, it is a fairly hopeful view:  if you adapt to the mores and speak the lingo, you can be admitted to the club, no matter who you are.  

            Another contrast might be to British society, where no matter how long you are there, if you are the wrong color or the wrong class, fergeddaboutit.

            It's the Supreme Court, stupid!

            by Radiowalla on Fri Jun 20, 2014 at 03:00:11 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  explains where we got it from (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              Radiowalla
              Another contrast might be to British society, where no matter how long you are there, if you are the wrong color or the wrong class, fergeddaboutit.
              I'd agree that it's a hopeful view, but ironically, the Left has a big problem with the idea of people needing to do anything to get accepted.  We really do believe in living up to Publius Terentius' verse: "Nothing human is alien to me".  We recoil at the notion that there is not room enough for all people and all ideals and aspirations, be it here in the US or there in Europe.  Ironically, this is a common canard that conservatives like to put in our mouths: "Africa for Africans, Asia for Asians, Europe for everybody!"  Perhaps we believe in some subtle but irresistible cultural force that will cause all entities to gravitate towards and orbit their common center?  I know conservatives love to claim that this is every bit as erasing of difference as anything we allege they think or do.

              Domestic politics is the continuation of civil war by other means.

              by Visceral on Fri Jun 20, 2014 at 03:31:06 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  Yes, and that's one point upon which (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                Visceral

                I disagree with many of my liberal brethren.  Perhaps too much of the French approach has rubbed off on me. But that's a whole other topic, ripe for another diary and another day.  

                I really enjoyed your comments, BTW.  

                It's the Supreme Court, stupid!

                by Radiowalla on Fri Jun 20, 2014 at 03:48:28 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

      •  "French must redefine what it means to be French" (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Radiowalla, Bob Love
        Rapid immigration from Muslim countries has put a strain on the state and there are huge numbers of residents who are not assimilating in the way that the secular state requires.  The very concept of "la république, laïque et democratique" is being severely challenged.  The French must redefine what it means to be French and many are not finding that very easy.
        This automatic assumption is the nucleus of what drives the French right wing crazy.  "Why the hell do we have to change?!  If they want to come here then they should have to change!"  The right wing in every country is arguing this ... and not just in terms of immigration, but all across the battle lines of the culture war.

        In fairness, they're right that the left always puts the burden of adaptation on the host, not the guest, and on the majority, not the minority.

        Domestic politics is the continuation of civil war by other means.

        by Visceral on Fri Jun 20, 2014 at 12:51:04 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Your last comment about the burden of (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Bob Love, Visceral

          adaptation is quite astute.  

          You make some excellent points about the French right wing, but the question of what it means to be French has many more levels to it.  The concept of "laïcité" (we don't even have a corresponding word for it) is taken very seriously by the left.  It is the core of the 5th Republic.  The left, including the current administration, is struggling to maintain a civic identity that is non-religious and for everyone.

          The public schools are challenged with an influx of Muslims who will not let the girls take gym class, who are demanding separate classes for girls and boys, who don't want pork on the menu and so on.  In the US we are used to making accommodations for religious practice, but in France civic responsibility says that you leave your religion at the door.  

          The French right wing are not great defenders of the civic state.  They yearn for the France of yesteryear and would happily install crucifixes in every classroom.   It's no surprise that they hold their rallies at the Place de la Pyramide where there is a statue of Jeanne d'Arc.

          One thing is for sure, French politics are always intense.

          It's the Supreme Court, stupid!

          by Radiowalla on Fri Jun 20, 2014 at 01:24:16 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  an interesting dilemma for the French left (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Radiowalla

            Defend pluralism or defend secularism?  It leads to very uncomfortable questions: are there inevitable limits to inclusiveness and tolerance, beyond which they become self-defeating by mandating inclusion and tolerance of those who believe in neither one?  Are the values of the Enlightenment not universal after all? Reminds me of how many conservatives think it's bizarre for the Left to defend "Muslims" when supposedly "Muslims" are against everything that the Left is for.

            Conservatives see these questions as fertile ground because they think an honest discussion of them will demonstrate that paradoxically, only conservatism can create and protect the "liberal" dream.  They're eager to make the argument that Christian white people are indigenous to Europe and according to the Left, deserve protection against alien persons and cultures.  They're eager to "prove" liberal hypocrisy about whether or not white people are entitled to an identity of their own making and to self-determination according to that identity as liberals hold non-whites to be.

            Domestic politics is the continuation of civil war by other means.

            by Visceral on Fri Jun 20, 2014 at 02:30:41 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  Yes, indeed. (0+ / 0-)

              This dilemma may be the undoing of the French secular state.
              In America, we find it shocking that France is trying to stop the expression of religion in the schools, but Americans don't really "get" that the secular state is key to French national identity.  Frankly, I have no idea of how this is going to turn out.  Sometimes I think that the stress of the debate will fracture the system in ways that are irreparable.

              In the meantime, I heard that France beat Switzerland at the World Cup...

              It's the Supreme Court, stupid!

              by Radiowalla on Fri Jun 20, 2014 at 02:45:51 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  my bet is on a "soft" reactionism (0+ / 0-)

                The idea that Catholicism would regain its old power, if only unofficially, really would be a no less radical transformation of French society.

                My guess is that large numbers of French people will simply lose faith in liberalism, in European integration, in internationalism, in multiculturalism/pluralism, in the Republic as currently constituted, and perhaps in politics as a whole when they see all those things fail them at every turn.  They will vote against them when they can, but their real feelings and energies will move them to retrench in their little corners of the world that they know, control, and draw strength from.  The nihilistic crusades of aggressive, organized, and paradoxically Other-oriented rightist politics is not what a people facing existential crisis need either.

                Domestic politics is the continuation of civil war by other means.

                by Visceral on Fri Jun 20, 2014 at 03:16:43 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

  •  Here's link with more info (10+ / 0-)

    on anti-semitism in France in the 21st century.  It ain't pretty.

    Wikipedia

    It's the Supreme Court, stupid!

    by Radiowalla on Fri Jun 20, 2014 at 09:14:52 AM PDT

  •  France #3 in world with 478-600,000 Jews. (7+ / 0-)

    Israel and the USA are the only countries with more.

    France's Jewish population doubled between 1945 and 2010.
    That's the highest rate of increase anywhere in Europe.

    About a third of Europe's Jews live in France today.

    Anti-Semitism and racism are real problems in France, as everywhere.

    Despite many dark hours, France has been by far the most successful European nation at developing and maintaining a large and flourishing Jewish population.

    It's vital to keep that context in mind.

  •  5000 go, 473,000 remain (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Rogneid

    Some context.

    "When dealing with terrorism, civil and human rights are not applicable." Egyptian military spokesman.

    by Paleo on Fri Jun 20, 2014 at 09:33:35 AM PDT

  •  At this rate.... (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Brecht, sfbob, AoT, Mannie

    It will take more than 100 years for them to leave. If it was as bad as some believe, it would be a stampede. In no way am I minimizing the degree of anti-Semitism in France and elsewhere. It is also correct to note that its nothing new. When I was in college 30 years ago in New York I had several French classmates that were Jewish and they stunned me by their references to the freedom they felt as Jews once they were outside of France. As an American Jew, my generation barely felt the hint of antisemitism and I had never had any direct experience with overt anti-semitism. I grew up in several places, some with large Jewish populations and some with small populations. Even when there was only one or two other Jewish kids in the class, I can't recall any issues or even a disparaging word. The overwhelming response I got from everyone was curiosity. They really didn't know much about Jews and were genuinely interested in finding out more about us. The experience in France is far different, and while alarm  bells are ringing I also have some faith in French society and its inherent decency. If all French Jews, who have a  much more intimate experience with the holocaust, are only losing less than 1% a year to emigration, I am more hopeful for the future of French Jews.

    Patriotism is the last refuge to which a scoundrel clings. Steal a little and they throw you in jail. Steal a lot and they make you king.... Dylan

    by bywaterbob on Fri Jun 20, 2014 at 09:46:53 AM PDT

  •  Interesting point from the (12+ / 0-)

    NY Times story on this:

    Last year, 3,288 French Jews emigrated to Israel — a 72 percent increase over 2012. For the first time since 1948, the year the state of Israel was founded, French émigrés surpassed the number of American Jews emigrating to Israel. This year, the Jewish Agency for Israel says it expects some 5,000 to make aliyah, the Hebrew word for immigration to Israel that translates literally as “to ascend.” The agency said that while globally emigration to Israel was stagnating, French Jews were the notable exception.
    emphasis mine.
  •  A nuanced look at recent anti-Semitism in France: (0+ / 0-)

    The article analyzes the situation and solicits responses and reactions from many perspectives.

  •  A few comments (0+ / 0-)

    3200 Jewish residents left.

    The Jewish population in France is about 600,000.  Remember that France is a very secular place, so it's unclear how many more people born Jewish have rejected religion.

    As a result, it's unclear whether you can discern a trend.  For someone who has spent their life in France, Israel is likely to be a rude shock.  Unfortunately, French anti-Semitism, like everything else on the French right, tends to be loud and obnoxious.

    •  The anti-semitism in France (9+ / 0-)

      is coming from the left as well as the right.  In fact, supporters of the Front National are not the ones who are murdering Jewish school children or beating up Jewish teens or firebombing the synagogues.  This is coming from the Muslim ideologues who hate Israel and they have lots of company on the French left.  

      It's the Supreme Court, stupid!

      by Radiowalla on Fri Jun 20, 2014 at 12:01:40 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  that seems like an important point (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Radiowalla, Mets102
        In fact, supporters of the Front National are not the ones who are murdering Jewish school children or beating up Jewish teens or firebombing the synagogues.  This is coming from the Muslim ideologues who hate Israel and they have lots of company on the French left.  
        It's suddenly not hard to imagine that many people could be assuming that it's white Christians in France who are antagonizing and terrorizing Jews and generally making them feel unwelcome.  The role of France's large Muslim minority - a lot of whom are impoverished, poorly assimilated, and vulnerable to radicalization - changes the picture somehow.

        Domestic politics is the continuation of civil war by other means.

        by Visceral on Fri Jun 20, 2014 at 01:01:02 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  Well, that's part of the point (5+ / 0-)
      For someone who has spent their life in France, Israel is likely to be a rude shock.
      Which is what makes the emigration rate so alarming. You don't just change from French society to Israeli society on a whim--there needs to be a pretty big reason to make the switch.

      Unapologetic Obama supporter.

      by Red Sox on Fri Jun 20, 2014 at 01:08:23 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

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