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You heard it here first.  More on this later, but first all need to work to make hemp completely legal...  Hemp  is God's gift to America, and I don't mean when it goes up in smoke.  I am speaking of  fibers...

Begin educating those who won't vote for hemp legalization....
The hemp plant is a renewable resource..,  Hemp enriches the soil it grows in. ...

Hempseeds and hemp oil are highly nutritious and delicious...

Hemp is the only plant that contains all of the essential fatty acids and amino acids required by the human body... (stop over-fishing).
It is an excellent option for vegetarians.
It's quite high in some essential amino acids, including gamma linoleic acid (GLA), a very rare nutrient also found in mother's milk.
Fishermen sprinkle hempseed on the water as an effective bait..
Songbirds will pick it out of the mix as they prefer it over other seeds.
Hemp is becoming a common ingredient in lotions and many other skin, hair, and cosmetic products.. (compared to toxic chemicals).
Hemp is an ideal material for making paper. It regenerates in the field in months (unlike trees which can take 30 years or more to become harvestable after planting.)...
It makes a fine quality paper that is naturally acid free and does not become yellow and brittle or disintegrate over time like conventional paper.
Hemp is also excellent for making rugs and other textiles.  Levi Strauss' original denim jeans were made of hemp.
Hemp is the traditional rope making fibre due to its flexibility, strength, and resistance to water damage..
Hemp oil can be used to create biofuels to replace gasoline for diesel engines. Unlike fossil fuels, biofuels are renewable and produce less of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide.  Diesel built his original engine to run on hemp oil.
Alternatives to plastic can be made from hemp... Hemp based materials can replace wood and other materials used to build homes and other structures including foundations, walls, shingles, paneling, pipes, and paint.
Hemp may look like marijuana, however it does not contain the active chemicals that cause mind-altering effects.  Politics have kept this gift from us.  When Dupont made nylon, it influence was used to suppress hemp production....
" 58,000 tons of hemp seeds were imported into America for paint products in 1935" — Sherman Williams Paint Co.
Hemp produces the same amount of oxygen while it’s growing that it would use in carbon dioxide if burned as a fuel. Also, due to it’s leaf/root ratio (this can often be 10% roots vs 30% leaves), hemp can produce between 20% - 40% more oxygen than will be polluted.
Thomas Jefferson himself said, "Hemp is of first necessity to the wealth and protection of the country."
The  draft of the Declaration of Independence was made on hemp paper....
The first American Flag was made of hemp.
If hemp cross-pollinates with marijuana, it creates a lower THC marijuana, not a smokable hemp... Illegal growers will not grow near hemp farms because it practically destroys the effectiveness and marketability of their product.
Fabrics made of at least one-half hemp block the sun's UV rays more effectively than other fabrics..
The US Drug Enforcement Agency classifies all C. sativa (hemp) varieties as "marijuana."  Hemp was grown commercially (with increasing governmental interference) in the United States until the 1950s. It was doomed by the Marijuana Tax Act of 1937, which placed an extremely high tax on marijuana and made it effectively impossible to grow industrial hemp...
While Congress expressly expected the continued production of industrial hemp, the Federal Bureau of Narcotics lumped industrial hemp with marijuana...
Because of its low lignin content, hemp can be pulped using less chemicals than with wood...
It is naturally resistant to most pests, precluding the need for pesticides. It grows tightly spaced, out-competing any weeds, so herbicides are not necessary. It also leaves a weed-free field for a following crop...
Today it is clear that these beginnings of "the war on drugs" were pushed into being by the newspaper, cotton, and petroleum industries, all of which had much to fear over being competitive with hemp.....
Finally, a word of wisdom from our founding father.... "Make the most you can of the Indian Hemp seed and sow it everywhere." — George Washington 1794

Originally posted to kavips on Mon Jul 21, 2014 at 03:37 PM PDT.

Also republished by Community Spotlight.

Poll

Would YOU Smoke or eat Brownies of Marijuana IF

20%119 votes
1%11 votes
31%180 votes
13%77 votes
2%16 votes
2%12 votes
1%7 votes
0%4 votes
1%11 votes
4%25 votes
7%43 votes
0%4 votes
2%14 votes
0%3 votes
8%48 votes

| 576 votes | Vote | Results

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Comment Preferences

  •  I JUST ate 2 brownies I made last week. (22+ / 0-)

    I am going to call ti "2 brownie Monday" and the reason is 2 days off on the weekend is no longer remotely sufficient for relaxing before returning to work.

    Now, I am THRILLED to have a job, back with a company that laid me off in May 2013. Hired me back in Feb of this year, been there 6 months this time, starting to relax.

    The work in mental health can be draining and usually I spend the first half of saturday vegetating or even taking a nap.

    I made brownies last week: 8x8 pan, used organic unsalted butter instead of oil, reduced a half oz of midgrade to flour and steeped it in the butter for a little while, then added about a 1/3 gram of dab.

    Next batch gets better herb cooked longer in the butter and more dab. Might make cookies instead.

    Legal means "good".
    [41984 | Feb 4, 2005]

    by xxdr zombiexx on Mon Jul 21, 2014 at 03:53:44 PM PDT

  •  Brownies make me sleepy. (11+ / 0-)

    That's why I eat them just before bed for a good night's sleep.

    :-)

    BTW, your poll leaves out options for those who not only would, but do eat pot brownies.

    •  Too many grandkids around for the summer (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      ozsea1

      here, no brownies. Besides, for a good night's sleep, a hops pillow works better. My hops are now blooming, hoping for a nice harvest.

      A known sedative/hypnotic "drug" plant that is a fine cash crop here in Beer City where they're lining up to pay top dollar for local organic, also useful for its medicinal qualities. When they legalize hemp, I'm gonna grow the heck out of that too. For rope, of course...

      There are three kinds of men. The one that learns by reading. The few who learn by observation. The rest of them have to pee on the electric fence for themselves. - Will Rogers

      by Joieau on Tue Jul 22, 2014 at 09:02:37 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  at least change law to exempt industrial hemp (13+ / 0-)

    Modify existing laws to legalize Cannabis sativa ssp. sativa and its cultivars when grown under approved general conditions to maximize fiber, oilseed, etc. yields.  Mandate that hemp crops be subject to random testing to prove that THC content is below the threshold for usefulness as a drug.

    Marijuana is a different subspecies of cannabis - C. sativa ssp. indica - and wants to be grown in a particular way (spacing, light levels, soil moisture, etc.) to maximize THC content in the leaves.

    Domestic politics is the continuation of civil war by other means.

    by Visceral on Mon Jul 21, 2014 at 04:40:10 PM PDT

    •  Leaves (5+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      AoT, jbob, CoolOnion, Stripe, buddabelly

      No one smokes leaves, it's the buds baby!!!!!  Never pretend to be an expert when you are not.

    •  Actually cannabis hemp is only a strain (10+ / 0-)

      of Cannabis Sativa L. Hemp is allowed to freely pollinate while herbal cannabis strains are not. The cannabinoid drugs that produce both the THC high and the many medicinal benefits are produced by the resin glands located almost exclusively in the female flowers of the cannabis genus of plants. When the female flower is pollinated it stops producing the cannabinoid rich resins and the plants entire energy goes into producing the seeds. So if you are growing cannabis for the cannabinoids it is necessary to prevent pollination as long as possible.

      If you grew a hemp strain of cannabis like an herbal strain it would produce significantly more THC than it would normally but it would also produce far more CBD which moderates the THC high. The primary cannabinoid found in hemp strains of cannabis is CBD and not THC. When there is more CBD than THC in a strain of cannabis it will not produce the THC high no matter how much THC is present.

      If you still believe that it is necessary to test hemp plants you would need to test for all the primary cannabinoids and not just THC. However, it's a huge waste of time and resources.  

      Really don't mind if you sit this one out. My words but a whisper -- your deafness a SHOUT. I may make you feel but I can't make you think..Jethro Tull

      by RMForbes on Mon Jul 21, 2014 at 11:12:32 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  I've been waiting many years (10+ / 0-)

        for them to make it legal to 'grow your own'. And no, I don't think it's anybody's business what I do with it. I grow (and manage, and wildcraft) my own medicinals, there is a lively market locally, the licensed dealers set up shop in these counties in September. Ginseng (going for upwards of $900 a pound), black cohosh, blue cohosh, goldenseal, American mandrake, spikenard, elder, echinacea, lemon balm, calendula, etc., etc. Including tobacco and tobacco substitutes (like mullen), 7 kinds of mint, stevia, the culinaries...

        Make my own preparations and essential oils, it's none of the gub'ment's business what I do with those either. They don't care about you and me - never have, actually - and none of their rules and regulations are designed to "protect" us from the hazards of anything that grows freely in the natural world. I've seen no big government eradication programs aimed at death angels (mushrooms) or mountain laurel or queen ann's lace or any other absolutely deadly plant found in abundance in the countrysides of this nation. Nor are there any laws against them growing in abundance in the countrysides. It's all about protecting corporate concerns, entire multi-corporate 'systems', and corporate bottom lines.

        There are three kinds of men. The one that learns by reading. The few who learn by observation. The rest of them have to pee on the electric fence for themselves. - Will Rogers

        by Joieau on Tue Jul 22, 2014 at 09:33:40 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  The prohibition against the entire genus of (8+ / 0-)

          cannabis plants has absolutely nothing to do with protecting the American public against a dangerous and addictive drug. None of the drug laws were created to do that. Drug laws are about controlling specific groups of the American public and they all are at their base primarily racist.

          Really don't mind if you sit this one out. My words but a whisper -- your deafness a SHOUT. I may make you feel but I can't make you think..Jethro Tull

          by RMForbes on Tue Jul 22, 2014 at 12:44:06 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  Don't worry, with the erosion of food safety laws (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          RMForbes, ozsea1, Joieau

          to promote GMOs, your local neighborhood orcharist and gardener will become the new drug dealer.

          "It were a thousand times better for the land if all Witches, but especially the blessing Witch, might suffer death." qtd by Ehrenreich & English. For Her Own Good, Two Centuries of Expert's Advice to Women pp 40

          by GreenMother on Tue Jul 22, 2014 at 02:45:56 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

    •  Maybe nettles will save the world (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      ozsea1, llywrch

      They're hardy and perennial, and I've been reading that they produce a fiber that's finer and stronger than flax for linen.  Apparently Germany is gearing up for it now.

      The leaves are nutritious and taste like spinach when cooked.  They can be dried and used for human or animal food (boiling or drying neutralizes the sting).  Some animals will eat young leaves raw - like hot sauce?

      The flowers are a glowing lavender.

      Maybe we should take more advantage of what grows here without care, even in spite of us.

    •  Some Clarification Needed! (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      BvueDem, 18038, ozsea1, rocksout
      Marijuana is a different subspecies of cannabis - C. sativa ssp. indica - and wants to be grown in a particular way (spacing, light levels, soil moisture, etc.) to maximize THC content in the leaves.
      For the most part, you are correct, except for where most of the THC is concentrated as someone else notes, but, and this is important, C. sativa sativa is better adopted to sub-tropical or even tropical regions (one of the reasons that hemp production was encouraged in the US during WWII is the fact that the Japanese occupied the Philippines - a tropical region - where most hemp used in the US and other regions was grown commercially at that time).

      C. sativa indica originated in more cooler and temperate areas, and was used to produce Afghani, Pakistani or Lebanese hashish, artifacts from the 1960s, but now the source of most good recreational marijuana being grown legally or illegally in the US. Indica will grow thickly, at least many of the hybrid strains developed in the last 10-15 years will, but for hashish production in the Middle East and the Hindu Kush region the plants were spaced far enough apart so that the hash production crews could run between the plants wearing leather aprons to gather the resin, which was then removed and collected to be processed into hashish for shipping.

      There are strains of C. sativa sativa that are high in THC, the pot grown in Colombia, for example, that just will not thrive if grown much above or below the 35th parallel. Nor will C. sativa indica do well in tropical regions without a significant difference between summer and winter day lengths and cooler nights in the Fall.

      So, it's not quite as simple as it may seem on the surface. And, another tip, recreational marijuana could be grown right next to industrial hemp with no drop in potency as long as a person did not plant any of the seeds from the recreational type and expect the same quality as the original crop. Pollination from a lower THC level strain of cannabis does not reduce the potency of the current crop, that takes place through the genes of the two types combining during flowering and pollination, and is expressed in the seeds. So next years crop of recreational cannabis would be affected if it were to be grown from seeds pollinated by industrial hemp, and not clones of female recreational type plants as is now the usual practice.

      God's preference is for more people to be included, (not excluded through doctrine),...whenever the circle is shrinking, where people are being excluded or disliked, God is not served. -Rev. Alice Connor

      by paz3 on Tue Jul 22, 2014 at 11:13:34 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Consumables (13+ / 0-)

    make my ears ring.  But we have 150 acres of farmland here in the southern tier of NY, and we've got the cow dung composting for fertilizer.  Just give us the word!

    "The light which puts out our sight is darkness to us." Thoreau

    by NancyWH on Mon Jul 21, 2014 at 05:13:16 PM PDT

  •  and they hate us for our hemp. hemp is truth! (12+ / 0-)

    twas the duponts protecting popularity of their new synthetics and the cotton and flax magnates aligned to demonize and forbid mj and hemp. hemp never hurt anyone.
    how many criminals wouldn't be criminals if the plant could live free? would save the trees slaughtered for paper.
    shoes, clothes, medical, nutritional.. gettin high is just a hint towards the value. some religions know what's what too.
    the counter-counterculture got it wrong again.

    decent wages don't eliminate jobs. Republicans eliminate jobs; and workers, and prospects, and then excuse it all and call for more austerity. there is no end to their ignorant, arrogant avarice. only political dinosaurs support their treachery.

    by renzo capetti on Mon Jul 21, 2014 at 05:53:05 PM PDT

  •  founders!!! (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Santa Susanna Kid, jbob, NancyWH, eyo

    or flanders!!!!

    m*u*n*c*hm*u*n*c*hm*u*n*c*hm*u*n*c*h

  •  Im all for Hemp farming, but as a sailor (22+ / 0-)

    I will say that I would never put hemp rope on my boat.  Hemp fibers shrink when they get wet and every natural fiber in the world will rot.  

    And on boat lines, they rot in the inner braid where you can't see it then when they get put under load they pull apart like soft cheese.

    The best natural fiber you can get is Manila.  Some people call it "Manila Hemp" but it ain't the hemp you are talking about.  Its grows from a tree related to bananas.

    Manila is still used today on large cargo ships, but its still not as good as synthetic.

    But your other points are spot-on.  Hemp needs to be brought back into mainstream US Cultivation.  Hemp is also one of the best plants in the world for water filtration.  It is great at naturally leeching out metals and other industrial toxins from polluted water.  The contaminated hemp can then be cut and disposed of properly.

    Красота спасет мир --F. Dostoevsky

    by Wisper on Mon Jul 21, 2014 at 06:19:18 PM PDT

    •  That said... (11+ / 0-)

      My grandfather grew hemp for the Navy in WWII.

      The United States for All Americans

      by TakeSake on Mon Jul 21, 2014 at 06:24:07 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Well.. you go to war with the rope ya got... (12+ / 0-)

        Nylon wasn't invented until 1935 and only took 25% of the rope market by 1945.

        The military was first focused on using it to replace the silk and cotton in parachutes.  The navy didn't start looking at it until later.

        But yeah.. it was definitely the tradition.  The navy used to coat the lines with TAR too in order to try and stop the rotting.

        There would be an entire new advanced lexicon of profanity invented on the spot if someone put molten pine tar on my white fiberglass boat.

        Красота спасет мир --F. Dostoevsky

        by Wisper on Mon Jul 21, 2014 at 06:32:20 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Didn't sailors pretty much invent (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          BvueDem, ozsea1

          profanity? If not, they certainly perfected it. Hence the descriptive, "Cussed like a sailor."

          There are three kinds of men. The one that learns by reading. The few who learn by observation. The rest of them have to pee on the electric fence for themselves. - Will Rogers

          by Joieau on Tue Jul 22, 2014 at 09:37:07 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  Imagine the smells: pine tar, hemp, oak, tobacco, (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          ozsea1

          rum, wet wool, linen, dried fish, beeswax, coal, vinegar, jute, oakum, woodsmoke, kelp, tea, black powder, lye, bacon/salt-pork, tallow, port, lard...  

          Bottle up a gallon of sticky extract, pour it into your boat's bilge, stand back and record the advanced lexicon lessons for generations of YouTubers. ;-)

          (Or, just get some SeaGoer hand cream, for a lighter effect. :-) )

    •  I was told by a retired Dupont engineer (14+ / 0-)

      that the push back against hemp was to eliminate it completely with Dupont's synthetics... but WWII proved that nylon disintegrated in salt water....  So with the Philippines in Japanese hands, there was no hemp and that is why during WWII hemp was almost force grown.... by almost everyone...

      Hemp For Victory.....

      •  hmm.. I don't see how (5+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        jbob, eyo, StrayCat, GeorgeXVIII, llywrch

        I certainly think there was a push to get DuPont's synthetics into Military equipment/supplies.

        ...but Nylon doesn't disintegrate.  Any braided fiber shrinks when it gets wet but Nylon shrinks much less.  Nylon is great at not chaffing/fraying from rubbing abrasions.  And being synthetic makes it much more resistant to rot.  Nylon is also less susceptible to UV deterioration compared to polypropylene or polyethylene ropes.

        But, like I said, with the war breaking out only 5 years after the stuff was invented in a lab and 3 years after it saw its very first industrial use (toothbrush bristles) and at the same time that companies were scrambling to get nylon stockings to market to undercut the expensive silk importers, there wasn't enough of this stuff to re-fit the entire Navy or keep up with US ship building.  (And the military wanted it first to replace expensive parachutes, not cheap rope)

        So I don't doubt the claim of "force growing" to Uncle Sam supplied.

        Красота спасет мир --F. Dostoevsky

        by Wisper on Tue Jul 22, 2014 at 04:00:14 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  The Navy was using hemp and Manila docking lines (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          ozsea1, llywrch

          As late as the 1960's on their destroyers.

          Patriotism may be the last refuge of scoundrels, but religion is assuredly the first.

          by StrayCat on Tue Jul 22, 2014 at 06:30:28 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Yeah, manila is STILL used on cargo ships (0+ / 0-)

            but that aint hemp, that's banana tree fiber (or close to it).

            Good for big large braids like mooring lines I suppose.  Wonder if the natural fiber is still cheaper?  Maybe its a byproduct of general agricultural cultivation in the Philippines or something....

            Красота спасет мир --F. Dostoevsky

            by Wisper on Tue Jul 22, 2014 at 07:05:25 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

        •  Hemp was indeed a needful (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Sunspots, RMForbes, ozsea1

          wartime crop. More "assigned" than "forced," farmers with big enough plots were given seeds and a guaranteed return. Still grows wild in Kentucky, like the 'weed' it is.

          When this country first began, hemp was an actual medium of exchange ("money"). And in fact, American dollars were printed on hemp paper. Most farmers grew some acres of hemp.

          There are three kinds of men. The one that learns by reading. The few who learn by observation. The rest of them have to pee on the electric fence for themselves. - Will Rogers

          by Joieau on Tue Jul 22, 2014 at 09:41:32 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  Nylon doesn't disintegrate. (0+ / 0-)

          Yes it does. Very slowly.

          "Onward through the fog!" - Oat Willie

          by rocksout on Wed Jul 23, 2014 at 09:37:44 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

      •  I think a lot of it was from cotton growers too nt (0+ / 0-)
  •  kavips; That was a really mean poll, (12+ / 0-)

    with no "all of the above" box! I have this sincere belief that industrial hemp production is the only key to really increasing job creation here in amerika. Not so much with solar; as plenty of parts are now Chinese-made and the scammer companies are really coming out of the woodwork here in Kali. Sustainable lifetime jobs with US-made goods. Union employees with a proud product; kind of like Detroit in the 40's & 50"s. Pride of product. And what Renzo said in his comment above...SSK  

    "Hey Clinton, I'm bushed" - Keith Richards UID 194838

    by Santa Susanna Kid on Mon Jul 21, 2014 at 07:17:13 PM PDT

  •  Making a plant illegal (12+ / 0-)

    Is a sign of insanity. Which just goes to show that cannabis causes insanity in politicians.

    "Things are not as they appear to be, nor are they otherwise." - Buddha

    by US Blues on Mon Jul 21, 2014 at 08:14:21 PM PDT

  •  I'm proud of my home state (15+ / 0-)

    For once Kentucky is at the forefront of bringing back industrial hemp farming.  It's ridiculous that it took this long and it's even sillier that it took a Republican Secretary of Agriculture to make it happen, but better late than never.   Our KY Democrats missed an opportunity here IMO, and I wouldn't be surprised if James Comer rides this into the governor's mansion next year.

    Any tobacco-growing state that isn't making this transition is stupid.

  •  here's a handy link with valuable info (5+ / 0-)

    from Innvista.

    I've been doing a shot of hemp oil every day for the past couple years and believe it has benefited my health in several ways with no negative effects. I use Dr. Bronner's soap every day and also use it for shampoo.

    If you drink hemp oil every day for a couple of weeks, some of the first things you'll notice is softer skin, shinier hair and fingernails that grow like mad.

    Not that I'm overly concerned about such things, but my hair and skin used to dry out, and my fingernails were so nasty that they could be embarrassing and sometimes painful. Now they look better, feel healthy, and I'm reluctant to admit they even taste better! Yes, it's a bad habit that I'm working on.

    The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, but wiser people so full of doubts. -Bertrand Russell

    by elkhunter on Mon Jul 21, 2014 at 10:05:21 PM PDT

  •  ::sigh:: And there you go conflating hemp and (8+ / 0-)

    marijuana between your diary and your poll. Not to shake my finger at you, but that's the same issue that's helped keep industrial hemp illegal for so damned long. Keeping advocacy for them strictly separate would have made it an easier case to make. Yes, the whole thing is stupid, but conflating the two interests just reinforces the idiots and gives them an excuse.

    Information is abundant, wisdom is scarce. ~The Druid.
    ~Ideals aren't goals, they're navigation aids.~

    by FarWestGirl on Tue Jul 22, 2014 at 03:29:13 AM PDT

    •  "The Idiots" are well-established bureacrats (4+ / 0-)

      college degrees and management experience up the yin-yang ... and as Upton Sinclair observed  "It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends upon his not understanding it!"

      It would have been nice if the artisinal fiber and small farm lobby could have gotten industrial hemp legalized without getting all mixed up with the messy messy cannibis crowd.

      And in another thirty or forty years, they may have succeeded.

      However, the big bucks and legislative clout are currently backing hash oil products and premium smoking mixtures.  And where no State has legalized industrial hemp for it's own sweet sake ... two States have legalized the recreational hippy weed.

      So ... the moving finger of history having writ ... it is now more likely that Hemp will ride to legitimacy on the back of Weed than the other way around.

      (That's not something I would have imagined, much less predicted, -- say 2 years ago.)

      But there it is.

      So is the objection tactical ... or is it ideological  "Good Hemp, Bad Weed ?"

      •  Tactical. lol Though I have to admit I'm more (4+ / 0-)

        likely to use the industrial than the recreational, personally. ;-)

        As an RN with a fair amount of background in dealing with people who have substance issues, I'd much rather see people using cannabis than beer. I'm not much for either, myself, but that's just me.

        It is an interesting switch. All about the Benjamins, of course. The taxes from the fun stuff open more doors than saving farmers or the planet. ::sigh::

        Information is abundant, wisdom is scarce. ~The Druid.
        ~Ideals aren't goals, they're navigation aids.~

        by FarWestGirl on Tue Jul 22, 2014 at 09:10:04 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  Love your optimism and I love hemp, but (6+ / 0-)

    like anything with the potential to "grow" profits, it will be taken over by big business. It is a romantic notion to think otherwise.

    Everything good a man can be, a dog already is. - pajoly

    by pajoly on Tue Jul 22, 2014 at 04:19:30 AM PDT

    •  Case in point: Colorodo's marijuana (5+ / 0-)

      Under California's  semi-legal, almost respectable, system, the product remained field-grown and was consumed as smoke.

      Under Colorado's full-bore "treat it like alcohol" system ... indoor hydroponics became the rule, and consumable oils are starting to dominate the market.  Now,  an actual cannabis overdose, long thought impossible, IS possible -- especially if the cakes and confections find their way into the hands of children under 100 lbs body weight.

      More importantly  the Colorado system is immensely capital-intensive.  And "banking" and banking regulation being how it is ... the market is open only to growers with tens of millions of cash on hand.  This creates a need for financiers capable of pooling the resources of multiple investors.

      Financiers, investors and growers will have their third business conference  in Las Vegas in November Check out the corporate logos

      And as with railroads and computers, once the pioneering work is done, expect the players with the greatest resources to dominate the industry.

      "That's Capitalism" :  it ain't changing it ways, or going away any time soon.

      •  Exactly. The diary reflects a sad naivete. (0+ / 0-)

        I wish I did still believe in Santa Claus and Leprechauns. Life was much brighter. Becoming jaded is like watching time weather one's windows into near opacity. The world gets dull and lifeless.

        Everything good a man can be, a dog already is. - pajoly

        by pajoly on Tue Jul 22, 2014 at 11:29:30 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  Hemp production will do more to undermine (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      ozsea1

      corporate farming control of the market than to perpetuate it. Growing hemp as a normal rotation crop would eliminate the need for herbicides like Monsanto's Roundup. If you don't need herbicides then you don't need Genetically Modified crops that are immune to herbicides. That alone would breakdown the corporate control of our food production.

      I don't believe that herbal cannabis production will be taken over by large transnational corporations, it is far to labor intensive and requires significant skill. Production will remain in the hands of small cottage style producers. The real danger is the big boys taking over distribution which is the reason we are currently moving towards CO-OP's and grower's associations.  

      Really don't mind if you sit this one out. My words but a whisper -- your deafness a SHOUT. I may make you feel but I can't make you think..Jethro Tull

      by RMForbes on Tue Jul 22, 2014 at 01:21:24 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  *sad laugh* (0+ / 0-)

        You do know that there are other GMOs in the world and herbicides other than Roundup? and companies other than Monsanto? You do know that GMOs are created for other reasons than insect resistance? You do know that there was considerable corporate control of agriculture before GMOs, don't you?

        I've seen this movie before. You are about to find out how Wile E. Coyote feels when the express train runs over him.

        This is the landscape that we understand, -
        And till the principle of things takes root,
        How shall examples move us from our calm?

        (Mary Oliver, "Beyond the Snow Belt.")

        by sagesource on Wed Jul 23, 2014 at 05:18:57 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Yes, I am well aware of the existance of other (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Travelin Man

          GMO's and all of the big factory food producers. I guess you are having a reading comprehension problem, I was talking about the fact that growing hemp for fiber as a normal rotation crop would eliminate the need for HERBICIDES for weed abatement like Monsanto's Roundup. I guess you can't follow the simple logic...if you don't need herbicides you wouldn't also need to buy more expensive GM seeds that are designed to survive the application of chemical herbicides in intervals during the growing cycle. My bad.

          I'm far more aware of the corporatization of agriculture than you think. My family have been farmers in the Central Valley of California for over a century and I lived on my brothers Organic farm for several years. I wouldn't say I'm an expert but I'm definitely more informed on the topic than most. I'm also a liberal so I believe that it would be better to have thousands of small farms producing our food throughout the country than just a handful of big factory farm conglomerates controlling our food as profit centers. It just makes more sense to me.  

          Really don't mind if you sit this one out. My words but a whisper -- your deafness a SHOUT. I may make you feel but I can't make you think..Jethro Tull

          by RMForbes on Wed Jul 23, 2014 at 07:20:02 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

  •  Without hemp, we would of lost WWII! (0+ / 0-)

    Hemp helped win WWII!

    https://archive.org/...

  •  I'm going to have to disagree... (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    StrayCat, theotherside

    I have no problem with making industrial hemp legal to grow and to use for various products. However, to say that it will save the family farm or improve the American economy isn't in the cards in my opinion. Hemp products will need to be superior and much cheaper than current products in the market in order to displace them. Materials science has done an excellent job in creating a plethora of very economic and effective products in the absence of hemp. To say that hemp will now come back and displace those products is taking too much of a nostalgic view of the market of days gone by. Hemp just isn't that much better than much of what is now in use. One only has to look at the multitude of countries where hemp production and use has always been legal. Industries simply haven't flocked to those locations to churn out multitudes of products to meet the world's needs and to save the local economies. The demand just hasn't been there. I'm sure that there will be some demand for hemp in certain niche and novelty markets, but to say that it will take over the world is not something that I believe will happen.

    •  While your points are well taken, the environmenta (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      OrganicChemist, Sunspots, RMForbes, ozsea1

      and political costs of oil based synthetics are very troublesome.  Hemp, like other plants, can be grown domestically, and products made here.  I am sure that the number of things and processes that can use hemp are not yet known, and the research will probably make hemp even more useful than it is now.  A few years ago, many claimed that solar energy was a non starter because of storage, efficiency limitations, etc., etc., etc.  Yet today, the research and development of the past 3 or so years has demonstrated that we haven't even scratched the surface of the savings in oil, political craziness and materials costs that solar will enable.

      Patriotism may be the last refuge of scoundrels, but religion is assuredly the first.

      by StrayCat on Tue Jul 22, 2014 at 06:38:05 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  I will agree that the.... (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        StrayCat

        environmental and political costs of petroleum-based synthetics are an issue. However, unless there is a huge increase in price because of these, those issues just don't seem to resonate with most of the American marketplace. Again, I think hemp will not win on being more ethical, but will only win on being cheaper and mechanically better.

        I certainly appreciate your comments! Thank you!

    •  And to jump behind Stray Cat (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      OrganicChemist, ozsea1

      I would just add there is a wild card in your economic hand. That is global warming.

      Can't say with certainty how it will play out yet, but, it is definitely a wild card, and it is in our "playing" hand......

      •  Ok, this is a very good and valid point... (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Sunspots

        I'm certainly no expert in the area of natural fiber agrononmics and economics. However, I do know that cotton production can be crazy water intensive. Look at what happened to Aral Lake! If climate change makes cotton production economically unfeasible, then hemp might well have an opening in that case.

        I will say this, however. While living in various places overseas, I've had several hemp shirts and a pair of hemp pants. They lasted ok, but they just never felt quite "right" to me. At first they were a bit uncomfortable. They seemed heavy and a bit rough. The fibers weren't as a fine as cotton. The locals told me that they needed to be worn and washed for a few months and that they would feel better then. They did get more comfortable. However, I don't see them as being equal to cotton and synthetic blends. Maybe they will improve, but if it requires quite a bit of use and washing before they feel as comfortable as the competition, then that will be a continued problem.

        Thanks for your comment.

    •  This is true, but let us add an increasing cost of (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      OrganicChemist, RMForbes

      petroleum to your equation.  Hemp requires no petroleum based fertilizers in its optimal habitats.

      Can materials science say the same of petroleum inputs?

      It's time to start letting sleeping dinosaurs lie, lest we join them in extinction by our consumption of them.

      by Leftcandid on Tue Jul 22, 2014 at 10:32:57 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  If petroleum gets incredibly expensive.... (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Leftcandid

        then that could certainly affect the cost of materials and transportation for clothing products. However, since the material cost of a clothing product seems to be about 10 - 15% of the total cost, it will need to have a pretty dramatic price increase to have people consider alternatives. Also, as I said above, my personal experience with hemp clothing is that it is certainly adequate, but it doesn't quite measure up to what is currently available using competitive materials.

    •  inexpensive product (0+ / 0-)

      The cost of processing hemp for most products is far more economical than the alternatives. For example using hemp for paper requires less chemicals to separate the pulp from the plant than it does for wood. How much paper is used every year?  If hemp replaced the use of wood for paper, that alone would be a huge boom for farmers. Really we could take over 90% of wood products off the market and have them made with hemp. Hemp lumber mills could be very profitable. All fiber boards can be made for far less and have a much lower ecological cost to produce with hemp over wood.

      And the kicker is, since it has been outlawed for so long, we really don't know all the uses it will have. Once the industrialists find more uses it will become more useful. We've taken a plant with a multitude of uses and outlawed it and prevented research that would show its true value.

      Right now we have industrialists as well as the booze and tobacco companies fighting the legalization of the plant. They chose the battleground by making it an issue about recreational drug use. They knew they could not win if it was a battle over hemp. As long as we let them keep the battle on their ground we will struggle imo.

      The legs of the crane have become short in the summer rain. Buson

      by Travelin Man on Thu Jul 24, 2014 at 08:50:30 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Why would it save small farms? (0+ / 0-)

    Small farms are dying because large farms can operate with greater economies of scale, and cutting corners.  Why would hemp be any different?

    •  The implication is this: (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Sunspots, RMForbes

      That large farms will remain tied down with more profit making endeavors... wheat, corn, soy, blueberries, and not interested in hemp, thereby opening an opportunity for lower labor cost endeavors like family farms, to fill in the niche....

      There were no large tobacco farms... for example.

      Becoming large, overwhelmed oneself with checking the quality of each leaf to make sure it was perfect before each step of harvesting, drying, and processing could individually proceed further...  

      The small farmer content with making a decent living could do well on a hemp farm, even if a large corporation needing to satisfy the insatiable craving of its stockholders, would pass for something with a greater return on investment....

      Those are two ideas in support of small hemp farming ....

      •  But that's not hemp- that's cheeb (0+ / 0-)
        h checking the quality of each leaf to make sure it was perfect before each step of harvesting, drying, and processing could individually proceed further...  
        Fiber quality is remarkably consistent, and fiber production requires post-harvest processing w/ equipment that's beyond the investment capacity of any small farm I know of.

        For individual, consumer use, that kind of QC might be profitable. I've grown a couple of different crops for industrial use, on a "hired gun" basis- There isn't a commercial user on earth who cares. They buy by the ton and all that matters is price.

        •  True, but it will create good living wage (0+ / 0-)

          manufacturing jobs creating those machines and to man the factories that process the raw hemp from the fields into any of the more than 50,000 uses. My family grew cotton and we didn't own a cotton gin. We didn't turn the cotton into textiles. We just grew it, harvested it and then sold it to processors.

          Hemp produces twice the usable fiber per acre than cotton without the high cost of petrochemical fertilizers, herbicides and pesticides. The economics favor hemp and it would not surprise me in the least if hemp became a trillion dollar a year crop in America.

          Really don't mind if you sit this one out. My words but a whisper -- your deafness a SHOUT. I may make you feel but I can't make you think..Jethro Tull

          by RMForbes on Tue Jul 22, 2014 at 01:42:39 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

  •  Appreciate the diary (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Sunspots, milkbone

    And I support eliminating all restrictions on the hemp industry.  I also still have several books about Hemp from my college days.

    With that said, diaries/articles like this over-promise the benefits of hemp.  It has an amazing amount of uses but to be commercially viable on the scale hinted at here, it needs to beat out other competitors in a few key uses.  This may be the case but in the places where it is used industrially it doesn't seem to be dominating any markets or growing all that hugely.  

    But perhaps I've missed some hemp industry news of late and, if so, I would be happy to be shown that the hemp industry is growing fast.

    We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them. Albert Einstein

    by theotherside on Tue Jul 22, 2014 at 08:02:18 AM PDT

    •  How many of us would use an oil (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Kentucky DeanDemocrat

      that was as flavorful as sesame and peanut, and was almost 100% good cholesterol, and contained every amino acid needed by man, including Omega 3 for which we seek out fish?

      As someone who likes to eat. I'm highly interested and two days ago, didn't even know this product existed....

      I think there is great possibility... Just like with solar.  We have to work through the costs, and problems always associated with start ups, but the idea that we could actually get electrical energy from the sun is a driving one we would all like to have... Just thinking of the idea of cutting our utility bills from the sun hitting our roof, puts a big smile on my face, every time I dream it...  

      That hope will drive innovation and eventually, as did train tracks slowly expand across our country, we will get there...

      Hemp, with it's food, its fuel potential, its massive amounts of cellulose for pulp and paper, and its bio-friendly method with which it achieves all that (like solar energy), is something that can drive new technologies forward, because of the passion of someone's dream, and someday quite possibly turn them into realities...  Granted, it may take awhile,

      But if we can get Obamacare off and running, we can do hemp....  right?

  •  Anyone know Nebraska legalized industrial hemp? (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Kentucky DeanDemocrat

    I found out on Saturday.  Talk about quiet action.  More proof that a "red" farming state--like Kentucky--is able to make some rational decisions about its long term sustainability.

    It's time to start letting sleeping dinosaurs lie, lest we join them in extinction by our consumption of them.

    by Leftcandid on Tue Jul 22, 2014 at 10:34:08 AM PDT

  •  Hemp is great, but nothing about small farms (0+ / 0-)

    I'm not sure why hemp, if it became commercially produced in the US again, would be of any real help to small farms.  However much it costs to grow to hemp, and however much it makes in income, a larger farm can produce it cheaper than a smaller one by distributing the fixed costs over more sales, like they do with everything else.  I don't see anything in hemp that would change the basic economics of farm size.   Besides, American farming is in a golden age of profitability right now as it is, with high product prices for virtually all agricultural commodities and farmland values at record levels because of that.

    •  Hemp is very economical and very drought (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Kentucky DeanDemocrat

      resistant. An acre of hemp produces over four times the usable paper pulp and produces a superior paper product than an acre timber fiber. Hemp also produces twice the usable fiber for textiles than an acre of cotton. Cotton is third largest consumer of petrochemical fertilizer, herbicides and pesticides right behind corn and soy...hemp doesn't require these at all and requires significantly less water. Also, hemp does not require the fields to be tilled before planting. The economics of hemp is very strong.

      Really don't mind if you sit this one out. My words but a whisper -- your deafness a SHOUT. I may make you feel but I can't make you think..Jethro Tull

      by RMForbes on Tue Jul 22, 2014 at 01:56:52 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  With the whole buy local movement, Hemp (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        RMForbes

        on a small farm could become artisan textiles, livestock feed, biomass, and who knows what else.

        "It were a thousand times better for the land if all Witches, but especially the blessing Witch, might suffer death." qtd by Ehrenreich & English. For Her Own Good, Two Centuries of Expert's Advice to Women pp 40

        by GreenMother on Tue Jul 22, 2014 at 02:48:00 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Yes, and several other basic needs products too (2+ / 0-)

          Personally, I think it's criminal that we are cutting down our forests to produce toilet tissue to be flushed away when we could be producing a superior product locally from hemp.

          Really don't mind if you sit this one out. My words but a whisper -- your deafness a SHOUT. I may make you feel but I can't make you think..Jethro Tull

          by RMForbes on Tue Jul 22, 2014 at 02:59:31 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Agreed, but if it's profitable for a small farm (0+ / 0-)

            it means it must be much more profitable for a big farm because of the economies of scale issue I mentioned above, so I'm not sure that hemp provides any more of a solution to reducing the structural pressure on small farms to get bigger than any other highly profitable commodity, such as fresh fruits and vegetables already, does.

            Hemp is great, and I'm all for it, mostly for the environmental benefits, but I don't see how it can help farms stay small, as your title implies.

            •  I disagree at a basic level (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              GreenMother

              I don't agree with the whole economies of scale meme. Food production is just too important to our survival to be concentrated as profit centers for large corporate interests. Like with energy production, distributed production shortens supply lines, increases competition which lowers prices to the consumer and would be far more safe and secure. Bigger is not always better.

              Really don't mind if you sit this one out. My words but a whisper -- your deafness a SHOUT. I may make you feel but I can't make you think..Jethro Tull

              by RMForbes on Tue Jul 22, 2014 at 03:21:46 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  Bigger isn't even necessarily desirable at all. (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                RMForbes

                When I choose to pay extra to buy from a mom and pop operation or a small local chain, I am choosing to keep my money in my local economy. I am choosing to help pay (hopefully) living wages, or at least higher wages, I am choosing to not pay for bulk shipping costs that are eroding our atmosphere. I am choosing a smaller carbon footprint all across the board in addition to community building locally.

                "It were a thousand times better for the land if all Witches, but especially the blessing Witch, might suffer death." qtd by Ehrenreich & English. For Her Own Good, Two Centuries of Expert's Advice to Women pp 40

                by GreenMother on Tue Jul 22, 2014 at 05:05:12 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

              •  Economies of scale isn't a meme. (0+ / 0-)

                It's structural fact of life that every farmer has to contend with as she goes about solving the problems of generating sufficient income, year after year, in order to afford the ever-increasing costs of living that is inherent in urban life. Because she cannot raise her prices above those of other farmers, many of which will also be local, but many others of which may be far away, her only options for being able to afford the things she needs are 1) grow bigger; 2) get a job off the farm; or 3) sell out to her neighbor and give up farming altogether.  

                The only people in the US that I can think of who have successfully, and sustainably, avoided the pressure to grow in scale are the Amish.  And they do this by intentionally not buying very much at all from the urban economy and thereby not needing to sell very much to urban markets either.  The Amish go "off-grid," in a very comprehensive way and thus are self-sufficient in most things they need.  This option isn't available for hemp, however, because it is of limited use for a small rural community, and your project imagines making a whole industry out of it, making any producers of it wholly dependent upon the urban economy for almost all of their sustenance, and requiring them to increase their productivity, year after year, in order to continue to afford all of the ever-increasing needs human beings require in urban life -- energy, health care, the internet, cell phones, legal advice, etc. -- all of which increases in cost all of the time because such industries are not structurally limited by facing increasing returns to scale in the costs of providing goods to a market like all farms are.  

                However large or small a farm may be, it will always reduce the average costs of production to add one more cow, or one more acre, to what she is already doing, all of which pushes the prices of farm commodities down by  increasing the quantity supplied to a market, as it trended for at least 110 years for which we have data.  This structural limitation on farm income requires growth to survive, which means that as long as our economy is structured around urban centers (which it wasn't before about 200 years ago),  we can't reverse the trend of larger farms without providing substantial additional subsidies to farms in order to help them stay small.  (This is what occurs in Japan, for instance, allowing at least rice farmers to stay competitive through high import tariffs.)

                What this means is that hemp, or any other commodity, cannot keep farms small and local. Only specific and intentional public policies to do so can, regardless of what farmers are planting.

            •  Like I said--Small, local is a big selling point (0+ / 0-)

              for conscientious consumers. And those points can be taken further with Pesticide Free, Certified Organic, Sustainably raised, etc., and so on.

              "It were a thousand times better for the land if all Witches, but especially the blessing Witch, might suffer death." qtd by Ehrenreich & English. For Her Own Good, Two Centuries of Expert's Advice to Women pp 40

              by GreenMother on Tue Jul 22, 2014 at 05:03:14 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

  •  The poll left out "All of the above" (0+ / 0-)
  •  Lest we forget: The War on Drugs grew out (0+ / 0-)

    of a Progressive era moral crusade:  Prohibitionism.

    It started in the Theodore Roosevelt administration, when TR, who wanted to assert US significance on the world stage decided to UNDO the outcome of Britain's Opium War by supporting the Chinese Imperial ban on opium importation.  From this grew the notion of mirroring the Chinese policy, as regarded Chinese Imperial subjects living in the United States ... and (oh yes) the Pure Food and Drug angle vis a vis soft drinks and patent medicines.

    When the US entered the Great War in 1917, the rationale for drug control and alcohol prohibition changed.

    First and foremost  the concern was "moral".

    Secondarily, the efficiency of mills and factories was thought to depend on a MORE sober workforce.

    And, of course, the grain used to produce beer and whiskey was needed to win the war to make the world safe for democracy ...

    But what's that got to do with drugs -- especially marijuana ?

    There was only so much room at the top in the Anti-Saloon League and the Prohibition Party.  Ambitious reformers had to branch out, finding new markets and new revenue streams.

    Not all their crusades succeeded.  For some reason "Chloral Hydrate" just never worked out as a menace. This may have been because no class or race stereotypes attached to its use.  Saccharine too came under brief attack by reformers -- but Theodore Roosevelt  (who might be credited with bringing the War on Opium to the world stage) LIKED his no-cal sweetener -- so that crusade never got off the ground.

    Between the end of WWI and Nixon's second term of office Prohibition got complex:  in different parts of the country different drugs and the different class/ethnic/racial minorities associated with their use were identified as "the problem".  Cocaine: Southern "Negroes"  Morphine: "hobos" and prostitutes. Marijuana: "Mexicans".  Politicians in each jurisdiction wanted Federal legislation to solve their local race/class/culture problem.

    Then,around 1972,  Richard Nixon took it into his head  that each tab of acid dropped and every joint of pot smoked was an act of civil disobedience against HIM personally.  In this, Tricky Dickie wasn't entirely wrong --

    But, the idea that late 19th century technology could turn hemp into paper, cloth, fuel oil or animal seed more profitably than the wood, cotton, petroleum and legume alternatives ...  it's a nice thought -- but probably not much more.

    (And I have some reservations as to whether hemp is really superior to bamboo and flax as a source of paper and cloth.  Perhaps,  if manufacturers, worldwide,  were compelled to internalize all the costs (carbon and toxin pollution) they now externalize AND neither coal nor internal combustion were used in the cultivation and processing of the hemp ... "maybe."

    But, so far, hemp appears to be a superb raw material for artisanal gift-shop products where "price is not a critical factor: ...  

    •  What about producing completely biodegradable (0+ / 0-)

      plastics from hemp like is being done in Australia or the production of dent resistant body panels that are more than ten times stronger per pound than steel?

      There are more than 50,000 things that can be made better, greener, stronger, lighter weight, more durable and less expensive from hemp. Including just about everything we now make from petroleum and timber.

      Hemp does not require the use of chemical fertilizers, herbicides and pesticides like corn, soy and cotton. In fact, hemp does not require the tilling of the fields prior to planting and produces a long strong tap root that improves soil structure by breaking up hard pan and draws nutrients up from deep in the soil. Hemp is an organic farmers dream rotation crop.

      Growing hemp will decrease the costs for farmers to produce their primary crops and decrease the need for expensive petrochemicals and will save on fuel costs while producing another cash crop. Growing hemp as a normal rotation crop will almost completely eliminate the need for weed control. Hemp grown for fiber is grown so close together and is so hardy that even the new super weeds created by the over use of herbicides cannot compete.

      An acre of hemp extracts over twenty tonnes of CO2 out of the atmosphere much of which is absorbed into the soil in the form of organic life. There are many good reasons that hemp will become a trillion dollar a year crop in America.

      Really don't mind if you sit this one out. My words but a whisper -- your deafness a SHOUT. I may make you feel but I can't make you think..Jethro Tull

      by RMForbes on Tue Jul 22, 2014 at 02:54:22 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  All wonderful ... if true (0+ / 0-)

        and if true ... one would expect canny farmers to be lobbying for hemp cultivation.

        The devil is/will be in the details ...

        You can do such a lot with a wompom.
        You can use every part of it, too.
        For work or for pleasure, it's a triumph and a
        treasure.
        Oh, there's nothing that a wompom cannot do.

        Now the thread from the peel of a wompom
        Has the warmth and resilience of wool.
        You need never wash or brush it, it's impossible to
        crush it,
        And it shimmers like the finest sort of tool. (tulle)

        So our clothes are made from the wompom:
        Modern gowns, sportswear and lingerie.
        They are waterproof and plastic. Where it's needed,
        they're elastic,
        And they emphasise the figure, as you see.

        Hail to thee, blithe wompom,
        All providing plant!
        Hail to thee, blithe wompom,
        Universal Aunt.

        You can shave with the rind of a wompom,
        And it acts as a soapless shampoo,
        And the root in little doses keeps you free from
        halitosis.
        Oh, there's nothing that a wompom cannot do.

        Now the thick inner shell of a wompom
        Can be moulded with a finger and a thumb.
        Though soft when you begin it, it will set as hard as
        granite
        And is quite as light as aluminium.

        So we make what we like from the wompom,
        And it proves very useful indeed.
        From streets full of houses, to the buttons on your
        trousers,
        With the wompom, you have every thing you need.

        Hail to thee, blithe wompom!
        Gladly we salute
        Gaudiamus Wompom
        Philanthropic fruit.

        Oh the outer leaf of a wompom
        Makes the finest Havana cigar.
        And its bottom simply bristles with unusual looking
        thistles.
        We haven't yet discovered what they are.

        You can do such a lot with a wompom.
        You can use every part of it, too.
        For work or for pleasure, it really is a treasure.
        Oh, there's nothing that a wompom cannot do.

        Oh, the flesh in the heart of a wompom
        Has the flavour of porterhouse steak;
        And its juice is a liquor that will get you higher
        quicker
        And you're still lit up next morning when you wake.

        Hail to thee, blithe wompom! Let your voices ring.
        Hail to thee, blithe wompom! Ever more to ring.

        To record what is what in a wompom
        Needs a book twice as big as Who's Who.
        I could tell you more and more about this fascinating
        flora.
        Oh, there's nothing that a wompom cannot do.

        You can shape. It you can square it .
        You can drape it. You can wear it.
        You can ice it. You can dice it. You can pare it. You
        can slice it.
        Oh, there's nothing that a wompom cannot do.

        •  In fact several farmer's associations do advocate (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          flowerfarmer

          for allowing hemp to be grown as a normal rotation crop. The Organic Farmers Association is at the top of the list. And yes, it's all true and I have links on my website to substantiate every point I made.

          Really don't mind if you sit this one out. My words but a whisper -- your deafness a SHOUT. I may make you feel but I can't make you think..Jethro Tull

          by RMForbes on Wed Jul 23, 2014 at 12:51:08 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  I have no doubt that Hemp is (would be) (0+ / 0-)

            a useful crop and the DEA's reasons for not growing it are irrational and absurd.

            And I imagine used as part of an organic crop rotational program on an organic farm, no chemicals would be used to maximize the yield.  And, if the farmers were Anabaptists, no (well, not much) internal combustion  would be used in the process.

            But what happens when and if corporate farms decide that hemp produces more or better oil for fuel than peanuts, cotton, rape or flax --

            It this

            There are more than 50,000 things that can be made better, greener, stronger, lighter weight, more durable and less expensive from hemp. Including just about everything we now make from petroleum and timber.
            You made a good case for hemp-oil as a substitute for corn ethanol.  That one is pretty much a no-brainer if the figures you use for crop yields and processing efficiency are both correct, and scalable ...  though it does invite  the question as to whether other oil-rich plants might not serve as well or better.

            But, unless you define "substantiate"   as  "say again with great confidence but no supporting citations" ...  you didn't exactly do that for even 3 of 50,000 things.

            My guess is:  the superiority of hemp for all these things relies heavily on "best case scenarios"  with a lot of fudged mathematics and wishful thinking.

            The rest of the world does not necessarily share the US's pathological horror of "cannabis"  ... and DOES have access to the information about THC-free Hemp and the products that might be made from it.

            The question being "Can it be done at a profit?"

            If Greater Russia is at too high a latitude, and agricultural acreage in Europe is too firmly committed to other crops ... there's a lot of "the rest of the world" with tropical climates,  where people need cash crops and industrial exports.

            And while the United States DOES prohibit the importation of hemp seed, even if  sterilized and from a non-THC strain ... the oil, cloth, paper, and certainly the plastic are probably NOT excluded.

            If the economic superiority of hemp were that clear-cut, one has to wonder  "If China  (with plenty of capital to invest in projects)  does not produce these things, and Brazil (with plenty of land, labor and water with which to produce these things) does not,  and sub Saharan Africa with land, labor, water, access to Chinese capital, and several highly corruptable governments don't produce these things ..

            "Why ?"  

            •  I guess you didn't take the time to visit my (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              flowerfarmer

              website. An acre of hemp produces between three to six tonnes of dried hemp biomass every 90 to 120 days. In many areas across America hemp can be grown year round. Hemp can be grown and harvested before the primary crop is planted or after the primary crop has been harvested and the fields do not need to be tilled before planting hemp which is very helpful for soil conservation.

              China does produce hemp and Russia who was once the world leader in hemp production has again began to grow hemp. Hemp is being produced across Europe and strong dent resistant hemp composites are being used in European auto manufacturing. Also, the organic hemp seeds I use in my salads and soups are legally imported from Canada.

              Yes, I would love to see hemp production in sub Sahara Africa but it is our own drug laws that prevents it. If any country in the world were to allow their farmers to grow any cannabis plants for any purpose, they would lose all their foreign aid by law. If we would encourage the growing of hemp it would be very helpful to these developing nations. In the 1800's hemp production saved the people of Australia from severe famine...TWICE. Hemp production in Africa would be a game changer especially in areas where fuel, food and building materials are otherwise scarce.

              The reason hemp has not seen it's full potential globally can be traced back to one man and one point in our history. When our first drug czar, Harry J Anslinger, got 160 nations to sign onto the UN's Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs in 1962 hemp production was virtually stopped world wide. It has taken over 50 years for a few countries who don't need US foreign aid to begin to back out of the UN Convention on Narcotic Drugs which defined hemp as a narcotic drug.

              Really don't mind if you sit this one out. My words but a whisper -- your deafness a SHOUT. I may make you feel but I can't make you think..Jethro Tull

              by RMForbes on Wed Jul 23, 2014 at 04:43:02 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  Yes ... I visited your website ... (0+ / 0-)

                And "assertion" is not "substantiation".

                •  Every one of my "assertions" were sourced (0+ / 0-)

                  You may not believe that the sources were scientifically proven to your satisfaction but it's where I got the information. I did not make up any facts as you imply. I simply paraphrased information I got from several other sources which have been sited on my website. It is all truthful and verifiable. I just don't understand your problem with these facts at all.

                  Really don't mind if you sit this one out. My words but a whisper -- your deafness a SHOUT. I may make you feel but I can't make you think..Jethro Tull

                  by RMForbes on Thu Jul 24, 2014 at 10:42:28 AM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

  •  Hemp seed oil is also high in EFAs (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    ozsea1

    The same constituents that make these good for livestock make it good for humans. You can buy hemp powder as a protein substitute for smoothies, for those who cannot do dairy or soy. Essential Fatty Acids (EFAs) are good for your brain, your heart and your genitals, your nervous system and cognition.

    http://www.rayandterry.com/...

    "It were a thousand times better for the land if all Witches, but especially the blessing Witch, might suffer death." qtd by Ehrenreich & English. For Her Own Good, Two Centuries of Expert's Advice to Women pp 40

    by GreenMother on Tue Jul 22, 2014 at 02:44:37 PM PDT

  •  Mass growing of hemp (0+ / 0-)

    . . .will make it cheaper and cheaper until eventually, no one growing it will be making very much money off of it. This has been the general path of all agriculture and, really, for all aspects of capitalism as well.

    Iit's the ones in the game early on that make the real money. After that, with  some exceptions, it is diminishing returns.

    •  There are over 50,000 products that can (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Kentucky DeanDemocrat, ozsea1

      be made better and less expensive from hemp. Just because we are capable of producing billions of tonnes of hemp per year does not necessarily mean the price will drop to a point where it would not be worth growing. That completely discounts the usefulness of hemp as a raw material and as a soil conditioner. Personally, I see just the opposite happening...as more hemp is produced there will be more products being produced using hemp as a locally available raw material.

      Really don't mind if you sit this one out. My words but a whisper -- your deafness a SHOUT. I may make you feel but I can't make you think..Jethro Tull

      by RMForbes on Tue Jul 22, 2014 at 03:49:50 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  My interest in hemp is fabric. I don't use (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    RMForbes

    plastic bags, why would I want to use plastic clothes?

    I want biodegradable clothes, dammit.  Have people seen where their synthetic fabric clothes end up?  They trash third world countries.  When you give your cast offs to the thrift store, most of them go directly to someplace like Haiti.  

    Organic cotton is okay but is probably GMO.  Regular cotton takes a lot of pesticides and fertilizer.

    Hemp is the way to go.

    •  They are making completely biodegradable (0+ / 0-)

      plastics in Australia from hemp to replace the plastic shopping bags used by retail stores. Since the plastic is made from cellulose it breaks down to cellulose which is a natural component of soil. Plastics made from petroleum do eventually biodegrade but into toxic waste.

      Really don't mind if you sit this one out. My words but a whisper -- your deafness a SHOUT. I may make you feel but I can't make you think..Jethro Tull

      by RMForbes on Wed Jul 23, 2014 at 04:53:14 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  George Washington (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    RMForbes

    grew hemp to make the ropes used by ships as his main crop on his plantation Mt. Vernon...

    he also reports in his diaries that he smoked it because of the pain he endured from his wooden dentures...

    hemp is easier to grow and far cheaper than cotton. clothing is made of hemp in many European and other countries...

    America is behind the times on many issues...

    Is that all there is?

    by Eral Felder on Wed Jul 23, 2014 at 10:31:22 AM PDT

  •  Dangerous (0+ / 0-)

    Used to smoke buds until I got crazy. Not a fun thing, I'd say. But to make soil fertile again would be one really good reason for it tri-annually. Biannual we have soybean and corn, and I'd imagine making one year out of three for hemp would be good. It won't be growing any drug in it if it isn't legal, so I don't know why these blowhards are harping about brownies. Hemp is a very good material, of good quality. And apparently it is a signifier of approaching pot-freak parades, who act like they are laying low, but can't wait to pass the pipe.

  •  Any chance hemp oil might replace palm oil? (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    RMForbes

    Huge swaths of Indonesian prime and virgin forests are being cleared and burned so that oil palms can be planted. You and I are the developed West consumers and thus guilty of complicity. Any chance we can undercut these forest-killing bastards and make a few bucks in the process (not to mention reduce balance of trade)?

    •  The only problem with hemp oil is it must remain (0+ / 0-)

      refrigerated. So in products like ice cream that would be normally continuously refrigerated then yes hemp seed oil would be an excellent replacement for palm oil. However, you cannot fry with hemp seed oil because it would go rancid very quickly. I usually use hemp seed oil in my homemade salad dressing which I keep in the refrigerator. I also like to use it in the place of butter on steamed veggies and on popcorn.  

      Really don't mind if you sit this one out. My words but a whisper -- your deafness a SHOUT. I may make you feel but I can't make you think..Jethro Tull

      by RMForbes on Wed Jul 23, 2014 at 07:30:37 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Hemp oil can be made into plastics as well. (0+ / 0-)

    I remember reading about a guy who as a proof of concept made a computer case out of hemp oil.

    This has all been known for decades. Read "The Emperor Wears No Clothes" by Jack Herer.

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