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(Diarist's Note: In checking the diary list, just prior to posting my diary, I see one of my favorite fellow bloggers, La Feminista, is also covering Rich's column today in, "*American Amnesia*."  I always find her views from across the pond to be insightful, and tonight they are exactly that. But, IMHO, I think my diary covers this from a different perspective, so I'm going to put it up on the boards, too. Frankly, I hope there are a dozen more posts about Rich's column today, because the topics covered in it are of critical import to all Democrats.)

As the old saying goes: If you repeat a lie often enough, it becomes the truth. And, if there's one thing the 2004 election cycle--littered with Kerry swiftboating distortions 24/7--taught us, for the umpteenth time, was that those pathological, lying bastards running the media effort for the G.O.P. can sell bacon at a bar mitzvah.

But, as Frank Rich reminds us in Sunday's NY Times, what's past was merely prologue for the crap that's already being flung our way in these 2010 mid-terms. He points to the reality that, at least for the moment, Dem's are parsing the woefully underwhelming "the Republicans are 'betting on amnesia'"  monologue. And, unfortunately, with 9.5% unemployment exacerbating voter dementia--reminding a typical voter that can't even recall what they had for dinner the previous evening, let alone confirming who/what really caused this mess over the past 10 years--the only sure way for Democrats to put that GOPer wildfire out is for the current administration  to directly "...address the cancer in the American heart -- joblessness..." between now and November. (Note: Rich says "address," he does not use the word, "cure.")

Yes, as much as some reading this will refuse to accept how low America's low-information voters actually go, Rich nails it again in: "How to Lose an Election Without Really Trying."


How to Lose an Election Without Really Trying
By FRANK RICH
New York Times
August 8, 2010

...Betting on amnesia is almost always a winning, not a losing, wager in America. Angry demonstrators at health care town-hall meetings didn't remember that Medicare is a government program, and fewer and fewer voters of both parties recall that the widely loathed TARP was a Bush administration creation supported by the G.O.P. Congressional leadership. So many Republicans don't know Obama is a natural citizen -- 41 percent in a poll last week -- that we must (charitably) assume some of them have forgotten that Hawaii was granted statehood. The G.O.P. chairman is sufficiently afflicted with amnesia that he matter-of-factly regaled an audience with the counterfactual observation that the war in Afghanistan, Bush's immediate response to 9/11, began under Obama.

--SNIP--

A political campaign built on Obama's faulty premises cannot stand -- or win. The polls remain as intractable as the 9.5 percent unemployment rate no matter how insistently the Democrats pummel Bush...

--SNIP--

...even if the Democrats sharpen their attack, they are doomed to fall short if they don't address the cancer in the American heart -- joblessness. This requires stunning emergency action right now, August recess be damned. Instead we get the Treasury secretary, Timothy Geithner, offering the thin statistical gruel that job growth has returned "at an earlier stage of this recovery than in the last two recoveries."

The tragically tone-deaf Geithner is on his latest happy-days-are-almost-here-again tour. He made that point in multiple television appearances as well as in a Times Op-Ed page article in which he vowed to "do more" to give workers "the skills they need to re-enter the 21st-century economy." On the same day his essay appeared last week, The Times ran a front-page report on "99ers," the growing band of desperate jobless Americans who have exhausted their 99 weeks of unemployment insurance benefits...


Bold type is diarist's emphasis.

As many within our own party have reminded us, the "things-could-be-a-lot-worse" meme is not a winning slogan enabling a successful Democratic run-up to November.

On Friday evening, Naked Capitalism's Yves Smith further empasized that truth by pointing to the "tone deaf" spinning (see Geithner's commentary, above) of already-spun government statistics which simply aren't cutting it on Main Street in: "Ugly Non-Farm Payrolls Revisions."

(Naked Capitalism Publisher Yves Smith has provided written authorization to the diarist to publish her blog's diaries in their entirety for the Daily Kos community.)

#            #            #

Ugly Non-Farm Payrolls Revisions
Yves Smith
Naked Capitalism
Friday, August 6, 2010

While the preparation of economic data is always a fraught business, one hopes that errors are more or less symmetrical, particularly in data series that (as is the case for some important metrics in the US, like GDP), are released on an initial basis (almost without exception the only one Mr. Market notices) and tidied up subsequently. It's troubling when a statistical release shows a marked bias over time in corrections. It suggests at best a need for a change in methodology (something statisticians are reluctant to implement, since it means the series will not be strictly comparable over time) or at worst, political meddling (pressure to interpret legitimate ambiguities in the early findings so as to produce a prettier picture).

And employment-related data is particularly important politically.

Andrew Horowitz of The Disciplined Investor sent a series of charts by e-mail, and I've included the ones I found most interesting below. Employment context comes first, then the pattern of revisions to non-farm payrolls.

CHARTS...

Unemployment (Source: Bloomberg/Horowitz & Company)

Underemployment (Source: Bloomberg/Horowitz & Company)

Change In Payrolls (Source: Bloomberg/Horowitz & Company)

Non-Farm Payrolls Initial vs. Revised (Source: Bloomberg/Horowitz & Company)

NFP Report is Bad Revisions are Nasty (Source: BLS/Horowitz & Company)

#            #            #

As many others in the blogosphere have recently noted over the past few weeks, just the potential of railroading middle class heroine and congressional TARP watchdog Elizabeth Warren out of the chairmanship  of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau has raised the ire of Democrats, nationwide.

Now, we're witnessing the departure of White House Council of Economic Advisers Chair Christina Romer. HuffPo's Lynn Parramore posted a particularly good piece on this late on Friday:  "Rooseveltians React to Romer: 'Sensible Thinking Will Be Missed,'"  which included reaction about this latest development from numerous Roosevelt Institute fellows and New Deal 2.0 contributors. Here are a couple of those comments via Parramore:


Thomas Ferguson, Senior Fellow at the Roosevelt Institute and professor of political science at the University of Massachusetts, Boston:


Now there's nobody in the White House familiar with the economics of the Great Depression. And Romer was very, very clear that the financial crisis and the Great Recession had not somehow magically combined to make 8.5% a valid benchmark for "full" employment. Let's see what her successor thinks on that one; it will tell plenty. Unemployment policy is the central economic problem for the United States and the person most interested in it in the White House just left.

Marshall Auerback, Senior Fellow at the Roosevelt Institute and a market analyst and commentator:


Compared to the usual Rubinite retreads who currently dominate economic policy in the Obama Administration, Christina Romer was a decided improvement -- although clearly not a terribly influential voice if the current policy trajectory is anything to go by. In keeping with the President's alleged Lincolnesque "Team of Rivals" approach, it would be nice to see Obama use her resignation to bring in an alternative voice, such as James K. Galbraith. More likely, unfortunately, is that Professor Romer will be replaced by another Clintonista who will make all of the usual noises about the need to "get the deficit under control" in order to "retain the confidence of the markets," as well as virtually ignoring the issues of employment, stagnant economic growth and growing income inequality. In other words, there will be no team of rivals, but an echo chamber of Wall Street Democrats.

Even the top editorial in today's NY Times addresses this brutal political reality for our Party this year: "In Search of a New Playbook."


In Search of a New Playbook
NY Times Editorial
August 8, 2010

In less than 90 days, millions of irritable voters will go to the polls to choose a new House and much of the Senate. If Democrats hope to retain control of both chambers in a year of deep dissatisfaction with incumbents, they need a sharper and more inspirational playbook than the one they are using.

Political forecasters have warned for months that the widespread anti-Democratic sentiment in the nation could well coalesce into a Republican wave that approaches that party's gains in 1994. President Obama's independents have deserted him, the business and Tea Party wings of the Republican Party are alight with fervor and cash, and even season-ticket Democrats are searching for their old enthusiasm...

--SNIP--

...For most voters, the only real issue is high unemployment, and it is here that Democrats seem to have set aside bold thinking and fallen into the Republican trap of placing deficit fears ahead of job revival. Rather than spend time during the campaign stoking anxiety over Social Security, Democrats should aggressively counter the myth that the deficit is causing unemployment, and advocate using government in ways that might re- inspire voters...

Indeed, this slow-motion, mid-term, Democratic trainwreck has been more than 18 months in the making. Many--from Paul Krugman to Simon Johnson to Joe Stiglitz to Christina Romer--have been warning us of the consequences of not doing enough, soon enough, to prevent what's now taking a massive chunk out of the Democratic Party's collective ass, less than 90 days before the election.

Earlier, Rich addressed this matter from another vantage point in his review of Jonathan Alter's, "The Promise: President Obama, Year One" (which I also noted in my diary, yesterday):


...it's hard not to wonder if much more would have been accomplished, both substantively and politically, had Obama's economic principals, Timothy Geithner and Lawrence Summers, been more open to ideas not of their own authorship and more capable of playing with others, including a public that still hardly knows either of them...      ...Once in place in Washington, they would all underestimate the threat of rising unemployment, be blindsided by the populist anger rising outside the capital, and even fail to predict the no-brainer popularity of the "cash for clunkers" program. Their paramount group-think lapse--their inability "to think more boldly about creating jobs fast"--still haunts the administration...

--SNIP--

...Summers's Machiavellian efforts to minimize or outright exclude the input of ostensible administration economic players like Paul Volcker, Austan Goolsbee, and Christina Romer seem to have engaged his energies as much as the policy issues at hand.

In April 2009, at Obama's insistence, a group of economists that Summers had blocked from the Oval Office, including Volcker, Paul Krugman, Joseph Stiglitz, and Alan Blinder, was invited to a White House dinner. That colloquy has been cited ever since by White House aides in response to complaints that the administration's economic circle is too insular. The dinner was a one-off, however, and the liberal economists' ideas about tougher financial reform and a more ambitious stimulus package have languished.

--SNIP--

...Obama was now imprisoned within the cozy Summers-Geithner group "and it would be increasingly difficult for him to see beyond its borders..." ...For all Obama's skepticism of cant, he was "in thrall to the idea that with enough analysis, there was a `right answer' to everything. But a right answer for whom?"

Responding to Rich's rhetorical question, the "right answer"--as navigated by Summers and Geithner--was promptly provided for Wall Street. In contrast, as Rich also points out, the employment hopes of voters on Main Street--much like the economic ideas and sentiments of one-time White House dinner guests Volcker, Krugman, Stiglitz, et al--have languished.

In no uncertain terms, and concluding his column in today's NY Times, Rich tells us of the most likely political consequences of these self-inflicted wounds, come November...


...The Democrats have already retreated from immigration and energy reform. If they can't make the case to Americans...that they offer more hope for a job than a radical conservative movement poised to tear down what remains of the safety net, they deserve to lose.

As I've mentioned it in more than one post over the past few weeks, and as Frank Rich covers it in his column, today, for the sake of the Party come November, it is time to fight the good fight for a second economic stimulus program for Main Street. Anything less than that would just be more "not enough."

Originally posted to http://www.dailykos.com/user/bobswern on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 03:19 AM PDT.

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  •  Tip Jar (148+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Lupin, JekyllnHyde, Angie in WA State, cslewis, Sylv, chrississippi, PrahaPartizan, El Zmuenga, abarefootboy, emal, TJ, shycat, Mnemosyne, RFK Lives, expatjourno, unonymous, TracieLynn, DaleA, Agathena, Major Tom, ctsteve, sviscusi, businessdem, flatford39, On The Bus, defluxion10, dkmich, Diana in NoVa, schuylkill, CanYouBeAngryAndStillDream, Deward Hastings, bibble, glenj, chumley, Desert Rose, 3goldens, NoMoreLies, Jagger, SherwoodB, mjd in florida, irate, Militarytracy, Flint, willibro, kamarvt, trinityfly, reflectionsv37, ratzo, aaraujo, Burned, Overseas, Phil S 33, WisePiper, Ginny in CO, FindingMyVoice, jbfunk, Jim P, MadGeorgiaDem, elliott, Hirodog, MissInformation, Orinoco, vigilant meerkat, HoundDog, Hear Our Voices, deha, blueoasis, imabluemerkin, Terminus, Sagebrush Bob, sceptical observer, profh, Cassiodorus, blueoregon, poxonyou, slksfca, orrg1, bigchin, One Pissed Off Liberal, phonegery, DorothyT, dotsright, SpecialKinFlag, Margfh, terryhallinan, yoduuuh do or do not, Trial Lawyer Richard, daveygodigaditch, Matt Z, Jimdotz, joyful, joedemocrat, Unbozo, aliasalias, HCKAD, millwood, oxon, Terra Mystica, Mighty Ike, brooklynbadboy, KJG52, jamess, monkeybrainpolitics, o the umanity, DixieDishrag, allie123, papicek, squarewheel, ibinreno, LaFeminista, aufklaerer, greengemini, maryabein, IndyRobin, allep10, maxzj05, Knarfc, A Voice, Integrity is fundamental, ohmyheck, Tommymac, Words In Action, coppercelt, Taxmancometh, freedapeople, Kristina40, Egalitare, Betty Pinson, orlbucfan, Mike08, ozsea1, kampa, sabo33, Bluerall, dle2GA, Sunspots, Ezekial 23 20, Willa Rogers, RockyLabor, anthony21, CalliopeIrjaPearl, Only Needs a Beat, Nena20409, mod2lib, Malvern, damfino, dance you monster, Ginger1

    "I always thought if you worked hard enough and tried hard enough, things would work out. I was wrong." --Katharine Graham

    by bobswern on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 03:25:36 AM PDT

    •  Direct hiring. (57+ / 0-)

      The only thing that will work is direct hiring. MB has repeated this time and time again.

      The thing is, direct hiring is actually the easiest, most cost effective, and simple thing to do. Furthermore, Obama should simply declare a national emergency and do it. FDR declared a national emergency his second day in office and then went about doing things he had extremely dubious legal authority to do. But since those things proved very popular, Congress later legalized and funded what was already working. Obama should just order his government to do his will and let Congress sort the authority out later.

      I'm no "imperial executive" nut, but methinks this President defers far, far too much to Congress. Yes, Congress is a co-equal branch of government and we should have orderly administration under the law, but there is a certain thing as exigent circumstances. That is why we have an strong executive in the first place, to take the decisive action a body such as Congress cannot when the times require.

      "I'm not a gentle, man. I'm a Method Man!" The What @tweetbbb

      by brooklynbadboy on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 06:29:40 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •   I was bored today (Should have been working) (21+ / 0-)

        and I went back through some old emails chains I was on about the stimulus...

        After reading, it made me wish Democrats actually followed through on the lessons they supposedly learned.

        ------------

        Feb 2009

        http://www.politico.com/...

              Democrats in the House are also concerned that a knee-jerk deference to the Senate will force them to continuously water down legislation to make life easier for Reid, who is up for reelection next year.

              "Think about the precedent this sets: You have Specter, Snowe and Collins dictating terms to 250 [House Democrats]," the lawmaker said. "We can’t let it happen again. We have to stop it now."

              "I’m all for bipartisanship, but I don’t consider three Republican senators bipartisan," said Missouri Rep. Emanuel Cleaver II, who oversees economic recovery issues for the Congressional Black Caucus. "Let’s not deny who we are legislatively for three senators."

        and from another article...blowing up the "the votes weren't there" argument...(I am saving this one for the next time I see that one show up in a thread...

         

        "Mr. Emanuel owned up to one mistake: message. What he called the outside game slipped away from the White House last week, when the president and others stressed bipartisanship rather than job creation as they moved toward passing the measure. White House officials allowed an insatiable desire in Washington for bipartisanship to cloud the economic message a point coming clear in a study being conducted on what went wrong and what went right with the package, he said. But, he said, Washington should have learned something about Mr. Obama as well, with the shift from bipartisan overtures to outright mockery of his opposition.
           He has an open hand, Mr. Emanuel said. But he has a very firm handshake."

        Well that didn't last...

        Instead, they couldn't help themselves and basically did the same thing over and over again.

        They knew it then, and they know it now.  They just won't act out of fear, incompetence, or ideology.  None of those three choices is good for progressive hopes.

        "Ultimately, we need to move beyond the tired debates of the left and the right, between business leaders and environmentalists" - President Obama, March 31

        by justmy2 on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 07:04:23 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  How soon we forget... (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          mataliandy, Betty Pinson, ozsea1

          From the Pew Research center:

          Ronald Reagan

          It is not an exaggeration to say that the rise and fall of the unemployment rate more than any other factor shaped general public reaction to Reagan in his first term. As unemployment rose from 7.5 % at the start of 1981 to more than 8.6% by January 1982, his job disapproval rating rose from 18% to 40% over this period.

          Graph of approval and unemployment figures here

          By the end of 1982, unemployment stood at nearly 11% and 50% of the public was telling Gallup that it disapproved of how the president was handling his job. Fortunately for Reagan, 1983 saw unemployment begin to decline. By year's end, his approval scores began to recover, setting the stage for his successful run for reelection in 1984.

          http://pewresearch.org/...

          Reagan saw the unemployment rise from 7.5% to nearly 11% in his first term and it took almost two years to begin to bring it down.

          Reagan used it though to promote his "government is the problem" meme which is different than Obama's "Bush did it" recent attacks.

          •  What point are you making here? (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            kbman, Unbozo

            It is a unclear?

            Inflation was a major issue in 1980.  There was more government regulation.  Reagan attacked Federal employees.  Reagan lowered taxes and then raised them.

            I am not sure what you are implying.  Are you saying because Reagan waited around and lost seats in the house, and people suffered for an extended period of time, with major stimulative options such as fed rate decreases, the Democrats should do the same.

            I don't quite understand your implication.

            "Ultimately, we need to move beyond the tired debates of the left and the right, between business leaders and environmentalists" - President Obama, March 31

            by justmy2 on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 09:55:02 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  Its simple... (0+ / 0-)

              People expect Obama and his policies to turn the job situation around overnight and that is ridiculous.

              To move an economy the size of the US takes time.

              Having said that though... there is still a lot more that the administration can do as well as the Dems in Congress.

              Another blog here was acknowledged by Reid that there is a pathway to bust the filibuster and he mentioned it in a press conference, so the cat is out of the bag.

              Obama's jobs bill efforts have been stopped or scaled back so radically that their effect is marginal.

              And by the way... God Bless Madame Speaker for calling the House back into session for the jobs bill that has managed to get through.

          •  Of course scoring political point is the ONLY (5+ / 0-)

            thing! NOT! Actually helping people IS the ONLY thing. Everything else is complete Bullshit.

            BTW - I lived through the 80's and the current situation ain't no 80's repeat. The economy is a completely different animal (a half dead animal).

            New improved bipartisanship! Now comes in a convenient suppository!!! -unbozo

            by Unbozo on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 11:44:58 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  BTW I think we should all join the DTRTP (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              3goldens, Betty Pinson

              What does DTRTP stand for? Do The Right Thing Party.

              What does the other two parties stand for? Let's feed em bullshit to get reelected.

              Until more Democrats join the DTRTP then it will be the same 'o same 'o.

              New improved bipartisanship! Now comes in a convenient suppository!!! -unbozo

              by Unbozo on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 11:54:29 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

      •  Sen. Paul Simon, an Obama mentor, made jobs bill (24+ / 0-)

        the centerpiece of his abortive 1988 presidential campaign.  Obama doesn't need to go back to FDR--he just needs to borrow from someone who, just before dying, cut an ad that Obama ran in S. Ill. during the 2004 Senate primary campaign.  Whether Obama should do so via executive fiat is another question--the preliminary question is why the idea is never even considered.  Instead, states are paying private employers to hire people.

        As someone who worked his a** off in Simon's campaign and who had mixed feelings about the senator by campaign's end, I figured we'd be getting a Simonesque POTUS w/ an Ivy pedigree and w/o a bow tie.  There's a long lineage of IL reform Dem senators (Paul Douglas, Adlai III, Simon, Durbin), and that lineage seemed to fit Sen. Obama like a glove.  Shows what I know.

        Some men see things as they are and ask why. I dream of things that never were and ask why not?

        by RFK Lives on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 07:27:51 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  The VERY big question: (8+ / 0-)

          the preliminary question is why the idea is never even considered

          I read the op eds, the blogs, the papers...listen to the talking heads, pundits, etc.  I hear reasonable solutions coming from every angle and with every bit of finesse or even pleading.

          Reasonable solutions and plans of actions that could be tried and maybe even accomplished.

          Everyday, day after day, the information is delivered with a hope that they will have a chance of being heard.

          Tone deaf?  Maybe.  

          Too 'busy' to listen? Maybe.

          Unable to comprehend? Maybe.

          Refusal to listen and consider? Maybe.

          Whatever it is, all or part of the above reasons (or different ones), some of the best minds in the country and some of the best considered opinions are apparently being willfully ignored.

          "Every single day, where ever we are, we need to know what is being done in our name. Amy Goodman

          by trinityfly on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 10:36:07 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  I seriously doubt he was a mentor (6+ / 0-)

            Obama is a career opportunist, the kind of guy who would curry favor with someone like Simon just to see how it would help his career.  Obama likely never agreed with any of Simon's political beliefs or ideas. He just wanted to use him to get ahead.

            I'm a proud liberal Democrat!

            by Betty Pinson on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 10:46:33 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  I wouldn't go quite that far (3+ / 0-)

              As I noted back in June 2008, David Mendell's excellent Obama bio addressed Obama's ties to Simon (and to Simon's daughter Sheila) in some detail.  Obama was close to Durbin, too.  Durbin, IIRC, encouraged Obama to run in 2008.

              Obama seems to fit the environment in which he happens to find himself.  He fit the good-govt liberal milieu of a US senator from IL then, and he clearly fits the Clintonesque milieu of a nominally Dem POTUS now.

              Some men see things as they are and ask why. I dream of things that never were and ask why not?

              by RFK Lives on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 12:26:01 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

            •  On that score, Betty, re Obama's opportunism.... (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              vigilant meerkat, Betty Pinson

              it reminds me of Teach for America, re an often criticized aspect of it.

              I see a certain linkage with Obama when considering his short stint in Chicago's down and out neighborhoods as community organizer (much promoted to great effect - even Giulianni and Palin, by mocking it, made him look better to progressives) Many TFA "corps members" (dilettantes?) appear purely opportunistic in their "service" as teachers in poor neighborhoods, which reminds me of Obama's cs stint ... although Obama at least surpassed their average 2 years of "doin good in da hood" by one. Their motivation is often attributed to getting a resume/career boost that has nothing to do with sticking around teaching in such neighorhoods... or continuing to teach, at all.

              Opportunism knocks... in the Race to the Top!

              Should a "progressive" Dem blog dwell in the safe zones of a tame party, or should it drive a tame party to break out?

              by NYCee on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 03:06:52 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

          •  Willfully ignored? Yes...but WHY? (4+ / 0-)

            Re: Marshall Auerback

               

            Compared to the usual Rubinite retreads who currently dominate economic policy in the Obama Administration, Christina Romer was a decided improvement -- although clearly not a terribly influential voice if the current policy trajectory is anything to go by. In keeping with the President's alleged Lincolnesque "Team of Rivals" approach, it would be nice to see Obama use her resignation to bring in an alternative voice, such as James K. Galbraith. More likely, unfortunately, is that Professor Romer will be replaced by another Clintonista who will make all of the usual noises about the need to "get the deficit under control" in order to "retain the confidence of the markets," as well as virtually ignoring the issues of employment, stagnant economic growth and growing income inequality. In other words, there will be no team of rivals, but an echo chamber of Wall Street Democrats.

            Why? Why, indeed. Doesn't anybody around here remember the Democratic primary and that "last minute" whateveryouwannacallit for Hillary to drop out and throw her support behind Mr. Obama?

            STOP the demonstrable liars who deliberately and with malice ABUSE the private company airwaves which used to belong to The People.

            by o the umanity on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 12:42:54 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

      •  Direct hiring cost about ... (9+ / 0-)

        ... $50 billion per million employed a year (at $21/hr), inclusive of a waiver and compensation to each state to have each employee covered by Medicaid, a mechanism which already exists with some Private Sector employees in many states. That doesn't include the immediate revenue of payroll taxes each job generates. Even if one tacks on a generous "overhead" for supervison (which is actually more employment and payroll tax revenue) it's a surprisingly modest amount of money in the grand scheme of Federal Budgets.

        We could obviously hire more people at a lower wage rate: at current Federal Minimum Wage plus Medicaid it becomes around $22 billion per million hired. But I chose $21/hr just to see what something that most people considered a living wage would be.

        "Power concedes nothing without a demand. It never did and it never will." -- Frederick Douglass

        by Egalitare on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 08:04:33 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  two birds with one stone . . . (10+ / 0-)

          How about an "emergency" declaration that any unemployed American is immediately eligible for Medicare, and remains so until employed at a job that offers more comprehensive insurance?

          We could "pay for it" by removing the cap on the Social Security tax, and extending it to include interest, dividends and capital gains.  And eliminating the special "capital gains" rate for income tax.  While we're at it how about raising the personal exemption so that no one pays income tax on income less than the minimum wage?  That's a "tax reduction" that everyone would get, but that would also put money immediately into the pockets of people who would just as immediately  spend it in the real economy.

          And how about taking some of the money currently enriching the MIC and Mercinary Class and using it to rebuild America's roads and bridges and other crumbling infrastructure?  Spend it on something that gives tangible long-term benefit to Americans rather than death and destruction building an "American Empire" around the world?

          How about some Democratic policies instead of "Republican (not so) lite" ? ? ?

          Fake Left, Drive Right . . . not my idea of a Democrat . . .

          by Deward Hastings on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 08:55:29 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Great ideas! it is excrutiatingly frustrating (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            3goldens

            to watch congress ignore, hide, or suppress rational, helpful to the many, ways of solving our current problems.    Americans are continually directed away from useful strategies to use in facing real global issues and instead bombarded with a complex mishmash of bad choices benefitting the insiders.

      •  Let's promote this idea! (8+ / 0-)

        There's plenty to do, especially as regards ecosystem sustainability.  Of course, when all is said and done, we will discover what the real purpose of our neoliberal government is -- to protect corporate profits while the rest of the ship goes under.

        "Any sensible person right now would join an anticapitalist organization." -- David Harvey

        by Cassiodorus on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 08:12:12 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  Obama has TARP money left over (9+ / 0-)

        He can do what you want any time he pleases.

      •  Regretably, in this environment, (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        ozsea1, Sunspots

        Obama shows no indication of declaring a "national emergency".

        And the 1932/33 vs. 2010 comparisons are misleading. We are closer to a 1930 than a 1933 in my view.

        But we'll see.

    •  unemployment and dementia (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      DaleA, Knarfc, ozsea1, Only Needs a Beat

      "... with 9.5% unemployment exacerbating voter dementia ..."
      one would think that if you are unemployed you have more time to read and to educate yourself.

      •  And to have recognized the (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Only Needs a Beat

        almost complete obstructionism, denial, and arrogance of the Republican Party Congressmembers on the issue.

        •  That would assume that most Americans are (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Knarfc, ozsea1

          capable of complex thought and they aren't.  The people capable of complex thought processes are democrats, those that aren't are either republicans or don't vote.  It is the reason it is so difficult to make changes in this country and so many people have amnesia...they either weren't really paying attention the first time or they did not understand what was happening or who was responsible.  We just no longer have an electorate that is up to the challenge of a complex democracy.  

          "When fascism comes to America, it'll be wrapped in a flag and carrying a cross." Sinclair Lewis

          by lakehillsliberal on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 10:37:27 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Obviously some Republicans have complex (0+ / 0-)

            thought processes which are primarily applied towards figuring out how to make more money. What they lack is ethics and a sense of the common good.

            I never liked you and I always will.

            by Ray Blake on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 12:35:33 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

      •  Voters still trust Dems more (0+ / 0-)

        when it comes to fixing the economy. They just aren't enthralled with the poor record of our current leader.

        I'm a proud liberal Democrat!

        by Betty Pinson on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 10:47:54 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  Well, there goes the rest of the jobs... (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Sunspots

      He made that point in multiple television appearances as well as in a Times Op-Ed page article in which he vowed to "do more" to give workers "the skills they need to re-enter the 21st-century economy."

      It's a good thing that China has so many citizens left who have not yet learned the skills to re-enter the 21st century.

      Wall Street: It matters because you have to know when to bring a steel reinforced umbrella on days it's raining stock brokers.

      by Deltones on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 08:49:38 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Good Post! (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      3goldens, ozsea1, Only Needs a Beat

      Please, please please keep this up.  I don't know what's going on with the Democratic party, but if they cease to care about people out of work, losing everything, then I can no longer support them.

  •  We have the same theme today (39+ / 0-)

    inspired by the same article [see a few diaries down]

    Our economics are indeed repeating the same meme no matter what the politics pretend.

    Tipped and wrecked

    ;-)

    Just stay away from my body and my rights, and everything will be just fine. ~LaFeminista Mon May 17, 2010

    by LaFeminista on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 03:38:11 AM PDT

  •  I never ceased to be amazed at the willingness of (32+ / 0-)

    the American people to make the same mistakes over and over again, such as electing two Bushes president (we should have learned from the first one, but we didn't). Mark my words, if Obama wins in 2012, the media and the GOP will be talking up Jeb! in 2016.

    It would not surprise me to see the Rethugs take back at least the House in this midterm. Why? Because America hasn't learned a damn thing from the most recent experience with the Rethugs in charge.

    Well done diary!

    The loudest cries for war come from those who have never seen one.

    by MadGeorgiaDem on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 03:38:23 AM PDT

  •  Second economic stimulus program for Main Street (16+ / 0-)

    When? How?

    With expected losses this Fall (perhaps even the House) there just won't be any second stimulus.

    Here we are now Entertain us I feel stupid and contagious

    by Scarce on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 03:39:16 AM PDT

    •  Fighting for a 2nd stimulus will reinvigorate... (30+ / 0-)

      Democrats, if it occurs prior to the mid-terms, of course. Sometimes, it makes political sense to fight, even if you know you're going to lose a battle...because in this instance, it could help us win the war.

      "I always thought if you worked hard enough and tried hard enough, things would work out. I was wrong." --Katharine Graham

      by bobswern on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 04:14:36 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  What happenend to all that hopey stuff? (21+ / 0-)

      "It was the filibuster, stupid." Really, it's so terribly sad. Our Democratic leadership actually allowed the Republicans to use the legislative fiction known as the filibuster to completely stall economic recovery in favor of retaining the current, disastrous status quo. Alas, the status quo is indeed a real killer in a down economy.

      Really, who would have thought the Republicans, who have been in a 59 to 41 minority status, could have pulled off this Senatorial coup d'etat? I say this because during the last twenty months, it has been that Republican minority which has wielded all the real power in the Senate. Yet, admittedly, they did have quite a bit of help from some in the loyal opposition.

      Shame ...shame and more shame on our Democratic leadership in the White House and the Senate for their utter stupidity and disgraceful lack of courage.

      Unfortunately, it hasn't been about "comity," rather it's just been a "terribly bad comedy," period. You know, it's not like no one knew, or should have known, that the Republicans would avail itself of the filibuster maneuver to its most extreme use.  

      Gosh, just imagine what America would look like right now, including current political polling numbers, if the filibuster had not been so successfully used by the Republican leadership, even if they did place party before country when they used it time after time.  

    •  Proposed. Doesn't have to be enacted. (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      3goldens, Malvern

      Has to be seen: "America, here's our plan. Give us your votes."

      We've got a Deficit Commission as soon as the Republicans and Wall Streeters said, "waaaaaa, Deficit." Snap! like that. Appointed by the President since Congress wouldn't enact one.

      So where's the Jobs Commission? What are people to hope for?

      Until we break the corporate virtual monopoly on what we hear and see, we keep losing, don't matter what we do.

      by Jim P on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 08:56:03 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Very good question(s) and (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Jim P

        your point is well-made.  Amazing how fast that Deficit Commission and its members got put together and the President did it on his own and then told Congress and us about it.  That a Commission made up of people who were NOT elected to this Congress is being allowed to devise ways to reduce the deficit amazes me.  What a nice dodge for Congress and both Repubs and Dems because they can say "Well, WE didn't do it!  This COMMISSION did and we're just doing what they told us to do!"  Good grief.  They've outsourced jobs and now they're "outsourcing" government.  

        You can have wealth concentrated in the hands of a few, or democracy, but you cannot have both. ~ Louis Brandeis

        by 3goldens on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 02:23:29 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  When? How? Tax cut! (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      orlbucfan, Only Needs a Beat

      But not a tax cut for the rich.  Let the Bush cuts expire.  Ask Congress to raise the Personal Exemption to the annualized "minimum wage" (so nobody pays taxes on income less than . . .).  That puts "tax cut money" immediately into the hands of the people who will spend it on Main Street, not gamble with it on Wall Street.  The problem on Main Street is not lack of capacity or lack of loans (to "ride out" the depression), it's lack of customers.  The fix for Main Street is to give potential customers money to spend.

      And then ask for a massive Public Works program to rebuild America, to be funded by removing the capital gains exemption (among other "wealth" taxes).  Let those who gain the most from America's infrastructure pay the most for it . . .

      Fake Left, Drive Right . . . not my idea of a Democrat . . .

      by Deward Hastings on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 09:08:06 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Tipped and rec'd (6+ / 0-)

    for another diary well done.  Thanks!

    Yes, I'm het, but I'm NOT a Mad Hetter!

    by Diana in NoVa on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 03:56:04 AM PDT

  •  Not Yet Convinced (6+ / 0-)

    About the electoral consequences of not addressing jobs in the short term.  Gerrymandering, a system that intensely favors incumbency, GOP craziness and other factors make me wonder ...

    "Simon Wiesenthal told me that any political party in a democracy that uses the word 'freedom' in its name is either Nazi or Communist."

    by bink on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 03:59:29 AM PDT

  •  Doom seats will be lost in both houses ofcongress (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Major Tom, Words In Action

    Gloom nothing will be done to help mainstreet

    Indiana with its high u6 around 18% and it looks to put a 2nd rethug in the senate as Ellsworth appears to be blowing the election.The DNC is working hard but Ellsworths campaign seems to be lackluster.
    For the house a few more rethugs look to regain seats as well.

  •  Dems will win because there is no other choice. (27+ / 0-)

    We can put totally insane, intolerant and overbearing Republicans back into power, or we can hold our noses to vote Democrat and make sure they lose because Republicans are still worse than Democrats as hard as that is to believe.  And no matter who wins, the Republican agenda will continue forward.

    Michigan just had an earth shaking primary for Gov. that the blogosphere and local media has totally ignored.  Six card carrying teabaggers running on cutting taxes to create jobs, cutting teacher wages and benefits, turning MI into a right to work for less state, and regulating our recently passed medical pot and stem cell research laws to death just lost to the independent CEO R from Ann Arbor who didn't run on their approved platform.  On top of that, the Obama/Granholm endorsed DLC, Republican ass-kissing Democrat Dillon lost to the populist union D candidate, Bernero.   MI did throw all of the bums out.  

    This election is going to be stranger than ever because our politicans are.  We have two parties that are exactly alike.  We can only tell them apart because Dems are in suits, and Republicans are the ones in the straight jackets.

    Don't tax the rich, starve the poor.

    by dkmich on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 04:00:37 AM PDT

    •  dkmich (9+ / 0-)

      At least Ed Schultz recognized Bernero.

    •  I didn't see Obama get involved (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Major Tom, dkmich, Only Needs a Beat

      in the Michigan governor's primary.

      The only time I saw Obama get involved in a primary is with the Senate Democrats incumbents.

      Jim Manley: "Republicans are making love to Wall Street, while the people on Main Street are getting screwed."

      by Drdemocrat on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 04:19:24 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  LOL! The straightjacket line... n/t (13+ / 0-)

      "I always thought if you worked hard enough and tried hard enough, things would work out. I was wrong." --Katharine Graham

      by bobswern on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 04:20:44 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Snyder won 36% of GOP vote (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      coffejoe, Only Needs a Beat

      And he is decidedly not of the "Culture of Life." I think once he is put on the spot as to just how he plans to "create jobs", some degree of buyers remorse is going to set in.

      "Power concedes nothing without a demand. It never did and it never will." -- Frederick Douglass

      by Egalitare on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 04:52:36 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  I don't think the Republicans are insane (28+ / 0-)

      They are very smart and know what they are doing. They are the party of chaos. With chaos they feel they can impose an authoritarian system of rule by decree and an economy of virtual slave-labor--and they are doing that by catering to every possible lower-brain ruse.

      The problem is not with Republicans it is with Democrats. They have refused to become the party of reason and frame it strictly that way so the voters can have a choice. Do you want to be stupid slaves with cable TV or wake up a little and become authors of your own fate? That's the choice we ought to have in November. It ought to be framed that way. Without a left there can be no viable center.

      •  I really like that banger... (8+ / 0-)

        Do you want to be stupid slaves with cable TV or wake up a little and become authors of your own fate?

        It's appealing too. It's a great framework for taking on the corporate agenda.

        Get off the Corporate Teat and create your own reality.

        The key is to show how the current law is structured to benefit corporate - tax abatements, rebates, public subsidies - or you run into the wall of meddlesome government, in the form of regulations, taxes and other rules that are the foundation of the ire against Big Government.

        Bonus meme - Job Killing Profits -
        http://www.dailykos.com/...

        In this brave new world, the political word masters speak of job killing spending, job killing deficits, job killing unemployment benefits, job killing stimulus, job killing funding of essential services, and job killing infra-structure projects--and now job killing vacations. Depression (economic and psychological!) by symbolism! Eroded consumer confidence by foreign chapel visits! Yet those who call the politicans/pundits and our own poor folk in beauty parlors and barbershops everywhere on this ridiculous ledgermain are declared to be rogues themselves! Rogues who want to kill more jobs!

        Emphasis mine....

        Funny that you won't ever hear Job Killing Profits.

        Perhaps we should start banging that drum - that concept of pitting profits vs jobs - I think could be a winner and foundation for change to a Steady State economy.

        Grow or die is doomed. We can't keep growing. There's not enough left on the planet to double our footprint too many more times.

        Profits are not the answer to the meaning of life.

        Democracy - 1 person 1 vote. Free Markets - More dollars more power.

        by k9disc on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 06:02:39 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Job Killing Profits? (7+ / 0-)

          Posted earlier:

          "Unfortunately, American job killing profits are made on Wall Street all the time. Let me give you a prime example. Let's say that Intel announces at 8:30 a.m. on CNBC that it is cutting 10 thousand jobs in America and is also going to establish several factories in China which will make certain electronic widgets that those soon to be laid off American workers were currently making in American factories.

          Let's also say that when Intel had made this early morning announcement on CNBC, its stock was selling for $100 per share and that the company had 1 billion shares outstanding which were being traded in the stock market. Let's also say that at the close of the market that day at 4:00 p.m., the shares of Intel had risen to $110 per share.

          Doing the math, over the course of just that one day, 10 billion dollars were made in profits for Intel and its shareholders; yet not one American job was created. To the contrary, 10 thousand American jobs were actually lost. Furthermore, not one extra electronic widget was created. Indeed, this is how wealth is too often instantaneously created out of thin air.

          Of course, this highly predictable and enormously profitable economic formula (which absolutely devastates the American worker) has been in play for far too long already - for at least two decades now. Well, isn't it time that American workers say that enough is enough?"  

        •  In fact government has become very meddlesome (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          k9disc, Only Needs a Beat

          in so many areas and treats us like children. Yet when it comes to large corporations it allows them to do almost anything they want if they're sufficiently lawyered and lobbyed up. This fact is known to some degree by most people know it is what disgusts them about government.

          Anyone who addresses that fact honestly faces, unfortunately, the problem of the corporate media that will not cover that sort of approach without a strong push from some corporate source. That's the sad fact--the mainstream media has become a corporate/gov't ministry.

          •  Ya. It's a vicious circle like 'small government' (0+ / 0-)

            The more it goes there the more anger that can be directed at it.

            It's beautiful stuff.

            Democracy - 1 person 1 vote. Free Markets - More dollars more power.

            by k9disc on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 09:12:44 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

    •  No Other Choice? (7+ / 0-)

      Democratic leaning voters can and will do strange things when they are thorughly disgusted with Democratic candidates; witness the protest vote for Scott Brown in Massachusetts. Often, Main Street voters don't get mad; rather, they get even.

      •  dont think it was disgust (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Major Tom, Matt Z, Only Needs a Beat

        more of a party machine issue.
        Spoiled child syndrome where the losers of the primary closed down the get out the vote in their area.
        Whereas in Indiana that went for Obama(which has not voted for a Democratic pres since LBJ) the ticket got split and Mitch got reelected.
        It was ripe for a Democatic Gov, republicans in this area like my mother were chanting ditch Mitch.
        No name recognition combined with an extremely lack luster campaign lost it.

        •  Don't want to vote for that person syndrome, you (5+ / 0-)

          mean, right?

          Tired of not being represented syndrome.

          A vote for the lesser of evils is still kind of evil syndrome.

          I want my vote to mean something syndrome.

          I battle those, all the time.

          Democracy - 1 person 1 vote. Free Markets - More dollars more power.

          by k9disc on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 06:21:08 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  no (4+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Char, Major Tom, Matt Z, Only Needs a Beat

            it was reported here at kos, that the party machine in the part of the state that lost the primary got upset at the loss and closed shop.
            It had nothing to do with the winner being liked or disliked.

            •  Maybe they found it hard to GOTV for someone that (0+ / 0-)

              they felt didn't represent them.

              I wouldn't GOTV for Nelson. I wouldn't even do it for Kerry. They don't represent my interests and my values enough. They can have my vote in the presence of greater evil, but they'll not get my time and effort.

              Sorry, can't support them like that.

              For me, I can't tell people to vote Democratic because the party is so fucked up.

              I wind up defending Democratic principles and pushing traditional Democratic values, but I can't push the Party. I have very little nice to say about many Democrats, and the Party as an institution, I think is just abysmal.

              Democracy - 1 person 1 vote. Free Markets - More dollars more power.

              by k9disc on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 06:36:33 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  how many different ways are you going to word it? (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                Major Tom

                It was not about the winner representing or not representing them it had nothing to do with him.
                It was all machine politics that was pissed its candidate lost.
                Machine politics.
                The Democratic party can be its own worst enemy.

                •  Yup. All about the machine. (1+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  Malvern

                  If Democrats were doing their job it wouldn't have been an issue.

                  It's friggin' Teddy Kennedy's seat - in Mass!

                  You are really blaming an electoral loss in a time of widespread hatred of Failed Republican Policies in the very heart of Liberal America on the machine shutting down the GOTV?

                  That was the sole reason the underwear model Tea Bagger Truck Driver got elected?

                  I don't think that's it.

                  I think there's far more of my rationale in operation in that loss than in the faulty machine, which no doubt played a part.

                  I think we should just agree to disagree or you can call yourself right, doesn't matter to me.

                  peace

                  Democracy - 1 person 1 vote. Free Markets - More dollars more power.

                  by k9disc on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 06:54:37 AM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

              •  So you just voted for the Republican. (0+ / 0-)
            •  The same thing happened in Virginia (0+ / 0-)

              Doug Wilder decided he couldn't support Deeds along with Deeds distancing himself from the President killed it for him.  Next McDonnell is declaring  confederacy month.

          •  Rich - "they deserve to lose." n/t (0+ / 0-)

            "History is a tragedy, not a melodrama." - I.F.Stone

            by bigchin on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 07:29:44 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

      •  But we're the ones who suffer from Sen. Brown (0+ / 0-)

        Not the democrats.

      •  Only One Other Choice, In Fact (0+ / 0-)

        And that's the problem with the two party system.

        When voters are mad at Democrats, their only other choice is to vote for the Republicans.

        If you go into an election assuming that that other choice is not a possibility, you are delusional.  Both major parties can win. And each very often does win almost entirely on the basis of disgust with the leadership of the other party.

        "In public, the parties stage a show of bitter bipartisan stalemate. But when the cameras are off, they fuck like crazed weasels in heat." - Matt Taibbi

        by GreenSooner on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 08:52:49 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  LOL!! What a crock! (0+ / 0-)

      Those same ppl that voted for us in 2008 do have a choice it is called STAYING AT HOME, because I don't care, because I have other things to do, because I am not excited about you or the GOP.  That is way more dangerous than the rabid base holding their nose and voting D anyway.

    •  In (0+ / 0-)

      your mind, there is no other choice.

      There are plenty of dems-who like me, have voted consistently dem for years-who don't even want to vote.

      This is what BO has done to the party.

      And the rejoinder "What's the alternative?" just isn't working on us anymore.

      The banks have a stranglehold on the political process. Mike Whitney

      by dfarrah on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 02:02:14 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  The pundits are telling the Dems that you (10+ / 0-)

    better have a better message on jobs including a PLAN because the Republicans don't and are counting on American amnesia.

    I actually have high hopes on the House Dems "MAKE IT IN AMERICA" proposal.  Pelosi and House Dem leaders talked about it during their one on one meeting with President Obama.  IMO they need to flesh out new ideas in their proposal on just how to get Americans back to work.

    The Republican ideas are tax cuts for the rich and deregulation which can be bashed are just Bush rehashed ideas.  The Republicans have already abandoned their ideas of zero capital gains and tax cuts for small business by filibustering the small business bill for weeks (perhaps they will let a final vote on it on September 14th for that is when the next vote is scheduled in the Senate).

    Jim Manley: "Republicans are making love to Wall Street, while the people on Main Street are getting screwed."

    by Drdemocrat on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 04:17:06 AM PDT

    •  The Republican appeal is to (4+ / 0-)

      anything that stimulates the lower-brain. Distrust of minorities, hatred of Muslims and gays, waving flags flying jets and marching soldiers. That's enough to capture a significant segment of the population-just that. Democrats need to counter that by specifically showing that these appeals are disgusting and challeging, for a change, the American people to do better. Obama did that in 08 and then chose to be Bush III.

    •  The point is to focus on what this GOP ... (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      odenthal, Drdemocrat

      ... leadership will do, not what Bush did. It may be 98% identical in ideology and intent, but for the electorate seeming to blame Bush is avoiding responsibility for current circumstances.

      The choice is among the individual candidates on the ballot in November. I think we hold our own focusing on that.

      "Power concedes nothing without a demand. It never did and it never will." -- Frederick Douglass

      by Egalitare on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 04:59:54 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  with your line of thought (0+ / 0-)

      "make it in America"

      as much as Republicans despise the word "mandate", could Democrats produce legislation that would require a percentage (say, maybe half) of the manufacturing force be based in America?  companies could continue to be globally minded but the government should more persuasive in getting jobs back to America.

      as someone else said in another comment, the retraining mantra has never worked out for manufacturing employees.  some may get trained only to see their new career being outsourced again.  they don't know where to turn next.

      if college education is going to continue to be out of reach for many Americans we need those blue collar jobs so they can make a decent living.

      I'm a blue drop in a red bucket.

      by blue drop on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 11:22:54 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  The Dems need to devise a plan for job (13+ / 0-)

    creation and run on it in the Fall.

    Although bringing back the Bush boogieman and talking about how Social Security will be destroyed by Republicans helps, elections are about the FUTURE.

    Thus the Democrats need to state specifically how they WILL address the number 1 issue in America which is joblessness.

    Both Rich and the NYT editorial explain it perfectly: JOBS JOBS JOBS

    Hopefully the House Dems are hearing this sound advice.  It is time to expand on "MAKE IT IN AMERICA" as a JOBS BILL PLAN.

    The Republican plan of tax cuts for the rich and deregulation IMO is a LOSER and can be defeated if the Democrats motivate their base with a GOOD JOBS PLAN.

    Jim Manley: "Republicans are making love to Wall Street, while the people on Main Street are getting screwed."

    by Drdemocrat on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 04:25:46 AM PDT

    •  But they don't need to publicize it (8+ / 0-)

      NOW. It's too early, nobody is listening, and besides, it would give the GOP too much time to come up with something to undercut it.

      They don't come up with ideas until WE do, and they just say 'we won't do that' and don't say what they WILL do.

      When we don't give them anything to campaign AGAINST, they just make up really crazy crap - stuff that makes it obvious that they're completely out there, and have no idea how anything works. And that all they want is to increase the wealth of the top few, they don't want to help anybody else.

      It becomes obvious when WE don't have a tag line, a plan, a united front.

      So don't give them one. Wait until Sept/Oct, and THEN campaign hard.

      Use that American amnesia to help us for once.

      •  Quote from GWBs Chief of Staff (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        flatford39, Egalitare

        "... you don't introduce new products in August". I expect to see a rising crescendo of populist rhetoric and votes in Congress that draw a very bright line between the two parties starting in September.

        One night in Bangkok makes a hard man humble ... Murray Head

        by virginislandsguy on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 04:57:39 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Yea, Politics as Marketing has done wonders for (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          ohmyheck, dance you monster

          this country...

          Sorry to disagree, but we're talking about shifting the nature of politics here.

          Marketing blitzes and the like cannot work for our side - we are (or should be) against the corporate agenda - our fair wage, social safety nets, stable workforce stance - these things do not jive with the corporate agenda, and our marketing cannot compare with the combined marketing of those pursuing a corporate agenda.

          We need a constant drumbeat of protecting people and providing for the general welfare.

          peace

          Democracy - 1 person 1 vote. Free Markets - More dollars more power.

          by k9disc on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 06:30:15 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  Tea Baggers Disprove That (5+ / 0-)

          Sorry, that's just plain wrong.  It's funny how the tea party movement seemed to get its start in August.  You know, the swiftboating of Kerry seemed to get marketed in August too.

          Do you want to know why Dubya's CoS made that statement?  The policy about Iraq that they wanted to push needed to be passed in a rush.  It couldn't withstand the bright light of day for very long, as we've all since learned to our discomfort.  So, they wanted only four to six weeks of discussion about the Iraq invasion issue, timed for the election.  If that election hadn't been scheduled for November 2002, when the Iraq attack vote could be used as a cudgel on the Democrats, that new product could have been introduced anytime.  It does make a good soundbite though.

          "Love the Truth, defend the Truth, speak the Truth, and hear the Truth" - Jan Hus, d.1415 CE

          by PrahaPartizan on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 07:21:59 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  Iraq will be rebranded in Sept. (0+ / 0-)

          I think it's 'enduring peace', or some other Orwellian name for military bases ( for example ,they will have Blackhawk Helicopters, and MRAP vehicles) that are privatized with McDonalds, Burger King, movie theaters, shopping malls, etc. . In other words the worst of America. The main one is bigger than Vatican City,in fact by far the biggest in the World and in history.
          They're gonna love us. Right.

          without the ants the rainforest dies

          by aliasalias on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 12:02:31 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

      •  I agree that they should present it in Sept/Oct (4+ / 0-)

        They need to present their MAKE IT IN AMERICA plan because that will MOTIVATE the base.

        Jim Manley: "Republicans are making love to Wall Street, while the people on Main Street are getting screwed."

        by Drdemocrat on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 04:59:51 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  Right, One has to Hope (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Drdemocrat, Only Needs a Beat

        Indeed, one certainly has to hope that the Democratic leadership has something big planned for September and October. Well, they better have.

      •  They are not listening because they're too busy (4+ / 0-)

        clamoring for protection and opportunity in dark times.

        I think this statement is pretty much a rationalization of the current strategy and nothing more.

        I think what you do is to tattoo the Republicans with Sabotage and put forth an ambitious plan like the New Deal - infrastructure, efficiency, clean energy, drawdown in forward deployment, etc.

        The Republican Saboteurs want you to pay for their continued exploitation of the planet and it's people. That is not smart and it's not fair.

        They need to get out of the way of Progress and let us get rebuilding America.

        If they can't get on board, they should be voted out of office.

        Democracy - 1 person 1 vote. Free Markets - More dollars more power.

        by k9disc on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 06:25:53 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  Somebody better wake Obama up & tell him that. (12+ / 0-)

      Can't believe he's let jobs languish as he has. Hey Mr. President, people are broke--and a recovery takes feeding the economy's demand side. And if the Repugs then obstructed it, then Obama should have been everywhere making them own it. Of course, that would've been sorta like fighting for the little people, something not exactly the president's style.

      As a scientist, Throckmorton knew that if he ever were to break wind in the echo chamber, he would never hear the end of it. --Bulwer-Lytton Contest entry

      by Wom Bat on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 06:00:01 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Stupid is as stupid does (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        dfarrah, Wom Bat

        The WH and DLC Dems have totally blown their advantage and their mandate from voters.

        I'm a proud liberal Democrat!

        by Betty Pinson on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 10:22:22 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Yes they have. An ardent Obama supporter (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Betty Pinson

          from the start, I now have difficulty even watching him. Whether Obama gets it or not, that mandate wasn't exactly his to toss blithely away, as he has. If 11/10 is good for the Repugs, these dimwits will have handed it to them on a platter.

          As a scientist, Throckmorton knew that if he ever were to break wind in the echo chamber, he would never hear the end of it. --Bulwer-Lytton Contest entry

          by Wom Bat on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 08:35:56 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

    •  Devise a plan? (0+ / 0-)

      How about they do something about unemployment?  Preferably sometime soon.

      The banks have a stranglehold on the political process. Mike Whitney

      by dfarrah on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 02:07:47 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Political Reality (6+ / 0-)

    It would be nice if the Democratic Party would announce that it represents reason and the scientific approach leavened by both compassion and reason. But the Democratic operatives lack sufficient faith in the American people to do that. It's much easier to play by the rules of the lying MSM and the corporate elites. So be it.

    Having said that, it is clear that someone needs to "educate" rather than manipulate the American public or we will continue down this road where nothing works other than the transference of wealth from the middle class to the top fraction of the population while poverty increases and wars drag on and on and on and on. At some point there has to be a force for reason and the Democratic Party in general and the Obama administration in particular has almost completely missed the boat on this. Just asserting reality would be a start, just asserting and repeating that you can be logical and amnesia is not something to be catered to but removed. The powerful try everything they can to keep us asleep and the worst thing we can do is to cater to the needs of sleepers. It just isn't worth it.

  •  Geithner had the gall to (29+ / 0-)

    resurrect this old chestnut? He vowed to

    "do more" to give workers "the skills they need to re-enter the 21st-century economy."

    The condescending  implication that "it's your fault you can't get a job.You were too dumb/lazy to recognize the need for  a 21st-century skill set, much less make any effort to keep up to date." Then there is the "it will take at least six months of training before you can have any expectation of qualifying for a job in the  21st century economy."

    Nothing like blaming the victim. Geithner and his ilk managed to trash the economy.  Now he has the audacity to blame the victims, and prescribe more pain before they can expect any improvement.  And Geithner is merely acting as an agent in relaying this message from President Obama?

    What do we struggle against the most? The inevitable.

    by phonegery on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 05:55:53 AM PDT

  •  Yes, Geithner sucks. (14+ / 0-)

     But Barack Obama can get rid of him (and Larry Summers) anytime he wants to.

     He hasn't.

     But he HAS driven away one progressive after another. And Elizabeth Warren twists in the wind.

     Face reality.

     Obama doesn't give a crap about American workers.

     After the Dems lose the House, he won't have Nancy Pelosi embarrassing him anymore. And he'll have even better excuses for moving right.

     Maybe that's part of the plan.

     

    "Le ciel est bleu, l'enfer est rouge."

    by Buzzer on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 06:05:59 AM PDT

  •  President Obama Cannot Make Jobs Out Of Thin Air (6+ / 0-)

    or w/o help of congress.  The repugs will never vote for jobs programs because they want america to fail and the president to fail.  Democrats need to get this message out stronger.

  •  Democratic Reality Check (17+ / 0-)

    I knew this Rich article would get a good debate going here.  I thought this article was directly on target.

    Voters want to know what you are going to do. Not why you didn't do it...especially when you have control over the executive and legislative branch.

    Betting on Americans to react on facts rather than emotion is a loser.

    Democrats have no one to blame but themselves and they are the only ones with the power to correct them.

    "Ultimately, we need to move beyond the tired debates of the left and the right, between business leaders and environmentalists" - President Obama, March 31

    by justmy2 on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 06:30:44 AM PDT

    •  Frank Rich is right on (4+ / 0-)

      Frank Rich is right on today. His is the message that Democratic leaders need to understand — more so for the sake of the nation than for the sake of the party or Obama's legacy.

    •  Attention span of a pixel phosphur (0+ / 0-)

      Dems have been played again.  Fox News spawned TeaPublicans.  Town hall goons and fillibusters showed Dems as effete pussies. Palin questioning Obama's cojones. "Lipstick on a pig"

      That's what voters remember. Street talk.

      It's going to have to get alot worse before it gets better. Dems prevented US from hitting bottom. Enablers of GOP crack.  Sacrifice is for suckers.

      Entertainment issues "God, gays, and guns" will amuse voters till the next crisis.

       

      Barack Hussein Obama- Don't Mock the Constitution.

      by odenthal on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 01:23:30 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  I agree lots more needs to be done on jobs (7+ / 0-)

    I wrote a fairly brief diary yesterday and said the following and I think this would help Democrats:

    Pass a WPA style jobs bill that would hire tens of thousands of people to install new and energy efficient doors, windows, insulation, and even energy efficient heating and air conditioning in working class and middle class homes at a subsidized cost based on a sliding scale. We could also do this in small business offices/buildings and in public buildings. And we could use such a jobs program to clean up our lakes, rivers, and the Gulf Coast.
    Use such a jobs/clean energy bill to help bring back manufacturing jobs to the United States. We could subsidize such products to a much greater degree if manufactured in the United States. If consumers want products made here, manufacturers will build and move factories here.

    "Comfort the afflicted and afflict the comfortable" - Dorothy Day

    by joedemocrat on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 06:33:06 AM PDT

    •  They won't do it. (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Only Needs a Beat

      So what do they think is going to happen to 20 million Americans who have no work and will have no work.

      There is no assistance.

      Do they think that they can hide 20 million homeless?

      I bet they do.

      And without an address just try to vote.

      •  Serfs on TV (0+ / 0-)

        Freidmans: Thomas and Milton are the GOP apostles. A flat earther and free-market priest. Gravity and greed are dogma. It is pointless vanity and counter productive to resist the natural order of things.

        The new new deal, a deck reshuffled where many are serfs, fortunate to be lead by the compassionate few.

        Unemployment insurance just delays the inevitable.  

        Homeland Security will control the tumult. Pee in a cup, take off your shoes, computer-cash, camera, internet and entertainment surveillance, color-coded terror levels, all with the consent of the governed.    

        Someday they will pay us in cable TV hours.    

        Barack Hussein Obama- Don't Mock the Constitution.

        by odenthal on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 01:56:48 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  Superb diary! (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Badabing, Only Needs a Beat

    Tipped and rec'ed.

  •  It was... (3+ / 0-)

    the GOP whose policies created the entire concept of a jobless recovery. As far as I'm concerned, any American who would vote to restore the GOP to power (especially so ridiculously soon) in the hopes that it will improve their job outlook probably doesn't deserve a job.

  •  Which is why cheerleading has been so unhelpful. (21+ / 0-)

    If we had ALL pushed for the administration and Congress to recognize the error of their ways, maybe they would have felt compelled to deliver more credible results.

    By having so many among us accepting the excuses that 1/32 measures are all that are practically achievable, that the "phantom filibuster" should drive strategy, and that the results are deserving of our thanks and praises, not only have we missed the slam dunk Democratic moment of a generation but we've also lost the opportunity to more responsibly address the burning crises of our time: re-establshing the rule of law, healthcare, global warming, the class war.

    The cheerleading moderates, not the Republicans, are the root of the problem.

    When the village is on fire, a sieve will not substitute for a fleet of fire engines. Sometimes incremental change won't EVER scale to address the problem.

    by Words In Action on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 06:49:51 AM PDT

    •  Cheerleaders are really just unwitting enablers (10+ / 0-)

      of the Democrat's impending electoral disaster. The Democrats and Obama are like kids who manipulate their parents into accepting and condoning their bad behavior. They know the parents will support them no matter how bad they go astray, so they really see no reason to change that behavior regardless of how destructive it becomes. The la la brigade on this list is no different than parents who always have an excuse for letting their children's behavior go unpunished and instead accuse those who do point out the destructive results of that behavior of being too critical and unsupportive.

    •  Phantom Filibuster (6+ / 0-)

      Is a frikkin disgrace.  That's the first thing they should have gotten rid of.  Make the bastards stand up there every day and make it obvious they're filibustering.  That's the only way to make it sink in with the public.  How many in this country know what a real filibuster is?

      I will hang my head and vote in November, but I won't be happy about it.  

      My 16 year old has more guts and backbone, and the brains and mouth to back it up, than any of the idiots in Washington.

  •  Thanks for the diary. (3+ / 0-)

    "It is not too soon for honest men to rebel and revolutionize" - Henry David Thoreau

    by blueoregon on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 06:56:46 AM PDT

  •  This will not change (15+ / 0-)

    as long as Obama keeps an economic team that fosters and echoes the foolish belief of The Fed; that Wall Street is the economy. It's not. The days when Wall Street profits meant Main Street prosperity are long passed. Geithner's nonsense is insulting:

    He made that point in multiple television appearances as well as in a Times Op-Ed page article in which he vowed to "do more" to give workers "the skills they need to re-enter the 21st-century economy."

    How many of the unemployed have lost their jobs in the last 2-3 years? To the best of my knowledge that was still the 21st century, and these jobs were not lost because people lacked proper job skills. They were lost because of what Geithner and his pals did to the economy. Why does this jackass still have a job in this administration?

    I'm not worried about your state of mind, 'cause, you're not the revolutionary kind - Gomez

    by jhecht on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 06:58:58 AM PDT

  •  To Obama zealots (15+ / 0-)

    This bears repeating, 9.5% unemployment, 2 unending wars, and increasing restlessness amongst working class voters is a recipe for disaster in November.  Its also worth noting Rich's comment about employment in auto industry still being 30% lower since the beginning of the recession in spite of obama's "stimulus." Too bad schools can't get that kind of stimulus. Also how can we be trumpeting the saving of gm when they build behemoths that suck gas and build one electric car that is inferior to every other electric car on the road?  We are in trouble in November.  Until we face that there's no way to prevent it.  Winning in November is dependent on getting the base out to vote and obama is alienating his base right now.  Textbook politics people, presidential elections are about swaying independents, midterms are about the base.  I hope Obama gets it before its too late.  

    I take political action every day. I teach.

    by jbfunk on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 07:04:21 AM PDT

    •  Repubs Spent 2 Years Energizing Their Base, Dems (13+ / 0-)

      spent 2 years cooling theirs off.

      We are called to speak for the weak, for the voiceless, for victims of our nation and for those it calls enemy.... --ML King "Beyond Vietnam"

      by Gooserock on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 07:06:27 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Obama is not (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      JuliaAnn, Only Needs a Beat

      on the side of the people.

      Wake up and realize that and act accordingly.

    •  Obama Zealots? Give me a break. (0+ / 0-)

      That is just a slam like the banned "Obamabots" that the disenchanted throw around here.  

      •  You (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        dfarrah

        Defend him like people defended Clinton. The numbers don't lie, 9.5% unemployment is a disaster. 2 opened wars he's made his own now. What else is there to say?  Defending him now without question is a mistake. Who will his die hard supporters blame after deems lose in November?  Bush, Micky mouse, the man on the moon.  Denial ain't a river in Egypt.  It's the economy stupid. USA needs jobs NOW!

        I take political action every day. I teach.

        by jbfunk on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 08:59:44 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Numbers do lie. (0+ / 0-)

          All the time. What is the trend. What might it have been under McCain/Palin? Unemployment itself ignores the under-employed.

          The numbers on WallStreet were lies. Your 401K, a lie. The troops needed to pacify Iraq.  Dem voters in PalmBeach, or Ohio.

          The unspoken numbers: Corporate cash hoards, Iraqi/Afgan deaths, BlackWater black budgets, non-white Teapublicans.      

          What else is there to say?
          It's a binary number system Choose A or B.
          "Yes we can" or "Hell no you can't".  
           

          Barack Hussein Obama- Don't Mock the Constitution.

          by odenthal on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 02:22:21 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

    •  Dont forget teachers/unions! Big big souring... (0+ / 0-)

      on Obama and go along Dems. Race to the Top... NCLB on steroids. Bad stuff going down as we speak. Ironically, his very flawed ed policy may end up giving pink slips (wrongly) to the very folks whose jobs he saved with the recent ed funding - which, by the way, he refused to take any from RttT, despite House passed bill asking for a few million, instead of taking it from food stamps... he said okay to take from that cause food prices declining! Lol/Ugh.

      Should a "progressive" Dem blog dwell in the safe zones of a tame party, or should it drive a tame party to break out?

      by NYCee on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 02:28:48 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Depends Entirely on WHO Votes in November. (14+ / 0-)

    If the Administration is expecting moderates who are even CAPABLE of acting rationally on memory, they're making the opposite bet from the Republicans.

    The Republicans are not talking to "Americans." they're talking to their base and potential base of terrorizabale, enrageable authoritarian-friendly independents who drifted away due to Bush incompetence.

    This is a base-dominant election for national redistricting, and with all that at stake, the Republicans have spent 2 years putting everything on energizing the base at all costs.

    The Democrats have been governing and talking to moderates, when they talk at all, who typically are low performers for midterms.

    One of these two parties made the wrong bet.

    We are called to speak for the weak, for the voiceless, for victims of our nation and for those it calls enemy.... --ML King "Beyond Vietnam"

    by Gooserock on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 07:04:52 AM PDT

  •  "they deserve to lose" n/t (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Jagger

    "History is a tragedy, not a melodrama." - I.F.Stone

    by bigchin on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 07:18:03 AM PDT

  •  Who would have thought (4+ / 0-)

    that 2 years ago, we would be at this point. So utterly depressing to think how much HOPE we had...now we point to the imbecile in the room (Rethugs), and say "look, we are better than them, so vote for us". How low can we go? How bad is our legislation, that this is now the selling point?

    I did campaign on the public option, and I'm proud of it! Corporat Democrats will not get my vote, hence I will not vote.

    by Jazzenterprises on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 07:19:03 AM PDT

  •  Great post, Jed. (3+ / 0-)

    I work with B2B PAC, and all views and opinions in this account are my own.

    by slinkerwink on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 07:23:48 AM PDT

  •  Geithner and AIG via Greider (4+ / 0-)

    The AIG Bailout Scandal

    The government’s $182 billion bailout of insurance giant AIG should be seen as the Rosetta Stone for understanding the financial crisis and its costly aftermath. The story of American International Group explains the larger catastrophe not because this was the biggest corporate bailout in history but because AIG’s collapse and subsequent rescue involved nearly all the critical elements, including delusion and deception. These financial dealings are monstrously complicated, but this account focuses on something mere mortals can understand—moral confusion in high places, and the failure of governing institutions to fulfill their obligations to the public.

    Three governmental investigative bodies have now pored through the AIG wreckage and turned up disturbing facts—the House Committee on Oversight and Reform; the Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission, which will make its report at year’s end; and the Congressional Oversight Panel (COP), which issued its report on AIG in June.

    The five-member COP, chaired by Harvard professor Elizabeth Warren, has produced the most devastating and comprehensive account so far. Unanimously adopted by its bipartisan members, it provides alarming insights that should be fodder for the larger debate many citizens long to hear—why Washington rushed to forgive the very interests that produced this mess, while innocent others were made to suffer the consequences. The Congressional panel’s critique helps explain why bankers and their Washington allies do not want Elizabeth Warren to chair the new Consumer Financial Protection Bureau

    "History is a tragedy, not a melodrama." - I.F.Stone

    by bigchin on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 07:26:39 AM PDT

  •  The line (5+ / 0-)

    That sticks out for me and hurts the most was obama on Inauguration Day in the tone of a angry disappointed parent telling us "...the time has come to put away childish things..." I believed him, took him at his word.. 21 months later, that was all just pie in the sky.  

    I take political action every day. I teach.

    by jbfunk on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 07:32:59 AM PDT

  •  The Diagnosis Of Amnesia Is Like Calling Ebola A (4+ / 0-)

    cold.

    This is from an opinion piece by a purported feminist on the Huffington Post website on why women have turned against Obama:

    More recently, women are increasingly concerned about a broad set of policies. We prioritize such things as creating jobs (especially for small businesses that disproportionately employ women), reducing the deficit burden left on our children...

    Obama can't tend the homefires because he is busy pouring kerosene on the bonfire with his own talk of reducing the deficit.  Cutting Social Security may not be - a great way to get votes for Democrats.

    Blaming Republicans for Democrats' suicidal tendencies is not overly efficacious.

    Straight talk about the need to spend money for jobs is desperately needed but how can a president who would save money on pensions for the aged and disabled to reduce the deficit make the case?

    Best,  Terry

  •  It's time to start... (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    odenthal

    Thinking about what to do in the aftermath of the big failure.  Because this is going to fail.  The leadership in this country (both D+R) is just too deep in the pockets of business interests.  Does it make sense to even try to save the dems from their own sorry asses?  Should the system be allowed to collapse sooner so that the rebuilding can begin in earnest.  Should we have a prolonged terminal illness or just hospice care.  Which path is gonna lead to the least suffering for everybody involved?

  •  At this point we can only rant... (5+ / 0-)

    ...and take personal steps to do the best we can and take care of our loved ones in what promises to be a tough decade.

    We're in mid-Gorbachev period, and the Empire is collapsing. (reed Greenwaldfor more examples with links.)

    Washington isn't the solution, mostly, no more than Versailles was. It's the problem. I really encourage folks who read this to think about personal, individual and local solutions.

    It doesn't mean we should give up on the democrats; we can still get some measures passed, and above all, stop the lunatics from seizing power, but for the most part, it's a rearguard action, too little, too late.

    I rewatched UPSTAIRS DOWNSTAIRS recently and was struck by the depiction of the Bellamy family (and their servants) in disarray as the stable pre-World war I world they had known & believed would last forever started to crumble after the Great War.

    We're right there, people. Move on. Obama, like Gorbachev, will be a transitional figure. The last symbol of 20th century America.

    OVER HERE: AN AMERICAN EXPAT IN THE SOUTH OF FRANCE, is now available on Amazon US

    by Lupin on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 07:52:57 AM PDT

  •  Education (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    aliasalias, Only Needs a Beat

    Talking to voters seems to require suspending any "rationality" and focusing on the latest "talking point. I guess this is explained by:

    The problem is that today’s young Americans are not coming close to acquiring the education and training needed to carry out that mission. They’re not even in the ballpark. In that key group, 25- to 34-year-olds with a college degree, the U.S. ranks behind Canada, South Korea, Russia, Japan, New Zealand, Ireland, Norway, Israel, France, Belgium and Australia. That is beyond pathetic.

    "While the nation struggles to strengthen the economy," the report said, "the educational capacity of our country continues to decline."

    Everybody is to blame — parents, students, the educational establishment, government leaders, the news media and on and on. A society that closes its eyes to the most important issues of the day, that often holds intellectual achievement in contempt, that is more interested in hip-hop and Lady Gaga than educating its young is all but guaranteed to spiral into a decline.

    "If they can't deal with the Internet, they should shut it off." Mike Lazaridis of RIM

    by taonow on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 08:17:21 AM PDT

    •  The collapse of our infrastructure (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Betty Pinson, Only Needs a Beat

      Has gone way past failures of roads and bridges.

      I'm not worried about your state of mind, 'cause, you're not the revolutionary kind - Gomez

      by jhecht on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 08:27:11 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Is It Worth (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Betty Pinson

      Spending $50-100k to teach young Americans to dislike Lady Gaga?

      In terms of professional training, there is no indication that the economy will produce enough jobs requiring college degrees to satisfy our graduation level ever again.

      Why are we sending so many kids to college anyway?

      "Simon Wiesenthal told me that any political party in a democracy that uses the word 'freedom' in its name is either Nazi or Communist."

      by bink on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 08:55:39 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Yes and No (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Betty Pinson

        College education is too expensive (driven by market forces and status). But that does not mean that additional education or training is not required. Just look at the unemployment rates for those with minimal education. That is where the job losses have been and where the length of unemployment is worst. If you are undereducated you are at an extreme disadvantage in tomorrow's economy.

        "If they can't deal with the Internet, they should shut it off." Mike Lazaridis of RIM

        by taonow on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 09:06:07 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  CNN college wasted (0+ / 0-)

        CNN story about money wasted in college. Video of mostly black students.

        Media is so incredibly powerful. Subtle and sub conscious is no longer needed. Mainline the hate.  Tube-suckled boobs voting with their cash.

         

        Barack Hussein Obama- Don't Mock the Constitution.

        by odenthal on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 02:36:51 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  Don't blame the voters (0+ / 0-)

      Blame the people they/we elected to fix the problem who've been sitting around with their thumbs up their arse and their hand in the corporate cash register.

      I'm a proud liberal Democrat!

      by Betty Pinson on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 09:49:23 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Funny how if they'd just done the right thing, (5+ / 0-)

    they'd be much better off than the half assed stuff they churned out.  

    "I will no longer be labeled, except as a human being."

    by BigAlinWashSt on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 08:23:52 AM PDT

  •  I hate to be one, but ... (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    TJ, Betty Pinson

    "They don’t have a single idea that’s different from George Bush’s ideas."

    --President Obama

    If Obama and his Clinton/Bush-lite administration had more ideas themselves that were different from Bush's ideas that argument would be a lot more credible and a boatload more effective. As it is it's lame and, to put it charitably, embarrassing. And if it doesn't work Obama's political strategists will be perfectly happy using the Republican-controlled House or Senate as a foil getting greased up for 2012.

    It's the country that will suffer. But it's kind of hard to see how different things will be, since the Republicans have effectively controlled the House and Senate anyway, thanks to the Obama administration's compromise-first, cave-later legislative strategy.

    We don't need a third party. We need a second party.

    by obiterdictum on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 08:35:42 AM PDT

    •  Load of crap (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      squarewheel, aufklaerer, moonpal

      Bush was a supply side economics booster.  Obama is not.  He inherited this Bush-made mess.  He doesn't and never has had the votes to to the bold economic things necessary.  Ben Nelson, Blanche Lincoln and the Blue Dogs Oppose any bold economic action and they shaved down the stimulus.  Obama can scream, jump up and down and make speeches all he wants, but legislation needs to get through the Senate and the House.

      Obama is very different from Bush and if you don't see that, you're not looking at the facts.

      •  Load of crap indeed (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        aliasalias

        So you think the President couldn't have pushed for actually-useful, actually-working measures, and if he had lost had a case for electing more Democrats in '10.

        Instead, they went for "Let's get checkmarks we can put on our 'Accomplishments List' regardless of how weak and irrelevant those accomplishments are in face of the voters' needs."

        Look at the stimulus. 2/3 of what was needed, minimum, half of that tax breaks which couldn't possibly create jobs in the real world, all watered down to get 2 votes in the House and none in the Senate. Just pissed away effectiveness to get close to what the Republicans wanted, with Republicans not even having to vote for it.

        11th-Dimensional Chess, we were told. Well, 11th-D chess is also a fantasy, as is "we were completely helpless to stand up for Americans' needs."

        Until we break the corporate virtual monopoly on what we hear and see, we keep losing, don't matter what we do.

        by Jim P on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 09:22:43 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  A POTUS who can only support (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          NYCee, Willa Rogers

          such a disproportionate effort and stimulus spending towards corporations & banks vs workers can only be a believer in supply side economics.  There's no other explanation.

          Its way past time we accept the fact that Obama himself is a believer in supply side economics and you'll never get him to change his mind.  

          We can either continue to live with Obama's supply side policies or we can replace him with another Dem.  Hard choice, I realize, but 2011 is coming up fast and we need to start thinking seriously about it.

          I'm a proud liberal Democrat!

          by Betty Pinson on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 09:54:56 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Top-down beliefs in economics and politics. (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Sagebrush Bob, Betty Pinson

            Also accounts for why there's not been the appeal to the public to pressure Congress on anything at all.

            Until we break the corporate virtual monopoly on what we hear and see, we keep losing, don't matter what we do.

            by Jim P on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 10:08:36 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  Seriously, (0+ / 0-)

              Unless Obama gets his act together and makes a major turnaround to embrace voters instead of dissing them, we're going to have to dump him for a better candidate in 2012.  I don't feel like losing another presidential election.

              Obama can still redeem himself, but he's running out of time and shows no inclination to admit he's screwed things up on the economy.

              I'm a proud liberal Democrat!

              by Betty Pinson on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 10:33:05 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

            •  I worked for Western Union (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              dfarrah, Jim P

              appeal to the public to pressure Congress

              I worked for Western Union when Reagan was President. He was a master at this. We would get inundated with telegrams/mailgrams to Congress whenever Reagan made the appeal and it played a big part in his success at implementing his crappy policies.

              "If we believe absurdities, we shall commit atrocities" -- Voltaire

              by Sagebrush Bob on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 12:57:19 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  Yet the Believers will tell you (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                Sagebrush Bob

                there's no such thing as a Power of the Bully Pulpit. And so that's why it doesn't need to be used.

                Until we break the corporate virtual monopoly on what we hear and see, we keep losing, don't matter what we do.

                by Jim P on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 06:36:40 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

      •  Obama is no Bush, but it is quite amazing (0+ / 0-)

        how much more effective Bush was without as great a majority.

        The bottom line is that we don't have enough true Democrats in congress to save us.  And we don't because of the voters.

        big badda boom : GRB 080913

        by squarewheel on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 10:16:34 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  Democrats need to figure out a way..... (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Betty Pinson

    to tie a jobs bill to the budget so they can get some legislation passed by reconciliation.  Otherwise, it will do them no good to put something out there and have Republicans defeat it, thereby continuing to make the Democrats look bad.

    I'm a blue drop in a red bucket.

    by blue drop on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 08:38:43 AM PDT

  •  This doesn't mean, to me at least. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Betty Pinson

    ...The Democrats have already retreated from immigration and energy reform. If they can't make the case to Americans...that they offer more hope for a job than a radical conservative movement poised to tear down what remains of the safety net, they deserve to lose.

    that the Republicans deserve to win. What will the voters think?

  •  We're boned (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    aufklaerer, Betty Pinson

    The Bobbsey Twins Speak

    The U.S. economy will improve slowly and another round of fiscal stimulus likely wouldn’t be effective, former Treasury secretaries Paul O’Neill and Robert Rubin said.

  •  "Pragmatism" isn't pragmatic (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    NYCee, Betty Pinson, orlbucfan

    Neither as policy nor as politics.

    Though McCain and the GOP would certainly have been worse, Obama and the Democratic Congress have failed, both at alleviating the single problem that voters care most about--unemployment--and at convincing voters to vote for them.

    I'd love to see the Democrats get actually serious about the economy in the next three months. But since they haven't for over a year (the stimulus bill, though inadequate, was at least an investment of political capital in our economic problems), I have my doubts about whether they will now. And politically it may be too late.

    But we need to also brace ourselves for the electoral post-mortem if the Dems take big losses in November. The "centrists" who control the party (and the Village) will insist that Obama, Pelosi, and Reid were too progressive, that they should have been focusing on balancing the budget and reforming killing Social Security...and say, what do we have here, a Catfood Commission Report that shows us how to "reform" it!

    In the past, progressives have repeatedly lost fights for the soul of the Democratic Party. The first two years of the Obama presidency are, among other things, a monument to those losses.

    We cannot afford to lose the next such battle.

    "In public, the parties stage a show of bitter bipartisan stalemate. But when the cameras are off, they fuck like crazed weasels in heat." - Matt Taibbi

    by GreenSooner on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 09:06:56 AM PDT

  •  On joblessness, throw the free market in...... (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    odenthal

    ...their face. Remind them that private enterprise creates jobs (unless you want government to do it and apparently, Republicans, you don't). And despite billions in taxpayer money being handed to it, private enterprise hasn't created the jobs. And so take your anger where it belongs: The US Chamber of Commerce.

    British Petroleum: I think that means it's foreign oil.

    by Bensdad on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 09:11:11 AM PDT

    •  Corporate cash hoard (0+ / 0-)

      US corporate profits are up. Playing it safe while overseas companies are investing and growing.

      Appears US managers are still paid enough to remain complacent. Overseas executives are kept hungrier with more modest compensation.

      Barack Hussein Obama- Don't Mock the Constitution.

      by odenthal on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 02:46:42 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  If you want to really lose, (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Betty Pinson

    the meme of we are slightly better than the other guy will guarantee folks stay home, when they are mad at both parties.  How is that making folks excited to vote, because I am a little bit better than the other guy?  Sheesh.  All those ppl that came out for us in 2008 are going to shrug their shoulders and state whatever, especially when they are facing joblessness.  Again, this WH can not communicate themselves out of a brown paper bag.

    •  They can't create jobs, either (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      orlbucfan

      If they were smart and successful at reducing unemployment, they wouldn't have to worry about how to communicate their success.  The WH problem is that they put the needs of Wall St. and corporate America first, that doesn't offer much of an electoral payoff in a wrecked economy.  

      No matter how much money the WH & DLC raises from corporate benefactors, it won't be enough to convince millions of unemployed voters that their lives are better.

      I'm a proud liberal Democrat!

      by Betty Pinson on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 10:01:07 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Why aren't voters faced with the facts (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    subtropolis, orlbucfan

    that the GOP stand on unemployment is incoherent?

    They go on tv and say that the number 1 issue is producing more jobs. But they have also fought the extension of unemployment benefits, saying that they only serve to encourage people not to go out and find jobs.  But if the jobs are out there, then why do more need to be produced? Their answer is that jobs are out there, just not the specific ones people want - but this is, from a factual standpoint, utter bullshit!

    Following their logic, if unemployment benefits are cut, the unemployment rate will go down.  This then should be all that is needed to address the jobs problem. Isn't it what they are saying?

    It makes as much sense as claiming that extending the tax benefits for the rich will start creating jobs, even though over the past 10 years, it has done no such thing.

    I know the voters want to send a message that they want a better economy now. But in what world does putting people back into power that believe such destructive things help at all?

    If the Democrats can't get this point across-  as well as construct a plan to show that they are taking serious action to address the problem, and that includes having the guts to fix the broken Senate, which is now less about minority rights than minority rule, well they do deserve to lose.

    "The only thing we have to fear - is fear itself." - Franklin Delano Roosevelt

    by orrg1 on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 09:40:04 AM PDT

  •  News media, pundits, everyone is worried (0+ / 0-)

    about the future of our economy and the upcoming election.  

    The only people who don't seem to be worried about the economy are in the WH, on K Street and in Congress. Everyone else is trying to wake them up and get them to work on it.  But no, Obama, Summers, Geithner, Rahm and the rest of the low IQ DLC crowd are geniuses, I tell ya, they're geniuses. Eleventy-level chess is gonna pay off, here, any day now.  

    I'm a proud liberal Democrat!

    by Betty Pinson on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 09:48:02 AM PDT

    •  killing an ant with a nuclear weapon (0+ / 0-)

      Sayeth Orange Man. Not too worried about economy. 11 dimensions are way too complicated. It's simple really.

      Let the market decide. There wasn't that simple.

      And regarding gays, muslims, mexicans, and sub-prime borrowers, "Hell no they can't"  

      Barack Hussein Obama- Don't Mock the Constitution.

      by odenthal on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 02:58:05 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  I've always thought that Obama "got it". (0+ / 0-)

    I'm realizing that he is brilliant at synthesizing information from many sources into a form containing all the elements. The trouble with this approach is that he seems to be missing key information from people who offer a perspective different than Geithner, et al. Consequently his solutions lack the completeness needed to be effective.

    I always hesitate to underestimate Obama. His remarkable rise is proof of his skill. I just hope that he returns to "getting it".

    Unapologetically pro-citizen. Not anti-corporation just very pro-citizen.

    by CanYouBeAngryAndStillDream on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 09:51:35 AM PDT

    •  I never thought he "got it" (2+ / 0-)

      He's just a guy who is a good communicator who is very ambitious and adept at advancing his own career. Typical corporate ladder climber, just following a career path in politics.  There really isn't a whole lot more to him than that.  His own staff and advisors like to boast that he is not a "sympathetic" person.  What that means is, he doesn't "get it" because he doesn't care about anyone besides himself. That cold, bloodless personality type works great in a corporation or major law firm, but its not suitable for POTUS.

      I'm a proud liberal Democrat!

      by Betty Pinson on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 10:04:53 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  It's possible to be (0+ / 0-)

        empathetic/sympathetic while recognizing what it takes to attain positions of power. The failure to know how to advance relegates the best of intentions to the sidelines yelling at the players.

        Just because Obama knows what it takes and maintains that during governance does not preclude an ultimate goal of bettering the life of ordinary Americans.

        We can have a valid difference of opinion of what it takes to accomplish the common good but we can't really know at this point what he's thinking and where he wants to go.

        Unapologetically pro-citizen. Not anti-corporation just very pro-citizen.

        by CanYouBeAngryAndStillDream on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 11:24:54 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  An it getter (0+ / 0-)

        Proping up WallStreet, car companies, government workers, and those too poor for medical insurance was not politically expedient.

        Being "the one" or a "black Jesus" was just GOP splatter. Raising expectations to impossible levels.

        He beleives government can help. He's a democrat.

        He's cold, bloodless or lacking in empathy? You'd make him a Teapublican without that hate in the belly passion.      

        Barack Hussein Obama- Don't Mock the Constitution.

        by odenthal on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 03:20:45 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  Look, reality is (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Betty Pinson, orlbucfan

    We aren't getting a second stimulus. So, "things could be a lot worse" best work, or things WILL be a lot worse.

    And if anyone is shortsighted enough not to be motivated by the fact that things WILL be a lot worse if we are dumb enough to allow the Republicans to take back power, forget them and move on.

    Time is short, and we simply cant afford to waste it on those who are willing to let their country suffer to assuage their hurt feelings.

    "The future of man is not one billion of us fighting over limited resources on a soon-to-be dead planet. . .I won't go back into the cave for anyone."

    by Whimsical on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 09:57:20 AM PDT

    •  I'm voting for Plan B (0+ / 0-)

      Replace the guy in the WH with a better Dem.

      I'm a proud liberal Democrat!

      by Betty Pinson on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 10:08:17 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Bwhahahahahahahahahahaha! (0+ / 0-)

        You MUST be joking. That strategy ENSURES a Republican takes back the WH in 2012, which is the complete opposite of what you intend.

        Learn your history.

        "The future of man is not one billion of us fighting over limited resources on a soon-to-be dead planet. . .I won't go back into the cave for anyone."

        by Whimsical on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 10:17:43 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Actually it will work (0+ / 0-)

          Check the polls, voters still prefer Dems over Republicans, they just don't like the work of the current leadership.

          Voters still trust Democrats to fix the economy, we need to get busy and get it done.

          I'm a proud liberal Democrat!

          by Betty Pinson on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 10:30:06 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  And that's fine. (0+ / 0-)

            But trying to get rid of Obama is a stupid idea that hands the WH back to Republicans. Guaranteed.  

            Learn your history.

            Now, if you're talking about 2016, that's another story I suppose..but a primary challenge in '12 is about the only thing more insane than not working your ass off to keep/enlarge the Democratic majority in '10.

            "The future of man is not one billion of us fighting over limited resources on a soon-to-be dead planet. . .I won't go back into the cave for anyone."

            by Whimsical on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 01:03:08 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

  •  I understand his point but (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Escamillo

    I tend to think Americans will not forget George Bush any time soon.  As a matter of fact, even if someone was running 20 years from now, I think Bush's name would still have a strong effect.  He was not an ordinary bad president.  He took incompetence and destruction to a level not seen in our lifetime.  His name will be just as powerful as "Herbert Hoover," for years, decades, even centuries to come.

    I have no problem whatsoever with Dems continuing to remind people from whence our current horrible state came.  

  •  Don't underestimate the rightwingnut (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    odenthal

    corporate control of AM radio and the boob tube. A big part of our problem as Progressives is the fact that we have to fight to get our points across through the loud noise and distortion of said media. We have the internet but we are going to have to fight to keep it free of their taint.

    If most ordinary, thoughtful Americans could hear what the Repukes & DLCers have in store for them, they would throw their worthless asses out in a heartbeat. But they are not going to hear the facts on AM radio and the boob tube. So, what are we going to do about it? That's the 64 Trillion $$ Question in my book.

    Life, The Greatest Writer.

  •  Larry Summers, the smartest man in a small room. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Fossil

    As for joblessness, there is no cure for what ails America.  We lost that war a long time ago, when we made outsourcing of manufacturing easy.  When you outsource your core competencies, and train people who can think and are willing to work for slave wages, there is no way for Americans to compete.  Paul Tsongas (remember him) was right.  We are now in a global economy.  Fact.  Education for most American children is poor, no math or science, bull pucky degrees not worth the paper they're printed on, too much BS reality TV and games.  Yep, we're in deep doo-doo.  If the government tries to print its way out of this, the buck will become more worthless than it already is, nobody will buy our bonds, etc.  A downward spiral.  The only cure for our problem is:

    1. Impose high tariffs on all imports.
    1. Credits for companies that bring work back here.
    1. Stop all outsourcing.
    1. Cut military spending by 50% and put soldiers to work rebuilding our communities.
    1. Make every 18 year old give three years of service rebuilding our country.
    1. Close our foreign bases.

    TAKE CARE OF OUR OWN FIRST.

    Ain't never gonna happen.  So buy some firearms and live in a gated community with private security.  That's a modicum of protection for what I think is gonna come down within the next ten years.

  •  even if we lose a battle over a second stimulus (0+ / 0-)

    it will still help us in november, just like the unemployment benefits battle has helped us

  •  One note :: self-employed Americans (0+ / 0-)
    "exhausted their unemployment benefits" just by breathing.

    Our system is set up to benefit the top rung.

    Only the top rung.

    Career criminals + Angry White Males + KKK wannabes + Personality Disorder delusionals + Pro-Life Christians =EQ= The GOPer Base

    by vets74 on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 10:47:48 AM PDT

  •  Wall Street is infamous for their (0+ / 0-)

    ..short-term thinking. Geithner is a product of Wall Street.

    The "bipartisanship" set sail when the neocons took over the Republican Party. They want to win and get power back so badly that many would revel in even higher unemployment in order to increase their numbers this year and regain the White House in 2012. It's naive to believe otherwise.

    I really do believe that we'll have a much larger permanent underclass no matter how the election shakes out. Someone needs to take their rightful place in the Third World. Why not 10% of Americans?

    That's right. I'm a "Librul" You have a problem with that?

    by Anthony Page aka SecondComing on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 11:15:43 AM PDT

  •  FIND THE VOTES, bob. (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    odenthal, soccergrandmom

    ...because, with respect, anything less than that  would be just more FANTASY. Seriously - head on down to D.C. and make 59 become 60...then make Ben Nelson rational...then stop the GOP from filibustering every bill...and maybe we can get what a second stimulus like the president would like.

    Also, and I mean this sincerely, I advise you to read Ezra Klein's most recent column:

    (excerpt):

    Recently, it has been popular to blame the tension between skyrocketing corporate profits and weak job growth on the White House and the Hill -- hence the Chamber of Commerce and Weekly Standard quotes. Something must have gone wrong, right? And it's probably Washington's fault.

    In fact, no: A look at the history of financial crises shows that our slow, halting recovery is right on schedule and the business community's caution is predictable.

    Not all recessions are created equal. Recessions caused by financial crises take a lot longer to dig out of than their more common cousins. One is like the flu. The other, a car crash. When the flu goes away, you're good. When a collision spins to a stop, that's when the long, slow process of healing begins.

    In "This Time is Different: Eight Centuries of Financial Folly," Carmen Reinhart and Kenneth Rogoff study every financial crisis of the past 800 years. It's an exhaustive study, and its conclusions are depressing for a country that believes itself exceptional even in its suffering: We're not special.

    If you consider unemployment, housing prices, government debt and the stock market, Rogoff says, "the U.S. is just driving down the tracks of a typical post-WWII deep financial crisis." In some areas, we're even a bit ahead of the game: Economic output usually falls by 9 percent. We held the drop to 4 percent.

    Even the unevenness of our recovery is predictable. "Housing and employment come back much slower than equity and gross domestic product," Reinhart says. GDP usually falls for two years and then recovers. Equity can move even faster, which helps explain corporate America's rapid revival. But employment tends to fall for five years. And housing? That's usually a six-year slide.

    He agrees with the idea of more stimulus needed - as does anyone who understands these things - but the historical perspective, especially in terms of "This Time is Different", which I highly recommend, is something that needs to be understood and emphasized - especially by and for those who are absurdly wondering why everything's not back to the way it was in just a year.

    May the forces of evil become confused on the way to your house.

    by dasheight on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 12:27:15 PM PDT

    •  P.S. Politically... (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      soccergrandmom

      ...the idea of trying to get through another large stimulus is very complicated. They KNOW it has no chance of passing with the GOP behaving the way they are and folks like Ben Nelson behaving the same way - so making a "show" of trying to pass a second stimulus would be just that - a "show" - it has no chance of passing. None. Not to mention, the stimulus, according to the polls, at least, even though it's done a lot of good, is not a popular WORD, let alone a popular measure of action (even though, ironically, the polls show the public WANTS more "spending" to bring more job growth).

      So basically, we would be making a "show" of trying to pass something that everyone knows has no chance of getting passed, which looks like pure politics rather than sincerity, and making a "show" of trying to pass something that's unpopular to boot - it's not a simple move. There's potential benefits in terms of rallying the base, but to independents it could look like pure political gamesmanship. It's possible that they could frame it as a fight between the Bush tax cuts for the rich, and a stimulus for more job growth - and the GOP could be framed as being against it - but when it didn't pass, which it wouldn't, it would be a legislative defeat right before the mid-terms. It's just as simple as it sounds, that's my only point.

      May the forces of evil become confused on the way to your house.

      by dasheight on Sun Aug 08, 2010 at 12:39:56 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Basically the bottom line is simple. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    odenthal

    People are basically incredibly gullible and believe the simplest message possible from those they trust.
    So it boils down to, do more people believe Fox news, or Naked Capitalism (and you) or President Obama?

    It doesn't really matter what anyone is saying, it only matters what people are believing?

    I don't believe your perspective frankly. So basically are there more of them or us?

    I listened this morning to Fareed Zakarias, who no doubt you sneer at, and he had on Robert Rubin and Paul O'Neill, who I have absolutely no doubt you sneer at. I thought they both made a great deal of sense.

    But then I am, gasp, horror, shock, an instrumentalist!!!!! and a moderate to boot, both pariahs in your camp.

Lupin, JekyllnHyde, tmo, tgs1952, jillian, slinkerwink, El Zmuenga, abarefootboy, GreenSooner, dfarrah, Char, emal, newjeffct, TJ, shycat, Mnemosyne, RFK Lives, mataliandy, Jerome a Paris, expatjourno, TracieLynn, Agathena, Glic, JuliaAnn, superba, jalbert, ctsteve, Redfire, danthrax, businessdem, laughingriver, Chirons apprentice, On The Bus, defluxion10, betson08, Timbuk3, dkmich, Diana in NoVa, Kitsap River, schuylkill, CanYouBeAngryAndStillDream, Deward Hastings, lyvwyr101, bibble, TexMex, Dirk McQuigley, joanneleon, Tarindel, 3goldens, Jagger, SherwoodB, mjd in florida, Militarytracy, Flint, willibro, run around, trinityfly, Gary Norton, reflectionsv37, ratzo, lennysfo, Burned, Overseas, bmaples, sunbro, RickE, WisePiper, CWalter, Ginny in CO, FindingMyVoice, peacestpete, jbfunk, fhcec, Jim P, MadGeorgiaDem, elliott, Nance, tarheelblue, keeplaughing, vigilant meerkat, deha, arlene, uberskeptic, blueoasis, imabluemerkin, Terminus, Sagebrush Bob, el cid, sceptical observer, profh, Cassiodorus, blueoregon, kurious, Friend of the court, Temmoku, slksfca, orrg1, seabos84, One Pissed Off Liberal, DorothyT, Loudoun County Dem, SpecialKinFlag, leema, Margfh, vets74, terryhallinan, yoduuuh do or do not, daveygodigaditch, Jimdotz, DWG, joyful, Unbozo, aliasalias, HCKAD, millwood, CT Hank, number six, JML9999, oxon, Terra Mystica, Mighty Ike, JDWolverton, mconvente, Fossil, brooklynbadboy, KJG52, jamess, monkeybrainpolitics, rssrai, icebergslim, S C B, o the umanity, DixieDishrag, allie123, watercarrier4diogenes, squarewheel, LaFeminista, dreamghost, aufklaerer, greengemini, maryabein, CamillesDad1, IndyRobin, obiterdictum, Mom in Maine, IreGyre, maxzj05, Knarfc, A Voice, Integrity is fundamental, nancat357, ohmyheck, Tommymac, Words In Action, swaminathan, coppercelt, wvmom, freedapeople, ctlrick, Egalitare, jim283, Betty Pinson, Mike08, ozsea1, mateohussein, Bluerall, dle2GA, EsperanzaCambia, poliwrangler, Wom Bat, Anthony Page aka SecondComing, Sunspots, zenox, RockyLabor, Dom9000, CalliopeIrjaPearl, Only Needs a Beat, Nena20409, Malvern, damfino, AreDeutz, Ginger1, NCIndy

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