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 The defining characteristic of the recovery from the 2008 crash has been the fact that the benefits of the recovery have fallen on so few and left so many struggling.
   Slowly, gradually, the American working class is waking up to this fact.

Economists, politicians, and the news media still try to convince us that things are returning to normal, but gradually the American worker is losing faith in their words.

  Here are a few vignettes for today's struggling worker.

Third-World America

  By most measures "extreme poverty" is defined by living on less than $2 a day.
This definition is usually reserved for 3rd world nations. The World Bank does not measure this level of poverty in the United States, but it should.

 Slightly more than one American household with children in every 25 is surviving on less than $2 per day of income from all sources. One quarter of that 4.3% (that’s 1% of all Americans with children) receive less than $1.25 per day. One third (that’s about 1.33% of all Americans) receive between $1.25 and $2. Another third of that 4.3% receive enough government benefits to be living on between $1.25 and $2 a day. A tiny 0.1% of that 4.3% are even surviving somehow on “Negative income & benefits.”
These are the findings of a Brookings Institution study.
When America gets described as a 3rd world nation, it shouldn't be reserved for just our politics anymore.
The official poverty line for a family of three would equate to roughly $17.00 per person, per day, averaged over a year, so our measure is roughly 13 percent of the official poverty line.
 It's hard to imagine how anyone could survive on so little money, but if things keep going the way they are many of us will find out.

The World Without Retirement

  The retirement crisis gets the occassional headline, but nothing ever gets done about it. Millions of Boomers are heading into old age with no hope of ever being able to stop working.
   So what does that look like? Harper's magazine decided to find out. It looks like this.

 In a must-read article in the current issue of Harper's magazine, journalist Jessica Bruder, adjunct professor at Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism, adds a new phrase to America's vocabulary: "Elderly migrant worker." She documents a growing trend of older Americans for whom the reality of unaffordable housing and scarcity of work has driven them from their homes and onto the road in search of seasonal and temporary employment across the country. Packed into RVs, detached from their communities, these "Okies" of the Great Recession put in time at Amazon warehouses, farms and amusement parks, popping free over-the-counter pain reliever to mask the agony of strained muscles and sore backs. And when they can't hold up any longer? The RV sometimes becomes a coffin.
   Since the financial crisis ripped the security out from under millions of people, the bulk of our politicians, including President Obama, actually tried to reduce, rather than increase, Social Security. The absence of pensions, along with the inadequacy of 401(k)s, skyrocketing healthcare and job insecurity and unemployment, are sending more and more people scrambling to figure out a way to keep body and soul together. Even grandparents are joining the ranks of those for whom life has become a game of Survivor.
 "Elderly migrant worker" is a common thing in 3rd world nations, but most of the people reading this probably have trouble accepting that this is the United States today. We are that country.
   What's truly disgusting is the way the companies "sell" this migrant worker lifestyle.
Amazon calls their program “CamperForce” and how they were recruiting “flexible and enthusiastic RV’ers with a positive, can-do attitude to join us in our warehouses.”  
  American Crystal Sugar Company calls their migrants "workampers," and refer to the work as “an unBEETable experience!”

The Wage Deflation Recovery

  The Federal Reserve is puzzled by the lack of wage inflation. After all, when unemployment falls and you get five years into a recovery, you are supposed to see wages really taking off.
   In fact, the problem is that not only are wages not rising. Wages are falling.

 Comparing the first half of 2014 with the first half of 2013, real (inflation-adjusted) hourly wages fell for workers in nearly every decile—even for those with a bachelor’s or advanced degree.
 What sort of "recovery" sees wages fall alongside unemployment? None that current economic models predict.
Class War

   Of course not everyone is struggling. The 1% are doing fantastic!
Corporations are having record profits, that are being extracted directly from the working class.

  Not everyone is blind to the fact that this growing inequality is not good for our democracy, our society, or our economy.
   Standard and Poor's and the International Monetary Fund has acknowledged the growing inequality in the United States and that it will hamper economic growth.

 An analysis by S&P, for example, noted income inequality is endangering the nation's economic health by making it more prone to boom-and-bust cycles and has slowed the recovery from the Great Recession. In response, S&P cut its growth estimates for the economy over the next decade.
   Meanwhile, an IMF report detailed how America's economic growth is being hamstrung by the current $7.25 federal minimum wage. It forecasted that the U.S. economy will grow by only 2 percent annually over the next several years and that low wages and bad tax policies are a major part of the reason why.
 Personally I'm not a believer in raising the minimum wage as the primary means to fixing this. I think it starts and ends with a strong labor union movement, but for that to happen people need to realize what class they belong to and accept that they will remain part of that class.
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Comment Preferences

  •  Bruder's piece is especially gnawing. n/t (22+ / 0-)

    Don't tell me what you believe, show me what you do and I will tell you what you believe.

    by Meteor Blades on Mon Sep 01, 2014 at 12:03:03 PM PDT

  •  Increasing the minimum wage is little more... (22+ / 0-)

    ...than a drop in the bucket. There's all this focus on it in the MSM and the blogosphere, yet, the truth is it's like putting a Bandaid on a gaping wound. And, this is the focus of the "Democratic" Party on September 1, 2014. Not exactly a very high bar. (And, for all those that respond with the "you've got to start somewhere" meme, I'm sorry but that bullshit no longer flushes.)

    "I always thought if you worked hard enough and tried hard enough, things would work out. I was wrong." --Katharine Graham

    by bobswern on Mon Sep 01, 2014 at 12:08:55 PM PDT

  •  Too many vote for the "boss" or don't vote nt (11+ / 0-)

    I voted Tuesday, May 6, 2014 because it is my right, my responsibility and because my parents moved from Alabama to Ohio to vote. Unfortunately, the republicons want to turn Ohio into Alabama.

    by a2nite on Mon Sep 01, 2014 at 12:14:12 PM PDT

  •  Correct. (17+ / 0-)

    Minimum wage increases are a good start but only a start, and as was said above, only a drop in the bucket.

    The real goal -- the long term solution is to build a workers movement the likes of which hasn't been seen since the 30s. The movement must be political, strong, its members aware of their class and their own interests. There has to be a massive solidarity movement. All workers, regardless of skill or trade, deserve a living wage, days off for sicknesses, pregnancy and emergency, vacation time, a retirement. Most of all, all workers want dignity. They want to see the value of their labor. They want to feel as if they have some control over the direction of the place they work for, they want to know that their job is secure into the future. That should be the goal of the movement -- dignity in work.

    Thanks for the diary gjohnsit. We will get there. It may take time, but we will.

  •  We're seeing the results of a systematic (18+ / 0-)

    plan of destruction of the rights of workers that has been going on for at least 40 years.  

    They've gone after good paying jobs (shipping them overseas via horrendous "free trade" deals), they've destroyed pensions (returning to the pre-New Deal idea that people should "save for their old age" themselves"), destroyed unions that enabled workers to join together to meet the power of employers and corporations, destroyed worker health and safety measures either through regulation elimination or non-enforcement, ensured that jobs are scarce so American workers will be fearful of losing what little they have, and done everything possible to ensure that American workers feel isolated, scared, alone, and vulnerable.

    It isn't a Happy Labor Day.  It should be.

    There already is class warfare in America. Unfortunately, the rich are winning.

    by Puddytat on Mon Sep 01, 2014 at 12:44:32 PM PDT

    •  It also destroyed a sense of pride in work as per (16+ / 0-)

      Pierce:

      There is still pride in work, but it is not as general as it was, because simply Having A Job has replaced Doing A Job. There is still pride in work, but it is not as general as it was, because people don't have the time any more to appreciate their own work. Its very existence is constantly in peril. There is still pride in work, but it is not as general as it was, because it does not pervade the economy any more. It exists, in isolation, one place or another. It exists, in fragments, because the social fragmentation of work has been the deepest subversion of that pride that came with a unionized workforce. So the children of steelworkers boo public schoolteachers. The children of autoworkers vote in their towns to stiff the cops, and they cheer swaggering louts like the governor of New Jersey who are proud to have arranged the looting of the pensions of thousands of firefighters. And the people on top, the thugs for J.H. Blair, the people who had to have every advance for American workers pried, or struck, or (yes) shot out of their grasp, they are still the same. Only their techniques are different, and the fact that almost every elected politician needs them to get elected again, because only 12 percent of this country's workforce is unionized, and the balance has slid back to where it was during the last gilded age.

      Unions made it possible to take the time to take pride in your work. A job wasn't necessarily something you grabbed out of desperation. It was a craft to be learned, and to be treasured, and it was something you did so you could show your children what you'd produced for them, and for the neighbors and, ultimately, for the country. There is nothing in the speedball capitalism of our current era to replace that, and to bring back the hope that sprang from that pride, that the kids would do better than you had, that the steelworker's son could be a lawyer, and the grandkid, well, hell, who even knew? Maybe he could be president. We all, after all, were in it together.

      Some men see things as they are and ask why. I dream of things that never were and ask why not?

      by RFK Lives on Mon Sep 01, 2014 at 01:56:37 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  This is the game, isn't it? (14+ / 0-)

    They've been playing it, and us as well, for a very long time. As rexymeteorite points out, we were moving in the right direction in the '30s, but WWII caused an interruption and while the workers were off fighting and dying, the owners were profiteering, buying political parties, and plotting. After the war they returned to a fait accompli. It's worth noting that the movement of the '20s & '30s was the reaction to the grab-back by the parasites after the first Roosevelt, so this war has been going on for awhile.

    It works, too. Just look at the timelines. Every time the American worker has made any headway, there's the inevitable backlash and a whole new form of suck is formed to put them back down.

    Thanks for writing this up today. It and you are appreciated.

    "Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities." - Voltaire

    by Greyhound on Mon Sep 01, 2014 at 01:12:56 PM PDT

  •  I was bowled over by (21+ / 0-)

    a new word that I learned the other day:

    In sociology and economics, the precariat is a social class formed by people suffering from precarity, which is a condition of existence without predictability or security, affecting material or psychological welfare as well as being a member of a proletariat class of industrial workers who lack their own means of production and hence sell their labour to live. Specifically, it is applied to the condition of lack of job security, in other words intermittent employment or underemployment and the resultant precarious existence.

    The term is a portmanteau obtained by merging precarious with proletariat.

    I submit that this is not only "what's become of America's middle-class", it also exactly describes "elderly migrant workers".  If I'm reading the wiki correctly, precariat was coined as a word originally to describe classes in Britain, but they certainly don't have a lock on it, IMO. I guarantee we'll be hearing more and more of it here.  

    "Counting on people having nowhere else to go is the logic of a slumlord."--Wolf10

    by lunachickie on Mon Sep 01, 2014 at 01:16:37 PM PDT

  •  I don't see a pathway for the (13+ / 0-)

    …American Colonists to change the trajectory of the collapsing middle class within the US corporate Plantation system that owns and operates the Federal Government. The trajectory has been straight, true, and utterly precise for five decades -- regardless of who was elected to office.

    At one time, I believed that the consumer class was the "engine of the US economy." I believed that our Corporate Overlords would not let the crushing of consumers continue after the US economy collapsed in 2006.

    But, what we have seen since the Democrats came into control in 2009, has lifted the veil on the real plan. Watching the TPP and the TTIP trade agreements come to fruition, it is simple to understand why the US domestic consumer class is now a mere footnote to the US economy. They can be crushed into low wage workers, indentured to the privately-owned Plantation of America. There are better, wealthier consumers to be had globally -- especially in the EU, where a decent standard of living is guaranteed by the participating governments via their social democracies.

    The Plan for the American future is a necessary one. The American middle class standard of living must be drastically lowered. Living spaces must be smaller. Families must double up. Public services must be cut, particularly outside the cities. Pensions must be allowed to fail or drastically cut back. Education must be unaffordable; travel as well. Commuting and domestic energy use must be cut back so the private owners of domestic oil can export to more lucrative markets -- after the taxpayers pay top dollar to buy vast stockpiles of oil for the military to continue its global adventurism and spree-killing. The Corporate Overlords will no longer be investing in infrastructure or in human capital inside the US Plantation. A strong, healthy, educated, mobile population is the last thing they want for the American Colonists.

    These are economic facts of life and this is the American future. Social mobility, where a child can earn more than his father did, is long dead in the US.

    But, it is not all bad news. Those who plan now and change now, can do very well. Americans have always over-consumed with great excess and waste. Embracing smaller desires and greater personal sustainability is probably good for the world and good for the soul. The happiest people seem to take a great deal of satisfaction in the small things, cooking, growing food, caring for extended family, fixing things instead of throwing them away, inventing ways to make life more fun through simple inexpensive pleasures, turing inward spiritually, rediscovering self reliance, becoming more communal.

    I've come to think the meek really will inherit the earth. Regardless of how you vote.

    •  I've even come to agree with Neal Stephenson (6+ / 0-)

      …who believes that things will be a lot better and more fun for people when all this attention on the Internet finally goes away -- and old-fashioned telephones return. Communicating by letters that arrive in your mailbox gave life a great deal of charm and allowed for a life lived with contemplative self-awareness.

      Good times.

    •  Perhaps you give the owners too much credit (8+ / 0-)

      if (northern) Europe has the 'consumers of last resort', then the austerian jihad would be slowing rather than gaining steam in the EU (Draghi's lipservice to 'lackluster demand' notwithstanding). I think they're just mindlessly looting and consuming with an 'aprés moi le deluge' mentality.

      You are right about a needing a plan. I think we are entering the era where 'deconstruction' will move from the philosophical to practical, and only the scroungers will survive.

    •  It'll change (7+ / 0-)

      The one consistency in history is change.
         Eventually the looting of the working class in country will become intolerable and there will be a backlash.

       The problem is that I just don't see when/how that backlash will start.
         Of course social changes can rarely be forecast. They often happen slowly, and then all at once.

      "The oppressors most powerful weapon is the mind of the oppressed." - Stephen Biko

      by gjohnsit on Mon Sep 01, 2014 at 03:11:05 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  A friend's job takes him often (6+ / 0-)

      to poor parts of Asia and Africa. If the poverty isn't devastating, where daily life can't function, just plain 'not a lot of things' he says these communities are almost always much happier than you see in the 'developed' world.

      The happiest people seem to take a great deal of satisfaction in the small things, cooking, growing food, caring for extended family, fixing things instead of throwing them away, inventing ways to make life more fun through simple inexpensive pleasures, turing inward spiritually, rediscovering self reliance, becoming more communal.
      I think of songs from the Sudan, back before their crisis, which translated say things like "Isn't it good to be walking along the river as the sun goes down after a day of work to have dinner with my family?"

      You'd need a hell of a lot of Satanic symbols in a western popular music video to help push that kind of lyric on the public.


      My country goes dead making money.

      by Jim P on Mon Sep 01, 2014 at 03:17:59 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Population pressure (5+ / 0-)

    Too many people. As long as population stays high, there will be lots of surplus labor.

    Need to have fewer people and a lot of these issues will resolve themselves. The fewer people who exist will live very high living standards.

    Seriously, put birth control everywhere.

    (-5.50,-6.67): Left Libertarian
    Leadership doesn't mean taking a straw poll and then just throwing up your hands. -Jyrinx

    by Sparhawk on Mon Sep 01, 2014 at 01:54:20 PM PDT

    •  One of the few things I agree with you on (4+ / 0-)

      is overpopulation of the human species, especially at current aggregate levels of consumption.  Tax breaks for offspring after the 2nd child per couple should be phased out. However there also needs to be strong environmental regulation and a phase out of fossil fuels rather quickly,  and the government has to put a huge thumb on the scale of markets through confiscatory levels of taxation on fossil fuels  and the profits made by them, plus taxation and regulation designed to make the unsustainable status quo unaffordable for everyone,  including the .01 percent.  Even with a smaller or shrinking population,  we can still destroy the planet if the same amount of economic activity continues or increases. The situation we are in is market failure writ large.

    •  nope, that's not it (3+ / 0-)

      Overpopulation is certainly a problem, and it's certainly to blame for a lot of ills. But unemployment and falling wages aren't among them.

      If the population of the world were 10% of what it is now, then economic demand would also be 10% of what it is now. So demand would be met with 10% of the automated systems and poverty-wage workers we have now. The problem is productivity, and that's essentially driven by technological development—regardless of the population level.

      Productivity doesn't have to be hell. It could be heaven instead. That's a political choice, and so far we're choosing badly.

      "The true strength of our nation comes not from the might of our arms or the scale of our wealth, but from the enduring power of our ideals."—Barack Obama

      by HeyMikey on Mon Sep 01, 2014 at 02:48:39 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Malthusism (5+ / 0-)

      Dropping all trade barriers causes the race to the bottom.

       There has always been countries with too many people and not enough work. It's only in the last 50 years did our leaders decide to compete directly with them on a labor level.

      "The oppressors most powerful weapon is the mind of the oppressed." - Stephen Biko

      by gjohnsit on Mon Sep 01, 2014 at 02:59:40 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  A serious question (5+ / 0-)

      If the question was simply supply and demand of workers vs. jobs, then why did wages fall this past year even while the unemployment rate fell?

      "The oppressors most powerful weapon is the mind of the oppressed." - Stephen Biko

      by gjohnsit on Mon Sep 01, 2014 at 03:38:12 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Automation and deskilling (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        mattc129

        Skilled jobs are being replaced by machines that are better, faster, and cheaper.

        As the skill level of your required workers drops, so does the salary.

        A cobbler costs a lot of money. A guy pushing one button telling a machine to make 50,000 pairs of shoes isn't.

        (-5.50,-6.67): Left Libertarian
        Leadership doesn't mean taking a straw poll and then just throwing up your hands. -Jyrinx

        by Sparhawk on Mon Sep 01, 2014 at 03:47:37 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  refusal to face facts (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    TracieLynn
    The Federal Reserve is puzzled by the lack of wage inflation. After all, when unemployment falls and you get five years into a recovery, you are supposed to see wages really taking off.

    In fact, the problem is that not only are wages not rising. Wages are falling.

    Comparing the first half of 2014 with the first half of 2013, real (inflation-adjusted) hourly wages fell for workers in nearly every decile—even for those with a bachelor’s or advanced degree.
    What sort of "recovery" sees wages fall alongside unemployment? None that current economic models predict.
    That's it, in a nutshell. Falling wages means the supply of labor exceeds the demand for labor. Period. The two ways to deal with this are essentially to create jobs with fiat money, or to redistribute wealth via progressive taxation. Preferably both.  

    But neither is politically popular. Both major parties have done everything in their power to refuse to recognize simple facts—basic supply and demand.

    "The true strength of our nation comes not from the might of our arms or the scale of our wealth, but from the enduring power of our ideals."—Barack Obama

    by HeyMikey on Mon Sep 01, 2014 at 02:53:32 PM PDT

    •  Other methods (4+ / 0-)
      The two ways to deal with this are essentially to create jobs with fiat money, or to redistribute wealth via progressive taxation.
      Actually the excess supply of labor you refer to exists overseas. Not in America.
        The way to deal with that is to recind our FTA's and drop the WTO.

      "The oppressors most powerful weapon is the mind of the oppressed." - Stephen Biko

      by gjohnsit on Mon Sep 01, 2014 at 03:01:51 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  2 reasons I don't (exactly) agree; 2 things to do (0+ / 0-)

        (1) The reason it's increasingly cheaper to tap overseas labor for the US market is technology. It's increasingly easier and cheaper to move goods and to perform services remotely. That ongoing pressure is extremely resistant to political fencing-off.

        (2) Those people overseas are human beings. They are just as entitled to eat, and to have roofs over their heads, and shoes for their children, as Americans. We should not let the rich divide and conquer. Everyone deserves to live decently.

        If I were King of Trade, I'd allow tariff-free trade in goods and services that meet the following conditions:

        A. Produced by people who are paid a living wage for their location;

        B. Who work in reasonably safe conditions;

        C. Using reasonably enviro-friendly processes;

        D. Who have the right to organize. (This would mean tariffs on Chinese goods & services.)

        Another thing we could and should do about this is tax carbon—including a carbon import tariff for stuff from countries that don't have their own carbon tax. If it were more expensive to burn the fuel to move goods halfway around the world, less of that would happen. This would move production to wherever the natural resources are; cheaper to ship a finished car than the umpteen tons of iron ore that went into making the steel, or the silicon that went into making the glass, etc. Honestly I'm not sure how the USA stacks up, natural-resource-wise, against competitors; I think we still have plenty. Regardless, we need to tax carbon.

        "The true strength of our nation comes not from the might of our arms or the scale of our wealth, but from the enduring power of our ideals."—Barack Obama

        by HeyMikey on Mon Sep 01, 2014 at 03:14:40 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  yes and no (4+ / 0-)

          I agree with your first point, but I think that the pressure has always been there. The difference is the power of the interested parties.

           However, your second point I strongly disagree with.
          You make the assumption that giving away our jobs will make other people wealthier. It was a popular belief in the 90's amoungst liberals.
             It turned out to be false. Mexican workers became poorer, not wealthier because of NAFTA. Illegal immigration increased dramatically because their livelihoods were crushed (just like ours were).
             The only people that have made out from the free trade agreements were multinational corporations and the very wealthy.

           I've written several essays on this subject.

           So no, I don't believe in free trade agreements, and never will.

          "The oppressors most powerful weapon is the mind of the oppressed." - Stephen Biko

          by gjohnsit on Mon Sep 01, 2014 at 03:24:30 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

  •  Best History of American Labor I know (4+ / 0-)

    is: "Labor's Untold Story"

    Every progressive needs to read this book IMHO. It sure opened my eyes!

    "The Democrats and the Republicans are equally corrupt where money is concerned. It's only in the amount where the Republicans excel." ~ Will Rogers

    by Lefty Coaster on Mon Sep 01, 2014 at 02:59:14 PM PDT

  •  Yeah, but, you know: The fundamentals are sound. (3+ / 0-)

    To put the torture behind us is, inevitably, to put it in front of us.

    by UntimelyRippd on Mon Sep 01, 2014 at 03:00:40 PM PDT

  •  Robots come cheaper. (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    gjohnsit, Joieau, gulfgal98
    raising the minimum wage as the primary means to fixing this
    That's why the idea that raising the minimum wage is a game-changer is insanely short-sighted, and no solution at all. Yes, Yes, Yes, raise the minimum wage so thankfully people can live better and for a while there'll be a boost in the economy as more dollars circulate.

    But the reality is that at the same moment robotics is actually at a point where you can pay off your purchase of a burger-flipping-robot in less than a year. (btw, robots don't need managers either, so count those jobs gone as well)

    For one example.

    In short, all the manual jobs we thought couldn't be shipped off to China or some miserable place, can be done by robots. How long before hair-cuts and gardening are done by machines? And we know damned well they won't be making the robots here.

    From the maker of the burger-flipping (custom burgers, btw) machines http://www.businessinsider.com/...

    Momentum Machines cofounder Alexandros Vardakostas told Xconomy his "device isn’t meant to make employees more efficient. It’s meant to completely obviate them." Indeed, marketing copy on the company's site reads that their automaton "does everything employees can do, except better."
    The 'increase the minimum wage' move is -- at the very most -- a palliative, and not a cure for the eternal depression The Quality have in mind for us. How people don't understand this at a site like DKos...?

     


    My country goes dead making money.

    by Jim P on Mon Sep 01, 2014 at 03:07:52 PM PDT

  •  My grandparents generation, who fought in WWII (5+ / 0-)

    and who came home to see the creation of the mid-20th century American Middle Class (unparalleled in human history for standard of living for such a large number of people) would never believe what is happening today in this nation.

    That the corporations have nearly reached the future which they have been after for over 150 years: they own everything and everyone in these United States of America.

    It was Dick Durban who said only a few years ago:

    Sen. Dick Durbin, on a local Chicago radio station this week, blurted out an obvious truth about Congress that, despite being blindingly obvious, is rarely spoken:  “And the banks — hard to believe in a time when we’re facing a banking crisis that many of the banks created — are still the most powerful lobby on Capitol Hill. And they frankly own the place.”  The blunt acknowledgment that the same banks that caused the financial crisis “own” the U.S. Congress — according to one of that institution’s most powerful members — demonstrates just how extreme this institutional corruption is.
    We on the Left have been bitching for years that the US Congress has been "bought and paid for" by corporations.

    Silly us. It wasn't the damned Congress they were really buying, it was all of us.

    Now a couple of part-time jobs is what far too many have to look forward to as they age into their 60s and 70s and beyond. In an era where a part-time job may consist of ZERO HOURS a week.

    Add slipping wages to not enough jobs and a continually lowered standard of living for not just minorities who have endured this shitty lifestyle since day one of the Republic, but for the aging, white, former-middle-class?

    There is a word for what happens when such a situation arises, and it's not called voting.... it has a much more terrifying name and that is revolution.

    "I like paying taxes...with them, I buy Civilization"

    by Angie in WA State on Mon Sep 01, 2014 at 04:02:08 PM PDT

  •  Thank you for this eye-opening article. n/t (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    davidincleveland

    The most serious problem in American politics today is that people with wrong ideas are uncompromising, and people with good ideas are submissive and unwilling to fight. Change that, and we might have a real democracy again.

    by Eric Stetson on Mon Sep 01, 2014 at 09:15:00 PM PDT

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