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As a [now formerly] lifelong Republican, a [Goldwater] Conservative, and a former GOP activist, operative and professional campaign manager, now ardently supporting Sen. Barack Obama, I feel that I have the proper perspective from which to advise this audience on how to "sell" Obama to your Republican friends, relatives, and business associates.

There is a large reservoir of discontent among Republicans who are dissatisfied with John McCain as the GOP nominee.  As the recent 25% votes against him in the now uncontested primaries indicate, this dissention is far deeper and more persistent than it will be among Clinton Democrats, when the dust settles in August.  These votes, and those of other Republicans now disenchanted are ripe for the picking this fall - IF you know how to make the case to these people.

Below the fold I'll try to give several viable talking points which should hold you in good stead with most any Republican you come across, talking politics with between now and the election...

In general, Republican voters dont have the same priorities as Democrats. The reasons YOU support Sen. Obama are most likely NOT the factors on which your Republican associates will make their voting decisions. Dont assume that your 'hot button' issues are necessarily even important to them, nor belittle the priorities they bring to the voting booth.

First, to most Republicans, the cornerstone Democratic issues of "Health Care", "Education", and "Jobs" just dont even register in the top five issues on which they will base their vote.  Arguing that Obama will best handle such subjects wont win their vote even if they believe you that he is best on these issues.  Moreover, Republicans will generally have less confidence in the government to deliver health care, and more confidence in private schools to deliver education than you will.   Dont argue these issues, arguments just harden attitudes; save your breath - just dont go there. You want their actual VOTE, not their nodding agreement on some arcane philosophical issue.

Second, resist the urge to "Bush Bash".  While many (even Most) Republicans are no longer enamored with the President, that doesnt mean they are sympathetic with everyone wanting to dump on him, either.  They may feel President Bush to have been well intentioned, though blundering; they may have felt events got out of his control, they may even blame the Democratic Congress for his apparent failings.  Again, DONT GO THERE.  Its not a fight worth having.  You dont win VOTES by fighting with people, you win by leading them to the better alternative - from their vantage point, not yours.  George W. Bush is not on this ballot, and neither is his Vice President running to succeed him.  That "Bush Third Term" drivel just wont cut it in winning Republican votes.  Fortunately, with Obama as our candidate, we can make a better, more substantive case than that.

Third, the only really serious, pervasively damaging charge the GOP will make against Obama is the tried-and-true tactic of painting him as a traditional "tax-and-spend-liberal-democrat, squishy-on-national-defense", in the mold of John Kerry, Michael Dukakis, Walter Mondale, etc. To most Republicans, that's the killer - if they believe it.  All other charges and acusations, no matter how scurrilous, are secondary and incidental to that one.  If they buy the 'tax-and-spend-liberal' label, they'll believe all the muddier garbage gossip; if they reject that charge as bogus, they'll most likely reject any other labels that may be pinned on him as 'not credible' either.  EVEN IF you, in your heart-of-hearts believe we need more taxes and spending, and you pray to your humanistic wiccan goddess every night (j/k) that Obama will bring these things, for the sake of the Polar Bears, keep those wishes to yourself!!!  To obtain an Obama VOTE, you are appealing to your Republican friend's existing sensibilities, rather than trying to change them.

You may not agree with the following policy conclusions which led me to cross over for the first time in my life, and vote for Sen. Obama in Virginia's open primary, but THEY DID.  And these same issues will resonate with other Republicans in voting booths across the country this fall...

1.  TAXES.  As a member of the Illinois State Senate, Sen. Obama was cosponsor of a bill which ultimately passed, creating the largest tax cut in state history.   Since the start of his presidential campaign, he has consistently favored a broad-based middle class tax cut.  By contrast, Sen. McCain "voted against tax cuts before he voted for them", and has no real credibility on this issue among conservatives.  McCain was very critical of the Bush tax cuts, which most Republicans believe gave us years of prosperity - until very  recently.  Obama can thus be taken more seriously than McCain as a President who will cut taxes, rather than raise them.

2.  SPENDING.  Most Republicans' biggest gripe with their own party - by far - is its failure to control the bureaucracy and reign in runaway federal spending and deficits.  It is useful to mention that while the last five (5) Republican Presidents promised fiscal responsibility and balanced budgets, all of them grew discretionary civilian spending by tremendous amounts, and ran up ever larger deficits.  Meanwhile, only Pres. Bill Clinton balanced the federal budget, and produced four years of surpluses, with the same forecast long into the indefinite future. A big problem with the federal budget is that almost nobody knows where all the money is going; its easy to add earmarks and pork barrel spending and special interest giveaways when the people back home cant tell the difference.   Sen. Barack Obama's major legislative accomplishment in the Senate, the The Federal Funding Accountability and Transparency Act of 2006 has been to bring transparency to federal spending.  Send your Republican friends to http://www.federalspending.gov which his legislation created, a veritable "Google of the Federal Budget", where anyone can research every dollar to see where their tax money is actually going.  The whole Federal Rathole is now online, for the first time ever, inviting scrutiny from whoever has the patience to slog through it all.  You dont have to be a CPA to realize that this does more in the long run to control wasteful federal spending than all the speeches Bush, Bush, Reagan, Ford, and Nixon ever gave on the subject, put together.

3. BIG GOVERNMENT.  In his North Carolina victory speech, among other things, Sen. Obama uttered the words "We dont need Big Government".  Whether you agree with that or not, remind your Republican friends that Pres. Bill Clinton's National Performance Review reduced the federal civilian workforce by 250,000 positions (ones they will consider, rightly or wrongly, to be useless tax-sucking bureaucrats).  This makes the last Democratic administration the only presidency since Eisenhower's to leave office with a smaller federal workforce that he started with - again, Bush, Bush, Reagan, Ford, and Nixon notwithstanding.  But, the real stones Obama brings to the table on this issue are his formative years on the south side of Chicago, doing meaningful community social work through voluntary, faith-based, non-governmental community organizations, rather than government bureaucracies.  Yes, We CAN - rehabilitate the homeless, educate the illiterate, provide day care for single moms, dry out alcoholics, and clean junkies off the dope without buidling perpetual bureaucracies - Obama himself has proven that, through social entrepreneurship. By contrast, John McCain has never drawn a day's pay that didnt come from the public trough, courtesy of your tax dollars (getting fabulously rich by marrying an heiress or taking money under the table from special interests he did favors for doesnt count as 'earning money in the productive sector').

4.  PERSONAL LIBERTY.  Barry Goldwater must be rolling over in his grave over what debasements of the U.S. Constitution the Bush Administration has gotten itself into, and which the man who took his seat in the U.S. Senate, John McCain now ardently defends.  Warrantless domestic wiretapping, warrantless searches and seizures, arresting U.S. citizens without probable cause, holding them without trial, etc., etc....No REAL conservative believes these things are legitimate perrogatives of the federal government. There are innumerable horror stories you can research and recount of how the GOP has sat idly by while our cherished Constitutional protections have been ignored, abrogated, and turned into a joke. The last thing real conservatives want is the Orwellian Police State we're presently heading for.  Grassroots Republicans dont necessarily trust the feds any more than you do.  Thats a case you can make - and make stick - with them.

5.  NATIONAL SECURITY.  To the rejoinder, "yes, but its worked, we havent been attacked since 9/11", you must add:  "BUT, we havent foreclosed the threat by taking out al Queada, either".  The National Security argument is like the Tax-and-Spend one, it doesnt matter where you stand on "bombing al Queada back to the stone age" - the fact remains that your Republican friends will vote for the candidate they perceive to be most in tune with that idea, period.  McCain vocally disagrees with the successful CIA program to take out al Queada leadership when located in northwest Pakistan, without alerting the local tribal authorities and Pakistani Intelligence, who have always warned off our targets in the past.  Sen. Obama, by contrast, opposes giving al Queada sanctuary in Pakistan, and ardently supports this initiative.  When McCain attacked Obama as niave for "wanting to bomb an ally", the very next day the CIA took out the #3 leader in al Queada with just such a raid, with a missile fired from a Predator drone.  Coddling Pakistan's corrupt dictator for these eight years hasnt made us safer, and John McCain's simplistic continuation of this weak policy is just being Soft on Terrorism, no way around it. Also, its worth noting that whatever other implications it may have for John McCain's Character, Psyche, or Mental Makeup, having a plane shot out from under you and spending six years behind bars does not automatically qualify anyone as a "national security expert"; that notion is just ludicrous on the face of it.

6.  OPPORTUNITY.  While John McCain's four-star Admiral father ensured him a prized appointment to the U.S. Naval Academy at Annapolis, his performance - 894th out of 899 cadets in his class - does not attest to diligent effort, whereas Barack Obama (from a broken home, on food stamps) won competitive academic scholarships to Harvard, which he proved himself worthy of by graduating Magna Cum Laude ("With Highest Honors").  Its been a long time since any politicians of either party could talk convincingly about "The American Dream", but Barack Obama can, because he lived it.  Without handouts, family patronage, or inheritence, he pulled himself up by his bootstraps from the Chicago ghetto through his own hard work, enterprise, and initiative to become President of the Harvard Law Review, one of the most prestigious scholarly legal journals in the country.  Which President is more likely to make a difference in the lives of people, and motivate them with initiative to best achieve their individual God-given potential?

Those are the issues that real, hard-core Republicans think about when they vote for a president.  Talk TO them - not past them with vague, touchy-feely bleeding heart nonsense they wont understand or agree with - and you might very likely ring up another VOTE for Barack Obama this fall.  Getting your friends VOTE is all that matters, not winning their hearts to any grander philosophical cause; that just wont happen, so forget it.  Make common cause between your GOP acquaintences and Sen. Obama, even if its on points you, yourself, disagree with. THAT'S HOW YOU WILL WIN THIS ELECTION FOR OBAMA.

Once you wash that "tax-and-spend liberal, squishy-on-national-security" label away, none of the other, lesser acusations the Karl Roves and Rush Limbaughs of this world can make against Obama will stick, either.  All other things thus being equal, the younger, more intelligent, more dynamic, less "Washington Establishment", less 'tainted-by-special-interest-money' candidate should prevail.  Even among Republicans...

Originally posted to Press to Digitate on Sun May 18, 2008 at 08:12 AM PDT.

Poll

But I cant sell Obama to my Republican friends; just talking politics with them makes me feel I need to ....

5%178 votes
13%410 votes
3%98 votes
5%158 votes
11%351 votes
17%529 votes
19%591 votes
12%380 votes
11%336 votes

| 3031 votes | Vote | Results

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Comment Preferences

  •  Before you make talking points (124+ / 0-)

    I would first listen to Repub friends about what they think is important.  I also usually start by apologizing for defending the Clintons for all these years.  I have found in the course of this campaign, that the Repubs, not Dems were most correct about Clinton's character.  

    The Clintons are corrupt selfish race baiting zero character scumbags. I'd rather be run over by a tractor-trailer than willfully vote for any Clinton again.

    by IhateBush on Sun May 18, 2008 at 08:20:26 AM PDT

  •  Well said (45+ / 0-)

    I'd add to point 2 --

    A lot of Republicans I know like Obama's unity message.... and I know a LOT of Republicans.

    I think here on the blogs, we make the mistake in thinking all Republicans, even all quasi-conservatives, are the Limbaugh types...

    Most aren't - and you're not getting the Limbaugh types, so don't waste your time.

    My cousin, daughter purposely named 'Reagan', is voting Obama this fall because he agrees with the 'post-partisan' message... to pseudo-quote "Even if he raises my taxes {and he'll get a tax raise from Obama's economic plan}, it's time politics wasn't a bloodsport again".

    An attorney I know in Chicago, she has aspirations of a political career as a Republican.  Yet, she's supporting Obama this cycle (she worked at the same firm where Michelle and Barack met, and will endlessly regale you with that fact ;-).

    There are Republicans who don't hate you because you're a Democrat, believe it or not.

    They're perfectly reasonable people that think Iraq is a debacle now, but don't necessarily think Bush lied to get us there.

    They just happen to have different views on the capital gains tax.

    I guess everyone's got their own blog now.

    by zonk on Sun May 18, 2008 at 08:27:26 AM PDT

  •  This is great stuff. (28+ / 0-)

    Really really great stuff. As I was reading it I was thinking of people that I know would respond well to your points. Thanks very much!!

    "He's patriotic in sincere ways, and not in photo-op ways." - jenontheshore

    by Ivey476 on Sun May 18, 2008 at 08:28:42 AM PDT

  •  Thanks for this (37+ / 0-)

    We live in a red area.  Tonight we are having my Republican in laws over for dinner, will try to use it.  Oddly enough, my mother in law is considering Obama.  I will let my husband talk to her about him.  

    What I say to Republicans quite a bit, is the war is costing us between$350 -400 million a day.  Our economy and dollar will not improve until we are out of there.  Small pork projects are nothing compared to this monster.  It is a losing strategy and we need to get out now before one more mother gets the dreaded news her son or daughter was killed over there.  McCain wants to continue this reckless war for at least 5 years but could go on for 100 years.

  •  Perfect sense (36+ / 0-)

    I'm a former Republican and two-time Bush supporter myself. I am still a fiscal and social conservative. I support Obama because of his character, integrity, and vision. Obama is a pragmatic leader that, contrary to popular opinion, is right-of-center on many issues, including education and national security. Let me say this once and for all: ISSUES THAT LIBERALS JERK OFF TO PISS US OFF. In other words, in Jove's name please shut up about gay marriage in California before you lose your state for Barack. Please shut up about oil-price conspiracies, or 9-11 conspiracies, or any other confounded conspiracies. Learn to hold a conversation without insinuations about "corporate media."

    Last of all, George Bush is a total idiot, but that doesn't give carte blanche for Bush bashing. Why? Because many conservatives don't think Bush is all that conservative. Explain how Obama is more aligned with conservative principles than McCain: - Respecting the Constitution - Ethics - Education and merit pay - Diplomacy: mention Reagan, Nixon, and Eisenhower - Fiscal issues: contrast budget-Google with Bush deficits - Faith: McCain is regarded with suspicion in evangelical circles. Exploit that by mentioning Obama's frankness about the important role of religion in civic life. I know a lot of Democrats are secularists... but shove it.

    Good luck!

  •  I can no longer do that .Like whacking brick (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    ssgbryan, KenBee

    wall to death with the top of my head.

  •  This won't work for me (17+ / 0-)

    I don't have any Republican friends.


    "Never let your sense of morals prevent you from doing what is right." - Salvor Hardin

    by Zackpunk on Sun May 18, 2008 at 08:42:57 AM PDT

  •  And it just might work! (35+ / 0-)

    Great post. I live in Utah of all Red places, and I can tell you, people have come up to us, intrigued by our Obama campaigning, and asked about him. And then, confessed that altho they are Republicans, they too support him. I've even had one Mormon mom tell me that she and EVERYONE SHE KNOWS supports Barack. This is a sea change in Utah. And its felt throughout the west as well. The points about civil liberties really hit home with westerners. They are mostly libertarians at heart and with big families, they could all use the MIDDLE CLASS TAX CUTs.
    This is what the 50 state strategy is all about folks. Obama can win in places we democrats have never dreamed about before. Change we can believe in! So talk it up!

  •  Well, this certainly flies in the face of (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    ssgbryan

    the old adage: Once you have to explain, you've lost.  Nice work here, but my experience in this regard is more aptly condensed to the title of an old Joe Walsh album.

  •  why do u spell him barak and not barack!??? n/b (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Gray, mconvente
  •  One more item for your poll: (10+ / 0-)

    "What Republican friends?"

    ------------------

    Time to end the drug war.

    by Sam from Ithaca on Sun May 18, 2008 at 08:53:16 AM PDT

  •  Having (5+ / 0-)

    a republican friend is not unlike having a pet Brown Recluse spider.

  •  Thanks! This is really useful stuff. (6+ / 0-)

    I was having a conversation just the other day about a friend who's a Clinton supporter.  I was similarly wondering how his mind worked.  Although he's an older gay man, I think some of your tips might help with him as well.

    As for how I feel when talking with a Republican, I'd have to say it depends on the Republican.  I once had a conversation with an avid Clinton hater who offered me a job at the end of the night; and other times I've felt like I needed to shower as badly as Jodie Foster in the Accused.

    Its not so much Republicans that give me the heebeegeebees as it is those with an infantile ideological arrogance.  I think people gave Bush the benefit of the doubt early on because he seemed like someone who was fun to party with, someone who wasn't going to blow smoke up your ass; however, as time wore on, it became clearer that he still helped himself to the sauce and to generous portions of his own Kool-Aid.

    Nobody likes a hypocrite.

    I think you should add one, no, two more points to your list.

    MISSION ACCOMPLISHED.  In '03 or '04 (can't remember when exactly), Bush stood in front of that sign.  Last week, he was rebuffed by the Saudis when he went begging them to produce more oil after five years of occupying a country with the world's third largest oil reserves.  If that's not weakness, I don't know what is.  It's time to change horses.

    FIVE YEARS.  John McCain was tortured for five years.  FIVE YEARS.  Any person who has undergone extremes  of physical and psychological torture for that long can never recover their sanity.  John McCain should not be President.  Even is you agree with his politics, he shouldn't be president.

    Nice diary.

    Son, you're makin' the same mistake with Iraq that I did with your mother. I didn't pull out in time.

    by fou on Sun May 18, 2008 at 08:55:34 AM PDT

    •  "He was tortured so he's unfit" doesn't work (6+ / 0-)

      Trying to seriously put forward the idea that McCain would be unfit as President because of his POW experience would be a bad (really bad) approach.

      People aren't always broken by horrific experiences. Permanently changed, yes, but not always broken or weakened by it.

      I'd never vote for McCain in a million years, and even I would be put off by someone trying to convince me that his POW experience means he shouldn't be in public office. Sheesh.

      •  Ok, fair enough. (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Chi, AlanF, Pris from LA

        Mandela was imprisoned for two or three decades, and he made a fine president.

        However, I'm disturbed by McCain because I think his POW experience has had the kind of effect on him that I fear.  His embrace of people and positions he soundly rejected a few years ago reeks of more than just political opportunism to me because he was broken by the Vietnamese.  It makes me wonder what he would do if the country were suddenly occupied for example.  Would he capitulate if he were in a weaker position?  Not to mention the fact that if he becomes president, he'd be the only president that I know of to ever have renounced the US Government.  

        Also, I know a few rather wealthy Republicans who are wary of McCain for exactly that reason.  Nonetheless, your point is well taken.

        Son, you're makin' the same mistake with Iraq that I did with your mother. I didn't pull out in time.

        by fou on Sun May 18, 2008 at 09:45:05 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  I would avoid any discussion (5+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Chi, bwintx, Ckntfld, JVolvo, SciVo

      that can be turned into "John McCain is a war hero I tell you and it's disrespectful to say otherwise."   That is where a Republican will take the discussion.

    •  Losing one's sanity (8+ / 0-)

      I was administrator of a torture treatment center for about five years, and I can tell you that even exceptionally severe torture does not make people insane or in any way beyond "recovering their sanity".  PTSD (and related depression for that matter) is not a mental illness in the same sense as bipolar disorder or schizophrenia.  

      Torture changes people, that much is true.  And it is inaccurate and frankly disrespectful to ever say that torture was a good thing, even if in retrospect, the result is a person with more empathy or understanding of human suffering.  Torture is never good for anyone. But many survivors rebuild productive lives; they are not more prone to violence than anyone else, or less reliable, or more erratic.  

      Having experienced torture is no bar to high office.  There's plenty else in his background that should give one pause, and his stated policies are enough to vote against him.

      Si los pendejos volaran, no se veria el sol.

      by ivorybill on Sun May 18, 2008 at 09:59:42 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Please correct your spelling of his name! (5+ / 0-)

    It's Barack Obama, not Barak Obama.

  •  This quote is absolutely right-on: (26+ / 0-)

    you win by leading them to the better alternative - from their vantage point, not yours.

    You're speaking my language here -- the language of a mediator.  It's all about listening well to people's concerns and uncovering their true interests.

    Great diary.

    Though a war may well be "too stupid," that doesn't prevent its lasting. Stupidity has a knack of getting its way. --Albert Camus

    by GreenMtnState on Sun May 18, 2008 at 09:00:07 AM PDT

  •  Very Nicely Stated n/t (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    empathy
  •  Thanks. This is really useful stuff........ (16+ / 0-)

    I have lots of Republican friends at work who clearly admire Obama but are not sure they will vote for him. They all live in Northern VA and I know with hard work VA can be turned blue this fall.  These friends of mine, I think, can easily be won over, and your talking points will definitely go a long way towards helping me make my case over the following 3-4 months. Again Thanks.

  •  This is yet another set of reasons (4+ / 0-)

    why we really don't need to suck up to the Hillacrats.

    Vyan

  •  I red'd this diary but... (4+ / 0-)

    I really think you should spell his name Barack, the way he spells it. It's not a BIG HUGE deal and I read your explanation of why you spelled it Barak, but if he chooses to spell it a certain way, isn't it a little pointless to spell it differently?

    Anyway, very good points in your diary. I will try some of them on my Republican father-in-law when I see him this week :)

  •  I agree with you (4+ / 0-)

    But "magna cum laude" is "with high honors." "Summa cum laude" is "with highest honors." Sorry about the nitpick.

    The truth shall make you free - but first it shall piss you off.

    by Killer of Sacred Cows on Sun May 18, 2008 at 09:07:26 AM PDT

  •  I actually have Republican friends (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    ssgbryan, revgerry

    Which I doubt many of you do from the ranting I see on this site.  Why would I have to market him to anyone? Is he a product?  Like laundry detergent?

    Tax cuts?  In the middle of a deficit?  Sorry What I liked about Bill Clinton is that he raised taxes on the wealthy to close the deficit.

    We don't need big government?  A line in a speech?

    Transparency act?  Will he cut spending?  That's what my Republican friends would ask?

    Personal liberty only works with Libertarians, republicans like the feeling of being secure, even if their not.

    •  no no no (5+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Chi, DebtorsPrison, Ckntfld, JVolvo, nolakohler

      Don't go lumping republicans into a giant one size fits all basket (as tempting as stereotypes are). Personal liberty is a HUGE HUGE issue in the west, as is personal responsibility. Many of the republicans i run into in the west are libertarians.

      At any rate, many of us have already admitted to having friends and relatives that are republican. And if you don't think politics and campaigns are about marketing, well I may not be able to change your mind, but I think they are. So to a certain extent, yes Obama or any other candidate, needs marketing strategies, like a product, to get the ideas across to people who would not otherwise seek out info.

      Tax cuts for the middle class, repeal of the bush tax cuts for the wealthy. Yes, that's helpful in the middle of a deficit.

    •  Your comment makes no sense... (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Chi, AlanF, JVolvo, UTvoter

      First of all, a lot of people have Republicans friends and family. When you have a two-party system in one country, it's kind of unavoidable.

      Second, this is the internet. People say a lot of things here, among people they know are like-minded, that they wouldn't say in public or in front of Republicans unless they were REALLY ANGRY. So stop be condescending please.

      Third, Obama, just like Bill Clinton, IS going to raise taxes on the wealthy. Apparently you haven't been paying close attention. But in addition, he's going to give on average, $1000 in tax cuts to middle class families. I think that's a good idea, I know my family could use it.

      And for someone who apparently is a big Bill Clinton supporter, why are you criticizing the Big Government line? We don't need a big government, we need an effective one. We've got a big government now and it isn't worth shit.

      The transparency act allows citizens to understand how their money is being spent, which is the only way we can pressure congress into spending more responsibly. If your Republican friends want to know what kind of spending Obama will cut, tell them he'll start with the bridges to nowhere.

      Finally, lose the attitude, we're all friends here. ;-)

  •  How about this... (22+ / 0-)

    5. NATIONAL SECURITY.  To the rejoinder, "yes, but its worked, we havent been attacked since 9/11", you must add:  "BUT, we havent foreclosed the threat by taking out al Queada, either".

    On the issue of national security, I might cautiously add this. The Republicans' record does not show that they are stronger on national security.

    Rather, it shows that they've been more willing to throw our tax dollars at military contractors for hundred-dollar toilet seats and multimillion-dollar high-tech weapons systems that even the generals themselves said they didn't necessarily need - and then to point to their increased defense budgets as the main "proof" that they're "stronger on defense."

    Meanwhile, it was Democratic administrations, not Republicans, that won two world wars and faced down the Soviets over Cuba.  

    "Lies return." - African proverb

    by Night Train on Sun May 18, 2008 at 09:12:02 AM PDT

    •  It was Democratic Adminstrations that took... (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Night Train

      us into every war of the 20th century--with the exception of Gulf War One--too.

      This is an excellent diary. Too bad many here don't see the call to action to actually recruit many of the people we'll need to win in November.

      "Never was so little asked of so many by so few"--Stephen Colbert

      by EMorgan on Sun May 18, 2008 at 08:07:04 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Great stuff (6+ / 0-)

    I just copied your 6 points into an email message. I'm going to send it to all those people who have sent me stupid GOP viral email in the past. Thanks for the ammunition!

  •  Very helpful ... (18+ / 0-)

    ... in part because you focus on Republican voters.  Most of us here spend most of our time arguing, in effect, with Republican bloggers, pundits, think-tankers, and politicians. What makes me feel like taking a shower is when I realize I've spent half an hour of after-dinner conversation arguing with an older aunt or uncle as if I was confronting Bill O'Reily.

    Along these lines, I also think we need to guard against our own potential to be intellectual bullies ... firing with both barrels loaded with facts and logical arguments at everyday conservatives who aren't equipped to fire back. I don't mean they aren't smart enough, they just don't spend all their free time thinking and writing about politics, like we do. That's how we get the unfair reputation of being shrill, rigid, and "PC".

    Thanks for this!

    "I knew a Buddhist once, and I've hated myself ever since." -- Hunter S. Thompson

    by apulrang on Sun May 18, 2008 at 09:13:52 AM PDT

  •  Or this: (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Chi, Leap Year, rapcetera, Sleepwalkr

    He's a self-made guy whose election quite frankly will put the Al Sharptons and Jeremiah Wrights and Jesse Jacksons out of a job. There's nothing more conservative than that. That's the core of conservatism.  That's what he means by the politics of hope.

  •  The Courts (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    ssgbryan, SciVo

    One thing you didn't mention is that many Republicans (like my father in Ohio) will vote for McCain just because they prefer him appointing judges to any Democrat. For my very conservative father, everything else in this election is secondary to federal and possible Supreme Court appointments.

    •  it may help to point out (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Chi, Sleepwalkr

      that McCain will have a very difficult time appointing a truly conservative judge (due to the Democratic majority of the Senate), and that most of the judges appointed by Republican presidents have turned out to be very fair and labeled "liberal" today.

      I can haz sound economic policy?

      by Isara on Sun May 18, 2008 at 09:43:03 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  As a former Republican, I concur! Excellent. (9+ / 0-)

    I love my Republican friends and family.  They're wonderful people.  They're just uninformed about the points you mention.

    Thanks for posting this.

    "We are one people, all of us pledging allegiance to the stars and stripes, all of us defending the United States of America." Barack Obama

    by keeplaughing on Sun May 18, 2008 at 09:19:47 AM PDT

    •  Let me add - family values. A lot of Repubs (11+ / 0-)

      I know who support Obama, including myself, like his obvious devotion to Christian values, his belief that family is number one, etc.  Ties in with the church organizations, etc.

      I think that if Obama gets known, if people find out who he REALLY is, how he's lived his life, Christians especially will vote for him.

      "We are one people, all of us pledging allegiance to the stars and stripes, all of us defending the United States of America." Barack Obama

      by keeplaughing on Sun May 18, 2008 at 09:23:04 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  this jibes with my experience (15+ / 0-)

        I know a LOT of Republicans here in rural MI, where they are the majority. Probably about half of them that I know will be voting for Obama, for precisely the reasons mentioned in the diary.

        One thing I like about Obama is his emphasis on personal responsibility and how people themselves must come up with their own solutions. I also like the guts he displays when telling people difficult truths, like telling an all black audience about gay rights. He plays it well, he obviously won that gas tax nonsense thing, by standing up straight and telling people the truth, even if it's not what they want to hear. That kind of strength bodes well. We are going to be in for some really tough economic times ahead and we are going to need it. I see Obama less as the best leader for conditions as they are now than as the best leader for the really tough times that are just around the corner. With Obama at least they won't be any worse than they have to be. With Clinton or McCain I think they would.

        krnewman.blogspot.com

        by krnewman on Sun May 18, 2008 at 09:29:28 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Hell yes. (0+ / 0-)

          I also like the guts he displays when telling people difficult truths, like telling an all black audience about gay rights.

          That event was what solidified my choice of Obama. I'd already voted for him in the primary, but more as an alternative to Hillary (whom I've never liked) than for himself. After that, I was glad I'd voted for him and I've been a dedicated Obama supporter ever since.

          The truth is a breath of fresh air after the bad gas that's been spouted for the last seven-plus years by the Bushites.

          The truth shall make you free - but first it shall piss you off.

          by Killer of Sacred Cows on Sun May 18, 2008 at 11:17:43 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

    •  Why'd you jump ship? n/t (0+ / 0-)

      Son, you're makin' the same mistake with Iraq that I did with your mother. I didn't pull out in time.

      by fou on Sun May 18, 2008 at 10:19:15 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Outstanding diary (6+ / 0-)

    This should be up on the rec list.

    Every day's another chance to stick it to The Man. - dls.

    by The Raven on Sun May 18, 2008 at 09:21:54 AM PDT

  •  They will be able to travel the world and (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Chi, ssgbryan

    will not have to say they are from Canada or wear a Canadian Maple Leaf hat.  The international opinion of the US will improve.  

    Canadians can of course proudly continue the tradition of the Maple Leaf.

    Those who say it can't be done are usually interrupted by others doing it. James Baldwin

    by fedupcitizen on Sun May 18, 2008 at 09:26:22 AM PDT

  •  Another line of argument ... (13+ / 0-)

    ... One of my Uncles is a former Republican who supported Bill Clinton and despises President Bush and most serving Republicans. The number one reason for him? Incompetence and lack of professionalism. He was always essentially a moderate, Rockafeller Republican, but what really turned him around was the politicization of public service, and open disdain for professional expertise that the Bush Administration has displayed.

    That might be another line of argument for some Republicans. However, I'm not sure how that would play out in an Obama / McCain matchup.

    "I knew a Buddhist once, and I've hated myself ever since." -- Hunter S. Thompson

    by apulrang on Sun May 18, 2008 at 09:28:12 AM PDT

    •  leadership shown in the campaign (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Chi

      lot's of my republican associates respond to this arguement fiscal responsibility in running his campaign, no drama, tight ship shows incredible leadership. that is a good talking point!

  •  We haven't been attacked since.... (9+ / 0-)

    my answer is always, "yeah, and we were not attacked before that either.  I wonder if all of those life-long national security experts suddenly quit their jobs, or if the new administration simply wouldn't listen to their expertise?"

    You can't sell me the "national security" meme as it relates to republicans.

    •  He's not asking you to believe, he's asking you (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Nova Land, fou, JVolvo

      to accept that others do.  (Isn't that a liberal trait?)  If you tell somebody up is down (from their perspective), they aren't going to take anything else you say seriously.  If you talk about the things that are important to them and make the case for Obama in terms that are compelling to them, it gets gears turning that were shut down years ago (or may have never been active).

      Jumping on the politicalcompass.org bandwagon: (-3.63, -3.03) - Does that make me part of the right wing here?

      by someone else on Sun May 18, 2008 at 09:52:26 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Important and well-written diary n/t (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    CodeTalker
  •  Thank you, thank you, thank you for (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    True North, CodeTalker, empathy, elwior

    this excellent diary!

  •  I can't thank you enough for this diary (20+ / 0-)

    I'm hearing rumblings of possible support for Obama from all over on the Republican side, including lifers, Southerners, and people who told me how honored they were to vote for George Bush and how Rumsfeld and Cheney were "good people."

    But I haven't known how to approach the conversation. Really, till now I've just been feeling my way. Thanks for taking the time to marshall all these arguments and share them with us.

    I'm glad I'm not George W. Bush, because George W. Bush is going to hell

    by Alna Dem on Sun May 18, 2008 at 09:31:35 AM PDT

  •  I just hope they stay home. . . (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    ssgbryan, filby

    on election day.  If they still call themselves Republicans after the last eight years, there is no winning them over.  So I say, let McCain do his job and they'll decide not to go out and vote.  It's going to be the numbers that win it this election.

    All politics is class-warfare.

    by dhfsfc on Sun May 18, 2008 at 09:34:19 AM PDT

    •  it's worth talking to them (7+ / 0-)

      If they still call themselves Republicans after the last eight years, there is no winning them over.

      Don't discount the power of tradition. My roommate 1) is a punk-rocker, 2) has a lesbian mom, and 3) is a complete social liberal. We live in Alameda, CA which shares many of the same Berkeley liberal ideology. She's a Republican.

      I asked her once why she votes Republican and she said it's because that's what her father always voted and that's what she's always voted. She's very smart and most people would label her a moderate liberal, but she just doesn't feel right switching her party.

      I don't see myself getting her to switch her party affiliation, but I do feel that I can talk her around to not voting for McCain.

      I can haz sound economic policy?

      by Isara on Sun May 18, 2008 at 09:52:00 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Especially the Big Government point! (12+ / 0-)

    That's a big appeal, and folks know that the Bush admin has been anything but conservative.

    As an enhancement to the diary's suggestion,  I'll be pointing out how he took his Chicago experience and applied it nationally to beat Clinton's inevitability status.  Instead of hiring over-priced, ineffective 'experts' and following the standard path, he focused a tight campaign on building volunteer groups all over the country who were able to get the groundwork done.  Those campaign volunteers will already be in place to carry on after the GE working towards resolving their local focus issues.  That's a huge asset!

  •  BRILLIANT! (8+ / 0-)

    I'm memorizing points for my Republican nephew, who is intelligent enough to be able to have this conversation.

    (My Rethug brother, on the other hand, is most unlikely to listen to anything that isn't shrieked at him from FuxNews, but I'll try!)

  •  Ratified by another Virginian former Republican.. (10+ / 0-)

    ... with the addendum that Republicans aren't our enemies; make sure you don't treat them as such. That's exactly why I left the Republican party; it was an us versus them mentality, and you were one of them if you didn't parrot the party line to a tee. Don't let that be the new Democratic mantle, or we're just as bad as them.

    •  I think that if we go down that path (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      elwior, Moo Means Hello

      there's a bit of hypocrisy, after Obama keeps reminding us about being "one America." We have to remember that.

      I haven't declared a party simply for the reason that Democrats (as the DLC) were just as bad as the Republicans for that "with us or against us" mentality.

      If Obama wins in November, I'll happily register as a Democrat, since the DNC ideology is one I can believe in.

      I can haz sound economic policy?

      by Isara on Sun May 18, 2008 at 09:56:08 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  I agree with this statement completely (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    empathy, fou, elwior

    Once you wash that "tax-and-spend liberal, squishy-on-national-security" label away

    I have Republican, indoctrinated-by-FOX News in-laws and these are the two key points that could switch them to Obama.

  •  As an ex-Republican, here's what got me: (25+ / 0-)

    I really believe in moral rectitude and fiscal responsibility. All those Republican sex and corruption scandals made me feel icky about belonging to the same party as those people. Also, the actual history of our national debt inescapably shows that Democratic administrations are the only ones who still believe in balanced budgets.

    Debt is legitimately used to get through dire straits (e.g. WWII) or invest productively. Reagan, Bush, Bush, and now McCain are "borrow and squander" Republicans. The cash that they raise from selling more debt doesn't go for productive investments (such as developing human potential or building out infrastructure); they don't even believe that's a proper role of government. Instead, it just goes directly into the pockets of corporate executives such as arms dealers and industrial farmers and whatnot. And, they obviously can't claim dire straits as an excuse, since we're not being asked to sacrifice like we did in WWII. They're just time-shifting our public daily expenses from today's corporate executives to tomorrow's children, plain and simple.

    Also, I really believe in democracy. I think that we need more transparency and more responsiveness from our government -- not less! I'm extremely disturbed by the gratuitous secretiveness and increasing rigidity of Republican administrations since Nixon. Something must be rotten in the party organization itself, since only arrogant, Soviet-style politicians -- ones who act like they think that they know what's good for the people -- are being allowed to advance to positions of leadership. It's freaky.

    McCain '08: because a magical money fairy will keep us from having to tax rich people! And if you believe that, I have a country to sell out from under you.

    by SciVo on Sun May 18, 2008 at 09:42:01 AM PDT

    •  I might've exaggerated in the heat of the moment. (0+ / 0-)

      I have a tendency to get caught up in a good rant sometimes; you know how it is. To be fair, Republican leaders are not "only" of that arrogant type who would impose their will on the People instead of representing the will of the People.

      Take this 2006 Senate vote on "privatizing" Social Security for example. I don't have a poll at my fingertips, but my understanding is that it's a wildly popular program with actual American citizens; we just want its funding strengthened, not its structure gutted. And, sure enough, a handful of Republicans voted accordingly: Burns, Chafee, Collins, Domenici, Lugar, Smith, Snowe, and Talent (and Voinovich abstained).

      So, in that particular case, 9 out of 55 Republican Senators refrained from imposing a radical ideology on an unwilling populace. That's something, I guess? My old party isn't completely rotten; it's just far enough gone to infuriate me with its overall implicit disrespect of regular folks like me.

      McCain '08: because a magical money fairy will keep us from having to tax rich people! And if you believe that, I have a country to sell out from under you.

      by SciVo on Sun May 18, 2008 at 10:02:02 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  No (4+ / 0-)

    I respectfully disagree.

    Presenting the Democrat as Republican-lite isn't just ineffective, its counterproductive.  You're conceding that the Republican framing is correct.  If you do that, the Republican is going to come out ahead.  

    The GOPers who won't admit the problems this country are facing or who won't admit the Republican have either caused, made worse or at the very least failed to solve these problems will not vote for Obama.  

    The GOPers and GOP-leaning independents will only vote for Obama because
    1- Something is wrong with McCain... his age, honesty or something along those lines
    2- Iraq
    3- The recession
    and most importantly long term:
    4- They've lost confidence with the GOP and might realign themselves.

    Number 1 is more of a negative tactic and is as likely to create a non-vote as an Obama vote, which is only 1/2 as good.

    Number 2 and 3 require linking McCain and Bush.

    Number 4 calls for celebrating and pushing the ideals of the Democratic party or Obama.  By presenting Obama as a watered-down version of the GOP, you automatically lose this vote.
    --------
    This was basically the DLC strategy.  It worked with Bil Clinton because he was an incredibly charismatic white Southerner.  It also was very damaging to the party, leading to the 1994 GOP takeover and eventually the Bush/neocon ascendancy.    

  •  asdf (11+ / 0-)

    The reasons YOU support Sen. Obama are most likely NOT the factors on which your Republican associates will make their voting decisions. Dont assume that your 'hot button' issues are necessarily even important to them, nor belittle the priorities they bring to the voting booth.

    This is the advice I think a lot of the people here need to hear.  Using "Your concerns mean nothing. Now, about this health care plan without mandates..." or "I'm right and you're wrong, you backwards dimwit" doesn't win hearts or minds.

    Jumping on the politicalcompass.org bandwagon: (-3.63, -3.03) - Does that make me part of the right wing here?

    by someone else on Sun May 18, 2008 at 09:43:18 AM PDT

  •  Let's try (6+ / 0-)

    'Take a Republican to lunch' -- I think it might also be worth trying an argument that America's image needs some re-branding and what could be better than showing that it actually is intent on becoming what it has always aspired to be -- the land of equal opportunity for all, where intelligence and hard work can truly overcome disadvantages and where people are, for every position, selected for capability and effort (that wider world already pretty much knows that Obama is a hundred times more capable than McCain).

    We have only just begun and none too soon.

    by global citizen on Sun May 18, 2008 at 09:43:18 AM PDT

    •  I love "Take a Republican to Lunch" (4+ / 0-)

      Let's do it!  Really, we've got a great candidate to "market" across the aisle, and many, many Republicans are not so fond of McCain.  I've avoided talking politics with my very conservative family until this past month.  They're ready for the conversation, and so am I.

      We might also do "Take a Hillary Supporter to Lunch."  

  •  My best friend is a Repub (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    ssgbryan, fou, JVolvo

    Though she recognizes we're going in a bad direction.  I know, how could she NOT???  But every time politics comes up, she says 'people seem to have forgotten about 9/11 already'.  Gah!!  Makes me want to bang my head against a wall.  So yeah, talking politics with my cat would be less frustrating.

    I will give her credit for at least considering Obama as an option.

    It'll be a great day when we put a woman in the White House. But it still has to be the *right* person, period.

    by BlueInRedCincy on Sun May 18, 2008 at 09:45:05 AM PDT

  •  This is good info... (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    lauramp, fou, JVolvo

    I think I intuitively knew some of this stuff. Unfortunately, I've run out of Republican family and friends to convert.

    Most of them were moderate, ticket-splitters anyway, so there wasn't a great deal of persuasion required.

    In fact, the most hardcore Republican in my family needed no cajoling at all. He was receptive to Obama from the beginning, which kind of shocked me. The tough part was getting him off his lazy ass to vote. GenXers have this thing where they love to complain, but hate to take action.

    But I will hotlist this and keep it as a reference, because I know I'll run into some Republicans between now and November.

    One minor nitpick... are you sure it's not okay to bash Bush or at least connect McCain with Bush. My experience has been that most folks, Republican or not, kind of hate Bush and think he's stupid (I don't think he's stupid, but I definitely hate him.)

    It seems to me, the folks who still support Bush, will never vote for Obama. But maybe I'm wrong.

  •  Would a PowerPoint type presentation help (0+ / 0-)

    market the Obama brand to the Republican segment of the electorate? Can we title it - "Obama - not just a niche product"?

    Could not resist the snark.

  •  really useful info (5+ / 0-)

    i live in repub land -- this will come in handy for the LTE's in the newspaper.  THANK YOU!

    (the editor is really good about publishing letters of differing views.  he even gave in to our "action alert by dems" to have David Sirota's column published!)

  •  I don't waste my breath (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    ssgbryan

    on trying to convince rethugs of even the shape of the earth.

    Your points are disturbing enough. They are the very core of disagreemnts on public policy.

    Taxes are needed to be raised, not cut. Government should and can be a force for enormous positive change. Public service is required of all our citizenry. The corruption of money must be removed from policy. The markets cannot run rough shod without regulation and public works projects must be undertaken to not only stimulat the economy but prepare us for an alternative energy future for ourselves and our children.

    All I want is the truth. Just gimmie some truth John Lennon

    by gimmie truth on Sun May 18, 2008 at 10:02:20 AM PDT

    •  Yes, but (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      EricS, skrekk, 417els, JVolvo

      ... the GOP was not always the Bush GOP.  Take a look at Nixon's domestic agenda, for example, and you'll see a lot of policies and programs that latter-day Republicans would consider borderline-socialistic.  Political parties are not immutable.

      I think it's interesting to consider the social implications raised here, as well as the ideological inroads that can be made by emphasizing that Obama represents a less intrusive, less authoritarian vision of government than does McCain, appealing to the libertarian wing of the party.

      We're talking about getting the votes we need to elect the guy who can deliver what we want.  If that requires "massaging" the message for different contexts, that's not so terrible.

      •  Eisenhower & Goldwater must be spinning in their (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        JVolvo, Killer of Sacred Cows

        graves - the Bush/Cheney GOP is NOT their GOP.  And don't even think about Abraham Lincoln's party...today's GOP claim to be "The Party of Lincoln" is a flat Earth bonanza.

        "Evil is a lack of empathy, a total incapacity to feel with their fellow man." - Capt. Gilbert,Psychiatrist, at the end of Nuremberg trials.

        by 417els on Sun May 18, 2008 at 01:08:34 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  If you argue that taxes must be raised... (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      ssgbryan, JVolvo

      You have to formulate this in the scope that you are talking about the wealthiest 1%.  Since 1981, our economy has grown by 66%. However the total share of income earned by the lowest 90% of wage earners has shrunk from 67% to 52%.  Adjusted for inflation, salaries of the lower 99% are essentially flat dating back 27 years.

      I make a modest salary - my taxes need not be raised. Although I'd gladly see taxes moved around - to carbon from income, for example.

      If the solution has never been to look at yourself, how is it that you expect to find it anywhere else?

      by glutz78 on Sun May 18, 2008 at 10:18:14 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Yes I should (3+ / 0-)

        have clarified. Taxes on dividend income should be 25% not 15%. Social Security taxes should not have a ceiling that in itself would make SS flush. And for example, unrealized stock option for CEO's should be taxed as unearned (no pun intended) income.

        No tax increases on anyone making 100,000 or less and families at 250000.

        "To those whom much is given, much is required."

        Taxes are a responsibility to the betterment of our education, health and welfare. We have seen what unwarranted tax cuts for the wealthy have led to:
        a crumbling society.

        All I want is the truth. Just gimmie some truth John Lennon

        by gimmie truth on Sun May 18, 2008 at 10:27:38 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  absolutely (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          JVolvo, Killer of Sacred Cows

          Capital gains at 15% is a gift to the wealthy.

          If the solution has never been to look at yourself, how is it that you expect to find it anywhere else?

          by glutz78 on Sun May 18, 2008 at 10:45:38 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  y'all live in a sheltered world (0+ / 1-)
            Recommended by:
            Hidden by:
            kovie

            Don't even raise the tax issue because you immediately sound dishonest.  Obama WILL raise taxes on the middle class.  McCain may or may not.

            You are all just too short-sighted or uninformed to recognize how pervasive taxes are.

            I'm currently retired due to medical issues and make <$40K a year, almost all of it in dividends.  Obama is going to hurt me bad when he nearly doubles my taxes.  Didn't realize I was wealthy!</p>

            My elderly mom has about the same income made up entirely of SS, dividends, capital gains and interest.  Obama will nearly double her tax rate too.

            All your other talking points are insignificant compared to the giant bite Obama is going to take out of the middle class like us.

            Refusal to recognize the full impact of the tax increases makes Democrats look either ignorant or dishonest.  It just makes independents like me angry every time I hear "tax cuts for the rich".  Bullshit.  Millions of middle class people will suffer with these changes.

            •  Lies, all lies (0+ / 0-)

              He specifically said that he would raise taxes on the rich. People like you still get to claim deductions and such. Do you enjoy making stuff up to distort peoples' policies?

              You are a shill and a troll and your comments are transparently planted bullshit.

              "I will vote for the Democratic candidate for president--period." --Me

              by kovie on Mon May 19, 2008 at 07:01:10 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

        •  This. (0+ / 0-)

          Taxes are a responsibility to the betterment of our education, health and welfare. We have seen what unwarranted tax cuts for the wealthy have led to:
          a crumbling society.

          This needs to be printed out and sent to every newspaper in the country.

          The truth shall make you free - but first it shall piss you off.

          by Killer of Sacred Cows on Sun May 18, 2008 at 11:25:19 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

    •  Look, nobody ever won an election (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      BruinKid, ezdidit

      by promising to raise your taxes.  Do like George H.W. Bush, Sr. and just hold that till afterwards, as he did in 1988...remember his pledge, "Read My Lips, No New Taxes!"  He kept his word, he didnt impose any new taxes, he just raised the old ones...

  •  I won't talk politics with them (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    ssgbryan, Contra

    Until they apologize.

    To the entire world.

    For reelecting this jackass.

    The abjectly stupid jackasses.

    Only the PTA? You know what the PTA stands for? Three things I respect and fear. Parents, Teachers, and Associations. [Rob Petrie]

    by eroded47095 on Sun May 18, 2008 at 10:06:45 AM PDT

  •  It can be done. (6+ / 0-)

    I'm a former somewhat Republican, that was looking for a place to go. Their war and their greed sickened me.

    Obama sold himself. I read his books. That simple.

    "...there is the United States of America." Obama

    by redtex on Sun May 18, 2008 at 10:08:03 AM PDT

  •  A thinker (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Killer of Sacred Cows

    amongst fools.

    All I want is the truth. Just gimmie some truth John Lennon

    by gimmie truth on Sun May 18, 2008 at 10:08:48 AM PDT

  •  Magna cum laude (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    skrekk, Killer of Sacred Cows

    is not highest honors. That would be summa cum laude.

    "The great lie of democracy, its essential paradox, is that democracy is first to be sacrificed when its security is at risk." --Ian McDonald

    by Geenius at Wrok on Sun May 18, 2008 at 10:12:20 AM PDT

  •  894th out of 899? (6+ / 0-)

    Say that again...What is the source for this?

    If the solution has never been to look at yourself, how is it that you expect to find it anywhere else?

    by glutz78 on Sun May 18, 2008 at 10:13:17 AM PDT

  •  My Republican colleagues are leaning Obama (9+ / 0-)

    and it's precisely because they are so p*ssed at the George W. Bush Republicans.

    I'm not making it up.  That's what they say to me.  Unprompted.

    However they were always clear:  if the candidate were Hillary they would vote McCain, and if the candidate were Obama they would vote Obama.

  •  One of the reasons I come to DailyKos (3+ / 0-)

    Finding an entry like this with detail and intelligence is one of the main reasons I visit here. Thank you!

  •  Just tell them that he's just like Bill Cosby (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    petral

    The fantasy Republican one.

    That's getting right down to their little pea brained level.

    "All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing." (Edmund Burke)

    by resa on Sun May 18, 2008 at 10:20:46 AM PDT

  •  I live in Connecticut (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    JVolvo, Killer of Sacred Cows

    so Obama's gonna win here no matter what, so I really don't give a shit how my right wing friends vote. I've really gotten a lot more satisfaction watching them squirm and slowly admit that Bush is a disaster. In November 2006 I really enjoyed watching them suffer. I think I'll enjoy it more in November 2008. Just a bit of Schadenfreude.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/...

  •  Here is a 1995 article from "The Chicago Reader" (3+ / 0-)

    that could have been written today.  It gives an accounting of Obama that contains some information that I had not read before.

    What Makes Obama Run?

  •  You are EXACTLY what the Dems need (0+ / 0-)

    And I thank you for such a fine diary...

    The Seminole Democrat
    A blue voice calling from the deep red

    by SemDem on Sun May 18, 2008 at 10:23:39 AM PDT

  •  Edited Talking Points to SEND to Republicans (15+ / 0-)

    I took the liberty of editing this so that it addresses Republicans rather than us DKos people.  This can be cut and pasted into an email.  Let's make this thing go viral:

    Subject: Why Republicans should Consider Voting for Barack Obama

    If you agree with this and find yourself supporting Obama, send this to your Republican friends.  The Dems will vote for Obama without knowing this.

    1.  TAXES.  As a member of the Illinois State Senate, Sen. Obama was cosponsor of a bill which ultimately passed, creating the largest tax cut in state history.   Since the start of his presidential campaign, he has consistently favored a broad-based middle class tax cut.  By contrast, Sen. McCain "voted against tax cuts before he voted for them", and has no real credibility on this issue.  McCain was very critical of the Bush tax cuts, which gave us years of prosperity - until very recently.
    1.  SPENDING.  Most Republicans' biggest gripe with their own party - by far - is its failure to control the bureaucracy and reign in runaway federal spending and deficits.  While the last five (5) Republican Presidents promised fiscal responsibility and balanced budgets, all of them grew discretionary civilian spending by tremendous amounts, and ran up ever larger deficits.  Meanwhile, only Pres. Bill Clinton balanced the federal budget, and produced four years of surpluses, with the same forecast long into the indefinite future. A big problem with the federal budget is that almost nobody knows where all the money is going; its easy to add earmarks and pork barrel spending and special interest giveaways when the people back home cant tell the difference.   Sen. Barack Obama's major legislative accomplishment in the Senate, the The Federal Funding Accountability and Transparency Act of 2006 has brought transparency to federal spending.  http://www.federal spending.gov is the website Obama's legislation created, a veritable "Google of the Federal Budget", where anyone can research every dollar to see where their tax money is actually going.  The whole Federal Rathole is now online, for the first time ever, inviting scrutiny from whoever has the patience to slog through it all.  You don't have to be a CPA to realize that this does more in the long run to control wasteful federal spending than all the speeches Bush, Bush, Reagan, Ford, and Nixon ever gave on the subject, put together.
    1. BIG GOVERNMENT.  In his North Carolina victory speech, among other things, Sen. Obama uttered the words "We don't need Big Government".  Pres. Bill Clinton's National Performance Review reduced the federal civilian workforce by 250,000 positions (ones they will consider, rightly or wrongly, to be useless tax-sucking bureaucrats).  This makes the last Democratic administration the only presidency since Eisenhower's to leave office with a smaller federal workforce that he started with - again, Bush, Bush, Reagan, Ford, and Nixon notwithstanding.  But, the real stones Obama brings to the table on this issue are his formative years on the south side of Chicago, doing meaningful community social work through voluntary, faith-based, non-governmental community organizations, rather than government bureaucracies.  Yes, We CAN - rehabilitate the homeless, educate the illiterate, provide day care for single moms, dry out alcoholics, and clean junkies off the dope without building perpetual bureaucracies - Obama himself has proven that, through social entrepreneurship. By contrast, John McCain has never drawn a day's pay that didn't come from the public trough, courtesy of your tax dollars (getting fabulously rich by dumping wife #1 and marrying an heiress or taking money under the table from special interests he did favors for doesn't count as 'earning money in the productive sector').
    1.  PERSONAL LIBERTY.  Barry Goldwater must be rolling over in his grave over what debasements of the U.S. Constitution the Bush Administration has gotten itself into, and which the man who took his seat in the U.S. Senate, John McCain now ardently defends.  Warrantless domestic wiretapping, warrantless searches and seizures, arresting U.S. citizens without probable cause, holding them without trial, etc., etc....No REAL conservative believes these things are legitimate prerogatives of the federal government. There are innumerable horror stories you can research and recount of how the GOP has sat idly by while our cherished Constitutional protections have been ignored, abrogated, and turned into a joke. The last thing real conservatives want is the Orwellian Police State we're presently heading for.  
    1.  NATIONAL SECURITY.  To the rejoinder, "yes, but its worked, we haven't been attacked since 9/11", you must add:  "BUT, we haven't foreclosed the threat by taking out al Qaeda, either".  The National Security argument is like the Tax-and-Spend one, it doesn't matter where you stand on "bombing al Qaeda back to the stone age" - the fact remains that your Republican friends will vote for the candidate they perceive to be most in tune with that idea, period.  McCain vocally disagrees with the successful CIA program to take out al Qaeda leadership when located in northwest Pakistan, without alerting the local tribal authorities and Pakistani Intelligence, who have always warned off our targets in the past.  Sen. Obama, by contrast, opposes giving al Qaeda sanctuary in Pakistan, and ardently supports this initiative.  When McCain attacked Obama as naive for "wanting to bomb an ally", the very next day the CIA took out the #3 leader in al Qaeda with just such a raid, with a missile fired from a Predator drone.  Coddling Pakistan's corrupt dictator for these eight years hasn't made us safer, and John McCain's simplistic continuation of this weak policy is just being Soft on Terrorism, no way around it. Also, its worth noting that whatever other implications it may have for John McCain's Character, Psyche, or Mental Makeup, having a plane shot out from under you and spending six years behind bars does not automatically qualify anyone as a "national security expert"; that notion is just ludicrous on the face of it.
    1.  OPPORTUNITY.  While John McCain's four-star Admiral father ensured him a prized appointment to the U.S. Naval Academy at Annapolis, his performance - 894th out of 899 cadets in his class - does not attest to diligent effort, whereas Barack Obama (from a broken home, on food stamps) won competitive academic scholarships to Harvard, which he proved himself worthy of by graduating Magna Cum Laude ("With Highest Honors").  Its been a long time since any politicians of either party could talk convincingly about "The American Dream", but Barack Obama can, because he lived it.  Without handouts, family patronage, or inheritance, he pulled himself up by his bootstraps from the Chicago ghetto through his own hard work, enterprise, and initiative to become President of the Harvard Law Review, one of the most prestigious scholarly legal journals in the country.  Which President is more likely to make a difference in the lives of people, and motivate them with initiative to best achieve their individual God-given potential?
    •  This could not have been more timely... (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      AlanF, DebtorsPrison, elwior, nolakohler

      I just received a right wing anti-Obama screed with about 50 email addresses in the "cc". I hit "reply all" and pasted your comment.

      Fingers crossed!

    •  There's a few places that need edits, though (0+ / 0-)

      The reasoning for us Dems and libs should be taken out of the e-mail or it's going to backfire when Repubs read it. The bit about Obama bootstrapping himself up from the ghetto is not true (as pointed out in another comment); take that bit out. And Magna Cum Laude is "with High Honors," not "with Highest Honors." A revamped version of this for email forwards:

      Please forward this message to everyone you know!

      It's time the truth came out - Senator Barack Obama's position is more in line with Republican values than McCain's or Clinton's ever could be!

        1.  TAXES.  As a member of the Illinois State Senate, Senator Obama was co-sponsor of a bill which ultimately passed, creating the largest tax cut in state history.   Since the start of his presidential campaign, he has consistently favored a broad-based middle class tax cut.  By contrast, Senator McCain "voted against tax cuts before he voted for them", and has no real credibility on this issue.  McCain was very critical of the Bush tax cuts, which gave us years of prosperity - until very recently.

        2.  SPENDING.  The biggest failure of the Republican party has been its failure to control the bureaucracy and reign in runaway federal spending and deficits.  While the last five (5) Republican Presidents promised fiscal responsibility and balanced budgets, all of them grew discretionary civilian spending by tremendous amounts, and ran up ever larger deficits.  Meanwhile, only President Bill Clinton balanced the federal budget, and produced four years of surpluses, with the same forecast long into the indefinite future. A big problem with the federal budget is that almost nobody knows where all the money is going; its easy to add earmarks and pork barrel spending and special interest giveaways when the people back home cant tell the difference.   Senator Barack Obama's major legislative accomplishment in the Senate, the The Federal Funding Accountability and Transparency Act of 2006, has brought transparency to federal spending. http://www.federalspending.gov is the website Obama's legislation created, a veritable "Google of the Federal Budget", where anyone can research every dollar to see where their tax money is actually going.  The whole Federal Rathole is now online, for the first time ever, inviting scrutiny from whoever has the patience to slog through it all.  You don't have to be a CPA to realize that this does more in the long run to control wasteful federal spending than all the speeches Bush, Bush, Reagan, Ford, and Nixon ever gave on the subject put together.

        3. BIG GOVERNMENT.  In his North Carolina victory speech, among other things, Senator Obama uttered the words "We don't need Big Government".  President Bill Clinton's National Performance Review reduced the federal civilian workforce by 250,000 positions.  This makes the last Democratic administration the only presidency since Eisenhower's to leave office with a smaller federal workforce that he started with - again, Bush, Bush, Reagan, Ford, and Nixon notwithstanding.  But, the real stones Obama brings to the table on this issue are his formative years on the south side of Chicago, doing meaningful community social work through voluntary, faith-based, non-governmental community organizations, rather than government bureaucracies.  Yes, We CAN - rehabilitate the homeless, educate the illiterate, provide day care for single moms, dry out alcoholics, and clean junkies off the dope without building perpetual bureaucracies - Obama himself has proven that, through social entrepreneurship. By contrast, John McCain has never drawn a day's pay that didn't come from the public trough, courtesy of your tax dollars (getting fabulously rich by dumping wife #1 and marrying an heiress or taking money under the table from special interests he did favors for doesn't count as 'earning money in the productive sector').

        4.  PERSONAL LIBERTY.  Barry Goldwater must be rolling over in his grave over what debasements of the U.S. Constitution the Bush Administration has gotten itself into, and which the man who took his seat in the U.S. Senate, John McCain now ardently defends.  Warrantless domestic wiretapping, warrantless searches and seizures, arresting U.S. citizens without probable cause, holding them without trial, etc., etc....No REAL conservative believes these things are legitimate prerogatives of the federal government. There are innumerable horror stories you can research and recount of how the GOP has sat idly by while our cherished Constitutional protections have been ignored, abrogated, and turned into a joke. The last thing real conservatives want is the Orwellian Police State we're presently heading for.  

        5.  NATIONAL SECURITY.  To the rejoinder, "yes, but its worked, we haven't been attacked since 9/11", we must add:  "BUT, we haven't foreclosed the threat by taking out al Qaeda, either".  McCain vocally disagrees with the successful CIA program to take out al Qaeda leadership when located in northwest Pakistan, without alerting the local tribal authorities and Pakistani Intelligence, who have always warned off our targets in the past.  Senator Obama, by contrast, opposes giving al Qaeda sanctuary in Pakistan, and ardently supports this initiative.  When McCain attacked Obama as naive for "wanting to bomb an ally", the very next day the CIA took out the #3 leader in al Qaeda with just such a raid, with a missile fired from a Predator drone.  Coddling Pakistan's corrupt dictator for these eight years hasn't made us safer, and John McCain's simplistic continuation of this weak policy is just being Soft on Terrorism, no way around it. Also, its worth noting that whatever other implications it may have for John McCain's Character, Psyche, or Mental Makeup, having a plane shot out from under you and spending six years behind bars does not automatically qualify anyone as a "national security expert"; that notion is just ludicrous on the face of it.

        6.  OPPORTUNITY.  While John McCain's four-star Admiral father ensured him a prized appointment to the U.S. Naval Academy at Annapolis, his performance - 894th out of 899 cadets in his class - does not attest to diligent effort, whereas Barack Obama (from a broken home, on food stamps) won competitive academic scholarships to Harvard, which he proved himself worthy of by graduating Magna Cum Laude ("With High Honors").  Its been a long time since any politicians of either party could talk convincingly about "The American Dream", but Barack Obama can, because he lived it.  Without handouts, family patronage, or inheritance, he pulled himself up by his bootstraps through his own hard work, enterprise, and initiative to become President of the Harvard Law Review, one of the most prestigious scholarly legal journals in the country.  Which President is more likely to make a difference in the lives of people, and motivate them with initiative to best achieve their individual God-given potential?

      Vote Barack Obama. It's the conservative thing to do.

      The truth shall make you free - but first it shall piss you off.

      by Killer of Sacred Cows on Sun May 18, 2008 at 11:42:49 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  I don't have any Republican friends (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    ssgbryan

    and I don't want any.  I do have some Republican relatives, but we have little in common and little to talk about.

    And please don't ask me to vote for Democratic dinos.  I've got one for a "congressman."  

    Great job, Georgie.

    by djohnutk on Sun May 18, 2008 at 10:28:09 AM PDT

  •  Excellent Diary (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Killer of Sacred Cows, elwior

    It is always important to understand what motivates whoever you are talking to about politics.  The goal is to present them with a reason or reasons to vote the way you want them to.  In order to do that, your argument must be presented to them in terms that they can relate to .

    All of this is excellent advice for the tactical purposes of winning this election. And , after all, isn't that our most important immediate goal?

    Florida Kossacks Rock

    Blog Florida Blue

    You can't govern if you can't win.

    by gatordem on Sun May 18, 2008 at 10:32:20 AM PDT

  •  #7 SMALL BUSINESS, ECONOMIC GROWTH, INNOVATION (7+ / 0-)

    I'd also bring up small business and innovation.  Of the democratic canidates, Obama is the only one who had a small business plan.  Obama understands that 99% of all employers are small businesses, and that to create new jobs, small businesses do it faster and more efficiently than all other approaches.  There is real committment.  He will make the R&D tax credit permanent, and, while he will be increasing capital gains, he will have exceptionsfor small business owners:

    February 4, 2008
    Timely story in today's Barron's outlining Senator Barack Obama's position on tax policy, based on an interview with Austan Goolsbee, a University of Chicago professor who advises Obama on the economy. Goolsbee says Obama would raise most rates on dividends and capital gains from their current top of 15 percent to between 24 percent and 25 percent with the goal of generating new revenue and paying for middle-class tax simplification.

    TO INSURE AGAINST A NEGATIVE impact on innovation and new business formation, Obama would have a zero rate on capital gains for entrepreneurs, venture capitalists and small-business owners forming new enterprises.  "He is being careful not to disturb innovation," said Goolsbee. Most of the highest taxes, he says, would fall on "gains from the past."

    From reading previous commentaries on this idea, Obama is considering the elimination of capital gains on "active investments" for small businesses that are using the capital gains to grow their company.   I've personally experienced this, we had a capital gain that we had to pay taxes on -- these taxes prevented us from making 2 new hires.  The capital gains we were taxed on would have been fed right back into the company, and not taken out for personal usage.   In a small business, where your income can fluctuate wildly, and where revenue recognition can happen 2-3 years after your expenses, taxing growth is a very bitter pill to swallow.   This is a very big deal, and while the details of the idea/plan arn't out, that he's thinking in this direction should be hugely important to republican cross-overs.

  •  Barack Will Win (5+ / 0-)

    I make similar talking points with Republicans  all the time.  None would vote for the Clintons but many are considering Obama.  They are disgusted and angry
    and done with business as usual.  I have re registered at least 20 former Rs in the last year myself.

  •  You've made some good points here (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    elwior

    I think they could be useful.

    Also, your poll made me lol

  •  George W. Bush is not on this ballot? (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    opinionated, LearningCurve

    I disagree. He, and many of his failed policies, are in fact 'on the ballot'.

  •  I love this phrase (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Nova Land, elwior, petral

    You want their actual VOTE, not their nodding agreement on some arcane philosophical issue.

  •  Help me understand, Press to Digitate... (11+ / 0-)

    My husband and I are very, very comfortably well-off compared to most Americans. Our HHI is well over 100K, edging towards 200K. We have both worked our ASSESS off for everything we have, and are happy to be living in both a democracy and a capitalist country.

    And we are both liberals. We are both content to pay our taxes and are taxed at the highest rate, as appropriate, given our income. We both understand that it benefits us ENORMOUSLY in the long run to make sure the gov't is funded well.

    Can you explain to me, please, why conservatives are obsessed with lowering taxes? Why so many of them seem completely un-satisfiable re: taxes?

    Seriously, I don't get it.

    Lisa

    "No! Ne'er was mingled such a draught In palace, hall or arbor, As freemen brewed and tyrants quaffed, That night in Boston Harbor" - Oliver Wendell Holmes

    by Boston to Salem on Sun May 18, 2008 at 10:45:23 AM PDT

    •  Glad to Explain: (5+ / 0-)

      conservatives know that if you and your wife took that same money you now happily pour down the federal rathole (see: www.federalspending.gov for details) and, instead, donated it to any of a thousand worthy non-governmental charities, at both the community and global level, your dollars would go a lot further toward funding the good deeds you hope to underwrite, than they do in Washingotn.

      Save the Children will feed more hungry kids per dollar than the government's Food for Peace progrma; many organizations will teach more underprivileged kids to read, per dollar invested, than the U.S. Department of Education.  This applies always and everywhere, in all fields of human endeavor.  Want better Cancer Research?  Give your money to the M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, not the National Institutes of Health. Want to Save the Whales?  Donate to Greenpeace, rather than NOAA.

      Save the carrying charges government invariably imposes, which are exorbitant and waste money on federal bureaucrats instead of helping people directly.  An emerging movement of "social entrepreneurs" around the world is mobilizing through NGO's and Community Action, instead of waiting for slow, unresponsive, ineffectual government programs to solve their problems.

      Obama didnt wait for the government in the south side of Chicago, he marshalled voluntary resources to solve problems, faster and more efficiently.

      Is being a Liberal more about helping people or making bureaucracies? Spend your tax money on solving problems through motivated, effective voluntary charitable organizations, and deduct that from the money you'd otherwise send to Washington.  You'll do more good, be more involved in the process, and feel better for making the effort.

      •  Oh how naive (4+ / 0-)

        of course your ideas work if those you reference are charitable. However, that doesn't absolve them of responsibilites to their fellow Americans.

        If your argument works so well then why weren't charities and " social entrepreneurs" helpful to Katrina victims? Goverment inefficency there was due to the very argument you press: Government isn't up to the job. Well if we demand it then government CAN do a better job.

        You completely ignore the corporate welfare of the corporate tax structure.Government must force change especially since so many of our problems simply cannot be solved by charities:
        Infastructure,mass transit,education costs,housing; the list goes on and on and on.

        this Regan thinking you espouse has been proved a cancer on our society; and the patient is barely breathing.

        All I want is the truth. Just gimmie some truth John Lennon

        by gimmie truth on Sun May 18, 2008 at 11:21:58 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  I agree. (5+ / 0-)

          No American citizen in need should have to rely on someone else being in a good mood on any particular day.

          And the DISGRACE that was Katrina is a perfect example of why private charities can't (and shouldn't) be expected to be the main source of assistance, ever.

          Lisa

          "No! Ne'er was mingled such a draught In palace, hall or arbor, As freemen brewed and tyrants quaffed, That night in Boston Harbor" - Oliver Wendell Holmes

          by Boston to Salem on Sun May 18, 2008 at 11:25:36 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  But I'm against Corporate Welfare, Too. (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Boston to Salem, elwior

          On Katrina, though, you're wayyy off base.

          Talk to ANYONE in New Orleans, and they'll tell you that the private, voluntary efforts underway there are doing 10x more than government programs to help the people and rebuild the city.  People have contributed hundreds of millions of dollars to private charitable efforts for Katrina recovery, and these organizations have done a LOT more than the befuddled FEMA, state and city governments have been able to accomplish - even given that they have vastly greater resources.

          Brad Pitt's Make it Right Foundation and Cate Blanchette's Solar-Aid are just two examples where commited Liberals put their money where their mouth was, instead of depending on the government to step in and solve problems which otherwise wont go away. It doesnt take celebrity fame, or millions to give away, it just take a realization that we are better than our government, and, Yes We CAN "make a difference", if we want to bad enough....

          •  I disagree (8+ / 0-)

            You are right that private foundations are doing great work in NO, but they are a drop in the bucket.

            And it's a function of the current badly-run Conservative government that the privates are outperforming federal response by 10 in N.O. You'd better believe that if Bill Clinton was president, LA would look a hell-of-a-lot-different today than it does.

            A well-run government response (which is possible despite what the neo-cons say)can do so, so much more, and more quickly, than any private response.

            Lisa

            "No! Ne'er was mingled such a draught In palace, hall or arbor, As freemen brewed and tyrants quaffed, That night in Boston Harbor" - Oliver Wendell Holmes

            by Boston to Salem on Sun May 18, 2008 at 12:37:06 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  Yes Lisa, you are right. (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              Boston to Salem, lauramp

              It IS on our government to do the bulk of the heavy lifting in disaster relief, in curing Social ills, in providing essential services, and so forth.
                The problem is about that "well-run government response" is that we don't have a well-run government to respond. And that really does pre-date the BushCo Administration. In case you haven't noticed we've been losing the war on poverty for many, many years now.
                We've got to listen carefully to what Barack Obama is saying. He's been on the front lines, and he's seen how the "System" fails people in massive ways. We are in desperate need of Reform in America; It's not that the problems have disappeared, but bigger government is not the answer, smarter government is. Throwing money at Social Problems is akin to throwing money at "National Defense." The more you give them, the more they'll piss away. But knowledgable military minds could run a far better Defense Establishment than what we have now at a far lower cost.
                Yes, it's true, Conservatives do have their heads up their asses, by and large, but they aren't the only ones who do, and bless their pointed little heads, they do get things right from time-to-time (just look at their view of the Clintons), though to be sure, not very often.

              "We the People of the United States..." -U.S.Constitution

              by elwior on Sun May 18, 2008 at 01:19:19 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

          •  This is what I mean by "shifting lines" in our (2+ / 0-)

            Nation. Throwing out the stagnant thinking that government ALWAYS equals good, therefore more taxes are always good. While in point of fact, our government REALLY DOES waste a great deal of money we send to them, from which nobody benefits but the Bureaucratic establishment.
               This is NOT, repeat NOT, Reaganism. Al Gore did a fantastic job in implementing efficiencies in the Federal government, which helped in balancing the budget back in the 90's. Cutting waste really is the people's work, and ends up being a People vs, fatcat fight, and we need to cross party lines on this one and we need politically skilled leadership to pull it off.
               Obama IS like Reagan in that he has a real feel for the pulse of the American people. Reagan just used that ability for less than noble purposes, i.e., a less egalitarian society, whearas Obama's core intent is quite the opposite!

            "We the People of the United States..." -U.S.Constitution

            by elwior on Sun May 18, 2008 at 12:53:59 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  Take it from me. (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              Killer of Sacred Cows

              There will always, always, always be a certain percentage of waste in a beaurocracy. There will always, always, always be cheaters on the welfare payrolls, etc...

              I am certainly not a black-and-white thinker. I don't think that gov't is always the answer, and I think it's important to keep the waste to a minimum. But we have to educate people to the fact that no system, no gov't is ever going to be perfectly run with no monies wasted. And some programs are going to do an awful lot of good for the long term while costing us money in the short term.

              Lisa :)

              "No! Ne'er was mingled such a draught In palace, hall or arbor, As freemen brewed and tyrants quaffed, That night in Boston Harbor" - Oliver Wendell Holmes

              by Boston to Salem on Sun May 18, 2008 at 02:21:49 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  Conservatives don't expect zero waste (0+ / 0-)

                They just see the unbelievable mountains of money that get wasted every day and it infuriates them, as it does many independents and some democrats as well.

                The basic problem with government inefficiency is lack of competition.  Until that is addressed the government will always maximize inefficiency. You can't address it with oversight alone, because sufficient oversight itself would double costs.

                Sometimes I think they need to set up two of each government agency and have them compete against each other each year.  Obviously that's not appropriate for every agency, but it sure would be nice to see any aspect of the government run at even half or a third of the efficiency achieved in the private sector.  Start with the post office, who - bless their  hearts - suck compared to UPS and FEDEX.

      •  Interesting. (10+ / 0-)

        I see things very differently than you do. I have to tell you: I have a been a professional social worker for a long, long time and have spent my entire professional life working with the type of people who access and need both charities and government funded assistance.

        Charities are very important and necessary. But they are not entitlements. They are hand-outs, and that hand can (and does) get withdrawn at the whim of the privileged who are handing out the money/goods/services. I see this all the time - private charities can (and do) create hoops to jump through, like proselytizing for one example. I don't think Americans should have to "go begging" or rely on the largesse of the wealthy. And no matter how well run, that's what private charity is.

        They are also sometimes a little light on the oversight. At least with government funding, I as a private citizen have a right to demand an accounting of the monies spent, etc...  I also think that government control can help ensure that the research being done, the monies being given are distributed according to our hightest principles like the idea that all of us are created equal. Private charities should be the icing on the cake of government spending on social "causes", IMHO.

        And all the private enterprises you cite exist because of our government's fostering of these programs and are regulated, to some extent, because of government mandates.  

        Here's a very personal and concrete example: my husband was the beneficiary of a very rare and important donation: a kidney. Without government programs and regulations there is no way he would be alive today.

        Just my 2 cents, and thanks for taking my questions so seriously.

        Lisa - who has a husband, not a wife.

        "No! Ne'er was mingled such a draught In palace, hall or arbor, As freemen brewed and tyrants quaffed, That night in Boston Harbor" - Oliver Wendell Holmes

        by Boston to Salem on Sun May 18, 2008 at 11:23:34 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  this is good he said after he actually read it (0+ / 0-)

    promoted elsewhere thanks again

  •  Thank You--Important Diary (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    lauramp

    I have seen and heard many of my Republican friends and family entertaining the idea of an Obama vote.  Some of the more critical thinkers have already made that decision.

    However, until now, I have just not known how to talk with the ones who are just now considering the idea.  I have stumbled with how to even begin the conversation or make the points that would really impact their thinking.  

    I have copied this diary as well as many of the important follow ups.  I now have a road map!  And I am sending this to like minded friends who need a road map to discuss an Obama vote with a Republican.

    Thank you.

  •  Sorry, can't work with you... (3+ / 0-)

    ..on this one:

    Second, resist the urge to "Bush Bash".

    I feel it both my civic & moral obligation to express my hot displeasure with not only George W. Bush, but also those that foisted that worthless criminal on this nation.

    I feel the least we can do when discussing Bush with Republicans is "Bush bash."

    After all, Republicans don't have any problem bashing Democrats who even failed to be elected: Kerry, Gore, Kennedy, etc. etc.

    I refuse to hold my tongue in front of a Republican concerning Bush just because there is a small chance that Republican might vote for Obama.

    Put it this way:  Any Republican who is a potential Obama backer will joint you in Bush bashing.

    "So this is how liberty dies. With thunderous applause."--Padmé Amidala

    by wyvern on Sun May 18, 2008 at 10:52:38 AM PDT

    •  Unfortunately, Bush-bashing from other (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      petral

      Dems makes my job as a Dem Committee person that much more difficult. Please try to save that argument until AFTER the November election. Besides, history will be Bush's harshest critic.

    •  Exactly (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      al23, wyvern

      rethugs by their very ideology will never support a dem
      don't wast your breath, just help get a democrat to the voting booth.

      All I want is the truth. Just gimmie some truth John Lennon

      by gimmie truth on Sun May 18, 2008 at 11:01:36 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  I don't think you understand very well (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Sleepwalkr

        What Obama is trying to do. Thinking of the other side purely as mindless isn't going to get you very far, and is why Clinton is a failure.

        I was someone who was either sitting on the other side of the fence or sitting out before Obama came around. Often times the worst and most caustic parts of the left are all too visible to those on the right, rather than the pragmatic and reality based parts of it. If you learned anything from this primary season, it should be about the existence of those problems. However, as this diary points out, Obama has been able to accentuate and sell things in a way that is compatible with a conservative framework.

        Here's one such recommendation: stay far away from Michael Moore. Far, far away.

        •  Michael Moore stuck (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Killer of Sacred Cows, wyvern

          his neck out waaaaayyyyyyy before it was popular or possible to call the Pretzildent out.

          He deserves our thanks and our respect. We don't need to "run and hide" and abandon our true friends to get a few republican votes.

          They hate all we stand for. Do not forget that.

          All I want is the truth. Just gimmie some truth John Lennon

          by gimmie truth on Sun May 18, 2008 at 02:03:25 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

    •  Would you rather have the argument (7+ / 0-)

      or win the election?

      Bush Bash when talking politics with your Cat, let your Republican friends here the truths that will win them over this fall.

  •  Thank you for an excellent diary. (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Nova Land, lauramp, Sleepwalkr, ozarkspark

    As an active Dem in my community, I'll pass along your POV to the rest of my fellow activists. Even here, in very conservative Lancaster County, PA., we see and feel that the timing for Obama is right. The trick is to remember that we see things in a different light on some issues and we need to focus on those that are consistent with one another.

  •  How To Market Obama To Republican Friends.... (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    petral, ozarkspark

    Daily Kos is truly an amazing cite.  You never know what you will learn here! Good diary

  •  NEED HELP WITH THIS ONE... (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    petral

    Recieved this in my email from a Repubican family member.  This is being sent around the net and I'd like to launch a rebuttle/rip this apart.  Need some help from the community.  Here it is  any help welcomed.

    Your Social Security        

    Just in case some of you young whippersnappers (& some older ones) didn't know this. It's easy to check out, if you don't believe it. Be sure and show it to your kids. They need a little history lesson on what's what . And it doesn't matter whether you are Democrat of Republican.  Facts are facts!!!

    Our Social Security

    Franklin Roosevelt, a Democrat, introduced the Social
    Security (FICA) Program.  He promised:

    1.) That participation in the Program would be
    completely voluntary.

    2.) That the participants would only have to pay
    1% of the first $1,400 of their annual
    incomes into the Program,

    3.) That the money the participants elected to put
    into the Program would be deductible from
    their income for tax purposes each year,

    4.) That the money the participants put into the
    Independent 'Trust Fund' rather than into the
    General Operating Fund, and therefore, would
    only be used to fund the Social Security
    Retirement Program, and no other
    government program, and,

    5.) That the annuity payments to th e retirees
    would never be taxed as income.

    Since many of us have paid into FICA for years and are now receiving a Social Security check every month -- and then finding that we are getting taxed on 85% of the money we paid to the federal government to 'put away', you may be interested in the following:

    -------------------------------------------------------------

    Q: Which political party took So cial Security from the
    Independent 'Trust Fund' and put it into the
    General Fund so that Congress could spend it?

    A: It was Lyndon Johnson and the democratically-
    controlled House and Senate.

    --------------------------------------------------------------------

    Q: Which political party eliminated the income tax
    deduction for Social Security (FICA) withholding?

    A: The Democratic Party.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------

    Q: Which political party started taxing Social
    Security annuities?

    A: The Democratic Party, with Al Gore casting the
    'tie -breaking' deciding vote as President of the
    Senate, while he was Vice President of the U.S.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------

    Q: Which political party decided to start giving
    annuity payments to immigrants?

    AND MY FAVORITE:

    A: That's right!  

    Jimmy Carter and the Democratic Party.
    Immigrants moved into this country, and at age 65,
    they began to receive Social Security payments! The
    Democratic Party gave these payments to them
    even though they never paid a dime into it!

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------

    Then, after violating the original contract (FICA),
    the Democrats turn around and tell you that the
    Republicans want to take your Social Security away!
    And the worst part about it is, uninformed citizens believe it!
     

    Sorry so long....

    My Voice, Your Voice, Our Voice

    by ourhispanicvoices on Sun May 18, 2008 at 11:07:49 AM PDT

  •  Obama got Iraq right. McCain got Iraq wrong. (6+ / 0-)

    Is best way to phrase the contest to the hard core Republicans. It is a winning argument with 60% of Americans.

    It gets past all the "lapel pin patriotism" and national security "concerns".

    For gun control, point out that restoring Habeas Corpus trumps gun control, your gun's not much use if you are in jail on trumped up "terrorism" charges...for legally owning a gun.

    So you've got them on war, national security, individual rights vs. big government, the bread and butter issues to Republicans.

    For a topping, "that McCain is too wild to be president". Uncontrollable rage, old age. "He's a good guy but his time is past and he's got emotional issues".

    Those are the main smokescreen items the Republican neighbors hide behind. With those gone, McCain's emotional stability questioned and Hillary off the table, most Republicans will then change the subject to the BBQ sauce and the weather.

  •  On taxes, what about... (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    lauramp, Sleepwalkr

    These two arguments

    1. Taxes need to go up at least a little to pay for the war. We've never had a war where we didn't raise taxes to pay for it.
    1. Tax fairness. Obama said in a debate that his reason for increasing the capital gains tax rate wasn't revenue, but fairness. That is, money earned from buying and selling stock or real estate shouldn't be taxed at a lower rate than money earned from working.
  •  Excellent diary, great points in the comments - (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Nova Land, lauramp

    Thank you for compiling these points, and for all of you who commented - both positively and negatively, and whether you agree or not with the premise that these talking points may or may not change Republican voters' minds, the salient message is that in more ways than we think we actually AGREE on certain things, and that message is fully in line with Barack's central message theme. I am NOT a Republican because I think government has a responsibility to cut out waste and spend wisely, for example, but that point resounds well with both left and right viewpoints.

    Press, I hope that you will take your listed points, maybe augmented with some good points made in the comments, and post another diary using them, because you summed up great reasons why McCain should not be President; you show how he is opposed to positions many, many Americans believe in - it isn't just about whether we can convince others to vote for Barack, but bringing the vast difference between them to light. You make a great case against McCain, concise and effective, and it would make a great diary from that perspective also.

    Well done!

    "The first duty of government is to protect the powerless against the powerful."
    Code of Hammurabi, 1700 B.C.
    www.caringbridge.org/visit/brittany

    by CodeTalker on Sun May 18, 2008 at 11:13:52 AM PDT

  •  great stuff, thanks! (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Temmoku, nolakohler

    And very welcome after a family dinner with my very Republican parents. You are absolutely right that they need to be approached on their own terms, not with what would sell Obama to a Democrat.

    My mom is reachable. I think she is in a bargaining stage right now, she says she wouldn't vote for Obama if he had Clinton on the ticket, but she won't say if she would vote for him if he chose somebody else as VP. But she is reading a lot of things (and not just ones I send her!) about Obama.

    However, my dad is so far right and so wedded to whatever the latest Fox News talking points are that I have never been able to get through to him on anything.

    I think my best strategy is to work on my mom and hope that if/when she becomes convinced she will be able to talk to Dad in a way that reaches him better than his very liberal daughter can.

    Those who bash Republicans as all being stupid, remember that for many of us they are our family. I love my parents very much, even when I despair of their political views.

    Hope is passion for what is possible. -- Soren Kierkegaard

    by lauramp on Sun May 18, 2008 at 11:20:51 AM PDT

  •  Correction (9+ / 0-)

    Without handouts, family patronage, or inheritence, he pulled himself up by his bootstraps from the Chicago ghetto through his own hard work, enterprise, and initiative to become President of the Harvard Law Review, one of the most prestigious scholarly legal journals in the country.

    Obama is not from the Chicago ghetto; he is not even from Chicago.  He grew up in Hawaii and he won a scholarship to and attended the very prestigious Punahou Academy, a private prep school.

    He lived in Chicago for the first time after he took a job as a community organizer after he had already graduated from Columbia with a degree in political science specializing in international relations.

    Not to argue with the substance of the point that he earned what he got, but he also had strong encouragement from home, from a mother who - although she was a teenaged mom and she did divorce Barack's Dad when he was very young, also managed to go back to school and earn a PhD.  She was very bright, clearly "intellectual," and there was great deal of emphasis obviously placed on learning and education.  So it's not like he overcame some totally deprived background on the mean streets of Chicago.  Just a corrective because, of course, if you overstate the case you could make people suspicious that you may be exagerrating other claims as well.

    •  Could the diarist please make this correction? nt (2+ / 0-)
    •  He began his career in Chicago (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Temmoku, ezdidit, Sleepwalkr

      which is the point.  With his Harvard credientials, he could have taken lucrative corporate offers on Wall Street, but, instead, he went to the ghetto, and made a difference.  I hate to put it this way, but he is one of Pres. Bush Sr.'s "Thouand Points of Light", people taking the initiative to do the right thing, even when it may not be in their own financial best interest.

      There is a large black middle (and upper) class in America today, but how many take the time, effort, and expense to go reinvest in the African American community?  Its very commendable, and from the small but noble beginnings of his career, he is now making history on the global stage.  Coming from a broken home, with no inherited wealth or connections, its quite a story.  Its how millions of affluent white - and ethnic - voters in middle America see their own life stories.  That shared magic is why he will win this election, madrassas in Indonesia at six years old, notwithstanding.

  •  Thanks for this diary (0+ / 0-)

    It helps me understand what Republicans want, even if it leaves out some issues that are most important to me.  And although I fail to see how most of these priority talking points led them to vote for Bush, I can contain my bewilderment when discussing the November election.

    Very valuable diary!

  •  Thanks - this is very helpful (5+ / 0-)

    I liked it so much I converted it into a web page so I can just point my family and friends to it: http://leighb.com/...

    I hope that's OK with you.  I did not add a link back to your original article since I didn't want a link to the Great Orange Satan.  Currently the page is not linked from anywhere, so please let me know if you want me to take it down; otherwise I'll link it from my http://leighb.com/... so the search engines can find it.

    •  No, that's Great! (5+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      rweba, Temmoku, elwior, petral, Sleepwalkr

      Feel free to propagate any of my other blogs.  Your GOP friends might particularly identify with this one.

      •  Fantastic Diary sir! (0+ / 0-)

         It's hard to argue with the points you raise from either "ideological" viewpoint. Common sense really does rule!
         What a lot of people just don't seem to get (as of yet) about setting up win-win solutions is that YOUR side is winning also. And nothing gets taken away because the other side didn't lose.
          This idea of ending the foolish, non-productive bickering, the us vs. them mentality is what makes Obama attractive to people who think differently, and the operative word there is think. And you really get it, and in coming months, many, many more people in this Country will get it too.
          Time is on OUR side in this one!

        "We the People of the United States..." -U.S.Constitution

        by elwior on Sun May 18, 2008 at 12:19:41 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  I missed your other one.... (0+ / 0-)

        It was very good.

        Sometimes I don't read for a couple of days, or I read and don't comment....which is why I miss a lot of good stuff!

        All I want is....Impeachment followed by Imprisonment!

        by Temmoku on Sun May 18, 2008 at 12:20:34 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  be sure to change the header (0+ / 0-)

      It currently says "Why Real Conservatives Should Vote for Barka Obama", but that should be Barack instead of Barka.

      Hope is passion for what is possible. -- Soren Kierkegaard

      by lauramp on Sun May 18, 2008 at 12:26:23 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Thank you, for helping me keep my job (0+ / 0-)

    Thanks - I need all the help I can get on this one.

    I have lunch with my boss once a week.  He listens to Rush Limbaugh on a regular basis, and has called him a "sage."  I think it will be hard to get him to vote for Obama, but perhaps your ideas in this diary can help ease the tension between my boss and me.

    It's a good perspective: avoid arguing about subjects that I can't change his mind over.  I will probably be better off talking about things like transparency to avoid overspending, consistency on tax cuts, opportunity, and national security credentials such as willingness to stand up to Pakistan.

  •  Two more talking points (5+ / 0-)
    1. He's gotten his money from (literally) millions of small donors. He doesn't owe a single damn thing to the big Washington interests. For the first time in American history, we have a serious, big-party candidate that Washington insiders don't own.
    1. He's tough and competent. He's an African-American that came out of nowhere, built a national campaign from scratch and beat the massive Clinton machine fair and square. That takes brains, guts and a boatload full of competence. America really needs that type of competent, energetic leadership in the worst way.

    -2.38 -4.87: Maturity - Doing what you know is right even though you were told to do it.

    by grapes on Sun May 18, 2008 at 11:46:48 AM PDT

    •  These "did it on his own" talking points (0+ / 0-)

      seem to me to fit Independents like a glove.

      Let's not forget that the real prize is the third of the voters that are neither Dems nor Repubs.

      It is time for a president that makes me feel small and dumb in comparison, not the other way around!

      by yaddab on Sun May 18, 2008 at 02:31:38 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  What about "talking to Castro" and other thugs? (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Killer of Sacred Cows

    Personally, I was slow to come on board with this.  When I heard Obama express willingness to do this during that YouTube debate, my reaction was: "Whoa!  You're gonna do what!?!"  Everybody knows that you don't just talk to Castro or Kim Jong-Il.

    The more I thought about it, though, the more I realized that our present strategy (of refusing to talk to thugs) isn't working.  It hasn't made us any safer.  North Korea now has a healthy nuclear program.  Iran has been a huge pain in the ass.

    President Obama talking to these thugs could be a "foreign policy curveball."  I think it's worth a try.

    Furthermore, the negative consequences (ie - Kim Jong-Il having a photo op with an American president), don't really scare me.  I think the damage will be minimal, and would be outweighed by the possibility.  I think of Reagan's speech in Berlin: "Mr. Gorbechev, tear down this wall!"  and I imagine President Obama commanding: "Mr. Castro, let your people be free!"

  •  This isn't going to work for me (0+ / 0-)

    I don't have any Republican friends!!!

    Attention Waxman Staffers! Clean up on aisle 1600! huttotex 3/27/07

    by reflectionsv37 on Sun May 18, 2008 at 11:55:18 AM PDT

  •  Social security (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Temmoku, elwior, Calamity Jean, Sleepwalkr

    I like all the points in this diary (one thing that really burns me, it was hard-working, wonky, dorkhead Gore who did the tedious hard work of finding those 250,000 govt jobs to cut, never got credit).

    But what about social security--shouldn't that get the attention of any one in the middle class?  What's the first thing Bush did when presented his "mandate" in 2004--an election he won solely on being Mr Tough Guy National Defense?  Tried his damnedest to use Republican total control to gut social security.

    That's not tax cuts, that's not subsidies or welfare, that's money every wage slave paid out of his pocket (and every small business owner for their employees), that these guys intend to steal if given half a chance.

    Remember Bush smirking about the "worthless IOUs"?

  •  About not "bashing Bush" (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    elwior, petral

    You might be right about the hardcore types. But as for the more moderate types, my experience has been far different. And since these are the only Repubs we can realistically expect to consider Obama, these are the ones I'm concerned with. But anyway, what I've seen from these people is that most of them feel pretty much the same about Bush as we do. That hasn't always been the case, of course, but it is now. Most of them have really come to dislike the scumbag. Oh, and the ones I've talked to also understand that "bashing" is about to become the LEAST of Bush's (and his buddies') worries. I've yet to meet a person, Dem, Repub, or other, who doesn't fully believe that there will eventually be criminal charges against those idiots.

    "Any dictator would admire the uniformity and obedience of the U.S. media." -- Noam Chomsky

    by ratmach on Sun May 18, 2008 at 11:59:26 AM PDT

  •  need one for "how to market Obama to your (4+ / 0-)

    pro-Hillary friends".  Seriously, i had a good friend yesterday (strong Dem) say she was under no circumstances voting for Obama.  We've had  long debate over the last few months.  Feel the divisions are burnt pretty deep.  

    My only thought is what did Obama do to deserve such feelings from well minded pro-Hillary supporters other than win?  

  •  i don't have any republican friends... (0+ / 0-)

    I'm sorry, I stay in with the "right" crowd.

    "Say no to drugs" -My old health teacher in high school

  •  We HAVE been attacked since 911 (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Calamity Jean, R Rhino from CT4

    Why does everyone forget the anthrax attacks?  Those were post-911, involved biological weapons (aka weapons of mass destruction), and have yet to be resolved.

    So, in addition to the response in the diary, I would add to number 5, by saying, "but we have been attacked since 911."

  •  Most of my "Republican" friends are already pro-O (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Killer of Sacred Cows

    Also, Obama's first brush with the Chicago ghetto was AFTER Harvard Law. Not to diminish his accomplishments, but it's inaccurate to say he pulled himself out of the Chicago ghetto.

  •  Not just for Republicans anymore... (4+ / 0-)

    These OUTSTANDING talking points work well not just with Republicans but Democrats like me who prefer SMART government to wasteful government or government that is so strapped that it can't get anything done.

    I highly encourage EVERYONE to read these points each morning at breakfast and practice them in the mirror before heading out the door.

    Republicans won't be impressed with an idealist version of society like I am, so paint with REAL, SOLID colors - and stay within the lines until you're at a play date with your Democratic friends.

    "Take sides. Neutrality helps the oppressor, never the victim. Silence encourages the tormentor, never the tormented." - Elie Wiesel

    by Vote On Paper on Sun May 18, 2008 at 12:44:00 PM PDT

  •  How to market Obama to my Republican Friends (0+ / 0-)

    I guess I'd have to start by apologizing for tell them all to fuck off and die after they voted for Bush in 04.

  •  I have no Republican friends (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Killer of Sacred Cows, petral

    I am a liberal Democrat, and, among the people I hang with, I am one of the most conservative.

    How to sell Obama to my Marxist and socialist friends would be a welcome piece...

  •  How do I save this diary? (0+ / 0-)

    Stupid question...but what do I do to save this diary on this site?  I know there is some way to save it for future use...but I just can't figure out how to do it!  Thanks...  (I realize I can highlight and move over to My Documents...but due to some type of problem, My Documents has gone highwire...long story but take it from me, I can copy and paste but then I can not find it anymore!)

    "Do nothing; say nothing; be nothing."

    by Apple Annie on Sun May 18, 2008 at 12:50:15 PM PDT

  •  Obama should select Ron Paul as VP (0+ / 0-)

    I don't care for Ron Paul's championing of free market values (shudder) but he does have some good things to say, and would motivate quite a few people for the ticket. Although this migght make obama look kooky and fringe, which is what the right is trying to portray him as.

  •  Feedback from a reasonable Republican friend (5+ / 0-)

    I was intrigued, so sent to a reasonable Republican friend who does not care much for McCain or Bush. His comments follow, responses to each point.

    A quick reply, because its unfortunately a work day.  My comments assume the goal is to convince (weak willed) Republicans to support Obama.  I'll probably be thrown in GOP jail for aiding and abiding : )

    1.  TAXES.  As a member of the Illinois State Senate, Sen. Obama was cosponsor of a bill which ultimately passed, creating the largest tax cut in state history.   Since the start of his presidential campaign, he has consistently favored a broad-based middle class tax cut.  By contrast, Sen. McCain "voted against tax cuts before he voted for them", and has no real credibility on this issue among conservatives.  McCain was very critical of the Bush tax cuts, which most Republicans believe gave us years of prosperity - until very  recently.  Obama can thus be taken more seriously than McCain as a President who will cut taxes, rather than raise them.

    I didn't know about his bill and found that it put Obama in a more favorable light.   Beating up an old war hero isn't going to get you many Republican votes. I would have stopped just before "By contrast"

    1.  SPENDING.  Most Republicans' biggest gripe with their own party - by far - is its failure to control the bureaucracy and reign in runaway federal spending and deficits.  It is useful to mention that while the last five (5) Republican Presidents promised fiscal responsibility and balanced budgets, all of them grew discretionary civilian spending by tremendous amounts, and ran up ever larger deficits.  Meanwhile, only Pres. Bill Clinton balanced the federal budget, and produced four years of surpluses, with the same forecast long into the indefinite future. A big problem with the federal budget is that almost nobody knows where all the money is going; its easy to add earmarks and pork barrel spending and special interest giveaways when the people back home cant tell the difference.   Sen. Barack Obama's major legislative accomplishment in the Senate, the The Federal Funding Accountability and Transparency Act of 2006 has been to bring transparency to federal spending.  Send your Republican friends to http://www.federalspending.gov which his legislation created, a veritable "Google of the Federal Budget", where anyone can research every dollar to see where their tax money is actually going.  The whole Federal Rathole is now online, for the first time ever, inviting scrutiny from whoever has the patience to slog through it all.  You dont have to be a CPA to realize that this does more in the long run to control wasteful federal spending than all the speeches Bush, Bush, Reagan, Ford, and Nixon ever gave on the subject, put together.

    You can attract more flies with honey than vinegar.   I would leave out Republican failures and any word that starts with CLINTON and emphasize Obama's legislation and its benefit in finding waste.  it doesn't matter if its true that Clinton did well fiscally. People don't want to hear their party leaders, especially sainted ones like Reagan, didn't come through. The intended audience will stop listening before the important point is made. I did.

     3. BIG GOVERNMENT.  In his North Carolina victory speech, among other things, Sen. Obama uttered the words "We dont need Big Government".  Whether you agree with that or not, remind your Republican friends that Pres. Bill Clinton's National Performance Review reduced the federal civilian workforce by 250,000 positions (ones they will consider, rightly or wrongly, to be useless tax-sucking bureaucrats).  This makes the last Democratic administration the only presidency since Eisenhower's to leave office with a smaller federal workforce that he started with - again, Bush, Bush, Reagan, Ford, and Nixon notwithstanding.  But, the real stones Obama brings to the table on this issue are his formative years on the south side of Chicago, doing meaningful community social work through voluntary, faith-based, non-governmental community organizations, rather than government bureaucracies.  Yes, We CAN - rehabilitate the homeless, educate the illiterate, provide day care for single moms, dry out alcoholics, and clean junkies off the dope without buidling perpetual bureaucracies - Obama himself has proven that, through social entrepreneurship. By contrast, John McCain has never drawn a day's pay that didnt come from the public trough, courtesy of your tax dollars (getting fabulously rich by marrying an heiress or taking money under the table from special interests he did favors for doesnt count as 'earning money in the productive sector').

    I fear there is too much GOP bashing in paper for much successful republican conversion.  Stay with the Obama positives. Republicans don't want to hear how great Clinton is. "we" all know he is a lying, lecherous bastard who wants to bed down everyone's daughter.  If you start with either how good Clinton was or how poorly the GOP did, you've lost audience.  Use the flashlight to point the way, not to shine it in their eyes. I think many republicans would be pleasantly surprised to hear Obama supported faith-based, non-gvt' etc.  
    When I see words like public trough I immediately smell fanaticism  unless its Clinton bashing : )

    1.  PERSONAL LIBERTY.  Barry Goldwater must be rolling over in his grave over what debasements of the U.S. Constitution the Bush Administration has gotten itself into, and which the man who took his seat in the U.S. Senate, John McCain now ardently defends.  Warrantless domestic wiretapping, warrantless searches and seizures, arresting U.S. citizens without probable cause, holding them without trial, etc., etc....No REAL conservative believes these things are legitimate perrogatives of the federal government. There are innumerable horror stories you can research and recount of how the GOP has sat idly by while our cherished Constitutional protections have been ignored, abrogated, and turned into a joke. The last thing real conservatives want is the Orwellian Police State we're presently heading for.  Grassroots Republicans dont necessarily trust the feds any more than you do.  Thats a case you can make - and make stick - with them.

    Please - I'm gagging here.  We're at war for God's sake. Now, not only am I not listening I'm pissed off.  Maybe this is not a good point as currently stated.  

    1.  NATIONAL SECURITY.  To the rejoinder, "yes, but its worked, we havent been attacked since 9/11", you must add:  "BUT, we havent foreclosed the threat by taking out al Queada, either".  The National Security argument is like the Tax-and-Spend one, it doesnt matter where you stand on "bombing al Queada back to the stone age" - the fact remains that your Republican friends will vote for the candidate they perceive to be most in tune with that idea, period.  McCain vocally disagrees with the successful CIA program to take out al Queada leadership when located in northwest Pakistan, without alerting the local tribal authorities and Pakistani Intelligence, who have always warned off our targets in the past.  Sen. Obama, by contrast, opposes giving al Queada sanctuary in Pakistan, and ardently supports this initiative.  When McCain attacked Obama as niave for "wanting to bomb an ally", the very next day the CIA took out the #3 leader in al Queada with just such a raid, with a missile fired from a Predator drone.  Coddling Pakistan's corrupt dictator for these eight years hasnt made us safer, and John McCain's simplistic continuation of this weak policy is just being Soft on Terrorism, no way around it. Also, its worth noting that whatever other implications it may have for John McCain's Character, Psyche, or Mental Makeup, having a plane shot out from under you and spending six years behind bars does not automatically qualify anyone as a "national security expert"; that notion is just ludicrous on the face of it.

    Oh, don't use the word foreclosed. You have most people worried about their mortgage.  Ha Ha   I think the predator hit was in Iraq so I don't get the point.  good luck getting Obama to play the hawk against McCain.  
    I would press Obama's hard stance on al Queada regardless of location.  Why keep mentioning the opponent?  Don't you want to convince people that Obama has the right plan. I wouldn't mention McCain once in the who release. Who is McCain anyway?  I didn't know this about Obama - the word is not reaching Republicans for sure.

    1.  OPPORTUNITY.  While John McCain's four-star Admiral father ensured him a prized appointment to the U.S. Naval Academy at Annapolis, his performance - 894th out of 899 cadets in his class - does not attest to diligent effort, whereas Barack Obama (from a broken home, on food stamps) won competitive academic scholarships to Harvard, which he proved himself worthy of by graduating Magna Cum Laude ("With Highest Honors").  Its been a long time since any politicians of either party could talk convincingly about "The American Dream", but Barack Obama can, because he lived it.  Without handouts, family patronage, or inheritence, he pulled himself up by his bootstraps from the Chicago ghetto through his own hard work, enterprise, and initiative to become President of the Harvard Law Review, one of the most prestigious scholarly legal journals in the country.  Which President is more likely to make a difference in the lives of people, and motivate them with initiative to best achieve their individual God-given potential?

    I would scratch the anti-McCain rehtoric and stay message with Obama doing it on his own.  

  •  Republicans won't vote democratic (0+ / 0-)

    Republicans won't vote democratic. They'll some for some third-party candidate or note vote before they vote Obama. Obama had said numerous times that he wants to increase capital gains taxes in the spirit of "fairness". That alone will get republicans to not vote for him.

    •  Sorry, but you are completely wrong (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      lauramp, Killer of Sacred Cows

      lots of Republicans have already voted for him, not as destabilizers, like the Republicans who voted for Clinton to disrupt the process, but because they support Obama for president. There are already many of them. I am friends and acquaintances with lots of them. And there will be many many more. Millions of them are awaiting a properly worded invitation. They really hate the Republican party now, almost as much as we do, some maybe more, since they are so disappointed and disillusioned and even humiliated by Bush/Cheney and what they have done to destroy America. I have no doubt that Obama is aware of this and up to the task.

      krnewman.blogspot.com

      by krnewman on Sun May 18, 2008 at 02:13:26 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  I personally have found this to be untrue. (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      lauramp, Killer of Sacred Cows

      My husband, who has never voted for a Democrat in his life (he just refused to vote for either Bush or Kerry), has an Obama sticker on his car.  My best friend at work who has voted Republican for 20 years is voting for Obama.  They are both insanely angry about the war as a trough for corporate buddies of Bushco, the travesty of the VA and how our vets are treated when they come home, and they are pissed at warrantless wiretapping and the nullification of habeous corpus.  There are more reasons...but the toppers are the war and the trashing of the constitution.

      There are Republicans who are voting for Obama.  They exist.  I live and work with them.

  •  As a former right-winger (and retired CIA) I say (9+ / 0-)

    there is a tremendous amount of resentment among old "Cold Warriors" regarding what George W. Bush has done to this country.  So, feel free to bash away, if you're not talking to one of the unregenerate 25% of his supporters (who most likely are lacking the ability to comprehend rational arguments anyway).

    Among my former colleagues in my generation (50-60 yrs old), I would say the disillusionment with Bush and GOP rule is near unanimous. I'm hoping for a groundswell of support for Obama from folks who haven't bothered to switch their affiliation.

    I may not be typical of former Reagan voters in that I want national health care (not insurance) and I voted for Nader; however, I share all of the following views with other ex-Reaganites:

    1. Dismay at the loss of respect and admiration for the US in the world.
    1. Revulsion at the erosion of our Constitutional rights and democratic principles in the name of security -- that is the sign of a totalitarian society, not a republic.  
    1. Ignoring UBL and al-Qa'ida.
    1. Catering solely to the super-rich in decisions regarding the environment, taxation, and regulation at the expense of the middle class and the larger economy.

    Much of this can be laid at the feet of the Iraq so-called "war", actually an unprincipled and unwarranted invasion of another country for no defensible reason. Obama showed the judgment to oppose that "war" and the strength to go against the tide.

    McCain supports the war, voted with Bush 95% of the time, has a "Zero" rating on environmentalism, and has changed his opinion on every policy that gave him the now-unjustified "Maverick" label.  What else does anyone need to know?

    •  The problem with Bush & Co. is not Bush & Co. (3+ / 0-)

      but with the delusional and dangerous ideology upon which they based their policies. There appears to be a strain within right-wing circles that holds that the central tenets of the modern GOP are still quite sound (very low taxes and regulations, weak federal government, massive military, extensive privatization, etc.), and that Bush & Co. were merely very poor implementers of such ideas. I say horseshit. The implementation sucked because the ideas sucked. Always did, always will. You can't have a strong economy and national security with taxes that are too low, insufficient regulation, excessive privatization and too much reliance on overwhelming military might. These are ideas that need to be discredited, because they're simply wrong. So I don't buy the nonsense about how Bush was a poor implementer of otherwise sound ideas, which is the right's version of diehard communists' insistence that communism is still sound (it is not), and that its implementers were merely inept. The baby AND bathwater needs to be thrown out with this one. Any Repub who's anti-Bush but still pro-conservative ideology simply does not get it. It was the ideas that sucked, not just the implementers.

      "I will vote for the Democratic candidate for president--period." --Me

      by kovie on Sun May 18, 2008 at 01:11:25 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  The question is how to appeal to Republican voter (4+ / 0-)

        I didn't really address whether Bush & Co's ideas were wrong or not, so perhaps you're not replying to me.
        For the record, I don't think there's a single policy of Bushco., foreign or domestic, that I agree with.

        I was trying (and probably failing) to make two points:

        1.  It's OK to bash Bush to most Republicans. If they have any brains, they don't like him either.  If they don't have any brains, no use arguing.
        1.  The reason a lot of people used to be Republican, at least in the Reagan era, doesn't necessary fall into the left/right spectrum or the conservative/liberal spectrum. Those people feel betrayed or infuriated by the ideas and policies of the current GOP, which have undermined America's reputation and ideals.

        In the Cold War generation, there was a feeling that America was on the side of the angels -- that we were fighting the big bad Soviet Union to save the world.  Ideologues may have been fighting "Communism" but (since most of our European allies were Socialist), the vast majority of people weren't fighting an economic system; they were opposing totalitarianism. Now we aren't opposing totalitarianism, we're becoming totalitarians--a corporatist totalitarian state.  

        I think George W. Bush is the worst President in the history of the United States, but I kept telling people "No matter how much I hate him, I wouldn't be happy if Canada invaded my country and bombed the Northeast corridor to free me from the 'tyranny of Bush'."  (or feel free to substitute Clinton or whatever President you hate).  That's what we did in Iraq.  And McCain thought it was a good idea, worth continuing.  So good he probably wants to do it in Iran too.

        •  Excellent point! (0+ / 0-)

          I think George W. Bush is the worst President in the history of the United States, but I kept telling people "No matter how much I hate him, I wouldn't be happy if Canada invaded my country and bombed the Northeast corridor to free me from the 'tyranny of Bush'."  (or feel free to substitute Clinton or whatever President you hate).  That's what we did in Iraq.  And McCain thought it was a good idea, worth continuing.  So good he probably wants to do it in Iran too.

          That's an excellent, excellent point, and one worth repeating. Thank you for pointing this out.

          The truth shall make you free - but first it shall piss you off.

          by Killer of Sacred Cows on Mon May 19, 2008 at 12:17:05 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

      •  Quote of the day (0+ / 0-)

        The baby AND bathwater needs to be thrown out with this one.

        Love it!

        It is time for a president that makes me feel small and dumb in comparison, not the other way around!

        by yaddab on Sun May 18, 2008 at 02:18:31 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  Sorry, no can do (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    John Driscoll, LiberalTill IDie

    Anyone who voted for Bush twice and still isn't 100% ashamed of it is, in my book, still living in fantasyland and precisely the sort of moron knee-jerk rah rah Republicans that I DON'T want on my side. Same thing for all the eedjuts who still cling to the myth of St. Ronnie and his slaying of the big bad commie dragon and all those other tired old fairy tales that Repubs need to tell themselves to avoid dealing with reality and admitting that all they really care about is their own well-being, not that of their neighbors across the street and country. THESE people I will NOT appease and make nice to just to MAYBE pick up a handful of votes.

    I don't triangulate or pander or tell sweet little lies in order to "win" over moron enablers of the likes of Bush. Let these fuckwads wander in the political desert for 40 years before they realize what delusional and selfish jerks they were for supporting the most despicable and evil politicians in the country's recent history. I don't want to make common cause with them. If they're ready for some reality, more power to them. But if they need to have their pathetic egos stroked and have sweet nothings whispered in their ears about how Obama isn't THAT liberal, no can do. I WANT him to raise taxes on the fucking rich assholes who have destroyed this country and made life so miserable for so many of its and the worlds' people, and I WILL NOT make nice with anyone who denies this undeniable truth.

    Bottom line, any Repub who's ready, willing and able to jettison their idiotic, delusional and selfish worldview is more than welcome to come on over to realityland. But any who still clings to all that Republicrap nonsense about government being the problem, not the solution, states' and property rights, global warming denial, American exceptionalism and unilateralism, self-reliance, etc., should vote for McCain and go down with him. I don't want them on my side. So no, I will not follow your advice, which is Clintonianism in a nutshell, which frankly sucks.

    "I will vote for the Democratic candidate for president--period." --Me

    by kovie on Sun May 18, 2008 at 01:03:30 PM PDT

    •  These people you speak of, Repubs, (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      lauramp, DreadWolf

      are my in-laws, some of my neighbors (who are really nice old folks), my clients, my son's best friend's parents, my doctor and dentist, whom I like a whole lot, they just have a different point of view.

      Obama is going to be reaching out to Republicans and working with them, so why not us?  

      •  Good Germans ... (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        kovie

        Sounds like you know a lot of "good Germans" who "just have a different point of view."

        Sure, let's just reach out to them and work with them. And exactly on what kind of terms are we going to do that?

      •  Ugh (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Killer of Sacred Cows

        Being for endless war against invisible bogeymen, bankrupting the US economy, and kicking to the curb people who aren't fortunate enough to be in the top 10% of the income and wealth bracket is having "a different point of view"?!? They might be "nice people", but they also happen to be delusional and/or selfish. You really expect me to welcome their kind into my party with open arms? Only if and when they renounce their despicable values will I do that. And btw, I also happen to be related to and otherwise know people who hold such views, and cut then zero slack on it. You adopt a "me first and screw the rest" world view, and you are not my friend or ally.

        The "they hold different views" argument for being tolerant of people can be applied to quite a few scenarios that I'm guessing you wouldn't be very comfortable with. Being the party of tolerance doesn't mean being tolerant to intolerant people. We might be nice but we're not suckers (and, honestly, we're not that nice when it comes to fighting for what's right against right-wing cretins and their delusional supporters).

        And one more thing, this silly notion that Obama intends to reach out to Repubs of all stripes by embracing them is one of the biggest myths that's been spread during this campaign. He intends to "reach out" to them the way that he intends to "reach out" to Ahmadinejad and Kim Song Il--by telling them to stop being assholes and start making sense, if they want a seat at the table. Reasonable people with different opinions are always welcome at the table. Unreasonable with fringe and intolerant opinions are not. That's my idea of "reaching out", and I suspect Obama's as well.

        "I will vote for the Democratic candidate for president--period." --Me

        by kovie on Sun May 18, 2008 at 06:35:24 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  Don't bother Susan. (0+ / 1-)
        Recommended by:
        Hidden by:
        kovie

        Sadly, the rabid demo-dogs here are zealots every bit as bad as the far right.  The don't live in the real world and don't accept any views that contradict their own.  They shame the Democratic party, which is why I'll stay Independent.

        If Obama means what he says, he would denounce opinions like kovie's which are all about hate and partisanship.  Which is it?  From many of his supporters it is difficult to tell if Obama supports unity or divisive hatred like kovie.

        I've seen too many kovies, and if Obama agrees with those ideas, then he is the opposite of a uniter.  If his base is rabid haters like kovie, who despise my friends and relatives who I know are good, giving people, then everyone should do everything in their power to oppose him.  

        I would have to say most Republicans I know are far better people than kovie, because they could not even understand such hatred and bile, much less ever spew it about Democrats.  Kovie's missives would make great ads to energize the Republican base.  

        Kovie, Let it go - that much hatred is bad for your health - mental, spiritual and physical.  Whoever told you otherwise did you a disservice.  You sound creepily exactly like Charles Manson in his prison interview.

        But if you want to sink Obama, shout louder!  Obama just intends to tell everyone who disagrees with him to shut the f%$# up and sit in the corner!  Cool!
        I'll pass that on.

        •   Obama's message of finding common ground (0+ / 0-)

          with your "enemies" is one of his more attractive qualities, I think.  Thankfully, he is much more evolved than most of us out here.

           

        •  HR'ed for the Manson comparison and sheer ad hom (0+ / 0-)

          bile. That you wouldn't find that to be creepy is quite revealing. You are a case study in passive-aggressive projection. Now go away and enjoy your friends who are ok with bombing hundreds of thousands of people to death just because they have "different opinions". I think that the "Good Germans" comparison above applies to you perfectly.

          "I will vote for the Democratic candidate for president--period." --Me

          by kovie on Mon May 19, 2008 at 06:57:46 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

  •  Back off the 'Public Trough' comment (4+ / 0-)

    John McCain has never drawn a day's pay that didn't come from the public trough, courtesy of your tax dollars.

    Though I'm not career military, I have many uncles that are. If you want to piss these people off, tell them that they've been living off of the public trough.

    To say this is a cheap shot and will remind some of them of the Glenn / Metzenbaum email that currently somehow places their 1974 candidate debate in a post - 9/11 Senate chamber, even though they were both retired at that point.

    http://www.snopes.com/...

    Do-Do-Do-Dum. De-Dum. De-Dum. It's Over. --David Spade

    by bad dad on Sun May 18, 2008 at 01:19:10 PM PDT

  •  Can I just say THANK YOU (0+ / 0-)

    for not including as one of your suggestions:

    "Play Down Obama's Blackness".

    You ROCK.

    Barack Obama is nobody's messiah. But I'm pretty damn sure he's better than our current idiot-in-chief!

    by Ambboogie on Sun May 18, 2008 at 01:39:22 PM PDT

  •  I'm not interested (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    John Driscoll

    in the bastardization of liberal policies in order to woo republican voters. I'm also not interested in walking around on egg shells while I discuss the numerous ways that Barrack is superior to McBush. The republican brand is broken. If now isn't the time to stand and defend our platform, when is? If liberals won't defend liberal policies, who will? We must be very careful of perversing our beliefs in an attempt to persuade the other side. Liberalism is superior to conservatism in too many ways to mention. Now's the time to make people aware of it, not try to make us sound like republicans. The egg shell days are over, folks. Stand tall.

    •  Liberal well said (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      John Driscoll

      We need to stand tall.

      I have been so tired of explaining why I a liberal democrat to idiots whose only mantra is:

      They'll raise my taxes!

      They don't even realize that the true WEALTHY pay less taxes as a percentage of their income than they ever will!

      Trying to be something we aren't is like trying to act straight when you're gay.

      It doesn't work. and anyway why hide in the closet NOW?

      All I want is the truth. Just gimmie some truth John Lennon

      by gimmie truth on Sun May 18, 2008 at 02:10:35 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Obama is not a liberal, but he is my candidate. (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      lauramp, Killer of Sacred Cows

      I am a life long liberal...so far left that at times I have wondered if I was a Bernie Sanders socialist.  So as a Kucinich supporter, Obama is too center to be my ideal candidate.  His healthcare plan makes me sad.  I believe that my gay brothers and sisters should have the right to be married, not civil unions which I belive to be second class relationship status.  And I could go on and on. Obama is not my definition of a liberal.  

      However, he is my candidate. I think that Obama's message has always been to end the divisiveness of this country...the us against them mentality has resulted in the manipulation of the center of the electorate into voting Republican and giving a right wing minority carte blanche to destroy our constitution, our civil rights, and create a corporate/facist state.  If we liberals cannot reach out and find the things we have in common with moderate Republicans and reach a consensus, then I fear that my country may never recover from the neocon damage done...or at least not in my life time.  I appreciate this diary very much.

      •  FfJ: Obama himself was right when he said (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        zett, lauramp

        "the old labels just dont work anymore".

        I hear ya.  Look, I'm so conservative I make Ronald Reagan look like a 'New Dealer'.  I believe that among the things the government has no business getting involved in is Marriage.  Straight or Gay, let Marriage return to being the spiritual sacrament it used to be, to be practiced freely by consenting individuals, through whatever religious denominations (or lack thereof) they choose to affiliate with, and leave the State out of it entirely.  Declaring a partner for inheritance, medical visitation, or any other legal purpose, for that matter, should be a voluntary thing; there's no empirical reason why gender even need enter into it.  While parenthood should require a legal commitment and obligation by two parents to the child, that is not actually the case even now.

        The real philosophical division that matters is libertarian vs. totalitarian, since the old notions of "what is a conservative?" and "what is a liberal?" are fast becoming as obsolete as the labels "Democrat" and "Republican".  These new creatures, "Big Government Conservatives" and "Liberal Social Entrepreneurs" are surely cause for realignment.

        Obama is right, its a new era, and change is at hand!

    •  They should begging us to let them in! (0+ / 0-)

      Well said LiberalTillIDie! After the mess they've got us in, they better wake up and fast or be left behind this november. I wasted my time and breathe in 2000 and 2004 and this year, I'm done with trying to convince ignorant repugs to see what is SO freaken clear to the rest of us. If it's not obvious enough for them now, then they are beyond reasoning with.

      "We have been told that we cannot do this by a chorus of cynics. It will only grow louder and more dissonant." Barack Obama 2.05.08

      by Cleopatra on Sun May 18, 2008 at 06:25:03 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Don't Show Them This (0+ / 0-)

    Obama is really Arab-American not African? Who Knew?

    http://www.icallbs.net/...

    or

    http://kennethelamb.blogspot.com/...

    There's more:
    http://savagepolitics.com/...

    "One good test as to whether folks are doing interesting work is, Can they surprise me? And..when I read Daily Kos, it doesn't surprise me...." ~~Barack Obama

    by SignalSuzie on Sun May 18, 2008 at 01:49:06 PM PDT

  •  Use his Campaign as a business model (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    lauramp, Killer of Sacred Cows

    Republicans appreciate good business...

    Talk about how Obama has totally changed the political
    organization as a business model.

    1. Networking all contacts for growth, money &  

      support.

    1. Built a database of volunteers that can move or        

      stop an issue locally, regionally and nationally.

    1. His smart approach to government policy will be

      beneficial...because he will listen to a variety
      of solutions for government bureaucracy and not
      just yes men.

    Most importantly...I think it should be a conversation and never a debate.  

    If it is someone you see all the time...use the current events approach. Whenever a current event comes up in the news use it and tell your co-worker how Obama has said he will handle the issue.  you have until November...

    Those who say it can't be done are usually interrupted by others doing it. James Baldwin

    by fedupcitizen on Sun May 18, 2008 at 01:55:52 PM PDT

  •  Repubs: There is One Legal Option for Change: (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Killer of Sacred Cows

    You have to vote in a different party than the one that's been in control.

    Like it or not, the country cannot turn around if you elect another Republican. Elect the Democrat, and you can get to work reforming your party back to some kind of sanity.

    If you don't think the country needs turning around, have a nice day.

    We are called to speak for the weak, for the voiceless, for victims of our nation and for those it calls enemy.... --ML King "Beyond Vietnam"

    by Gooserock on Sun May 18, 2008 at 01:57:15 PM PDT

  •  Let's make one thing clear: (0+ / 0-)

    we should reach out to Republicans but we should never pander to them. Barack Obama should not pretend to be Grover Norquist just to get a few votes.

  •  A few suggestions (3+ / 0-)
    1. Add a Republican friendly option to the poll.  Not all of us hate the idea of talking to one, especially if they're among our friends and family.
    1. I think there's plenty of common ground that's not mentioned here.  For instance, there are plenty of Republicans that don't support the Iraq war and think Bush is an idiot.  Lot of Republicans also don't see McCain as a straight-shooter and are fully aware of his flip-flops on pretty much every issue.  I don't think it's hard to go with the pandering/flip-flip arguments when McCain supports things like the gas tax holiday.
    1. There are Obama's stands on issue that help with Republicans like his openness to support private school vouchers.  There's also a myth that Obama hasn't "done anything" or nothing "bipartisan"...to which I point to legislation such as his support for Walter Reed or his appropriate focus on nuclear non-proliferation.  
    1. Obama's intelligence.  Speeches, biographies, outstanding campaigning...there's plenty of evidence that this is no Dubya and that has cross-political appeal.

    I also keep in mind that some Republicans have jumped ship to become Independents--so, when talking to Independents I try to get a feel if they're leaning conservative or liberal (many times it's clear) and treat a conservative-leaning Independent like I would a moderate Republican.

    Also, change goes down smoother with honey...it's better I think to take it slow and diplomatically than try to change someone's thinking overnight.  It takes patience and sometimes it pays off.  But at the least, I think having Republicans open enough to listen to Obama will end up having less knee-jerk partisanship against him which is helpful when you're looking at the level of support he'll have after the election.

  •  LMAO.... (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Sleepwalkr

    EVEN IF you, in your heart-of-hearts believe we need more taxes and spending, and you pray to your humanistic wiccan goddess every night (j/k) that Obama will bring these things, for the sake of the Polar Bears, keep those wishes to yourself!!!

    How did you know????Are you spying on me???

    Photobucket
    AAAWWWW!

    BTW I'm going to try this on my parents who both voted for Bush twice. I tried to persuade them in 2004 but all we did was argue to the point that we don't discuss politics any more. I'm older and wiser now.Thanks.

    "Let us tenderly and kindly cherish, therefore, the means of knowledge. Let us dare to read, think, speak, and write."John Adams

    by Wild Starchild on Sun May 18, 2008 at 02:08:25 PM PDT

  •  Excellent diary. (0+ / 0-)

    Thanks Press to Digitate. Where's your tip jar?

  •  In Point 5, the WaPo link contains no (0+ / 0-)

    McCain positions on Pakistan. This link does though.

  •  Republican friends? (0+ / 0-)

    Who has heard of such an invention?

  •  This is a great, great diary. Valuable as hell. (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    lauramp, Sleepwalkr

    Thank you.  I have a lot more to say about this, it turns out, but too much for a comment.

    So for now, thank you for writing this.  Many of us do get your intention and are grateful so please don't be discouraged by some of the disdainful and/or lukewarm comments.

    Calloused hand by calloused hand.

    by PocketNines on Sun May 18, 2008 at 02:40:32 PM PDT

  •  Hotlisted & (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Sleepwalkr
    Rec'd.  Would leave tip if there were a tip jar.  Going out right now to meet some Republican friends.
  •  First, I don't like the poll questions (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    lauramp, nolakohler

    I honestly enjoy talking politics with hard-core Republicans. I always start by asking them what's important, and go from there. Obama's positions, teamed-up with the complete failures of this administration, are more than enough to keep the conversation going. I called a guy in Indiana last month (yes, from Iraq on Skype), and talked for about 30 minutes. He started by saying he was voting for McCain, but after 30 minutes of explaining what was important to him, and how McCain has been screwing all those things up, he calmly and enthusiastically said he was going to give Obama "a second look".

    This is an absolutely great diary.

    With sacrifice comes rewards. Have YOU thanked a veteran today?

    by Matt from Iraq on Sun May 18, 2008 at 02:55:12 PM PDT

  •  Great diary. (0+ / 0-)

    But I don't have any rethuglican friends.

    Friends don't let friends vote rethuglican.

    My friends who need convincing are Nader supporters.

    And they're a much tougher crowd, as it turns out.

    ~Doc~

    -7.88 -8,77 Just a wine sipping, brie eating, $6 coffee drinking, Prius driving, over educated, liberal, white, activist, male New Englander for Barack Obama.

    by EquationDoc on Sun May 18, 2008 at 03:01:31 PM PDT

  •  1. Health care ... (0+ / 0-)

    Health care would not be some esoteric philosophical issue if Obama would come out in favor of single payer health care. But I guess that's one of those big government programs that Obama says we don't need. Pffft.

  •  Thank you for this !! (0+ / 0-)

    It's one of the very best pieces of intel I've come across - meets its stated purpose to a "T" !!

    "Change doesn't happen from the top down; it happens from the bottom up." Barack Obama

    by ezdidit on Sun May 18, 2008 at 03:26:20 PM PDT

  •  Great list, but I'm too lazy so... (0+ / 0-)

    ... I just say "George W Bush" and a lot of them seem to come around.

  •  Not "drivel" and not "nonsense" (0+ / 0-)

    I'll grant you that there are parts of my belief system that I would keep to myself when I was trying to convince a Republican. But that doesn't mean it's "drivel" or "vague, touchy-feely bleeding heart nonsense".

    •  that part was sarcasm, (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      AlanF, lauramp

      I didnt mean to offend anybody.  BUT, my point is how the liberal parts of your belief system may be perceived by the Republicans you might be trying to convert to vote for Obama in the fall election.  Dont fall for the usual intellectual traps, and stick to debating within their existing worldview, or you'll be talking past them and expend a lot of effort that goes nowhere toward winning them over. Always imagine how what you're about to argue will be understood according to their cosmology; its seldom going to be the same as that from which you originate it...

      •  I see what you're saying. n/t (0+ / 0-)
      •  The one problem I have with this (0+ / 0-)

        Is that their existing worldview makes me want to scream at them and knock heads against walls. It's a selfish, self-centered worldview, and not appropriate for anyone over the age of twelve to be holding. It's childish. It's insulting. It's anti-intellectual and anti-reason. It's intolerant. It's greedy. I could think of other words but I'll let those stand as the representative sample of how I feel about their worldview.

        Got any workable suggestions for those of us who want to slap people silly when they promote or adhere to the ridiculous ideology currently going by the name "Republican"?

        The truth shall make you free - but first it shall piss you off.

        by Killer of Sacred Cows on Mon May 19, 2008 at 12:25:03 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  Show 'em what REAL conservatives think (0+ / 0-)

    Have 'em check out John McCain's Newt Problem over at Freeperville, circa Feb. 2000.

    "Question authority and the authorities will question you." Now more than ever!
    I remember when all of America was a free speech zone.

    by armadillo on Sun May 18, 2008 at 04:52:37 PM PDT

    •  Oops, posted too quickly (0+ / 0-)

      Sure, the problem with this is that they don't like him anyway, so they surely wouldn't like Obama. Still, interesting reading.

      The link doesn't seem to work from DK. Are they blocking us? Works if I use it from my bookmarks.

      "Question authority and the authorities will question you." Now more than ever!
      I remember when all of America was a free speech zone.

      by armadillo on Sun May 18, 2008 at 05:34:53 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  I just read this piece to my republican... (0+ / 0-)

    friend as she cooked dinner.  Excellent post!

    All the war-propaganda, all the screaming and lies and hatred, comes invariably from people who are not fighting. - George Orwell

    by Five of Diamonds on Sun May 18, 2008 at 04:53:51 PM PDT

  •  Sad to lose friends over politics (2+ / 0-)

    I just got an email today from a long-time conservative friend who sent me an article from WorldNetNews about how Obama is a muslim.  

    I was sure no one believed this anymore, but I guess I was wrong.  

    I wrote back, talking first about the lack of credibility of the news source, and then provided links to a multitude of reliable, credible news sources who have debunked this myth.  

    The problem is, I don't think it will matter.  She and her husband are part of the 18% who still believe anything the right-wing tells them, and also subscribe to every nutcase conspiracy theory out there- 9/11, Katrina, soy products causing homosexuality, etc.  It's insane.  

    She wasn't like this years ago- she married a man who is borderline certifiable, IMHO.  But I exercise tolerance, and try not to make waves.  

    I just don't think I can do it anymore.  And it's so sad.

  •  Great Diary (0+ / 0-)

    Spot on analysis, you won't get many hard core right wingers but you might get them to stay home.

  •  My version of marketing Obama: (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Killer of Sacred Cows

    "Vote for Obama or I'm going to punch you in the face!"

    They all tell me they're going to vote for Obama, but that whole secret ballot thing makes me wonder.

    Si se fucking puede! - Melody Townsel

    by Endangered Alaskan Dem on Sun May 18, 2008 at 05:16:59 PM PDT

  •  Real glad this made it to the rec list (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Killer of Sacred Cows

    some folks might need to read it a few times for it to sink in.

    We need ex-Republicans who have finally seen the light about how awful Bush/Cheney have betrayed America and sold our birthright for a mess of potage.

    krnewman.blogspot.com

    by krnewman on Sun May 18, 2008 at 05:23:55 PM PDT

  •  Best diary-- Bookmark this one. (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    lauramp, Bogey Bill

    Outstanding, recommended.

    If you want to win people over, close the sale, make a friend, get a client, have a successful speech, win over the team to perform, etc. you have to know where they're coming from and tailor your communication to that and not to your own biases, while remaining honest and open.

    Excellent essay.

    Children in the U.S... detained [against] intl. & domestic standards." --Amnesty Internati

    by doinaheckuvanutjob on Sun May 18, 2008 at 05:30:06 PM PDT

  •  Good news, bad news (0+ / 0-)

    The good news is that Obama is fairly easy to market to your Republican friends.  The bad news is that's because (a) he is closer to Republican positions on some issues than he should be, and (b) he appeals to their hatred of the Clintons.

    -5.38/-3.74 I've suffered for my country. Now it's your turn! --John McCain with apologies to Monty Python's "Protest Song"

    by Rich in PA on Sun May 18, 2008 at 05:34:39 PM PDT

  •  one more issue (0+ / 0-)

    I like your issues, but what do you think about adding net neutrality?  My life-long  Republican brother and a couple of evangelical-Christian Republicans who were big Obama volunteers with us in rural PA are on the same side of this issue as we lefties are.

    Obama has a fantastic technology platform.  He wants to preserve realistic internet access for grassroots groups across the political spectrum, while providing parents with tools to protect their kids.  Bringing the left and the right together!

    It seems to me that the "pornographers and pedophiles having unfettered access to your internet connection" argument made by some Republicans is a straw man to promote tiered network management for the purpose of increasing the profits of the telecoms.  Filters already exist to monitor your internet reception and Obama is committed to expanding them and providing them to every parent, while keeping internet providers from privileging some types of content over others.

  •  Obama's academic record (0+ / 0-)

    Obama's grandparents helped him to get into Punahou High School in Hawaii. Because he was less than a diligent student, he went to Occidental College in California. After two years he transferred to Columbia. After graduating from Columbia he worked as a community organizer in Chicago, then attended Harvard Law School where he was the first black president of the Law Review. Obama was elected president in part because both liberal and conservative students thought that he would be respectful of them. This actually happened. In the NYT today we have a factoid that a conservative law professor at the U of Chicago, Michael McConnell, worked with Obama on a law review article and said to colleagues, "This is a brilliant guy, we should try to recruit him". The contrast with McCain is very sharp because you will happily find people from all three places who will describe Obama's intellect with superlatives.

    Otherwise good points. The social entrepreneurship one was excellent.

    -4.00, -5.33 "When serving as a judge, do not act as a lawyer"--Pirkei Avot, too late

    by 4jkb4ia on Sun May 18, 2008 at 06:55:53 PM PDT

  •  Good, smart, useful diary. Now where's that (0+ / 0-)

    blunt object?

  •  very well said (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    lauramp

    My Republican husband - who votes in every election held in town, we have a small home business, x military, gun toting - you know the type voted for Obama -
    yet he grudgingly mentions the "raising taxes" issue. Thanks for the info., i'm now armed to make him feel more comfortable with his decision.
    b4 this, i nodded and reminded him how much worse our econmy is under Bush, and higher taxes has to be better than paying for it it every where else.

  •  This is great stuff (0+ / 0-)

    Not only that, but Barack is not afraid to reach out to groups who might otherwise never hear from a Democrat (example: his speech in 2007 at Pastor Rick Warren's Saddleback Church in southern Orange County (not exactly a Democratic stronghold)).

  •  Lowered taxes in IL? (0+ / 0-)

    I've been googling and can't find info on Obama lowering taxes in Illinois.  TAX is the ONLY issue for my Repub brother - so if I can prove to him that Obama's better on taxes, that'd be great. Please provide a link, or more info.  I hope it's more than just that gas tax break, since Obama now says it was a mistake.

    Any info you can give me would be appreciated.

    Thanks!

    •  From the campaign website: (0+ / 0-)

      "In the Illinois State Senate, this meant working with both Democrats and Republicans to help working families get ahead by creating programs like the state Earned Income Tax Credit, which in three years provided over $100 million in tax cuts to families across the state."

      I would imagine that there are Illinois sources that could give you the cumulative current value of the EITC to state taxpayers, since its inception.  For a state known for some of the worst taxes in the country, that's a pretty big accomplishment.

      One thing I forgot to put in the blog under "Spending" was the fact that Obama has voted every year to support a return to the Graham-Rudman-Hollings PAYGO spending caps, which the Republicans set aside, allowing the present explosing in deficit spending.

  •  One correction... (0+ / 0-)

    This:

    Most Republicans' biggest gripe with their own party - by far - is its failure to control the bureaucracy and reign in runaway federal spending and deficits.

    That is not true.  That might be true of the dyed-in-the-wool party faithful that actually understand something that they consider a conservative creed.  But for most registered Republicans that is WAY too abstract, and it's not worth arguing unless somebody brings it up.  I think there's little pay-off in raising that subject at all.  

    The one thing that is not on your list that a lot of average registered Republicans might object to is that they don't like being lied to, and they feel that they have been lied to by people they trusted.  That's very basic and non-ideological.  It goes to issues of character rather than policy.

    Do you want to know what approach I think is best for soliciting Republicans?  Just say it's time to throw out the rascals, whether they are Republicans or Democrats, all the people that have served us so poorly.  It gives them an excuse to turn on their own leaders without feeling like they are turning to The Dark Side.  

    Complain about all the politicians that have lied to us, that have grown fat in Washington while serving us poorly, that have got so comfortable and arrogant in their digs that they don't even care that they are obvious about it.  Say it's time to give somebody new a try FOR A CHANGE.

    This is a CHANGE election.

    Arguing ideology is a waste of time with most Republicans.  If you speak to someone that actually believes and can enumerate abstract Republican "principles," then they probably aren't flippable through argument.

    •  Throw the Bums Out; They've Lied to Us.... (0+ / 0-)

      That goes without saying this year; everyone already knows and feels that bit.  But to most lifelong Republicans, what our leaders have lied to us about the MOST, for the LONGEST TIME, and MOST CONSISTENTLY is Federal Spending, Deficits, and Bureaucracy.  It goes back to Nixon.  Every Republican President has promised "fiscal responsibility, and yet only Bill Clinton delivered it.  THAT'S the Unforgivable Sin that GOP Congressional Leaders are now begining to recognize they've commited...

      Tossing out the incumbents is just common sense, no matter which party they are, at regular intervals.  "DONT RE-ELECT ANYBODY" is always a good approach to politics.  :-)

  •  I think integrity is the strong point (2+ / 0-)

    As in "What you see is what you get," which sure isn't true with Clinton, and isn't true with a flip-floppping Mcccain.

    I have a staunch Repubilcan friend from Utah who said "Paul, you won't believe this, but I'm gong to vote for Obama in November. He's way too liberal for me on most issues, but I think he has integrity."

    I think we should push themes where we really do agree and have common ground (like the assaults on the constitution that dismay even many core Republican operatives--I've talked with them). But not twist our own politics into something we don't believe--becaus that just backfires.

    Also nothing wrong with saying Bush has been a disaster--I think most winnable Republicans acknowledge that.

  •  I say send THESE videos and then (0+ / 0-)

    see what they think....

    and that his top adviser is a lobbyist and lobbied for foreign dictators and mass murderers:

    and tell them McCain and Bush want to VETO the new GI bill

    obama rebuttals:

  •  I always point to (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Killer of Sacred Cows

    The biggest tp of the season: Obama out=manuvered. out-organized, out-managed the Clinton machine.

    This is no small thing.

    He beat the Clinton machine!

    He came out of nowhere, & kicked their ass.

    This alone elevates him.  

    This alone makes him a force to be reckoned with.Photobucket

  •  Don't need the advice, thanks (0+ / 0-)

    All my Republican friends are reasonably smart and have been paying close attention since they voted for Bush in 04. Every last one of them has come up and told me, unasked (and whether they admit to their 04 votes being a mistake or not), that they're voting for Obama.

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